Incident Command System National Incident Management System in by zpq79685

VIEWS: 143 PAGES: 133

									  Incident Command System
 National Incident Management
            System
               in
Managing Public Health Activities


          NIMS - ICS
      NACCHO or nachos ?
     NACCHO-
National Association
         of
 County and City
  Health Officials
In partnership with

  Centers for Disease
  Control (CDC)

  Federal Emergency
  Management Agency
  (FEMA)
  The Department of Homeland
           Security




National Incident Management System
“One team, one plan…”
         Good Public Health Practice
                     is
         Good Domestic Preparedness:
   exercises         education      leadership

    contacts       communication   collaboration

threat awareness    organization    public trust

                      media understanding and
  surveillance
                              support

   stockpiles         training      equipment
CDC says

“We are now living in the “new
 normal.”

A world in which we need to be:
     Prepared
     Collaborative
…there’s always a first time!

 “ When anyone asks me how I can best
 describe my experience in nearly 40 years
 at sea, I say, ‘Uneventful’ .”

 “ Of course there have been winter gales,
 storms, fog and the like, but in all my
 experience I have never been in any
 accident of any sort worth speaking
 about.”
“…I have seen but one vessel in distress in
all my years at sea…I never saw a wreck
and have never been wrecked.”
“ Nor was I ever in any predicament that
threatened to end in disaster of any sort.”




         Guess who said this?
                                              Captain E.J. Smith
                                                   RMS Titanic




The Captain, his crew/passengers and the Titanic itself
were all ill-prepared for an emergency:
   •Delayed SOS transmission
   •Inadequate training of staff and passengers
   •Inadequate number of lifeboats
                     Outline
I.     Principles of Integrated Emergency
       Management System (IEMS)

II.    Incident Command System (ICS)

III.   The National Incident Management System
       (NIMS)

IV.    Other useful concepts

V.     Exercise
             Learning Objectives

I.     Understand the Integrated Emergency Management
       System
II.    Understand the Incident Command System (ICS) in
       the context of Public Health
III.   Understand the five primary functions of the ICS.
IV.    Identify the elements of the ICS roles as well as the
       personal characteristics needed to fill the positions in
       both general and command staff.
V.     Understand the basics of the National Incident
       Management System and the relationship between
       ICS and NIMS
VI.    Develop a clear understanding of the Incident Action
       Plan (IAP), and its utility.
I.   Principles of Integrated
     Emergency Management
     System (IEMS)
           Integrated Emergency
                Management

Integration…

Act or process of bringing people or organizations
 together for a common cause or goal.
Why is it a challenge to manage a
group of people (whether in day to
day or emergency situations)?



 video
IEMS is a comprehensive plan which
  provides an overview of all that needs to
  be considered in managing from
  beginning to end:
  – BEFORE
  – DURING
and
  – AFTER an incident or event.
Integrated Emergency Management
        System = Blueprint
           IEMS
Emergency Management Phases


        Mitigation
        Preparedness
        Response
        Recovery
                    IEMS
                 Mitigation
Activities which actually eliminate or reduce the
chance of occurrence or the effects of an event.

Examples:
–   Vaccinations
–   Seat belts, air bags, antilock brakes
–   Tobacco/weight loss/health lifestyle programs
–   Careful and deliberate hazardous materials (“Hazmat”)
    routing and storage location

                       Risk Reduction
We do it all the time; we seldom
call it “mitigation.”




 video
                  IEMS
               Preparedness
Planning activities for an emergency or disaster
that work to increase available resources and to
more effectively respond.
Examples:
– Plan development
     BT, Mass Vaccination/Prophylaxis
– Training courses
     Employee and public education
– Exercises/Drills
     TOPOFF 2000 & 2003
     Identify weakness / Build on strengths
– SNS (Strategic National Stockpile)
                          IEMS
                         Response
Activities occurring during and immediately following
a disaster, designed to provide emergency assistance to
victims of the event and reduce the likelihood of
secondary damage.
Examples:
    HAN Alerts
    Public Announcements – Risk communication via media,
    web, phone centers
    Mobilization – Case investigations, increased surveillance
    Activate Systems/Plans (ICS, EOC, etc)
    Analysis of situation – Epidemiology activities
    Treatment – Vaccination/Prophylaxis
                       IEMS
                      Recovery
Activities required until all systems return
to normal, or near normal. (This phase may last
anywhere from a few hours to months or longer.)
Examples
• Case follow up
• Studies (lessons learned)
    • Assess impact on residents (E.g, Rocky Flats clean up
      monitoring, aftermath of 9/11)
    • Critiques and Debriefings (AAR –After Action Report)
• Environmental Clean up (Anthrax-DC,2001)
 IEMS Building Blocks

