Strategic Plan – Dixie State College of Utah by pcu17276

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									 Dixie State College of Utah
  STRATEGIC PLAN
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
       August 27, 2007




              1
                       Strategic Plan – Executive Summary
                            Dixie State College of Utah
                                                      May 30, 2007



Introduction: The Importance of Addressing Regional Needs
Dixie State College‘s mission statement makes clear that the College functions both as an agent of the state
and as a servant of the community. As an agent of the state, the College functions within the Utah System
of Higher Education, ―authorized by the Utah State Board of Regents‖ (DSC mission statement). The
College enthusiastically accepts the roles the state has assigned and duly heeds the state‘s directives. The
College‘s mission statement confirms that it will ―responsibly [use] public funds to meet the state‘s needs.‖
However, in its assigned role as a servant to Washington and Kane Counties, the College is eager to
identify and fulfill regional economic and educational needs. The following excerpts from the College‘s
mission statement illustrate the College‘s commitment to engage the community and meet local needs:
            DSC is committed to accountability and creativity in delivering quality higher educational
            opportunities within its service area.
            DSC will cooperate with the local community, region, and state to identify and meet the demands of
            business and industry. The college will provide leadership and support to economic development.
            DSC also contributes to the quality of life and economic development of the community and the
            state. Local citizens and alumni will enjoy educational, economic, cultural, and recreational
            opportunities provided by DSC that enhance the community‘s quality of life. They will feel
            ownership and pride in the College, sustaining it through donations and promoting it among their
            associations.
            DSC will invite members of the community with varying preparation for higher education, reaching
            out to under-represented populations, and meeting individuals‘ needs with offerings ranging from
            developmental education to an honors program.
In its mission statement, fulfillment of regional need is a central theme – expressed as perhaps the College‘s
most important function. DSC‘s mission reflects the Board of Regents‘ statements printed in its ―Highlights
of the Utah System of Higher Education Master Plan 2000: A commitment to the People of Utah.‖ In this
document, the Regents provided the underlying principles for higher education in Utah, with the following
primary objective: ―Education and training of students is our foremost priority‖ (p. i). In addition, the
Regents recognized that colleges and universities would need to refine their missions and roles in order to
contribute significantly to the economic development, competitiveness, and quality of life of Utah‘s citizens.
 In order to accomplish its objectives for higher education in the state, the Board of Regents‘ stated in the
Master Plan 2000 a commitment to respond to citizens‘ needs. Of all regions in Utah, Dixie State‘s service
region has undergone perhaps the most drastic transformation in recent years, leading the state in both
economic and population growth. Within the span of twenty years, the population has more than
quadrupled from about 37,000 to over 140,000. As the region‘s economic complexity brings new industry
demand, the region‘s educational attainment has not kept pace. For example, the 2000 census shows that
Southwest Utah‘s baccalaureate attainment among 25- to 34-year-olds lags far below the state average,
and the baccalaureate completion rate in large metropolitan counties is nearly twice that of Southwest
Utah1.
For many years, community leaders in Southwestern Utah have expressed alarm about what they saw as a
growing disjuncture between educational offerings and local needs. In 1997, a group of community leaders
developed a long-range, comprehensive economic strategic plan for Washington County. One of the



1   See ―Educational Attainment Slips in Utah‖ in the Salt Lake Tribune, 8 August 2006.

                                                           -2-
strategic goals listed at that time was to ―Establish Dixie College as a Four-Year College.‖ In the decade
since that original plan was developed, each successive draft of the county‘s economic development plan
has called for increased attention to local needs, including both baccalaureate degrees and technical
training. A goal in the 2003 version was to ―convince the Board of Regents of continued need for additional
baccalaureate degrees to be offered by Dixie State College of Utah,‖ and the 2007 draft plan includes these
goals: ―Promote the need for additional baccalaureate degrees to be offered by Dixie State College of Utah‖
and ―Involve, align and coordinate technical programs with Dixie State College of Utah and the Washington
County School District and the Dixie Applied Technology College.‖
This document lays out in outline form the strategic plan of Dixie State College of Utah, including attention to
four themes: a) the academic plan, b) the enrollment plan, c) the campus master plan, and d) the financial
plan.

