The Student Development Center, a department within Student Services by ypy11747

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                                  The Student Development Center
                          2000-01 Program Planning and Assessment Report


1. Program Mission/Purpose
The Student Development Center, a department within Student Services, promotes student learning,
student success and retention and personal development in support of the College’s mission of ―providing
rich opportunities for learn [ing], [offering] excellence in teaching, and comprehensive support services . .
[and] serv[ing] the community’s lifelong educational and cultural needs‖ (Strategic Plan: Shoreline
Community College, 2000, p. 5).

The Student Development Center offers the following services:

   Counseling
     Personal Counseling
     Crisis Counseling
     Educational Counseling
     Career Counseling
     Support/Information Student Groups
     Consultation

   Academic Advising
     Individual Student Advising
     New Student Orientation and Registration
     Advising Workshops

   High School Relations Outreach

   Assessment and Testing

   Services for Students with Disabilities

   Community Integration Program

   Human Development Courses



Counseling Services
As defined in the Washington State Student Services manual entitled, A Student Services Manual:
Directions and Challenges (1998, p 16), ―the mission of Washington State community and technical
colleges Counseling Services is to maximize the potential of students to benefit from the educational
environment by facilitating access, promoting student learning and teaching student success strategies.‖

The counselors at Shoreline Community College provide educational programs and services designed to
meet the needs of their diverse communities and support the College’s mission of ―demonstrat[ing]
dedication to student success by providing rich opportunities to learn, excellence in teaching and
comprehensive support services. . . [serving] the community’s lifelong educational and cultural needs
(Strategic Plan: Shoreline Community College, 2000).
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Students benefit from the College’s counseling program throughout their college experience. There are
several critical points where students benefit from counseling. These points include: entry into college,
selection of classes, exploring and establishing career and life goals, overcoming barriers to academic
success, transferring to other institutions, and entering the job market (Washington State Student Services
Manual, 1998).

In support of the Washington State community and technical colleges counseling services' mission, and
the College’s mission and core values, counselors assist students with personal, crisis, academic
advising/educational, and career counseling; provide consultative services to faculty, staff and community
members; aid in the development of health awareness programs and materials; work in partnership with
college staff to support student success; and assist in developing linkages with four-year colleges through
transfer centers, K- 12 schools, and local service agencies.


                                              Personal Counseling
Counselors provide short-term personal counseling to help students resolve personal problems and face
life difficulties that challenge or disrupt their academic progress, which can effect retention, graduation
efficiency and overall success at SCC. Students come to the Center with a variety of presenting problems
such as substance abuse, domestic violence, eating disorders, separation and divorce, suicidal thoughts
and feelings, sexual abuse and harassment, anger, stress, depression, and anxiety. The institution staffs
only professionally trained counselors who regularly engage in continuing professional development and
who maintain working relationships with mental health practitioners, medical care providers, and social
service agencies to help students access external support services, longer term therapy, and/or medical
care when needed.

While the above mentioned problems are among the most difficult, many other students seek counseling
to deal with academic performance issues such as time management, study skills, test anxiety, math
anxiety, financial problems, classroom grievances and failing grades. Counselors assess problems and
explore strategies to help students gain personal insight, employ resources, resolve conflicts, change
behaviors, face fears and accept responsibility for their education and growth. This results in enhancing
the larger campus learning environment. Providing multiple avenues for growth and development,
counselors offer individual counseling sessions, issue-related support groups, classroom visitations,
workshops and Human Development courses such as Stress Management, Improving Relationships and
Student Success to address specific issues and serve the diverse interests and needs of students.

With significant populations of single parents, high school drop-outs, immigrants and refugees, adult
learners, Work First and Pre-Employment Training students, international students and dislocated
workers, students bring their personal beliefs, values, fears, relationships and problems to campus and the
counseling relationship. Personal counseling services are essential to support a campus environment
dedicated to diversity. Students with physical and emotional disabilities continue to require
accommodation and service, which is often provided by generalist counselors and a counselor from
Service for Students with Disabilities. Helping students get through difficult situations, promoting health
and wellness, addressing problem behaviors, as well as supporting the learning environment will, in turn,
help students remain in school, progress toward goals and experience success.


                                              Crisis Counseling
When a student or staff member is in crisis or imminent emotional distress, counselors are an identified
resource to assist in handling the situation. Counselors maintain a schedule for crisis coverage so that
there is a counselor and back-up counselor available to serve student crisis needs. Skilled in mental
health assessment, legal obligations and protocol, counselors manage a crisis by assessing the student's
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presenting problem, counseling the student, and if needed, notifying and consulting with County
Designated Mental Health Professionals (CDMHP) and other professionals. In-service training in crisis
intervention is regularly scheduled.


                                              Career Counseling
Career counseling coupled with academic advising ―involves students in an exploration of personal
interests, motivations, values and abilities and teaches the development of decision-making skills through
the selection of [educational] and career goals‖ (Washington State Student Services Manual, 1998). At
Shoreline, counselors guide students through a self assessment using a variety of methods including:
interest inventories; personality inventories; on-line career assessments and career information from
occupational data bases; professional development courses; information interviews; job shadowing; and
written materials to help them examine their values, interests and abilities and relate those values,
interests and abilities to career and life goals.

High school graduates seeking first time careers, Work First students returning to the labor market,
workers in need of retraining due to injury or layoffs, employees seeking professional development, and
adults in transition seeking new opportunities, all benefit from the availability of comprehensive career
services.


                                          Educational Counseling
While counselors work primarily with a large assigned load of "undecided" and at-risk students, which
represent about 60% of the College’s student population, they also work with certain general transfer
students.. As their target group is typically undecided, counselors recognize the importance of providing
counseling that helps students clarify their educational goals. Educational counseling includes, helping
students identify strengths and limitations, develop time management skills, assess academic concerns,
identify appropriate resources and develop an academic and career plan.


                                       Support/Information Groups
Counselors, with graduate training in group dynamics and group process, offer support groups based on
student interest and/or identified need. Examples of focus groups include relaxation training, a support
group for African American female students, and a support group for students who are parents.


                                                 Consultation
Counselors provide consultation services to campus programs and departments, and to faculty and staff
who deliver direct service to students, as well as maintaining collaborative relationships with community
groups and service agencies for consultation and referral. Peer consultation is regularly employed among
SCC counselors to discuss strategies, arrange for in-service training, share resources and improve
counseling services.



Academic Advising Services
Academic advising is often described as a developmental process whereby students with diverse
backgrounds, values, interests, and abilities seek guidance and information regarding their educational
experience. Students seek advising for multiple reasons: to have transcripts evaluated, check course
equivalencies, review graduation requirements, investigate majors and careers, as well as glean support to
make adjustments to college life. Some students are very sure and confident about their direction, while
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many others are undecided and at risk of attrition. Research indicates that students with well-formed
academic plans are more likely to continue and to complete their educational goals, thus the need for a
strong academic advising program.

At Shoreline Community College, as agreed upon in the Federation contract, faculty provide student
academic advising. Student academic advising occurs with faculty in every academic division,
faculty/counselors in the Student Development Center and with several instructional and non-instructional
administrators. At the Student Development Center, academic advisors work primarily with a large
assigned load of ―undecided‖ and at-risk students and general transfer students which represents about
60% of the SCC student population. Shaped by an inherent belief in the value of education, Shoreline has
developed several programs with specific outcomes to promote student success and the goals of our
Strategic Plan. Our diverse program offerings, outlined below, were created with this vision in mind.


                                           Individual Advising
While the efficiency and value of group advising is not overlooked, we also recognize the importance of
meeting with students individually, affording students the privacy they may need in order to review their
academic records, select courses, develop an academic plan, talk about a career, or engage in a process of
research and consultation. To this end, Advising and Counseling, as well as individual faculty members,
offer individual and drop-in advising services.


                                New Student Orientation and Registration
Current research suggests that a quality new student orientation program is one of the most effective ways
to improve student satisfaction and retention. Shoreline’s New Student Orientation program is designed to
welcome new students, their families and friends to our campus; to promote our programs, services and
degrees; to answer complex questions; to alleviate fears; and to provide students with a flexible,
comprehensive informational program. New Student Orientation includes: an overview of our programs,
services and degrees; a small group experience to allow students the opportunity to gather information
and ask questions; as well as individualized advising assistance to help students select courses and
register. Because of their training in group process and facilitation, counselors have traditionally
conducted the small group portion of the orientation program

Our program is designed to help students understand the college environment, to make choices, register
for classes and successfully progress toward their goals. At orientation students are assigned an advisor
based upon their academic interests and career goals. Undecided students are assigned to counselors and
after declaring an area of interest, they are referred to academic departments for in-depth program
advisement.


                                    UW Transfer Information Workshop
The purpose of UW Transfer Workshop is to help Shoreline students prepare for and experience a smooth
transition to the University of Washington, the target destination for a majority of our transfer students.
This program was developed, in concert with UW staff, to advise students about admission and
graduation requirements, major preparation, and short-and long-term academic plans. This program is
directly in line with strategies to address Washington State’s Accountability Improvement Plan.


                         Program Information Sessions/Advising Workshops
Program Information Sessions are workshops designed to provide program specific information to groups
of students. Coordinated by the Advising and Counseling Center and in concert with academic divisions,
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these sessions serve to inform, guide and direct students toward their educational and career goals. These
workshops are also directly in line with the Accountability Plan.