        Investing in resources

   Developing policy and procedure

Exercising             Identifying resource
                          requirements
Planning                     Training
      IEMS works because…
It is based upon basic management skills that
managers and leaders already know:
    Directing
    Organizing
    Coordinating
    Communicating
    Delegating
    Evaluating
                  IEMS
                 Summary

 Communication & coordination of multiple
 agencies is essential for effective response

 IEMS Is a 4 phase continuous cycle:
  – Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, Recovery


Fundamental principle:
   Agencies need to work together during an
              emergency/disaster.
      Integrated Emergency
       Management System

 Recovery            Resources
                                     Mitigation



   Organizations
                                 Individuals



Response                           Preparedness
                   Functions
           Reflection



What are the two most important
 points discussed here?
II. Incident Command System
              (ICS)
 Successful buildings
     require both
       a blueprint
           and
the tools with which to
          build.
Incident
Command
System
is the tool !
  Incident Command or Incident
          Management:
         what’s it called?
The original system is called incident
command; it emphasized one person as
being in command.
The whole system is more complex than
simply who is in command; command is
just one part of this MANAGEMENT
system.
         The name may vary…

                  SEMS

  NIMS

                              HEICS


ICS


          NIIMS           PHICS
but the basics of the tool remain the same…




   “a hammer is a hammer is a hammer…”
History/Background if ICS:


 Wildfires pushed the Fire Services’ need
 for a common incident management
 system.
FIRESCOPE* found:

  Lack of common organizational structures,
  terminologies.

  Poor on-scene and inter-agency communications.

  Inadequate joint planning.

  Lack of varied and timely intelligence.

  Inadequate resource management.
 *FIRESCOPE (FIrefighting RESources of California Organized for Potential Emergencies)
   The new system needed to :

Be Organizationally flexible
  Day-to-day use
  Standardized
  Cost effective
Make inter agency collaboration
possible
          What is an Incident?
An Incident is anything out of the ordinary day-
to-day activities that necessitates a response.

–   Emergencies and Disasters
–   Outbreaks
–   Vaccination Programs
–   Important meeting/conference
Natural disasters:
Human caused accidental disasters:
Human caused deliberate disasters…
Public health activities which could
benefit from the use of ICS:
  Supporting the deployment of the Strategic
  National Stockpile
  Conducting field investigations and monitoring
  of people
  Conducting surveillance and epidemiological
  studies
  Establishing a disease/exposure registry and
  monitoring long-term impacts
  Medical interventions/decontamination and
  recommendations
Public health activities which could
benefit from the use of ICS (continued):

  Establishing disease control and
  prevention measures
  Establishing and publicizing protective
  action guidelines
  Evaluation of the health and medical
  impact on the public and on emergency
  and medical personnel
  Communication with the public, policy
  makers, and the media
              ICS
 more Public Health Applications
Disease outbreaks
 – SARS, Meningitis, West Nile Virus,
   Hantavirus
Non-Outbreak Situations
 – Vaccinations (Smallpox, Flu), natural
   disasters
Food-borne illness
 – E. Coli, Salmonella, Giardia
Medical Emergencies
 – Anthrax, 9/11, transportation accidents, air
   quality
ICS = tool i.e., hammer
                    ICS as a tool

• For the command,
  control and coordination
  of resources during an
  activity and/or incident

• Consisting of procedures
  for organizing personnel,
  facilities, equipment, and
  communications during
  an activity and/or
  incident

                                    Merlin, 1999:2
  Reasons NOT to use ICS

Our
      –   Region
      –   Territory
      –   City
      –   County
      –   Area
      –   State
      –   Problem
      –   Situation