DSC’s Strategic Academic Plan
The College is committed to providing quality educational programs that meet students‘ needs and the
needs of the local and regional economy. Those programs, as the mission statement explains, are at three
levels:
            DSC offers associate degrees and certificate programs that meet the needs of students, the
            community and the state. The College also offers baccalaureate programs in high demand areas
            and in core or foundational areas consistent with four-year colleges.
The College has a history of providing quality associate- and certificate-level programs. More recently, it has
developed a number of high quality baccalaureate programs. The College will continue to offer quality
programs at these levels. Also, the College will expand programming to address the growing regional
needs.
Among the most important needs that must be addressed are those of the Washington County School
District, which is projected to grow from its current 24,000 students to 31,000 in just three years. The district
must hire 1,200 additional teachers by the year 2015, and current and projected supply and demand
patterns suggest that the district will have particular need for teachers in math, biology, English, music, and
early childhood education. For the past several years, over twenty percent of teachers have retired, and this
pattern is expected to continue. The College will respond to these needs.
Large regional employers also have unmet need for educational service, including Intermountain
Healthcare, which projects that it will hire 3500 new employees by 2010, and SkyWest, the nation‘s largest
Regional Airline, with more than 18,000 employees. In Southwest Utah, local high tech and biotech start-up
companies and providers for at-risk and troubled youth likewise express need for educated employees, and
Forbes Magazine recently rated St. George as number one in job growth among the ―Best Small Places for
Business‖2.
Responding to these needs, the College will create academic programs in three cluster areas: 1) Business
and Technology, 2) Health Care and Public Safety, and 3) Education. These clusters cover a
comprehensive set of needs identified for the dramatic growth and on-going development in Washington
and Kane Counties. Included within the Business and Technology cluster are the College‘s current
associate and baccalaureate-level programs in business, computer information technology, and technology.
To these, the College will add baccalaureate degrees in accounting, health care management, computer
science, aviation management, and communication leadership. Included within the education cluster are the
College‘s current elementary education and biology and English baccalaureate degrees. To these, the
College will add degrees in math, fine arts, social sciences, and family life, as well as associate degrees for
education paraprofessional. Included within the Health Science and Public Safety cluster are the College‘s
current certificate, associate, and baccalaureate programs in nursing, medical radiography, and dental



2   See http://www.forbes.com/lists/2006/5/Rank_1.html.



                                                          -3-
hygiene. To these, the College will add degrees for respiratory therapy assistants, and medical lab
technologists, physical therapy assistants.
 (See Program Clusters graphic below, and see a detailed description of the Strategic Academic Plan, page
10 below.)




DSC’s Strategic Enrollment Plan
What kinds of students will enroll in the academic programs in the academic plan above? Where will
students come from, and what will be their academic and demographic profiles?
The College‘s overall strategic enrollment goal is to meet Southwest Utah‘s need for an educated workforce,
and meeting these needs will require that enrollments grow. The College‘s enrollments will grow
significantly because of three trends: First, significant population growth in DSC‘s service region will lead to
increased headcount and FTE, almost regardless of what the College does. Second, the College will
develop academic programs and outreach services that address currently unmet needs for higher education
that exist in identifiable segments of the population. If DSC cannot provide an attractive range of certificate,
associate, and baccalaureate offerings, the currently unmet regional need for higher education will continue
or worsen. And third, the College will retain students at a higher rate.
Enrollment is often described as a ―pipeline.‖ The College will meet its overall strategic enrollment goal by
focusing on three broad phases of the enrollment pipeline – the Input Phase, the Maintenance Phase, and
the Output Phase. In the first enrollment phase, students come into the educational pipeline. In the second
enrollment phase, students flow through the pipeline of the College‘s academic programs. In the final

                                                      -4-
enrollment phase, students complete their academic programs and leave the institution having fulfilled their
goals.
The following discusses enrollment goals related to these three phases.

 Enrollment Input Factors (i.e., getting new students into the pipeline):

                                                                      Current     Yearly      Yearly      Yearly
                                                                      Status,     Goal,       Goal,       Goal,
           Factor                          Description
                                                                       2006-      2007-       2008-       2009-
                                                                       2007        2008        2009        2010

                                    Number of new freshman
     1. New Freshman
                                  students enrolled fall term as       1,339       1366        1448        1549
        Students
                                     measured at third week.



                                Total full-time equivalent students
     2. Overall FTE              at DSC as of third-week in fall       3,982       4062        4305        4650
                                                term.



                                  The headcount of all enrolled
     3. Total Headcount          students as of third week of fall     5,967       6086        6573        7165
                                              term.



