VPRI STRATEGIC PLAN PRESENTATION - PowerPoint

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					January 24, 2008

VPRI
STRATEGIC PLAN PRESENTATION
               Introduction
• Strategic Planning Process
  – Mission Statement
  – Objectives
  – Goals
  – Action Plan
  – Gathering Background Information
  – Strategic Planning Committee
  – Resources
                            Goals
• Create the vision that supports SRC activities
   – Advance the University’s SRC Agenda through creation of
     endowed chairs, support of PDF activities, support and
     development of infrastructure and space, and research
     collaborations
• Invest in new funding opportunities and maximizing the
  SRC output of the institution
   – Work to actively encourage an increase in the proportion of
     Faculty engaged in SRC
   – Develop new sources of research funding
• Advance SRC among different communities
   – Provide additional opportunities for collaboration within
     Ryerson and through external partnerships
                Goals Continued…
• Propel our ideas and innovations into the community,
  industry and marketplace
   – Promote knowledge transfer and commercialization
   – Rationalize IP policies and provide additional opportunities for
     researchers to dock with commercial enterprises
• Increase Ryerson’s impact nationally and internationally
   – Work to develop partnerships to build Ryerson’s research
     footprint
                Goals Continued…
• Continue to invest in the development of our
  undergraduate and graduate programs
   – Work to align the vision of the VPRI with that Provost in building
     an integrated strategic plan that recognized Research as central
     to the University Mission
• Reputation Building
   – Work to attract research prizes, awards and fellowship to
     enhance the profile of Ryerson within the research community
   – Examine collaborations with University Advancement and
     Faculties to forward the SRC goals and celebrate successes
• Public advocacy on research and building relations
   – Work with Government, Community and Industrial stakeholders
     to advocate for Ryerson’s research aspirations
                Goals Continued…
• Create a vision and administrative structure that supports
  SRC activities
   – Build the operational infrastructure with sufficient capacity to
     promote and encourage growth of Ryerson’s SRC goals
• Measure our progress and adjust policies as needed
   – Benchmark against accepted metrics to ensure that the VPRI is
     delivering on its stated goals and initiatives
               Consultations
• The VPRI will be consulting with academic,
  community, and external stakeholders in
  developing the strategic plan
• The plan will recognize the unique strengths of
  Faculties
January 24, 2008

THE INTERNATIONALIZATION OF
RYERSON’S SCHOLARLY, RESEARCH AND
CREATIVE ACTIVITIES
             OIA Mandate

The Office of International Affairs (OIA) works
within the University community to
strengthen Ryerson’s international
partnerships and expand the range of
overseas experiences for students and faculty.
    Context - Internationalization

• Internationalization is becoming increasingly
  important to Canadian institutions
  – As of 2006, 95% of universities reference the
    international dimension in their strategic planning
    documents, as compared to 84% in 2000 (AUCC)
  – Canadian universities are increasingly backing
    their interest in internationalization with concrete
    measures and investments
        Why internationalize?
• Prepare internationally knowledgeable
  graduates
• Build strategic alliances abroad
• Promote curricular innovation & program
  diversity
• Ensure research and scholarship address
  international and national issues
• Respond to Canada’s labour market needs
         International Research
              Collaboration
• As of 2003, only 3.6% of world knowledge came from
  Canada (0.5 % of the world’s population) –
  Emphasizing the point that Canadian researchers
  need to be part of international networks
• No longer sole domain of natural sciences and
  engineering
• Shift from individual researcher collaborations
  towards collaboration stemming from specific
  priorities and strengths of institutions
          Barriers to undertaking
          international research

1.   Setting clear and strategic priorities
2.   Involving faculty members
3.   Securing financial support
4.   Coordinating government involvement
5.   Sharing knowledge among institutions
 OIA’s support for the development of
        the VPRI’s Strategic Plan
• Work with the Faculties to collect data on
  their strategic objectives for the
  internationalization of SRC activities
• Inform the work and decisions to be made by
  the Strategic Planning Committee, through the
  collection of data and information as needed
 OIA’s support for the development of
        the VPRI’s Strategic Plan
• Inform the Strategic Planning Committee of
  Federal and Provincial Government priorities
  for international research collaboration and
  match these with the SRC strengths at
  Ryerson, and relevant funding opportunities
• Identify strategic Canadian and international
  partners to pursue funded international SRC
  opportunities
                     OIA
• Marsha McEachrane-Mikhail, Director, OIA
  and International Liaison Officer
  – (416) 979-5000 x-6995
  – mmceachr@ryerson.ca
  – www.ryerson.ca/oia
January 24, 2008

OFFICE OF RESEARCH SERVICES
                  Objective
• Provide administrative support services for
  SRC to internal and external stakeholders
• E.g.
  – Review and assistance in preparation of proposals
  – Financial processing, monitoring and reporting
  – Seed programs
  – Research statistics
                 Motivation
• Help faculty members achieve their SRC goals