            Is not like everyone else
We are unique…
True: One size DOESN’T FIT ALL
But… size isn’t the only factor-
  purpose is also important
Questions to be asked…
What’s going on?
How large an event/incident is it?
How many people are responding?
What is the nature of the
 event/incident?
  –   Is it a fire?
  –   Is it a BT incident?
  –   Is it a state wide meeting?
  –   Is it a natural disaster?
 If the management system can be
adapted for the size and adapted for
          task, it will fit…

Each and every region is unique…
but
  – ICS is a system which is flexible and adaptable
  – ICS can become the standard to which we refer even
    as we tailor it for our own special situation…
  – ICS enables the most competent person to be in
    charge according to the nature of the situation.
          We need the BIG picture!




…with local applications
 and adaptations
          Reasons to use ICS
Mandated by Office of Homeland Security (in NIMS)

Establishes clear lines of authority and clear objectives

Removes emotion from the decision making process

Enables all “players” to have a voice at the table and thus
utilizes all available resources

Creates a safer work environment for response personnel
Homeland Security Presidential Directive
            HSPD-5 (2/28/03)
•To enhance the ability of the United States to
manage domestic incidents by establishing a
single, comprehensive National Incident
Management System (NIMS).

•To prevent, prepare for, respond to, and
recover from terrorist attacks, major disasters,
and other emergencies
              ICS
addresses challenges faced by all
         management-
     emergency or routine:
Establishing clear objectives and priorities
Clarifying the decision making process and
the allocation of resources
Minimizing direct reports and establishing
clear lines of authority
Facilitating effective communication
among all responders and with external
agencies
                ICS
              Elements
1.   Management by objectives
2.   Unity and chain of command
3.   Organizational flexibility
4.   Span of control
5.   Common terminology
6.   Personal accountability
7.   Integrated communication
8.   Resource management
          ICS
Five Management Functions


   Operations             Logistics


                Command

    Planning            Finance /
                      Administration
              ICS
   Functional Responsibilities
COMMAND          =Overall responsibility
OPERATIONS       =Carry out the plan
PLANNING         =Thinking, what’s
                  going to be needed in
                  hours/days to come
LOGISTICS     =   Provide support
FINANCE / ADMINISTRATION
             =    Tracking cost and
                  procurement
               ICS
     Incident Commander
Overall incident responsibility-(i.e......, individual
with the most experience with the particular
incident)q24
Determines the Public Health incident objectives
and strategy
– Objective(s): What can be accomplished during an
  operational period (24 hours)
– Strategy(s): What needs to be done (activities) to
  accomplish the objective.
Develops an organizational structure that can
effectively manage the incident
What are the advantages of having
one person in charge?




 video
               ICS
     Incident Commander
Within the first responder community the
initial Incident Commander is the first
person responding to the scene, who will
then be replaced as needed.q1
He or she will establish a command as
soon as possible, and set up an incident
command post (ICP).q3,4
            Span of control
Adequate span of
control drives the
expansion and
contraction of the       LEADER
IMS.
The optimum span
of control for       1   2   3   4   5
emergency response
is a ratio of 5:1.
Delegation as an element of span of
control is an essential ingredient for
the successful functioning of the
Incident Command System.


  demonstration
Many “hats” can lead to a confused manager!
What are the advantages of being
able to delegate to other competent
persons?
The Incident Command System is
flexible; it can expand or contract as
needed.
                            ICS
                     Organization & Roles
                         INCIDENT COMMANDER

                 INFORMATION OFFICER
                    SAFETY OFFICER
                    LIAISON OFFICER                                Primary Roles
OPERATIONS            PLANNING         LOGISTICS   FINANCE /
 SECTION               SECTION          SECTION      ADMIN.
                                                    SECTION

BRANCHES              RESOURCE UNITS   SERVICE     TIME UNIT
DIVISIONS             STIUATION UNIT   BRANCH      PROCUREMENT
GROUPS                DEMOB UNIT
                      DOCUMENTATION
                                       SUPPORT
                                       BRANCH
                                                        UNIT
                                                   COMPENSATION/   Roles Added
  STRIKE TEAMS              UNIT                     CLAIMS UNIT
  TASK FORCES
  SINGLE RESOURCES
                                                   COST UNIT
                                                                    As Needed
             ICS
  Expanding the Organization
             (Larger Events)