High School Relations Outreach
As of September 2001, the College appointed a manager of high school and college relations to develop
implement and manage the college's high school outreach program and activities. This manager visits
high schools and provides high school advising, recruitment workshops, informational group sessions and
training. The manager also provides advising for Shoreline students and assists with the coordination of
the New Student Orientation Program. In addition, the manager works with relevant campus departments
to coordinate and assist in the broader institutional effort to provide high school relations and recruiting
services to ensure the smooth articulation of high school students. This appointment serves to stabilize
and improve the high school relations program, offering better services to our high school partners, their
students and their families.



Assessment and Testing
Assessment and Testing seeks to promote student success by providing each student with the opportunity
to gather information about his/her academic skills, complete a GED, complete the ASSET/COMPASS
test, identify career interests and assess abilities. In concert with quality advising, students may select the
best course of study, leading toward successful academic achievement, career development and
satisfaction. Assessment exists to provide students and advisors with the information needed to make
sound educational decisions.



Services for Students with Disabilities
The purpose of the services For Students with Disabilities Program (SSD) is to insure that all students
have access to educational programs, campus services and activities. SSD provides service, information
and accommodation for students who qualify as disabled under state and federal law. Specific
accommodations for students who qualify are determined individually, in consultation with the
Coordinator of services for students with disabilities.

Examples of services provided to students includes, but are not limited to; priority registration, testing
accommodation, note-taking assistance, access to adaptive equipment, assistance in making classroom
accommodation or modification, and referral.



Community Integration Program
Shoreline Community College’s Community Integration Program arose to support the needs of
individuals with significant cerebral palsy who had chosen Shoreline as their educational resource. The
program places emphasis on academic goals and academic achievement. The program supports students
in their exploration of areas such as career and academic transfer programs, life-long learning, GED
completion and adult basic education. The program is funded by King County and Snohomish County,
and seeks to remove the physical and social barriers to integration in the college environment.
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Human Development Courses
The Student Development Center faculty teach courses related to human development in the following
areas: career exploration and life planning, stress management, improving relationships, and student
success. They also guest lecture on campus when invited by faculty members and administrators who
wish to call upon their unique experience and training. Invitations have come from Physical Education,
Math, Parent Education, Education and Human Services, English, Sociology, Psychology, the Women's
Center, the GED Program, and professional development programs. Topics have included stress
management, self-esteem, overcoming perfectionism and procrastination, test-taking strategies, time
management, motivation and goal setting, educational options after high school, and career opportunities,
etc. Students also enroll in human development special topic/special project courses with counselor
permission.


                   Support of the Colleges Mission, Core Values and Strategic Plan
The services offered by the Student Development Center support the mission and core values of the
College. The expected outcomes of these services relate directly to Shoreline’s Strategic Plan
Support of Core Values and Strategic Plan.

The Student Development Center services support the strategic directions and strategic plan of Shoreline
Community College. Subscribing to the values of respect and excellence, staff has, as primary interest,
the health, well being and success of students. Counselors are concerned with equal access to programs
and services, assessment of college readiness and course placement, success strategies for course and
program completion, identification of educational and career goals, and intervention and support with
personal difficulties to support students, the learning environment, and the mission of the college. To this
end, staff uses and invites innovation, collaboration and support with campus departments, programs,
councils and committees, internally and externally, to meet the diverse needs of our students and
community.

Strategic Direction One: Striving For Excellence
Shoreline Community College will strive toward excellence by continuously improving its quality,
effectiveness, responsiveness and flexibility based on comprehensive evaluation

In striving for excellence, the counseling department is committed to ongoing feedback and evaluation to
improve our quality of service and contributions to students and the college. Efforts in this area include:

   Work directly with new and prospective students to identify student needs and providing direct
    services or referrals to other providers
   Help students identify and resolve personal challenges and difficult situations that impede their
    academic progress
   Provide input and shaping policies and procedures that are sensitive and responsive to student needs
   Continue to offer and develop advising workshops and general transfer information programs.
   Continue to offer afternoon and evening orientation programs and expanded these services to support
    Saturday registration.
   Continue with the research, development and publication of advising materials— Advising
    Handbooks, Academic Planning Sheets, and Academic Pathways.
   Continue ongoing professional relationships—especially with major feeder high schools and
    universities.
   Assist new and/or undecided students with program identification and goal clarification to improve
    access to college, progression toward goals, and graduation efficiency
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   Assess college readiness; helping students select courses and develop academic plans
   Continue teaching Human Development courses and campus workshops to maximize student learning
    and personal success
   Representing students' academic needs in a number of campus and educational forums, (e.g., Faculty
    Senate, Instructional Services Council, Student Service Managers, Curriculum Committee, Student
    Success Committee, The Federation, Washington Council, Articulation Council, Counseling and
    Student Development Administrative Council (CSDAC), Washington Community and Technical
    College Counselors Association (WCTCCA), Washington Post-Secondary Educators of the Disabled
    (WAPED)
   Provided general overview and input on curriculum issues in response to access and progression,
    respecting both academic standards and understanding student needs
   Improved the new student orientation program to include multimedia PowerPoint presentation,
    collection of student evaluations and expanded evening and Saturday registration and orientations
   Collaborated with the K-12 system to establish the new WA State K-20 Comprehensive Guidance
    and Counseling Guidelines; strong relationships with area high schools supporting post-secondary
    enrollment
   Increased the use of technology to enhance communications
   Continued the partnership with University of Washington Academic Advisors for the Science and
    Humanities Divisions
   Hired the Director of Student Development Center
   Developed and implemented a tracking system to effectively assess student profiles and track student
    needs
   Collaborated with the Business Administration 120 Principles of Marketing class to develop a process
    for assessing advising and counseling programs and services
   Invited student government representatives to New Student Orientation Sessions.

Strategic Direction Two: Teaching, Learning and Academic Excellence
Shoreline Community College will be known for the quality of the faculty and the commitment to rigorous
academic standards

   Worked together with division faculty to approve and implement Associate in Science degree at SCC
   Provide a comprehensive new student orientation program to approximately 1700 - 2500 students per
    year, to increase preparedness for incoming students
   Recognize developmental aspects of advising and provide appropriate services/programs to meet
    student needs
   Provide well-researched advising materials to inform students of requirements for transferring to a
    baccalaureate institution
   Support faculty in Professional/Technical program by providing advising to those students and
    referring to the appropriate program
   Invite representatives from 4 year. institutions to assist students in preparing to transfer to a fou-year
    institution
   Work with the Office of Instruction to add key courses during registration, which allows students to
    get the courses they need to start at the College and progress toward academic goal
   Converted an administrative exempt position to a counseling faculty position which strengthens
    appropriate preparation in the discipline in which this position works
   Offered an interdisciplinary course on student success taught by counselors and librarians
   Provided consultation services on an as-needed basis to instructional faculty in order to ensure
    students are supported and safe in the achievement of their individual educational, career and personal
    goals.
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   Emphasized and enforced course prerequisites and other standards of preparation in advising,
    orientation and registration processes
   Provided counseling and advising liaison assistance to various academic divisions on campus
   Provided an opening week workshop on Working with Disruptive Students in collaboration with
    Humanities faculty and the Vice-President for Student Services

Strategic Direction Three: Diversity and Multiculturalism
Shoreline Community College will continue to advocate awareness of, knowledge of and appreciation for
diversity. At Shoreline diversity is understood to include racial, ethnic, cultural, gender, age, sexual
orientation, socio-economic status, ability and religious differences.

As part of its mission and goal, the Student Development Center staff has provided leadership in
Shoreline's thrust for equity, diversity and multicultural development. By supporting programming, such
as Martin Luther King Day, Multicultural Week, and other diversity initiatives at Shoreline, advisors and
counselors are active participants in appreciating and promoting campus multicultural development.
Advisors and counselors encourage students to explore and integrate their multicultural identity and
heritage into their college experience and decision making process; extend and expect respect, and
promote inclusion and enrichment of our community.