                                    Unduplicated headcount of
     4. Non-Traditional            degree-seeking students 25
                                                                       1034        1241        1489        1787
        Headcount               through 64 years of age, as of 3rd
                                        week in fall Term

                                   Percent of Total Headcount:         17.3%       20.4%      22.7%       24.9%



                                   The headcount of non-white
     5. Ethnic Headcount         students as of third week of fall      531         616         715        829
                                              term.

                                   Percent of Total Headcount:         8.9%        10.1%      10.9%       11.6%



 Enrollment Maintenance Factors (i.e., keeping new students in the pipeline):

                                                                      Current     Yearly      Yearly      Yearly
                                                                      Status,     Goal,       Goal,       Goal,
           Factor                          Description
                                                                       2006-      2007-       2008-       2009-
                                                                       2007        2008        2009        2010




                                                    -5-
                             Number of New Freshman who
    6. First- to Second-
                             Return for the Subsequent Fall                  629      676      753
       Year Retention
                             Term, as of third week fall term.

                                   Percentage increase:           43.4%     47.0%    49.5%    52.0%



                                FTE generated by courses
                              numbered at 3000 and above
    7. Number of Upper-
                               divided by FTE genrated by          301       350      405      470
       Division FTE
                             courses numbered at 2999 and
                             below, as of third week fall term.

                                 Percentage of total FTE:          7.6%     8.6%     9.4%     10.1%



    8. Headcount of           Number of students who have
       Declared              declared majors in one of DSC's
                                                                   460       534      619      718
       Baccalaureate        approved baccalaureate degrees,
       Degree Majors            as of third week fall term.



                              Number of students who have
                             declared majors in one of DSC's
    9. Headcount of
                               approved discipline-specific
       Declared Non-
                              associate degrees, as of third       867       919      974     1033
       General Associate
                              week fall term (AAS, AB, APE,
       Degree Majors
                             ACJ, etc. -- all associate degrees
                                   except AA and AS).



Enrollment Output Factors (i.e., students leaving the pipeline upon completion):

                                                                  Current   Yearly   Yearly   Yearly
                                                                  Status,   Goal,    Goal,    Goal,
          Factor                       Description
                                                                   2006-    2007-    2008-    2009-
                                                                   2007      2008     2009     2010

                                 The Percent of a Cohort
    10. Completion within   beginning Six Years Previous who
                                                                  34.0%     35.0%    36.0%    37.0%
        Six Years           have completed their associate or
                                 baccalaureate degrees.



                              Number of students awarded
    11. Certificates
                              certificates of one year or less     404       412      433      454
        Awarded
                                during the academic year.




                                                 -6-
                                   Number of students awarded
     12. Associate
                                 associate degrees (AS, AA, AAS)           809         825          858            901
         Degrees Awarded
                                    during the academic year.



                                   Number of students awarded
     13. Baccalaureate
                                   bachelor‘s degrees during the           141         164          190            220
         Degrees Awarded
                                         academic year.



                                    Increase the Percentage of
                                 Persons in DSC‘s Service Region
     14. Service Region
                                 (Washington and Kane Counties)
         Educational                                                      16.8%       17.4%       18.1%       18.9%
                                     Aged 24 – 35 Who Have a
         Attainment
                                 Bachelor‘s Degree, as reported by
                                        the Census Bureau.




DSC’s Campus Master Plan
The College will develop the facilities that will allow it to meet Southwest Utah‘s dynamic need for an
educated workforce. Working with nationally known architects and master planning consultants, the College
is completing a master plan that will be presented to Regents in September 2007.

If enrollment growth follows a similar trajectory to that projected for the service region‘s general population,
the campus could be the most densely populated campus in the western United States. With roughly one
hundred acres, the campus is currently land locked by well established residential and commercial
developments.

Following are goals in the emerging campus master plan:

    1. Land acquisition: The College will evaluate land acquisitions to accommodate future housing,
       sports, and recreation needs, for the possible remote location of parking, and for selected
       academic needs.
    2. Strengthening the academic core: The College will focus the next ten years of academic and
       student life capital development in the area of the core academic campus along the north and west
       portions of the Heartland Campus.
    3. Campus entry: The campus entry will remain on 700 East. A new academic and administration
       building will be designed to further reinforce the sense of entry, address, and gateway to the
       Fountain Quadrangle and the campus.
    4. Parking: The College will initiate a traffic study to confirm the parking needs for the short and long
       term, including analysis of the campus flow and the traffic flow intensity on surrounding
       neighborhood streets and intersections. The College will implement a new parking structure
       accessed from 700 East, providing parking for the Academic Core, the Arts Center, and campus
       and public uses to the south. The College will maintain the parking at the Eccles Fine Arts Center
       at the corner of 700 East and 100 South, providing views of the Arts Center as a key link between
       the campus and the community.
    5. Housing: The College will initiate planning strategies for student housing – planning that
       incorporates academic, social, economic, and student life concerns. This plan will describe the
       type and quantities of housing accommodations, including those for married and single students,
       the locations of the housing and its integration with campus life, and means for financing.