Task Forces and Strike Teams
Divisions and Groups
Emergency Operations Center
Unified Command
Joint Information Center
               ICS
            Command Staff
Information Officer
– Coordinates all information dissemination to
  the public q36,45
Safety Officer
– Anticipates, detects, and corrects unsafe
  situations q20
Liaison Officer
– Serves as contact point for representatives of
  assisting and cooperating agencies q14,44
When it comes to communication with
the public, for most of us…


We need to know how
 to politely introduce
 media members to
 our information
 officer.
               ICS
        Operations Section

Participates in the planning process
Operationalizes the strategy of the Incident
Action Plan
Accomplishes the incident objectives
          (Gets the work done!)
                   ICS
             Planning Section
Determines resource need, assess the situation q41
Gathers and analyzes data
– Surveillance, data collection
Provides situational information
– Geographic Information System (GIS), mapping,
  graphs
Estimates future probabilities
– Modeling
Prepares alternative strategies
– What’s next?
                 ICS
           Logistics Section
Acquires resources (personnel, equipment,
services, and support) q8
– Gets what’s needed
Obtains supplies (food, water, TP)
Manages internal communications equipment
Maintains equipment
            ICS
Finance/Administration Section
Provides financial management and
accountability q7
Authorizes expenditures
Maintains reimbursement records
Maintains injury, death and damage
documentation
Negotiates contracts with vendors
Tracks cost associated with mutual aid
agreements with other agencies
    Personal Characteristics Needed
                  by
     Command and General Staff
By considering qualities or characteristics, we
  develop valuable flexibility in filling these
  positions because:
        Incumbents may be away at the time of an incident (vacations,
        meetings, illness)
        Protracted incident time frames require multiple persons for
        each function
        The incident itself may disable some of the regular occupants
        of these roles
Incident commander should possess:
 Leadership ability
 Capacity to work collaboratively with
 peers and subordinates
 Capacity to delegate
 Content expertise about nature of the
 incident (i.e. fire vs. public health incident)
 Capacity to receive, integrate and correlate
 information
Command staff:
 Information officer:
  – Ability to communicate clearly
  – Familiarity with risk communication principles
  – Capacity to deal calmly with the media

 Safety officer:
  – Recognized expertise with hazards attendant on
    particular kinds of incidents
  – Ability to be forthright with the incident commander
Command staff continued:
 Liaison officer
  – Good working relationships with other ICS
    staff
  – Ability to work effectively with different
    groups
  – Ability to facilitate various groups working
    together
Command Staff
General Staff
                            ICS
                     Organization & Roles
                          INCIDENT COMMANDER
   Command                                            General Staff Positionsq11
    Staffq47     INFORMATION OFFICER
                    SAFETY OFFICER
                    LIAISON OFFICER




OPERATIONS            PLANNING            LOGISTICS       FINANCE /
 SECTION               SECTION             SECTION          ADMIN.
                                                           SECTION

BRANCHES              RESOURCE UNITS      SERVICE        TIME UNIT
DIVISIONS             STIUATION UNIT      BRANCH         PROCUREMENT
GROUPS                DEMOB UNIT          SUPPORT             UNIT
                      DOCUMENTATION q43   BRANCH         COMPENSATION/
  STRIKE TEAMS              UNIT   q34                     CLAIMS UNIT
  TASK FORCES                                            COST UNIT
  SINGLE RESOURCES
What qualities or characteristics
would be useful in:

  The liaison officer?
  The planning officer?
  The operations officer?
  The safety officer?
  The information officer?
  The logistics officer?
III. National Incident
  Management System
         (NIMS)
National Incident Management System

Provides a consistent nationwide approach
for Federal, State, tribal, and local
governments to work effectively and
efficiently together to prepare for, prevent,
respond to, and recover from domestic
incidents, regardless of cause, size, or
complexity.
NIMS: What It Is / What It’s Not
 NIMS is not…
 –An operational incident management plan
 –A resource allocation plan
 –A terrorism / WMD-specific plan
 –Designed to address international events
 NIMS is…
 –Core set of
     Doctrine
     Concepts
     Principles
     Terminology
     Organizational processes