   Coordinated campus-wide collection of gift items to be delivered on Mothers' Day to Seattle
    Women's shelters
   Organized in-service training on topics including crisis intervention, domestic violence, and child
    abuse
   Attended numerous training opportunities on multiculturalism and diversity such as Washington
    Center's year long series on Culture and Learning, Northwest Coalition Building, UW Diversity
    Advising, etc.
   Showed University of Washington video, specifically used to recruit Students of Color and persons
    w/disabilities
   Participated and assisted in planning campus multicultural events and activities (i.e., Expanding Your
    Horizons, Women's History Month, Martin Luther King Celebration, Multicultural Week, etc.)
   Provided Multicultural/Diversity Education Center outreach and drop-in advising
   Held daily New Student Orientation groups for Fall quarter in the Multicultural/Diversity Education
    Center
   Advisor position for the Rainbow Club is co-chaired by two counseling faculty. Projects included the
    fruition of the Safe Zone project and sending two students to a national conference on gender issues,
    and co-sponsoring events with other student clubs
   Developed and initiated a tracking program that will more accurately assess the diversity of students
    served in the Student Development Center
   Student Development Center staff sponsored and participated in the quarterly Assistive Technology
    Open House, which includes students with disabilities and students from multicultural courses
   Reviewing New Student Orientation Program to integrate appropriate multicultural images and
    materials
   Counselor on sabbatical volunteered at the Center for Human Services and CASA Latina, and visited
    other agencies that also serve Latinos
   Counselor on sabbatical studied Spanish; attended "Working with Hispanics" workshop through the
    University of Washington School of Social Work; researched and studied Latino cultures; and
    volunteered at and visited community agencies that serve Latinos as preparation to recruit, encourage,
    support, and retain Latino students at Shoreline Community College.
   Counselor co-advised the Latino student group, MiGrupo, and facilitated the meeting between with
    SCC MiGrupo students and the University of Washington Latino student group
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   Worked with the Rainbow Club to provide programming and support for students and faculty (the
    club worked in partnership with Student Government Leadership on a Safe Zone Project designed to
    improve campus climate)
   Provided training for Japan's Osaka College Addiction Studies program in collaboration with
    International Programs and Intra American Studies/Social Sciences faculty
   Participated in the Women's Words of Fire Poetry Event, sponsored by the Feminist Majority
    Leadership Alliance and the Women's Center
   Supported the needs of individuals with cerebral palsy through the Community Integration Program
   Continued to work with ADA governance committee to ensure that the College provides appropriate
    disability services

Strategic Direction Four: Learning and Work Environment
Shoreline Community College will foster and promote a positive, safe and supportive learning and work
environment.

The Student Development Center staff supports and contributes to the campus learning and work
environment by:

   Value and encourage professional development opportunities to stay current in our field (e.g., a
    counselor was funded by the Puget Sound Technology Center to attend a three-day workshop on
    student success and retention; counselors participated in three in-service workshops with community
    social service agencies to learn more about current issues and trends on domestic violence, crisis,
    child abuse;
   Welcome and guide new students to campus, creating a safe, comfortable and supportive environment
    to promote learning
   Consult with faculty and staff, as needed, to resolve conflicts or issues that impede student learning
   Collaborated with the Rainbow Club and Student Government to bring the Safe Zone Project,
    designed to improve campus climate, to fruition, and actively participate in Wellness Committee
    activities
   Counselors who have received state licensing as Licensed Mental Health Counselors, will complete
    36 hours of continuing education, bi-annually, as required by state law.
   Counseling and Humanities faculty and the Vice President for Student Services provided an opening
    week workshop on "Working with Disruptive Students"
   Counselors provided a "Relaxation Skills Training" workshop to students and staff.

Strategic Direction Five: Partnerships
Shoreline Community College will continue to strengthen ties with its diverse community by fostering
stronger partnerships with community, business, education, government, industry and labor
organizations

The Student Development Center staff values and promotes partnerships both on the campus and in the
community. In an effort to maintain integration with instruction, campus services, and college
governance, staff actively participates in several campus committees and college councils, including the
Washington Council and the Articulation Council and the College Coalition for Prevention of Substance
Abuse. We maintain positive working relationships with the admissions, undergraduate advising, and
upper-division departments of other state and regional colleges and universities. We have a long-term
partnership with the University of Washington, which enables us to stay current with changes in transfer
requirements and program advising systems.
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   Maintain membership and valuable relationships with professional organizations such as Counseling
    and Student Development Administrative Council (CSDAC), Washington Post-Secondary Educators
    of the Disabled (WAPED), American Counseling Association (ACA), Washington State Substance
    Abuse College Task Force (WSSACTF), and the National Academic Advising Association
    (NACADA).
   Developed contacts with several community agencies (e.g., New Beginnings, Child Protective
    Services, and King County Designated Mental Health Professionals, CASAS Latina, etc.)
   Actively maintain a network of contacts with colleagues at high schools, other colleges, and
    universities, which helps improve the transition from high school to Shoreline and from Shoreline to
    baccalaureate institutions.
   Serve on the Shorewood high school career center advisory board and meet with advisors from
    Seattle area community colleges.
   Continue close relationship with the University of Washington through outreach initiatives resulting
    in the creation of transfer programs and a shared Academic Advisor position for the Science Division.
   Invite advisors from the University of Washington Bothell and other universities to come to campus
    to provide students with transfer information.
   Actively participate in local and statewide organizations and initiatives to foster positive working
    relationships between SCC, high schools, universities and community organizations.
   Provided GED testing for the Northend Rehabilitation Facility (NERF), the King County Department
    of Corrections.
   Serve as liaison between Shoreline faculty and faculty at area high schools (i.e., Shorecrest High
    School, Shorewood High School, University Washington, Western Washington University, etc.)

Strategic Direction Six: Technology
Shoreline Community College will evaluate and adopt appropriate technologies for student learning and
for supporting college operations

The Student Development Center staff recognizes the importance of technology to enhance the quality of
services to students. Technology has made the development and maintenance of our programs and
information much easier and more efficient. The flexible software programs allow for easy development,
storage and modification of our documents and information. Presentation software promotes student
attention and retention to information. A database of stored information rests at our fingertips.
Technologies include:

   Use SCC and other institutional websites for admissions information, academic planning and transfer
   Maintain a database of advising information. (i.e. Advising Handbook, planning guides)
   Provide on-line advising resources to students and prospective students
   Use the listserv to communicate advising updates and other important information to faculty
   Continue to provide ―Ask Alberta‖ e-mail advising services to students and prospective students
   Use websites to obtain advising information from other universities
   SCC and other institutional websites for admissions information, academic planning and transfer
   Use on-line assessment tools (e.g., Keirsey-Bates, Learning Styles Inventories) for student
    development and guidance
   On-line information and referral resources for personal counseling issues
   Professional listserves (e.g., JobPlace, NACADA) to solicit professional advice and contribute to
    discussions with colleagues nationwide
   Multimedia PowerPoint presentation for New Student Orientation
   Students are provided access and guidance with on-line career information, job market data and
    career development tools which include:
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       Washington Occupational Information System (WOIS)
       Washington Interactive Labor Market Access (WILMA)
       CHOICES
       Career development web sites (e.g., The Riley Guide, JobTrak, Career Mosaic and What Can I
                Do With A Major In . .)
       SCC advising web page with links to colleges and universities


Strategic Direction Seven: Promotion
Shoreline Community College will increase community awareness of and participation in its educational
offerings, services and programs

Student Development Center advisors and counselors aggressively promote Shoreline's programs, course
offerings and services. During New Student Orientation, high school visitations, at the Washington
Council and the Articulation Council, counselors actively promote the college. We have been very active
in collaboration and recruitment in the local K-12 school districts. From presentations in the community,
to individual meetings with prospective students, counselors represent the college. Counseling services
are promoted throughout the campus community. A counseling brochure was developed and distributed
to promote our services throughout the campus community.

   Collaborating with the Business Administration 120 Principles of Marketing class to develop a
    process for assessing advising and counseling programs and services
   Advising and Counseling staff along with many other campus staff, played a role in the campus-wide
    organization of the Expanding Your Horizons conference to engage and involve high school and
    middle school girls in areas of math, science, and technology
   Several groups of students visiting from Garfield High School attended an Open House for the Career
    Center
   Collaborated with Central Washington University's McNair Scholarship program to promote
    awareness of scholarship opportunities at the post-secondary level
   Promote the College’s mission and core values at high school outreach events (e.g., High School
    Parent night, Career & College Fairs, and informational workshops
   Expanded participation high school college conference sponsored by the College
   Increase student and community awareness of Shoreline’s programs, offerings and services through
    phone, email, appointments, presentations and programs
   Promote special programs such as Jump Start, Study Abroad, Interdisciplinary Studies and Student
    Interest Groups
   Actively promote various support services, in the new student orientation and one-to-one student
    contact
   Promote professional/technical, as well as transfer programs.
   Provide printed and on-line advising materials, highlighting Shoreline programs, services and
    degrees, reaches thousands of clients and students each year.


Strategic Direction Eight: Nontraditional Funding
Shoreline Community College will expand nontraditional funding sources for its programs and offerings

   Assessment and Testing provides the GED testing services that generate non-traditional funds for the
    college.
   The Academic Advisor position for the Science Division is jointly funded with the University of
    Washington.
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2. Students/Clients Served by the Program
As a result of legislative mandates and societal trends, the services offered by the Student Development
Center have seen a significant increase in students from targeted populations (e.g. Running Start, Tech
Prep, School to Work, Worker Retraining and CEO). The College continues to serve an increasing
number of international students, immigrants and refugees, non-traditional students and a more diverse
ethnic and racial student population. In addition, at the Student Development Center, we continue to see
an increase in students arriving on campus with mental health problems that require both on and off
campus services. It is essential that the college continue to develop support services that meet the needs
of their diverse student population.