                                                      -7-
    6. Sports and recreation: As the campus population grows and the College enters NCAA
       competition, the College will respond to the greater need for sports and recreation facilities and
       open playing, practice, and recreation fields. The College will consider moving some sports
       venues out of the core campus area by forming partnerships with the city and the county for shared
       venues.

DSC’s Strategic Financial Plan
Historical Perspective:
When DSC was granted the mission change to provide baccalaureate programs, funding to make the
change was not provided to the institution.
While the reasons for the funding shortfall can be debated, the deficit should not be. Calculations using
funding models based on Institutional Credit Hour Equivalents, (ICHE), shows the amount of the shortfall to
be $6,533,500 for the FY 2005-06 funding year.
Financial Plan:
In order to cover this shortfall and to provide for balanced expansion, Dixie State College has implemented
a financial plan that has two major components:
    1. Raise tuition over three years (2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009). The target rate is the
       WICHE average for four-year institutions. (This benchmark is open for review as soon as the
       College and the Commissioner‘s staff agree upon an appropriate peer group for the institution.)
             a. The College raised tuition by 31.5% in FY 2006-07
             b. The College raised tuition by 9% in FY 2007-08
         This leaves the College with a significant anticipated increase for the FY 2008-09 in order to come
         up to the WICHE average.
    2. Seek legislative support for the remaining $4,539,200 not covered by tuition increases to provide
       for the critical mass of baccalaureate programs and to cover prior funding shortfalls.


Implementation of the Financial Plan:
In 2005-2006, Dixie State College needed an additional 42 faculty members to address core instructional
needs at an estimated cost of $6,533,500. Raising tuition for the academic year 2006-2007 and the
passage of SB90 as well as partnership allowances have reduced the residual deficit to $3,460,800.
In order to take a balanced approach to strengthening the instructional core and at the same time continuing
to develop regionally responsive educational offerings, Dixie State College proposes additional programs.
The majority of these programs develop currently established departments. As new faculty members are
added to the existing faculty, their workloads are comprised of both core courses and program
enhancements that support the new award or degree. The workload ratio for most areas would be 80
percent core and 20 percent new courses.
Based on the dual role of faculty members (reducing the core instructional deficit and supporting new
certificates and degrees) and raising tuition to the Utah Non-R1 comprehensive college system average of
$1,346 for an estimated 6000 FTE, the remaining funding required to cover the original deficiency and
provide for balanced expansion is $4,539,200.




                                                    -8-
Dixie State College of Utah
STRATEGIC PLAN
      August 27, 2007




            -9-
DSC’s Strategic Academic Plan


Detailed Description of the Strategic Academic Plan
Strategic Academic Plan Talking Points
      Three Strategic Program Clusters
           o Business and Technology
           o Health Sciences and Public Safety
           o Education

      Student Demand by Program Cluster, Fall 2005
           o Business and Technology, 1076 students (23%)
           o Heath Science and Public Safety, 1019 students (22%)
           o Education, 876 students (18%)

      Major Employer Support for Program Development within Clusters
           o Identified Employee Base
           o Tuition Reimbursement for Student-employees
           o Partnerships
           o Program Support
                    Monetary Contributions
                    Physical Facilities
                    Employee Support

      Economic Drivers
          o Washington County School District Growth
                    1200 Additional Teachers by 2015
                    Critical Need Areas
                            Math
                            Biology
                            English
                            Music
                            Early Childhood Education
                    Retirement Replacements, 20% each year
           o Local High Tech and Biotech Start-up Companies
           o Intermountain Healthcare Projections, 3500 new employees by 2010
           o SkyWest, Largest US Regional Airline, 18,000 employees
           o Metropolitan Demographics
           o Providers for At-Risk and Troubled Youth Facilities