 –Applicable to all hazards
    NIMS Key Concepts
Flexibility
–Applicable regardless of cause, size,
 location, complexity
Standardization
–Key to interoperability
NIMS Compliance Requirements
  All Federal department and agencies
  required to adopt
  Adoption an eligibility requirement for
  Federal preparedness assistance to State
  & local governments
       Compliance continued…
FY 2005 State and local organizations must adopt NIMS
to receive Federal preparedness assistance (through grants,
contracts, and other activities)
By October 1, 2004 NIMS Integration Center will publish
standards, guidelines, and compliance protocols for
determining whether a Federal, State, tribal, or local entity
is compliant
Short term compliance is possible by adopting the basic
tenets of the Incident Command System
Other components require additional development and
refinement to enable future compliance (e.g. data and
communications systems interoperability)
The NIMS Integration Center, will publish on an ongoing
basis, additional standards, guidelines, and compliance
protocols for those aspects of the NIMS not yet fully
developed
         Command Types
Single Command Incident Commander —
Incident occurs in a single jurisdiction with no
jurisdictional or functional agency overlap.
Unified Command (UC) — Used when incidents
involve more than one political jurisdiction,
multiple agencies within a jurisdiction, or several
political and functional agencies.
Area Command - Oversees the management of
multiple incidents handled by a separate ICS
organization or a very large incident that involves
multiple ICS organizations, such as incidents that
are non-site specific, geographically dispersed, or
evolve over longer periods of time, (e.g. a bio
terror event).
        New ICS Component
 Information and intelligence function
Intelligence includes not only national
security or other types of classified
information but also other operational
information, such as risk assessments,
medical intelligence (i.e. surveillance),
weather information, geospatial data,
structural designs, toxic contaminant
levels, utilities and public works data, etc.,
that may come from a variety of different
sources.
Information and intelligence function


The intelligence and information
function may be organized in one of
the following ways:
 – Within the Command Staff
 – Branch within the Planning Section
 – Branch within the Operations Section
 – Separate General Staff
Multiagency Coordination Systems -
            elements
  Emergency Operations Center
  Multiagency Coordination Entities
  –crisis action teams
  –policy committees
  –incident management group
  –executive teams
       Command and Management
       Public Information Systems
System and Components
–Joint Information System (JIS)
   Includes developing and delivering coordinated
   messages and supporting decision maker
–Joint Information Center (JIC)
   Must include representatives of each jurisdiction,
   agency, private sector, and non-governmental
   organization involved
   Single JIC location is preferable
   Procedures and protocols to communicate and
   coordinate effectively with other JICs, and other
   appropriate components of the ICS organization
             Preparedness
          Concepts & Principles

Implemented through a continuous cycle of
planning, training, equipping, exercising,
evaluating, and taking action to correct and
mitigate.

Preparedness requires a unified approach.
(“one plan, one team…”)
NIMS provides or establishes processes for
providing guidelines; protocols; standards for
planning, training, qualifications and
certification; and publication management.
National-level preparedness standards related to
the NIMS will be maintained and managed
through a multijurisdictional, multidiscipline
center, using a collaborative process.
Mitigation activities are important elements of
preparedness.
           Preparedness
             Planning

Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)
Procedures
Preparedness Plans - “Getting prepared”
includes identifying and meeting training
needs (based on expectations the EOP has
outlined.
Corrective Action and Mitigation Plans
Recovery Plans
   This should sound familiar:
           it’s IEMS!