Individuals served by the Student Development Center includes:

   New and continuing students
   Current students seeking individual counseling
   Current students seeking advising or educational planning
   Current students experiencing academic difficulty and in need of support
   Current students experiencing a short term family or personal emergency
   Students in crisis who need immediate attention and support
   Prospective students and community members seeking assistance to identify career goals, make
    academic plans, discover professional development opportunities and pursue continuing education
   Prospective students needing admissions placement testing (e.g., ASSET/COMPASS)
   Students returning to school with a need to revise goals or update their academic plan
   Students seeking assistance for test anxiety, time management, stress management, procrastination, to
    improve their chances for success
   Special population students referred by Work First, Running Start, Essential Skills/ABE, etc.
   Students with disabilities seeking assistance to identify career goals, make academic plans, discover
    professional development opportunities and pursue continuing education
   Students with cerebral palsy seeking to continue their education and work in the community
   Students, community members and residents at the Northend Rehabilitation Facility (NERF) needing
    to take the GED test
   Faculty, administration and staff who wish to consult with staff regarding: advising issues, mental
    health concerns, improving classroom learning, student development, student success, and
    management of disruptive students
   Colleagues at high schools, colleges and universities (i.e., Shorecrest High School, Shorewood High
    School, Roosevelt, University of Washington, Western Washington University, etc.)


Students Served:

While we are cognizant of the importance of keeping accurate data, it has taken some time to create an
effective and efficient data collection process. In 1999 and 2000 staff worked on the development of a
web based database, however, as the details of what was needed became more clear, we decided to use
the existing HP 3000 database for collection of advising student contact data. This was started in June
2000 by tracking three categories: Advising Appointments, Drop-In Advising, and Career Counseling
appointments. Personal and crisis counseling data are kept separately due to confidentiality concerns.
During the last two years we were able to collect the following numbers (See Table A). Note 1: This was
the first year that data were being kept by counselors. Recorded numbers are known to be lower than
actual student contacts. Note 2: Many contacts with prospective students were counted into the Advising
Appointments and Drop-In, Phone & Email categories, but some were counted separately.
                                                                       Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                                         13

                   Table A: Academic Advisors and Counselors Advising Combined
Quarter          Advising        Drop-In,   Total Orientation -#      Total Additional                                    Total
                 Appointments    Phone &            of students per          Prospective
                                 Email              group session**          Students
Summer           124             1028       1152    0/0               1152   47                                           1199
2000*
Fall 2000        325                     1410           1735        15/256                1991       54                   2045
Winter           380                     1223           1603        11/77                 1680       68                   1748
2001
Spring           282                     1247           1529        8/30                  1559       89                   1648
2001
Total            987                     3880           4867        34/363                5230       211                  5441
*The count for Summer 2000 only includes academic advisors. Counselor numbers were not available.
** All academic advisors and most counselors advise at all New Student Orientation and Registration Programs. The New
Student Orientation Program has approximately 40 sessions during the Summer Quarter, and an additional 10 sessions for Winter
and Spring Quarter.


As shown in Table A, advising appointments decreased Spring 01 possibly because of students familiarity
with degree and major requirements. Fall 2002 numbers were slightly down because one advisor was
absent for approximately 4 weeks. Drop-in shows the heavy demand for advising for new and prospective
students around scheduled orientation times. Group-Class/ # of students numbers show how many
workshops were held by advisors and the total number of students who attended the workshops. For
example, Fall 2000 (15/256), there were 15 workshops and 256 participants attended in total.


Counselors also provide a variety of services to a number of students, which includes career counseling,
crisis counseling and personal counseling. (See Table B)

Table B: Counseling Services
      Quarter        Career                           Crisis            Personal                   Total
Summer 2000          Not Available                    NA                NA                         NA
Fall 2000            119                              37                106                        262
Winter 2001          132                              19                76                         227
Spring 2001          95                               41                109                        245
Total                346                              97                291                        734



Assessment and testing seeks to promote student success by providing each student with the opportunity
to gather information about his/her academic skills. Students are SCC are given the ASSET/COMPASS
to help assess the appropriate English and Math placement (See Table C).

Table C: ASSET/COMPASS TOTALS
             Academic Year                                   Total Tested

2001                                                         2280
2000                                                         2366
1999                                                         2388
Total                                                        7034
                                                              Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                                14

GED testing is provided to students, community members and residents of the North Rehabilitation
Facility (See Table D).

Table D: GED Statistics (including North Rehabilitation Facility (NRF)
Year      # of Students       # of students      NRF clients        NRF clients passed all
          tested              passed all 5 tests tested             5 tests
2001      303                 206 (68%)          170                75 (44%)
2000      207                 154 (74%)          121                59 (49%)
1999      146                 105(72%)           164                93(57%)

As shown in Table D, the number of students taking the GED test has more than doubled since 1999. In
addition, the number of students passing all 5 tested has dropped below 70% in 2001. This may be due to
unprepared students taking the test, because the test expires December 2001, leaving those who have not
tested or passed to begin preparation for a new GED test. The number of NRF residents passing all 5 tests
has decreased from 57% passing in 1999 to 44% passing in 2001.


Faculty Served
Academic advisors support and enhance the faculty’s advising role by managing and organizing
information, creating new advising resources, and providing training and direct support for faculty
advising sessions.

Advisor Training: In our training role, we offer workshops prior to Orientation and during Opening Week
for new and veteran faculty advisors. Advisors offer additional faculty training throughout the year. For
example, Science Division faculty were trained in computer science programs and pre-requisites. Faculty
and advisors both are ―trained‖ through consultation and workshop collaboration.

Academic advisors have a crucial information management role. They provide faculty advisors with
degree planning sheets, Advisor Handbooks, Pathways handouts, workshop schedules, and other advising
documents and resources. Internet technology enables us to maintain the advising web site, offer campus-
wide access to WOIS, and offer printable handouts on academic majors and careers.

Advisors are available by phone, email, and in person to answer questions arising in faculty advising
appointments, to follow up with students at faculty request, and to handle difficult advising situations that
fall outside the faculty area of expertise.

Colleagues and Staff Served
By creating visible and publicized drop-in hours and workshops, we ease the referral process for everyone
on campus. We further improve campus-wide communication by sharing information and by
collaborating on new projects with other units.

Administration Served
Our key role with administration is to represent student experiences and advise the administration about
what college programs and services are effective and what programs and services need improvement. To
this end, we actively participate in committees, initiate and work on proposals, research topics and
prepare reports. We supply faculty and administrators with information for program review, for example,
information on graduation efficiency rates and the transferability of specific courses. We research and
report on what happens with students and classes and we help with recruitment by seeing prospective
students and providing community outreach. As advisor and counselor one of our main responsibilities is
to continually develop and implement programs and services that support outreach, retention, student
learning and student success.
                                                            Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                              15

3. Criteria and Methods Used for Measuring Program Effectiveness

Number of individuals served
       number of students assigned to counselors for advising
       number of undecided students assigned to specific advisors in the academic divisions
       number of drop-in students that received advising
       number of advising appointments
       number of students served at the New Student Orientation Program
       number of students served at Advising Workshops
       number of ―hits‖ on the Advising and Counseling Center web site
       number of students served through email advising
       number of students seeking personal counseling services
       number of prospective students seeking advising and counseling services
       number of students seeking GED testing

Student admission, placement, progression, and retention
         student admission data
         student assessment data
         student retention data
         student graduation data
         transfer student success rates at the UW

Student evaluations
         student evaluations of the New Student Orientation Program
         student evaluations of advising workshops
         faculty triennial evaluations
         HUMDV course student evaluations
         Business Administration Marketing class survey feedback

Campus feedback and support
       informal conversations and comments
       referrals we receive from colleagues

Regional, state and national recognition
        invitations to present at regional and national conferences


4.   Enrollment/Staffing Trends (Non-instructional programs need not complete)--Counselors

Staffing
    The College replaced the counseling position left vacant with Sandra Kirk Roston’s retirement. The
counselor replacing that position was Fall 01. The College agreed to replace the Humanities academic
advisor position. That position will be replaced in January 2002 as a 75%, one-year temporary faculty
position. As funds become available, the position will increase to a 100% tenure track faculty position,
with the additional 25% supporting counseling responsibilities. In addition, a part-time academic advisor
in Health Occupation and Physical Education (HOPE) has been identified as a budget goal for the
College. However, with budget cuts, it may be difficult to fill this position.
                                                              Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                                16

Enrollment Trends
Enrollment for Fall 2001 has reached 8,292 compared to 8,056 last year and 8,174 the year before. Since
last year, we have an increase of 236 students requiring advising program services. At the same time,
enrollment by FTE has gone from 5,245 in fall of 2000 to 5,404 this fall—a gain of 159 FTE’s National
1999 ACT data indicates that 48% of Community College students will dropout between their freshman
and sophomore year. Of the new students surveyed by the Public Information Office, during Summer
1999 and Fall 1999 orientation program, 56% were undecided about their academic goals. In addition,
over half of the students, who took the ASSET/COMPASS placement test, scored below college level in
basic skills (See Appendix A).

Although we have seen a modest decrease in enrollment, the trend toward more students attending per full
time equivalent student continues. We have seen increased numbers of undecided students who request
counselor assistance with selecting both educational programs and courses appropriate for transfer until
they determine a program.

The dramatic increase we have seen over the past several years in students requesting crisis intervention
services has continued for this year. We have had students dealing with post traumatic stress disorder,
suicide threats, self mutilation, eating disorders, domestic violence, panic attacks, depression, assessment
for hospitalization for acute mental illness, grief and loss, immediate consultation regarding student
disruptive behavior, and warnings regarding threats made by students on faculty and other students.
These services continue to place a heavy demand on both time and energy.