                                              - 10 -
   Specific Implementation Strategies
       o Eliminating Tiered Tuition
                   Lowers Upper Level Tuition
                   Raises Lower Level Tuition
                   Encourages Upper Level Course-Taking Patterns
       o Eliminating Mandatory AS Entrance to BS Programs
       o Developing Workforce Partnerships
                   Washington County School District
                   Intermountain Health Care
                   SkyWest
                   Local Law Enforcement Agencies
                   University of Utah Graduate Degrees, MSN, Special Education, MBA
                   Southern Utah University, Criminal Justice, Athletic Training, Secondary
                     Education upper division majors that are not delivered by DSC (i.e., special
                     education)
       o Developing Adult Degree Completion Programs
                   Self-Supporting
                   General and Employer Specific
                   Flexible
                   Cohort Based




                                              - 11 -
Degrees Under Consideration
             Submitted February 22, 2006
Programs Under Consideration                                                              Status
2006/2007
Secondary Ed Licensure                                                  LOI Submitted Oct., 2005
                                                                                and Feb., 2007
Respiratory Therapy                           Certificate, AAS, BS
Physical Therapy Assistant                    Certificate, AAS, BS
Medical Laboratory Technology                 Certificate, AAS, BS
Interdisciplinary Fine Arts                                    BIA                     LOI 2/07
Communication (Replacing                      Replacement BS                            LOI 2/07
Communication and New Media with
emphasis areas in Broadcasting, Film
and Human Communication)
Self-Support Degree Completion:
     Aviation Management                                       BS                       LOI 2/07
    Communication/Leadership                                   BS
Accounting (Current emphasis area to                           BS                       LOI 2/07
stand-alone degree)
                                                                                        2007-2010
                                                                     Early Childhood Ed                 AS
                                                                     Integrated Studies              BS/BA
                                                                     Math/Statistics                    BS
                                                                      Mechanical Eng Tech             AAS
                                                                     Psychology                      BS/BA
                                                                     Social Science                  BS/BA
                                                                      Degree Completion:
                                                                         Family Life Studies            BS
                                                                     Construction Management         AS,BS
                                                                     Automotive Electronics         AAS,BS
                                                                     Computer Science                   BS
                                                                     (Emphasis Area to Stand-
                                                                     alone degree)                     BS
                                                                     Allied Health

 Additional Certificates are being developed in response to local employers:

       Radiography (multiple certificates)
       Vet Tech
       Emergency Services
       Dispatch Program
       Ultra-Sound Certification
       MRI Certification
       POST (Police Officer Standards and Training)




                                                     - 12 -
Community Base for Academic Programs
Dixie State College of Utah today is the product of its community. Since inception and early development,
the institution has grown in response to the needs of Washington County and the surrounding extended
service area. The College‘s future is no less related to its community than was its past, and any discussion
of the College‘s strategic plan is founded in the needs and direction of the region. The overall strategic goal
for Dixie State College is to offer core and high demand educational opportunities at both the associate and
baccalaureate levels, which are sensitive and responsive in scope to its constituencies. Dixie State College
takes great pride in continuing its role and responsibility as the region‘s community college. It also
embraces the logical extension in its mission to a balanced college, which offers one-year certificates, two-
year general and applied associate degrees, and four-year baccalaureate degrees needed for its
constituencies and the regional economic growth. In addition to its own certificates and degrees, Dixie State
perceives its role to include facilitating advanced degrees delivered by participating senior institutions,
including the University of Utah, Utah State University and Southern Utah University.
Future programs for Dixie State College are centered in three primary strategic clusters: 1) Business and
Technology, 2) Health Care and Public Safety, and 3) Core Degrees and Education. These clusters cover
a comprehensive set of needs identified for the dramatic growth and on-going development in Washington
County; consequently, the clusters are driven primarily by the economic and workforce development of the
community and only secondarily by student preference. Student preference is, however, supportive of the
identified strategic clusters. Upon admission to DSC, students self-declare their intended majors. Of the
entering new freshman for fall 2005, 1076 (23 percent) identified fields within Business and Technology,
1019 (22 percent) declared majors in Health and Public Safety and 837 (18 percent) indicated they were
pursing careers in education and/or related majors, such as math, psychology, English, and biology. It is
also notable that there were 705 unspecified Health Occupations majors other than nursing, dental hygiene
and radiology majors.
Since the 2000 census data, Washington County is a designated metropolitan area – one, however, without
balanced local educational opportunities that support the continuing and dramatic economic or social
growth. As a consequence, core and foundational programs within these clusters are not anticipating future
needs; they reflect critical, current needs. The change in Dixie State College‘s mission created a ―new‖
baccalaureate-granting institution intended to serve the critical educational needs of the area. In order to
fulfill this mission to the maximum benefit of the area, the institution needs the resources to create programs
and hire founding faculty. The discussion that follows will provide a brief background rationale for each of
the clusters and their anticipated impact on program development at Dixie State College.