 Recovery            Resources
                                     Mitigation



   Organizations
                                 Individuals



Response                           Preparedness
                   Functions
                Preparedness
      Mutual Aid Agreements

The means for one jurisdiction to provide
 resources, facilities, services, and other
 required support to another jurisdiction
 during an incident.
              Preparedness
   Publications Management

Includes development of naming and
numbering conventions; review and
certification of publications; methods for
publications control; identification of
sources and suppliers for publications and
related services; and management of
publication distribution.
Managed by NIMS Integration Center.
    Resource Management
Primary tasks:
 –establishing systems
 –for describing, inventorying, requesting,
  and tracking resources
 –activating those systems prior to, during,
  and after an incident
 –dispatching resources prior to, during,
  and after an incident
 –deactivating or recalling resources during
  or after incidents
     Resource Management—
            processes
Identifying and typing resources
Certifying and credentialing personnel
Inventorying resources
Identifying resource requirements
Ordering and acquiring resources
Tracking and reporting resources
Mobilizing resources
Recovering resources
Reimbursing
Communications & Information
      Management

  Principal goals:

  The establishment and maintenance
   of
   –a common operating picture
   –ensuring accessibility and
    interoperability
  Communications & Information
        Management
     Concepts & Principles
Common operating picture accessible
across jurisdictions and functional agencies
–allows incident managers at all levels
 to make effective, consistent decisions
 in a timely manner
–ensures consistency at all levels of
 incident management
Common communications and data
standards
     Communications & Information
             Management
Incident Management &Communications
NIMS Integration Center is responsible for
 Interoperability Standards meeting following design
 goals:
  – Incident notification/situation report
  – Status reporting
  – Analytical data
  – Geospatial information
  – Wireless communications
  – Identification and Authentication
  – National database of incident reports
Ongoing Management & Maintenance

   HSPD-5) requires the Secretary of
   Homeland Security to establish a
   mechanism for ensuring the ongoing
   management and maintenance of the
   NIMS.
   DHS will establish a multi-
   jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary NIMS
   Integration Center.
Ongoing Management & Maintenance
   Concepts and Principles
All users and stakeholders—including
various levels of government, functional
disciplines, and private entities are given
the opportunity to participate in NIMS
Integration Center activities.
Process relies heavily on lessons learned
from actual incidents, training and
exercises, as well as recognized best-
practices across jurisdictions and functional
disciplines.
     Ongoing Management &
    Maintenance Responsibilities

A national program for NIMS education and
awareness
The definition of general training requirements
and the development of national-level training
standards and course curricula.
The development and publication of national
standards, guidelines, and protocols for the
qualification and certification of emergency
responder and incident management personnel.
 Ongoing Management & Maintenance
    Responsibilities – continued…

The establishment of standards for the performance,
compatibility, and interoperability of incident
management equipment.
The development of national standards for resource
typing.
The development and publication of materials and
standardized templates to support implementation and
continuous refinement of the NIMS.
IV. Other Useful Concepts
Some further concepts / terms:


 Transfer of responsibility
 Universal responsibilities
 Incident Action Plan
 more on Unified Command
 Incident Command Center /Emergency
 Operations Center
     Transfer of Responsibility
The last task you should always complete before you go
 home, is to brief both your supervisor and the individual
                      replacing youq17
Situation statusq25
Objectives and priorities
Current organizational structureq25
Resource assignmentsq25
Resources en route and/or orderedq25
Facilities established
Communications plan
Prognosis, concerns, safety mattersq25
   Universal Responsibilities
Before:
– Locate and read your own agency’s emergency
  response plan
– Know the location of your agency’s emergency
  operations center
– Identify your own BT competencies and shortfalls and
  identify training needed to get up to speed
– Be aware of the role you agency expects you to play
– Maintain any BT equipment in your possession in
  working condition
                     ICS
           Universal Responsibilities

As an event occurs:
  Receive assignment from your agency
  Upon arrival at site, review the Incident Action Plan *
  Bring any specialized supplies or equipment
      Remember Photo ID!
      A pair of gloves
  Follow check-in procedures
  Use clear language; avoid jargon and acronyms.
       Incident Action Plan

Essential & integral element of IMS
Usually written
Contains measurable objectives
Specifies assignments which need
completion to accomplish objectives
Specifies all activated organizational
elements
                  ICS
       Universal Responsibilities


During an event:
 Keep subordinates and supervisors informed
 Complete required forms
                 ICS
       Universal Responsibilities
After an event:
  Demobilization (clean up)
  Participate in the After Action Report
  (AAR) and determine lessons learned
  Implement lessons learned from AAR
  Train in areas of weakness
  Replenish supplies/equipment
           Unified Command
Integrates all agencies into the incident action plan
and command structure.