As a result of the increased number and severity of crisis intervention requests, we have instituted a
formal system for dealing with crisis requests, which includes a protocol and a rotating schedule. This
schedule facilitates the use of our services and balances the workload within the department. We have
also requested and received training from The County Crisis and Commitment Services, State Child
Protective Services, and New Beginnings (domestic violence resource in our area).

Local state and national trends continue to show increases in numbers of students dealing with serious,
acute, or chronic mental health problems and severe emotional and physical challenges. Coordination of
services through the Disabled Student Services program has been a tremendous asset to students and the
college and has provided students with improved access to our services and for services in the
community. We have seen a reduction of community services provided for free or on a sliding scale and
most of the students we see are unable to pay the professional rate for mental health services. With the
large demands placed on the Coordinator for Services for Students with Disabilities, she continues to be
unable to provide counseling services to the general student population.

We have instituted a system that will allow us to gain much needed student information on student
contacts that will help us to better evaluate service delivery and identify student groups that we are not
currently reaching.

In an effort to meet increased demand for services we added Human Development 101, Student Success,
and all of the following support groups. We are continuing our efforts to develop ways to better market
these groups and increase student participation.

        African American Support Group
        Parent Support Group
        Relaxation Skills Training Workshop
        Test Anxiety Reduction Workshops
        Student Success for Developmental Math
        How to Choose A Major
                                                            Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                              17

        Immigrant/Refugee Evening Outreach Program
        Dealing With Grief and Loss
        Conflict Resolution
        Conflict Mediation

The Coordinator of Advising has a reduced student contact load and reduced responsibilities for drop in
services in order to deal with the increasing demand for coordination and reporting. This reduces the
resources available for direct student service.

Dr. Yvonne L. Terrell-Powell, Director of the Multicultural/Diversity Education Center, was assigned
additional responsibilities as Director of Student Development. Although Yvonne has been a tremendous
asset to the center and has provided much needed leadership and supervision, the demands placed on her
time by the dual assignment are heavy. She is only in the Student Development Center two days per
week. We appreciate her leadership and feel we could benefit from additional time spent on innovation
and program planning.

Due to space limitations, we have at times been unable to provide standing room for students checking in
at the desk or the quiet, comfortable and confidential waiting area we feel is necessary for personal
counseling clients. We lack a room for consultation and regular meetings for planning and administrative
requirements. During times of peak demand there are not rooms sufficient to meet the needs of students
requiring alternate testing space. Some staff would assert that we need the office and lobby space that is
occupied the Essential Skills Programs/ABE, on a temporary basis, to meet the demands for advising and
counseling services or additional space assigned.


5. Significant Anticipated Changes
 During the 2000 – 2001 academic year, we operated with two fewer positions, one in counseling and
    one in advising. While the counseling position has been replaced, the Humanities academic advisors
    will not be replaced until Winter 2001. This replacement will be a one-year temporary position at
    75% of a faculty contract.
 With the results of the PERC grievance, advising duties were reallocated causing a reduction of
    advising staff time to students.
 General economic recession may lead to increased layoffs, which could in turn effect enrollment and
    state funding.
 Anticipated growth in enrollment due to rise in traditional college age population
 Increased outreach and articulation agreements with K-12 and baccalaureate institutions.
 Challenged to provide increased access to advising information in multiple formats (i.e., one-to-one,
    workshops, non-traditional hours, via the Internet, via email, etc.).
 New State Laws pertaining to disclosure statements, progress notes, etc.
 New licensure requirements for counselors
 Staffing changes (i.e. a shared director, new faculty positions for ESL, International Programs and the
    Humanities Division)
 On-going competition for space for offices, meetings, classrooms and workshops
 Increased demand for services to deal with the 9/11 events and on-going events (e.g. the war on
    terrorism, anthrax etc.)
 Increased demand for on going accountability
 Increased demand for night and weekend services and for services at off campus locations
 Increased emphasis on advising and career counseling
 Expansion of partnerships with K-12 and other colleges and universities
 Increased demand for career services and assistance with transition from work to school
                                                            Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                              18

   Increased demand for crisis intervention due to changes in student population and changes in our
    environment
   Increased demand for consultation and classroom visitation to deal with human development and
    mental health issues that affect student progress


6. Program Self-Assessment--Counseling

Strengths
           Strong, broad base of professional training including extensive clinical, career guidance and
            advising experience
           Successful completion of the triennial evaluation process by faculty counselors (with high
            scores from students, peers and administrator)
           Whole person orientation to address multiple needs of the student
           Strong support and participation for multicultural initiatives on the campus and in the
            community
           Clinical case consultation
           Human Development classes and workshops
           Class visitations and community presentations
           Institutional representation at regional and national conferences and meetings
           Liaison responsibilities with campus divisions
           Collaboration with other student service divisions; addition of Director of Student
            Development and Multicultural Services on Student Services Managers Meetings
           Active participants on college councils and committees, promoting student success
           Wellness orientation addressing balance and long-term productivity
           Licensed Mental Health Counselors with training appropriate for response to increasing needs
            for crisis counseling and serious mental health issues
           Appointment of part-time Director of Student Development has:
                 i.      improved leadership, clinical supervision, staff supervision, and management for
                         division
                 ii.     provided adequate administrative representation at campus governance level and
                         within student services
                 iii.    improved availability of director for counselor staff meetings, and coordination
                         of in-service training
           Resolution of the Public Employee Relations Commission complaint resulting in appropriate
            job classifications, education, credentials, retention of original faculty positions, and
            clarification of advising as a faculty function
           Replacement of counseling faculty position after counseling faculty member's retirement
           Willingness to collaborate with the Multicultural/Diversity Education Center to provide drop-
            in advising

Weaknesses
       Loss of 60 extended days used to cover quarter breaks and new student orientation
       Humanities Faculty Advisor position funded at 75%, representing a 25% loss of counseling
           and advising function (NOTE: anticipate this position will be funded at 100% after one year
           or as fund become available, per administration)
       Unreasonable per-counselor advising load. Fall Quarter 2000 six counselors had 955
           advisees assigned
                                                             Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                               19

           The Career Center resources and space continue to deteriorate. For example, the recent move
            of the ESL/ABE program into the Advising and Counseling Center resulting in a secretarial
            work station being moved into the Career Center, eliminating space for the
            occupational/career video library and video equipment and other career exploration materials
           Increased volume and variety of workload have resulted in insufficient front office reception
            and staffing


Program Self-Assessment – Advising

New Student Orientation Program
During the Fall 2000 registration period, the new student orientation program served over 1400 students.
We served approximately 300 students each winter and spring registration period. We schedule
approximately 60 to 70 appointments for each session, with show rates averaging 75 to 85%. Many no
shows attended later sessions. The Orientation program expanded into evening sessions to
accommodate students unable to come during the day.

We continue to work with the academic divisions to add new sections of high demand classes and were
able to add several math and English classes. One strength area for the program is the ongoing
cooperation with Enrollment Services staff, who schedule the student appointments for New Student
Orientation.

This year we had difficulty getting commitments from instructional faculty to participate in the summer
orientation program. During summer 2001, there was decreased faculty representation at New Student
Orientation, particularly in September. This also remains a difficult issue with New Student Orientation
sessions during the academic year when faculty rotate through the session. It continues to be difficult for
individual faculty advisors to provide adequate representation for all the programs in their division,
especially for the professional/technical programs, where students are often on a defined schedule.

Student evaluation of the orientation program continues to report overwhelming positive results. A copy
of the results is attached for your review. This program has been featured all over the country--at national
and state conferences. Several colleges have purchased the program and are attempting to implement it on
their campuses. We continue to receive requests.

It is important to recognize that the vast majority of entering students are in fact undecided about their
major and career direction (See Appendix A), even if they have identified an area of interest. Very few
students have gone through an adequate self-assessment and career identification process. Thus it needs to
be our expectation that almost all students need assistance with self-assessment and career identification.

As in previous years, once students leave the orientation program, there is very little information
assessing the quality of ongoing advising services. However, students with fewer than 15 credits are
required to obtain an advisor's signature before they can register. We are also concerned about the
numbers of new students who are not being referred to our Orientation program. In a review of the
literature, it is well documented that a new student orientation program improves student progression and
retention.

Shoreline’s Associate in Arts and Science degree continues to be complex, which means students have
less opportunity to complete major prerequisites within the Option A degree. Our complex degree
requirements, combined with the limited advising resources provided to instructional faculty in their
offices, make comprehensive advising difficult.
                                                              Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                                20

Advisor Assignments
Student/advisor ratios are driven by a student’s declared academic/career goals and the quality of advising
services rendered. Programs with the most students will generate more advisees for advisors in those
programs. Because so many of our students are undecided about their academic/career goals, counselors
are assigned numerous advisees, from 100 to 260 each.