• Advance and protect the reputation of the
  University

• Fulfill our contractual obligations
                 Landscape
• Increased competition for external dollars

• Increased complexity in the management of
  awards – “Accountability”
                    Goals
• A plan that will simultaneously allow us to
  grow our SRC income and lessen the burden
  on faculty
         Supporting the Vision
• Provision of background materials and
  statistics
• Consultation with counterpart offices at other
  universities
            Key components
• Increased support for the development of
  proposals
• Improved systems and better use of existing
  systems
• Streamlining of processes
• Appropriate balance between local and
  central administrative supports
                      ORS
• Robert Dirstein
  – (416) 979-5000 x-7609
  – dirstein@ryerson.ca
January 24, 2008

INDUSTRIAL LIAISON AND
COMMERCIALIZATION
                  Objective
• To support Ryerson’s research agenda by
  promoting knowledge transfer and
  commercialization of SRC outputs
• To foster relationships with industrial partners
  and create a collaborative environment in
  support of research and innovation efforts
                  Motivation
• Ontario universities and colleges have world class
  researchers and facilities – capability exists to
  conduct research
• There are many excellent sector-specific
  programs and supports for research initiatives…
  Auto21, MaRS, OCE…
• There exists a gap in translating new ideas
  efficiently to into innovative, economically viable
  products – requires the right people and an
  appropriate forum
       Importance of Innovation
• Example Situation:
  – If Canadian industry wants to compete on price alone,
    then LCCs (Low Cost Countries) will win
  – But if our industry can continuously come up with new
    products, processes and services that meet market
    demand, we have the “first to market” advantage over
    LCCs
• Answer:
  – We need to drive the innovation agenda and do it at
    several levels simultaneously
                 Landscape
• The Federal Government has been developing
  its innovation strategy since 2002, aiming to
  "move Canada to the front ranks of the
  world's most innovative countries"
• In 2007 the Federal Government issued its
  S&T Strategy, stressing that "For Canadians to
  enjoy a high quality of life and standard of
  living, we must improve our productivity and
  competitiveness through innovation."
Canada’s Ranking
Most recently, Canada's report card on
innovation was released and
prominently publicized in the media.
The Conference Board, a not-for-profit,
economic think-tank based in Ottawa
gave Canada a grade of "D" in
innovation, ranked 14th out of 17 OECD
countries concluded that "Innovation is
centrally important to Canada's
competitiveness and sustainable
prosperity, but our performance is
woefully inadequate."
                  Summary
• Canada’s productivity and competitiveness are
  falling
• Social Innovation – the focus of a great deal of
  Canada’s R&D investment – is strong and is
  respected world-wide, but difficult to quantify
  $ results
• Our entrepreneurial culture is weak
• Canada’s Innovation Eco-System is complex,
  but needs to be understood by participants
                    Solution
• The gap between R and D can prove
  insurmountable leaving great ideas to languish
• We are working to develop a plan that will fill this
  conceptual gap with a new innovation
  methodology that provides guidance in navigating
  the move from lab to market
• The result will be a new methodology with
  foundations in both academia and business for
  collecting the outputs of research and creative
  endeavours and getting them to market quickly
                     Goals
• To build within Ryerson the premier Innovation
  and Commercialization framework in Canada
• To develop new means and methods of
  innovation and commercialization
• To construct the much needed translation
  apparatus to take the excellent outputs of
  Ryerson SRC and turn them into commercially
  viable processes, systems and products
• To improve Ontario’s competitiveness
                  Synergy
• The objective will not be to set the research
  agenda, but to provide a concrete avenue for
  implementing research outputs
• Industry, Academia and Government will act
  in an advisory capacity to ensure a
  collaborative environment – a synergy of
  purpose
• Across-the-board support of VPRI Strategic
  Plan
           Commercialization
• Steven Martin
  – (416) 979-5000 x-2792
  – steven.martin@ryerson.ca
January 24, 2008

RESEARCH INTEGRITY AND
PARTNERSHIPS
           Academic Integrity
University research is governed by policies
and practices that ensure the protection of:
• research participants
• faculty, student or staff researcher
• the University
• the public
   Creating a Culture of Research
              Integrity
Develop and oversee research integrity and
 compliance programs for:
• Research involving humans
• Research involving animals
• Research involving controlled goods
                   Role
• Consultation with faculty and students
• Educating and motivating the Ryerson
  community
• School of Graduate Studies support
• Advice and outreach to senior management
• Networking with integrity community
• Development of Research partnerships
• Introduction of SRC Integrity Policy
Contribution to Goals and Action Plan
• Create the vision that supports SRC activities
• Advance SRC among different communities
• Propel our ideas and innovations into the
  community, industry and marketplace
• Reputation Building
• Public advocacy on research and building
  relations
           Research Integrity
• Alex Karabanow
  – (416) 979-5000 x-7112
  – alex.karabanow@ryerson.ca