Involves all participating agencies and organizations;
every unit is represented in the top tier of the
command structure.

Utilizes objectives and work plans of all involved
agencies in a consolidated Incident Action Plan.

Emphasizes (and demands!) teamwork and shared
leadership.
          Unified command
Requires well established and extremely
skilled communications infrastructure
Addresses the coordination and utilization
of the specific capabilities and resources of
each organization involved
   (An assessment of these resources prior to any
     incident is imperative)
Unified Command – its advantages:
 A single shared set of objectives
 Utilizes personnel and resources most effectively
 and compensates for deficiencies in any single
 agency
 Reduces duplication of efforts; maximizes
 results for energy and resources expended.
 Facilitates coordination and information
 exchange
 Facilitates understanding perspectives of
 participating agencies
             Summary Statement
Management using
NIMS/ICS is not primarily
an issue of who is in charge;
rather, it is a method by
which all responders can
best work together
to achieve the desired
outcomes.

    •Command
    •Control
    •Collaboration
EOC vs. Incident Command Post

 EOC:                                  ICP:
  – Pre-defined location                – Identified by first
  – Prepared in advance                   responder at time of
    with necessary                        event
    equipment,                          – More “portable”, i.e.,
    communications                        car, engine, a room
    capabilities, and                     adjacent to scene
    resources                           – Designated by the
                                          name of the
                                          incidentq31
Every agency should have an identified EOC as a part of its emergency
          plan; the ICP is determined as the event unfolds.
          Some Potential
Communication/Collaboration Pathways
                 Law
              Enforcement    State     Federal
                             OEM

     Fire                   Public
              Regional
                            Works      State
               EOC                     Health

               Health        Public     Lab
   EMS
               EOC           Health
                                         Clinic/
                                         Office
   Hospital                 Hospital
               Hospital
     ‘X’                      ‘Z’
                 ‘Y’
                     Conclusion:

• The question is not…
    Who is in charge?

• The question is:
  How can all
  responders work
  together for the
  best results?
           Reflection


What is the biggest challenge you
  face in implementing IEMS
        ICS/NIMS in your
          organization?
   Questions to take home with you:
• How would you know that the ICS system has
   been put into place within your agency?

• If you are out of your office and an
  emergency arises, how do you get information
  about it?
• What role(s) would you feel personally
  prepared to fill?

• What role(s) would your agency see you
   filling?
              Questions Cont..
What role(s) would your agency need to ask
other agencies to fill, i.e., where are mutual aid
agreements needed?

What piece(s) of communication equipment do
you still need training on?

Where is your EOC located?

Does your agency have a designated Emergency
Response Coordinator and do you know who it
is?
               For More Information:

                         The Media & You
   A booklet designed to help you tell your public health story to any
reporter.It can help you survive one of the most stressful experiences of
                your professional life - a media interview.
                 http://www.nphic.org/media_guide.htm

     National Interagency Incident Management System (NIIMS):
           http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/operations/niims.shtml

              Incident Command System, NY State Site:
           http://www.nysemo.state.ny.us/ICS/explain.htm
           For More Information:
           Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS):
                 http://www.emsa.cahwnet.gov/Dms2/heics3.htm

                    ICS, a site with textbooks, forms, etc…
                            http://www.wildlandfire.net/

            Incident Command System, US Coast Guard Site:
                 http://www.uscg.mil/hq/gm/mor/Articles/ICS.htm

                                  Firescope
                          http://www.firescope.org/


Emergency Preparedness: Core Competencies for all Public Health Workers
      http://www.nursing.hs.columbia.edu/institute-centers/chphsr/btcomps.html

                             Glossary of terms:
                  http://www.acadia.net/mdisar/icsgloss.html
FEMA websites:
  Homepage
  http://www.fema.gov/

   General educational opportunities
http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/crslist.asp

   ***To take the FEMA ICS certification test:
http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is195.asp
The full text of the NIMS document
issued on March 1, 2004 is available
at: http:
www.dhs.gov/interweb/assetlibrary/
NIMS-90-web.pdf
For more information about this
presentation, you may contact:
  Don Sutton, PhD
  don.sutton@rmpdc.org
  (303)739-1206

								
To top