The ratio of assigned advisees to advisor is an important factor in the quality of advising that an advisor
can deliver. The following are our current numbers (Nov 2001) for instructional faculty, some
administrators, counselors and academic advisors (See Table E):

Table E: Number of advisees assigned to faculty advisors and percentage of faculty
Student advisees                   Number of faculty              Percent of faculty
0 – 10                             36                             32%
11 – 25                            23                             21%
26 – 50                            37                             33%
51 – 75                            6                              5%
76 – 100                           6                              5%
101 – 125                          2                              2%
126 – 150                          1                              1%
150 – 175                          0                              0%
176 - 200                          0                              0%
200 - 225*                         1                              1%
226 - 255*                         2                              2%
Total faculty                      111
* Counseling faculty


Each of the Counseling Faculty has 200 to 255 advisees currently assigned, with the exception of the
newly appointed counselor and the two counselors who are also program coordinators and have a
proportionally reduced advisee loads. The number of advisees assigned to counselors and some
instructional faculty is unreasonably high when we take into account their other academic and program
responsibilities. The Science Division Academic advisor’s student advisees total 84. This number is kept
low because the science division academic advisor is expected to be a back up for science faculty
advisors. One division that is particularly impacted at this point is the Business Administration Division,
where 4 faculty advisors, each have between 85 and 128 advisees. While the availability of group
advising workshops is helping, it does not adequately address this problem.

Of continuing concern is the unequal number of advisees assigned to faculty advisors. Because of the
varying number of students in different programs, this cannot be equalized entirely. However, we would
like to work with College administration and faculty to find ways to address this concern. The Science
Division has already begun to address unequal advisee loads in their area. With teamwork by the Science
Division Academic Advisor and Science Faculty, faculty from less popular major areas have been
recruited and trained to advise in popular areas such as Engineering and Computer Science.


Advising Materials
Our advising materials have been hailed as among the best in the state. The academic and
professional/technical planning guides were updated and uniformly designed and color coded for student
and advisor use. The Academic Advising and Professional/Technical Handbooks were revised and
distributed campus wide, as well as to area high schools. The Academic Pathway handouts were created
                                                            Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                              21

and published to advertise the curriculum requirements for specific majors. All of our advising materials
are stored and secured on a share drive and carefully managed to promote easy maintenance of
information that is both accurate and timely. Last year we noted the need for more timely information
augmenting our excellent printed materials.

Leaders in the Use of Technology
The advising staff has been leaders in the use of technology to support advising programs and services.
Publication software is used to create multiple handouts and advising materials. We created and maintain
the multi-media power point presentation for New Student Orientation. With Jeff in the lead, much of our
information and services have gone on-line. Jeff has been instrumental in getting academic advising, as
well as Student Services, on the WEB. There have been over 12,000 hits on the main page of the advising
web site since 1999. Students are increasingly using e-mail to ask advising questions and to take care of
school business from off campus locations. Jeff independently manages the ―Ask Alberta‖ advising
system whereby students email advising questions to Jeff and he promptly responds.

Academic Advisors in the Divisions
In Spring of 1998, Shoreline joined with the University of Washington to hire Joyce Fagel, the Academic
Advisor for the Science Division. Joyce has done an outstanding job coordinating advising services for
her division faculty. She works closely with the faculty in her division to keep them informed with
regards to advising information. Because many of the science faculty advise for the Health Science
programs, Joyce has also supported the Health Science Division by developing and offering information
sessions for that area. Joyce has also collaborated with Business Division faculty to develop Information
Sessions for computer technology students. Joyce has created several new advising handouts to be used
by advisors and students (See Appendix B). She has worked closely with baccalaureate institutions to
expedite the articulation of curriculum. Faculty, staff and students have come to greatly rely on her
services. Joyce’s written evaluation of services is being used as a model for other UW/CC advising
positions.

In October of 2000, Kelli Jayn Nichols resigned as the Academic Advisor for the Humanities Division.
We are in the process of replacing this full-time academic advisor position with a 75% one-year
temporary faculty contracted position. As resources allow, this position will be expanding to 100%, and
include providing counseling services. The need for academic advisor support continues in the other
divisions: Health Occupations, Business, Intra-American Studies/Social Sciences, as well as
Automotive/Manufacturing.

Information Sessions
The Student Development Center staff continue to offer advising workshops and information sessions.
These group-advising workshops serve approximately 10 to 20 students each session.

Joyce Fagel has taken the lead on developing and publicizing the advising workshops. She created flyers
and advertised in classrooms, the student newspaper, on sandwich boards and list serves to attract
students. Our workshops are gaining campus support and student participation as a result of these efforts.
Also, the evaluations for these workshops have been very positive. Student comments have been very
positive and the program is continuing this year.

UW Transfer Information Session
Every quarter we offer a ―UW Transfer Information‖ workshop for students who are planning to transfer
to the University of Washington. The number of students served range between 20 to 30 per session. This
program has become very popular, quickly filling with very little advertisement. We need to extend the
number of sessions offered and perhaps serve students interested in other universities.
                                                              Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                                22

Evaluation of Services
Currently, there is very little evaluation of the academic advising services provided by faculty.

Advisor Training
It continues to be true that advisors involved with Orientation attended a two-hour training, and that most
other advisors do not attend any training sessions, even when offered. The attendance at the September
Opening Week Advisor Training session was ten. In addition to basic advising training, it would be
helpful to add other components such as promotion of exemplary or best practices.

Advisor Recognition
There is still no official recognition for quality advising. The National Academic Advising Association
(NACADA) emphasizes the importance of recognition and reward for academic advising. This needs to
be addressed on our campus.

Career Information Center
The lack of a highly visible and integrated Career Center and Career Counseling Services continues to be
a concern at the Student Development Center and for the College. At the Student Development Center,
there is no one assisting students with locating and using career resource materials at the Career
Information Center. For example, the computerized career information system has not been fully utilized
due to lack of staffing in this area. In addition, there is no one to manage the day to day upkeep of
resources and materials. Another concern that must be addressed is the lack of coordination between the
Career Information Center housed at the Student Development Center and the Career Center housed in
Career Employment Services. There has been some discussion regarding merging the two Centers.


Summary of Strengths and Areas Needing Improvement/Weaknesses– Advising Services

Strengths
 Professionally printed and on-line advising materials
        Academic Transfer Handbook
        Professional/Technical Handbook
        Program Planning Guides and Pathway Transfer Handouts
 Use of Technology
        PowerPoint Multi-media Presentations
        Advising and Counseling Center Web Site
                G.P.A. Calculator
                Career Information
                Registration Aid
                ―Ask Alberta‖ Advising Questions
 Partnerships
        UW/SCC jointly funded Science Division advising position
        Develop professional relationships with counselors, career specialists and advisors at other
        colleges, universities, and area high schools.
        Advisory Board to Shorewood High School Career Center
 Knowledgeable and Skilled Advisors
        Shoreline advisors are highly knowledgeable regarding requirements of baccalaureate institutions
        and majors
        Active participants on college councils and committees, promoting student success
        Advisors provide advising training and consultation to instructional faculty
                                                             Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                               23

Areas Needing Improvement/Weaknesses
 Lack of a structure for the campus community to provide ongoing input and direction for the campus-
   wide advising program
 Inadequate assessment and evaluation of advising services (i.e., advising materials, one-to-one
   student advising, etc.)
 Inconsistent instructional faculty participation in advising training and programs
 Faculty do not have easy access to student records in order to provide the comprehensive advising
   needed to evaluate degree progression and enroll students in classes.
 Given an all faculty advising model, the traditional contract does not meet the needs of students who
   need to register during the official quarterly calendar. Also, with faculty having only 5 office hours
   per week, they are often not available to advise students during critical enrollment periods.
 Lack of an academic advisor/coordinator in all the academic divisions
 With the settlement between the union and faculty regarding advising responsibility, the total number
   of advising hours in Student Services has decreased
 Increased demand for advising programs and services; staffing levels cannot meet the demand
 Understaffed and inadequate Career Information Center
 Orientation and workshops displaced with the library remodel
 Inadequate laptop computer for the orientation program and outreach activities.


Program Self-Assessment --Assessment and Testing

In January 2000, Program Coordinator position was upgraded to Program Manager A to manage ASSET
placement testing and GED testing. This upgrade provides for managing the budgets for assessment and
GED testing and supervising staff for both programs. In October 2001, the testing proctor position was
filled with a person who is able to assist with ASSET/COMPASS testing. This allows the Program
Manager to concentrate on GED testing and administrative projects/tasks associated with assessment and
GED testing. Demands for ASSET/COMPASS and GED testing continue to increase as advisors more
regularly check assessment testing and there are increased special populations requiring assessment (i.e.,
Running Start, WorkFirst, etc.). Also, GED testing increased in 2001 in response to the discontinuation
of the current series of tests, thus requiring GED examinees to complete testing in 2001 or begin a new
test in 2002.

Hiring of a GED testing proctor will help meet the needs for placement testing. Future needs of testing
will be the naming of an alternate GED examiner, a new testing room, as the current room (5100A) is
inadequate for testing services and creative scheduling. GED funds generated by NRF testing have come
under the management of Student Development/Testing. Demands for ASSET/COMPASS and GED
testing continue.

Approximately 2600 people take the ASSET test per year. This includes recent high school graduates,
non-traditional students, and people in special programs (Running Start, Worker Retraining, refugee/
immigrants, Career Employment Opportunities (CEO).

In response to the needs of local high school students, the Assessment program accepts SAT and ACT
scores in lieu of the ASSET. Assessment has also expanded to include computerized placement testing,
COMPASS, thus giving students multiple options for testing.