Historical Program Perspective
Education is important to the residents in Washington County. Ten days after the first settlers came to the
area, they founded a school. The development of Dixie State College of Utah reflects that same priority and
commitment held by those early pioneers. The original Dixie Stake Academy offered music, chemistry and
accounting, and by 1932, DSC‘s predecessor was a normal school educating teachers for the local area.
The two-plus-two model of DSC‘s early history, which included the last two years of high school and the first
two years of post-secondary education, successfully translated into associate degrees and career-ladder
vocational training.
Through the middle part of the last century, Dixie College provided a strong two-year college transfer
curriculum. Eventually, during the 1970‘s, career and technical training became part of the overall offerings
at the institution and many provided certificate programs. With the advent of federal support, such as
Perkins funding, several training programs were created; however, even by 1995, the offerings at the
institution included only one general associate of applied science. Unlike institutions that were designed as
comprehensive community colleges, DSC did not develop multiple specialty degrees in career and technical
areas. That is until recently.
After the legislated creation of the Utah College of Applied Technology (UCAT) in 2001, which was designed
to provide non-degreed career training opportunities and technical training for high school students, Dixie
State College focused on providing career and technical training with career-ladder opportunities. These

                                                     - 13 -
opportunities did not compete with the mission of the DXATC and maximized restricted resources.
Concurrently, local economic development, which included Intermountain Health Care planning a regional,
tertiary, health care facility in St. George, propelled Dixie State College into a new focus in career training.
Supported by generous program seed money, property and personnel from Intermountain Health Care,
DSC is developing allied health training and degrees to meet the needs of the related professions. By
necessity, as the primary training provider in health care, the institution must provide for entry-level
employment and baccalaureate level preparation, which is needed for supervisory positions in the allied
health fields.
Vocational, career and technical education is stronger today at Dixie State College than it has ever been.
Below is a fifteen year comparison of the number of certificates and degrees awarded by DSC. The
difference and growth in these offerings is the focus toward career-ladder education. That focus is due to
the growing needs of the community, and that in turn is what a good community college provides—
responsive education driven by community needs. College officials continue to actively participate in the
regional vocational advisory committee, which includes ATC and Washington County School District
personnel.



                                                  Dixie State College of Utah
                                             Awarded Degrees by Year and Category

                                                  1000
                   Number of Degrees




                                                      800
                                                      600
                                                      400
                                                      200
                                                       0
                                                            1990           1995   2005   2006
                                       AAS                  28             21     66     67
                                       Total Associates     455            601    846    804
                                       Certificates         201            246    338    404
                                       BS                    0              0     94     118


                Information provided by DSC Institutional Research.
As indicated in the chart below, Dixie State College offers more specialized associate degrees than it ever
has during its 96 year history. With the strong partnership in health sciences forged by Intermountain Health
Care, it is anticipated that this list will continue to expand. Currently, Intermountain Health Care is
supporting development of three additional entry-level degrees in critical areas (respiratory therapy, physical
therapy assistant and medical laboratory technology) and their related career-ladder pathways. The
institution is open to other degree opportunities that will meet the needs of the expanding employment
market within the southern region of the state. In partnership with DXATC, Dixie State College is committed
to providing educational access to its service area, at all educational levels.




                                                                  - 14 -
Associate Degrees: 1995                                 Associate Degrees: 2005
        Associate of Arts (AA)                                 Associate of Arts (AA)
        Associate of Science (AS)                              Associate of Science (AS)
        Associate of Applied Science (AAS)                     Associate of Science in Business (ASB)
                                                                Associate of Pre-Engineering (APE)
                                                                Associate of Science in Criminal Justice
                                                                Automotive Mechanics (AAS)
                                                                Graphic Communications (AAS)
                                                                Dental Hygiene (AAS)
                                                                Emergency Medical Services (AAS)
                                                                Medical Radiography (AAS)
                                                                Nursing (AAS)
                                                                General Marketing (AAS)



The chart below compares rate of associate degrees in Washington County compared to other selected
counties with institutions of higher learning as well as the level for the State and the US. It shows that
Washington County residents as well as other county populations have taken advantage of the educational
opportunities offered at Dixie State College.