Test scheduling includes evenings and Saturdays to accommodate students not able to attend daytime,
weekday-testing sessions. The Assessment program is committed to expanded services by offering
ASSET and GED testing at both on campus and off-campus sites.
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                                                                                                24

During the summer of 1999, the English faculty developed clear guidelines for placement based on these
scores, which are now consistently implemented in advising. The Math faculty have created a flexible
placement system by developing a Student Self-Assessment Guide, to be used in consultation with math
faculty or the Science Division advisor. Both English and math faculty continue to report anecdotally that
placement in Fall 99 was better than in years before. Both English and math faculty have made
appropriate adjustments to the placement criteria. However, while we have expanded our offerings and
use of placement tests, we as yet do not have information regarding the success of students in core math
and English courses that followed placement recommendations. A continuing point of contention is that
placement guidelines cannot be fully enforced until the registration system is set up to enforce placement
and prerequisites. While indicators are that placement advising has improved significantly, it is difficult to
get a true measure of how placement affects student success, because success is affected by so many
factors, including quality of instruction and the motivation of the student.

Summary of Strengths and Areas Needing Improvement/Weaknesses – Assessment and Testing

Strengths
  Flexible testing schedule. Daytime, evening & Saturday assessment testing offered. Daytime and
     evening GED testing offered.
 Coordination of GED testing services under one department. Previously under two departments
    causing service inadequacies.

Areas Needing Improvement/Weaknesses:
 Staffing. Assessment proctor hired in Oct. 2001 has improved assessment testing offerings.
   However, a person is still needed to assist with GED testing and records
 No backup assistance for GED testing and management
 Space. The testing program has outgrown the current testing center space, (5100A). 5100A is too
   small to accommodate more than 14 paper and pencil examinees or 10 computer examinees. This
   requires numerous tests to be offered to meet the needs of students, often causing conflicts in setting
   priority testing needs
 Funding. The assessment and GED budgets are "self-support". This limits funding available to
   upgrade computers used for COMPASS, staffing, materials (i.e., new testing books)
 Impact of heavy scheduling/rescheduling duties on limited support staff


Program Self-Assessment -- High School Relations

In September 2001, Jeff Omalanz-Hood was promoted to High School Student Relations and Recruitment
Manager. As a result, the College has already increased the number of high school visits. Hundreds of
high school students are contacted through the High School Relations program. Potential students are
seen both through high school visits and by hosting high school students on the Shoreline campus. Each
year, we host the annual High School-College Conference, which draws approximately 500 high school
juniors in the spring. The manager is currently working with career specialists at district high schools to
share resources and information to improve our service to students. In addition, the manager with the
assistance of advisors, attends high school visitations, talks to students and parents about our programs
and services, and provide information and materials to market our college.

Summary of Strengths and Areas Needing Improvement/Weakness --High School Relations
Program
Because this is a new position as of Fall 2001, it is too early to assess strengths and weaknesses
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Program Self-Assessment – Services for Students with Disabilities
(See separate document, prepared by KimThompson, Services for Students with Disabilities, Program
Coordinator)

Program Self-Assessment – Community Integration Program
Students range in age from 21 to 66 and bring with them diverse backgrounds and previous educational
preparation. Students make a significant contribution to the diversity of the campus, both because they
are individuals with significant disabilities and some are females and students of color. The students are
largely dependent on public transportation and on their power wheelchairs for access to the campus. The
previous director provided input to public transportation that resulted in better transportation services for
students. We currently provide services to King County participants and Snohomish County participants.
The numbers have decreased this quarter, which may be due to the director leaving and student reaching
their goals.


Summary of Strengths and Areas Needing Improvement/Weakness-- Community Integration
Program

Strengths
 Program continues to seek to remove physical and social barriers to integration of students into the
    college environment
 Committed staff
 Assistive technology allows student greater opportunities to learn and access higher education


Weaknesses
 With the resignation of the CIP director, the organization has lacked direct leadership
 King County auditors identified several areas of non-compliance
 Shortage of hourly or work-study staff
 Program needs to be reviewed, assessed and possibly reorganized
 Limited office space for confidential conversations


7. Diversity/Multiculturalism

As part of its mission and goal, the Student Development Center staff has provided leadership in
Shoreline's thrust for equity, diversity and multicultural development. We actively participate and support
diversity training, the diversity council and other school initiatives, and we are committed to recruiting
and retaining a diverse staff and student population. Staff supports programming, such as Martin Luther
King Day, Multicultural Week, and other diversity initiatives at Shoreline.

Advisors and counselors encourage students to explore and integrate their multicultural identity and
heritage into their college experience and decision making process; extend and expect respect, and
promote inclusion and enrichment of our community. They provide services in multiple formats in order
to increase retention and success of underrepresented staff and students on our campus. As advisors and
counselors have reviewed our materials, they have revised many of our materials to be accessible and
sensitive to students with disabilities. In addition, staff have included anti-discrimination statements on
many of our materials and offered publications in alternate formats by contacting the Services for
Students with Disabilities Office.
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                                                                                              26

Multicultural and diversity efforts are supported and valued by our staff to ensure fair and equitable
treatment of staff and students. As we continue to assess our programs, we are open to improving and
expanding our services to meet the goal of campus diversity.

   Coordinating campus-wide collection of gift items to be delivered on Mothers' Day to Seattle
    Women's shelters
   Organized in-service training on topics including crisis intervention, domestic violence, and child
    abuse
   Attended numerous training opportunities on multiculturalism and diversity such as Washington
    Center's year long series on Culture and Learning, Northwest Coalition Building, UW Diversity
    Advising, etc.
   Showed University of Washington video, specifically used to recruit Students of Color and persons
    w/disabilities
   Participate and assist in planning campus multicultural events and activities (i.e., Expanding Your
    Horizons, Women's History Month, Martin Luther King Celebration, Multicultural Week, etc.)
    Provided Multicultural/Diversity Education Center outreach and drop-in advising
   Held daily New Student Orientation groups for Fall quarter in the Multicultural/Diversity Education
    Center
   Advisor position for the Rainbow Club is co-chaired by two counseling faculty. Projects included the
    fruition of the Safe Zone project and sending two students to a national conference on gender issues,
    and co-sponsoring events with other student clubs
   Developed and initiated a tracking program that will more accurately assess the diversity of students
    served in the Student Development Center
   Student Development Center staff sponsored and participated in the quarterly Assistive Technology
    Open House, which includes students with disabilities and students from multicultural courses
   Reviewing New Student Orientation Program to integrate appropriate multicultural images and
    materials
   Counselor on sabbatical volunteered at the Center for Human Services and CASA Latina, and visited
    other agencies that also serve Latinos
   Counselor on sabbatical studied Spanish; attended "Working with Hispanics" workshop through the
    University of Washington School of Social Work; researched and studied Latino cultures; and
    volunteered at and visited community agencies that serve Latinos as preparation to recruit, encourage,
    support, and retain Latino students at Shoreline Community College.
   Counselor co-advised the Latino student group, MiGrupo, and facilitated the meeting between with
    SCC MiGrupo students and the University of Washington Latino student group
   Working with the Rainbow Club to provide programming and support for students and faculty (the
    club worked in partnership with Student Government Leadership on a Safe Zone Project designed to
    improve campus climate)
   Provided training for Japan's Osaka College Addiction Studies program in collaboration with
    International Programs and Intra American Studies/Social Sciences faculty
   Participated in the Women's Words of Fire Poetry Event, sponsored by the Feminist Majority
    Leadership Alliance and the Women's Center


8. Achievement of 1999-2000 Program Goals/Objectives – Counseling Services
1. Develop comprehensive evaluation tools to gather more information and data from students, faculty
    and staff to improve our programs and services.

    Developed and implemented methods to track students receiving services. Using HP3000 system for
    coding and processing data. Developed an intake form to gather data for counseling students.
                                                              Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
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    Collection of data allows us to assess types of students served, type of service provided, student
    program or special population, etc.

2. Retain academic advising of undecided, undeclared and/or at-risk students as a faculty function
   Continue to work with undecided, undeclared and/or at-risk students. However, the large number of
   advisees compared to other faculty advisee caseloads needs to be reviewed and advisees need to be
   re-distributed to other faculty. In addition, faculty would need training to provide appropriate
   services to students.

3. Continue to support the establishment of a faculty cadre to support academic advising services

    Supported the establishment of faculty advisors/counselors to support academic advising services
    in some academic divisions. A part-time academic advisor in Health Occupation and Physical
    Education has been identified as a budget goal for the College. With budget cuts, it may be
    difficult to fill this position. In January 2002, the College will replace the Humanities Academic
    Advisor, a faculty position at 75%. As funds allow, this position will be increased to 100% with
    the increased 25% focusing on counseling duties and responsibilities.

4. Support and promote filling of Advising and Counseling Director position

    In Fall 2001, a director was hired to oversee Advising and Counseling, renamed, the Student
    Development Center, which better describes the broader and inclusive services provided to students.
    The director position is shared with the Multicultural/Diversity Education Center. The new director
    has played an integral role in providing leadership and organization to Student Development Center
    faculty and staff. In addition, she has facilitated positive internal and cross campus communication.

5. Increase front office staffing; enhance front office service delivery through increased supervision
   time, reorganization and in-service training

    The Student Development Center director has encouraged the hiring and training of appropriate
    student help. During Spring 01, the Administrative Assistant retired. The position was reviewed and
    it was determine that a Secretary Lead was the most appropriate hire. In Fall 01, the Secretary Lead
    position was filled. The director meets regularly with office staff. They address office concerns as
    well as better ways to provided services to faculty, staff and students. Office staff are encouraged to
    seek professional development on and off-campus. The Student Development Center Office Assistant
    has taken several courses at the College and completed a certificate program in W01. There has
    been limited in-service training.

6. Develop and implement counseling services delivery tracking and evaluation system

    Developed and implemented methods to track students receiving services. Using HP3000 system for
    coding and processing data. Developed an intake form to gather data for counseling students.
    Collection of data allows us to assess types of students served, type of service provided, student
    program or special population, etc. Utilized students in the Business Administration Marketing class
    to help evaluate Advising and Counseling Services. This information is being evaluated and will be
    used to enhance marketing, services and programs.
                                                              Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                                28

7. Begin weekly meetings of counseling faculty to share information, assess student needs and develop
   professional counseling programs.

    Maintained meetings of counseling faculty to share information, assess student needs, and develop
    professional counseling programs (i.e., Human Development 101 Student Success course).
    Maintained counseling faculty bi-weekly case consultation time. Met monthly with advisors and
    counselors to discuss a variety of issues (i.e., programming, advising services, New Student
    Orientation, advisee loads, retention, etc.). At the end of each quarter, held a meeting with the entire
    Student Development staff to highlight strengths and accomplishment made during the quarter,
    address unit concerns and College concerns, and identify any new changes for the next quarter.


    Achievement of 1999-00 Program Goals/Objectives – Advising Services

1. Engage in ongoing evaluation and assessment. Continue to implement student satisfaction surveys to
   evaluate our programs and services. Develop a database of information to account for the numbers of
   students served.

    We continue to evaluate New Student Orientation, as well as some of the advising workshops.
    Beginning summer 2001, we also implemented the input of advising and drop-in contacts in the
    Student Management System. In addition, we are tracking the numbers of prospective students.
    Also, the college has decided upon an annual survey that includes advising in the assessment.

2. Implement regular advisor training, recognition, and incentives; implement at least one form of
   recognition or incentive for advisor dedication and service.

    We have continued to offer advisor training in the form of workshops and upon request. We
    have not been able to implement a system that recognizes quality advising.

3. Increase advising services and support for faculty and students in the academic divisions. Hire an
   academic advisor dedicated solely to advising in an assigned division. The 1999-2000 goal will be to
   obtain this in at least one more division.

    A part-time academic advisor in Health Occupation and Physical Education has been identified as a
    budget goal for the College. With budget cuts, it may be difficult to fill this position. In January
    2002, the College will replace the Humanities Academic Advisor at 75%.

4. Career Center: Establish a highly visible, state-of-the-art career center that supports the needs of
   both advisors and students. Support hourly staff assistance and the upgrade of the Secretary Lead
   to take over in this area.

    While we initially made progress in this area, by adding these duties to the Administrative Assistant,
    upon her retirement, and the reclassification of her position, these duties were not reassigned.
    Currently, there is no dedicated staff support for the Career Center and very limited space. This is a
    major shortcoming for an educational institution.

5. Expand the career assessment program to meet the needs of students across the campus and the
   needs of students in special programs.

    Due to reduced staff and office restructuring this goal was not accomplished.
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                                                                                              29

6. Clarify roles of faculty advisors and other advising professionals at Shoreline. Use the ongoing
   Union and Joint Management process as well as an advisory committee to develop Shoreline’s
   vision for advising services on campus.

    This has been partially addressed by the settlement between the administration and the faculty;
    however, the definition of advising, the workload issues around advising, the evaluation of advising
    services, and the accessibility of advisors must be addressed.

7. Continue to develop a target ratio of undecided students to counseling faculty. Use the advisory
   committee to develop this in conjunction with the Counseling Faculty; explore new ways to
   serve undecided students.

    The goal was not accomplished. There is some discussion regarding creating an advisory
    committee to address advising concerns at the College. As the College assesses it needs through
    the self-accreditation process, there will be more discussion regarding the most appropriate
    way(s) to address advising concerns (i.e., advising evaluations, faculty advisee loads, etc.)

8. Increase development and circulation of advising materials. Develop the existing ―Advising
   Quarterly‖ into a professional publication circulated to both advisors and students. Complete
   additional pathway publications for major areas.

   Several additional transfer pathway publications were revised and developed—The Advising
   Quarterly needs to be updated and disseminated. Continue to review advising materials and working
   toward putting materials on the web

9. Evaluate and improve our office scheduling system. Research and install a new scheduling system.

   We improved the use of our current system therefore we did not need to research a new system.

10. Provide more professional development opportunities to staff to enhance the service operation of
    our department. Employ part-time hourly personnel so that full-time staff can attend professional
    development opportunities.

    We are all committed to supporting professional development activities in our department. As such,
    the staff has taken classes and participated in conferences and seminars.

11. Reevaluation of Testing Coordinator and Testing Proctors job classification.

    The Testing Coordinator was upgraded to Program Manager and a part-time Office Assistant III was
    hired to assist with the ASSET/COMPASS placement test. There is still discussion regarding hiring a
    person to assist with GED testing. With budget constraints, non-traditional funding is needed in
    order to hire a GED testing assistant.


9. 2001-03 Program Goals/Objectives -- Counseling
   1. If funds allow, increase Front Desk coverage (more staff)--temporary, hourly, sharing personnel
   2. Career Center Improvement (display of materials, update materials, appropriate staffing, and
       possible merging)
   3. Work with administration and faculty to review advisee loads and make appropriate
       recommendations and changes
   4. More Student Services' communication in areas where we share responsibilities
                                                           Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                             30

   5. Return to Student Lounge or another appropriate location for Orientation and Registration and
      advising and counseling workshops
   6. Develop new and innovative human development courses
   7. Collaborate with the Multicultural/Diversity Education Center to offer advising, counseling,
      informational sessions about the University of Washington and other baccalaureate institutions
      and other relevant resources and services


 2001 - 2003 Program Goals/Objectives – Advising
   1. Acquire a new laptop computer that is adequate to support our new student orientation and
        registration, workshops and recruitment programs.
   2. Work with administration and faculty to review advisee loads and make appropriate
        recommendations and changes
   3. If funding allows, hire an academic advisor dedicated solely to advising in an assigned division
   4. Gain administrative support to provide recognition and incentives for advisor dedication and
       service, e.g., a monetary reward or certificate of appreciation.
   5. Career Center Improvement (display of materials, update materials, appropriate staffing, and
       possible merging)
   6. Increase advising services and support for faculty and students in the academic divisions.
   7. Collaborate with the Multicultural/Diversity Education Center to offer advising, counseling,
       informational sessions about the University of Washington and other baccalaureate institutions
       and other relevant resources and services
   8. Return to the Student Lounge or obtain another appropriate location for Orientation and
       Registration and advising workshops


 2001-03 Program Goals/Objectives -- High School Relations
    1. Continue discussion with appropriate area regarding new high school recruitment plan and
        implement the plan
   2. Develop a data gathering and reporting system to tracking high school outreach efforts,
       including student applications, student enrollment and retention
    3. Continue to work with career specialists at district high schools to share resources and
       information to improve our service to students


2001-03 Program Goals/Objectives – Assessment and Testing
1. Identify a permanent GED alternate examiner to increase availability of testing
2. Identify more appropriate testing space to increase ASSET/COMPASS and GED testing
3. Obtain training for Assessment Program Manager on technical/computer issues to help manage
   testing information and reporting
4. Provide additional testing opportunities for students


2001-03 Program Goals/Objectives – Services for Students with Disabilities
(See separate report provided by Kim Thompson, Services for Students with Disabilities Program
Coordinator))


2001-03 Program Goals/Objectives --Community Integration Program
1. Hire a director/program manager for the Community Integration Program
2. Review, assess and make appropriate changes to the Community Integration Program (i.e., update
                                                             Student Development Center PPA 2001-02
                                                                                               31

   technology, increase student participation, increase types of students, access state funding for
   additional programming, etc.)


10. Report Prepared by: Student Development Center Faculty and Staff

       Counseling Faculty
       Nancy Field, Certified Mental Health Counselor
       Marty Olsen, Certified Mental Health Counselor
       Linda Sue Nelson, Certified Mental Health Counselor
       Matt Orlando, Faculty/Counselor

       Advising Faculty and Staff/Administrative Exempt
       Diana Sampson, Counselor/Coordinator of Advising
       Jeff Omalanz-Hood, High School Student Relations and Recruitment Manager
       Joyce Fagel, Academic Advisor, Science Division

       Assessment and Testing Staff
       Karen Polsgrove, Program Manager

       Services for Students with Disabilities Faculty and Staff
       Kim Thompson, Counselor/Program Coordinator
       Claire Ball, Program Assistant

       Student Development Center Staff
       Syd Howland, Office Assistant III
       Pam Francisco, Secretary Lead

       Community Integration Program Staff
       Rosemary Dunne, Program Manager
       Barbe Fiske

       Student Development Center Administrator
       Dr. Yvonne L. Terrell-Powell, Director

								
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