 Dixie State College carries its fair share of community college offerings in the state. The chart below shows
the number of certificates awarded at Dixie State College compared to Salt Lake Community College and
Weber State University. The information is from USHE data book and is presumed accurate. Note that the
focus of the majority of certificates for DSC is in the health professions.

                                                    - 15 -
            M
              as
                sa
               Co chu




                                    0.0%
                                           5.0%
                                                  10.0%
                                                          15.0%
                                                                  20.0%
                                                                          25.0%
                                                                                          30.0%
                                                                                                  35.0%
                                                                                                          40.0%
                                                                                                                  45.0%
                  n s
                Ne nec etts
                   w tic
                  C Jer ut
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                       rm is
          Ne          K on
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                                                                                          27.6%
                   M Iowa
           No C iss a




- 16 -
               rth alif our
                    Ca orn i
                  M rol ia
                      on ina
                     O tan
                  M reg a
                      ich on
                           iga
                          Oh n
                          Ut io
                        Te ah
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                    nn rid




                                                                                  25.0%
                        es a
                            s
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               ut In on
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                  W aho na
                     yo m
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                  w la g
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                          ex a
                             ic
                                                                                                                          Bachelor Education Attainment Population Aged 25 to 34 2000




                  Ke Ida o
                       nt ho
                  Ar uc
                M k a ky
         W         iss ns
           as          i a
              hi N ssip s
                ng e p
             W to va i
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                  t V Cn
                       irg ty
                            in
                               ia
                                                                  17.4%
Unfortunately, limited access to baccalaureate degrees is not offset by the associate degrees or certificates.
The level of associate degrees in the county does not transfer to continued education at other institutions.
The previous chart and the one below dramatically tell the story of educational attainment in Washington
County at the baccalaureate level. The first chart shows the attainment rate for 2000. At that time, if
Washington County had been a state, it would have been second-to-last in educational attainment, just
slightly above West Virginia. By 2005, it would have dropped to dead last. Even the state of Utah, which
did not fall dramatically, is in a relatively low position, which indicates that other states have made progress
in actively addressing the attainment rate. (The source for both charts is the American Community Survey,
which is provided by the US government census office.)



                         Bachelor Educational Attainment for Ages 25 to 34 2005

   50.0%
   45.0%
   40.0%
   35.0%
                                                     29.9%
   30.0%                                                                27.2%
   25.0%
   20.0%                                                                                                           16.7%
   15.0%
   10.0%
    5.0%
    0.0%
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This strategic plan is focused on addressing the critical educational needs in the region. There is not the
vaguest suggestion that Dixie State College intends to reduce or compromise its proud community college
mission. There may be weighted arguments and implementation plans for bachelor degrees, but that is
because there are so few available to count residents that expansion is a necessity. Dixie State College
serves its community college mission well and will continue to develop associate programs and certificates
for local markets. From attainment data, it needs to make no apology. It is vital, however, that Washington
County residents have access to bachelor degrees in the quantity necessary to sustain the county‘s
economic growth.

Framework for Educational Offerings at Dixie State College
Business and Technology Cluster: Economic indicators of Washington County reported by the Utah
Department of Workforce Services provide a sound basis for expansion of educational opportunities in the
local area. Although historically connected to the economic growth and direction of Salt Lake County,
Washington County‗s local economy is increasingly impacted by southern Nevada and California business
interests. These interests stimulate the service providers in the area, but for sustained growth, they require

                                                     - 17 -
a more educated local workforce than is currently available. In addition to outside factors, locally owned and
operated businesses, such as the largest regional airline in the United States, SkyWest, need employees
who are equipped with a large range of educational backgrounds, particularly in business related subject
areas.
Enhancing educational opportunity is a significant factor in the potential development of the local economy.
Dixie State College is the pivotal provider of that opportunity in Washington County. In order to maximize
economic development, residents need local access to sustainable and committed delivery of core degrees.
As new businesses relocate to the southern region of the state, they require an increasingly larger pool of
baccalaureate prepared individuals from which to draw potential supervisors. With a baccalaureate
attainment rate of only 16.7 percent for 25-34 year olds, Washington County desperately needs educational
opportunities to address developing this pool with adaptable, job-related degree opportunities. In partial
answer to this need, new, degree completion programs are being considered that will provide working,
experienced adults with flexible learning opportunities. The first such degree is currently in the approval
process and has been developed in partnership with SkyWest Airlines.
One key element in the College‘s response to local needs is the use of advisory committees comprised of
local business and education leaders. After a need is identified, researched and deliberated, the process
identifies possible educational options. For instance, in order to meet the growing educational needs of the
area, the College constructed its core Business degree in such a way as to provide for new areas of
emphasis. This model discourages proliferation of degrees, yet increases responsiveness to local needs
and provides for efficient program review and oversight. The only major limitation to this approach is when
a content field graduate school application would be impeded based upon the title of the degree, as is
identified in the case for computer science and accounting. Under current consideration are emphasis
areas and degrees such as Aviation Management, Health Science Management, and Construction
Management.
Health Sciences and Public Safety Cluster: According to population projections provided by the Utah
Department of Workforce Services, it is probable that Washington County will double in population by 2010
and will reach half a million residents by 2020. Intermountain Health Care, one of the largest employers in
the area) anticipates the dramatic increase in the number of qualified health care professionals needed to
provide basic services for the expanding demands in the local area. As a result, Intermountain Health Care
incorporated Dixie State College‘s educational role into its strategic plan. The College is the beneficiary of
land from Intermountain Health Care for DSC‘s new health sciences building, as well as a $600,000 pledge
over the next five years to help train about 225 additional registered nurses. As of January, 2007
Intermountain Health Care‘s commitment to DSC and its growth in regional health care training includes an
additional $720,000 over three years for targeting recruiting, developing and implementing three new
programs: physical therapy assistant, respiratory therapy and medical laboratory technology. This
company‘s 1.3 million dollar investment in Dixie State College‘s healthcare has provided the ability to begin
the challenge to hire appropriately credentialed personnel that will insure high quality graduates to meet
local needs. Intermountain Health Care‘s commitment underscores the financial resources to begin new
programs in health care. Due to accreditation expectations and requirements, these programs are typically
three to six times more expensive than a general associate degree.
In addition to the expansion of Dixie Regional Medical Center and the need for qualified nurses, support
positions for doctors‘ offices and pharmacies, as well as dental hygienists, radiographers, and respiratory
therapists make up a few of the secondary support areas that will need a steady supply of qualified health
care professionals as Washington County absorbs the enormous population growth. Developing additional
clinical sites and adapting course delivery are College priorities intended to address educational preparation
for future health care providers.
Within this strategic service cluster are also needs addressing public safety. Identified needs in public
safety include qualified and more highly educated law enforcement and correctional officers, homeland
security, and first responder preparation. Dixie State College‘s regionally accredited Emergency Medical
Services program, which includes EMT and Paramedic training, is currently recognized as a regional leader
that will play a primary role in addressing needs to build a stronger and more adaptable first responder
capacity in the county.


                                                    - 18 -
Education Cluster: The foundation of future business, professional and health care industries is largely
dependent upon educational opportunities across K-16 continuum. Recruiting the number of professionals
necessary in Washington County not only requires the ability to provide a trained workforce, but the ability to
educate the children of those professionals. Washington County School District (WCSD) is close to a crisis
point; it is unable to provide sufficient numbers of highly qualified teachers. The shortage of math, science,
English, music, vocational, special education and speech pathology teachers is anticipated to reach the
catastrophe level in the near future. WCSD anticipates the need of an additional 1200 teachers by 2015,
including double the number of secondary math, science, and English teachers. Compounding the issue is
an anticipated 20 percent retirement/replacement level within the District. The bottom line is that the
anticipated need for math and science teachers is between 30–40 teachers each year for the next 10 years,
and these numbers are based on a conservative growth projection.
Both Washington County School District‘s and Dixie State College‘s attempts to hire qualified teachers have
included aborted efforts related to the cost of living and, in particular, housing costs, which have increased
30 percent in the last year. In order to address the needs, degrees that would allow local residents to
prepare to take instructional positions in WCSD are critically needed. Today‘s crucial needs will translate
into larger class sizes and under served populations with special needs unless an infusion of opportunity is
created. WCSD cannot afford to have degree opportunities dribble into place; critical shortages must be
addressed in a comprehensive approach that is, as near as possible, concurrently implemented.
Included in the District‘s and College‘s approach to train, recruit, and retain educational employees is the
production of DSC‘s current elementary education program. District and College personnel are in a steady
state of communication. Although the program was initially restricted for the first three years to only one
cohort of thirty students, it has expanded and has plans to expand again. According to the Utah Department
of Workforce Serves update of March 2007, all non-metropolitan counties in Utah (of which Washington and
Kane Counties are a part.) show total annual openings of 160 elementary education teachers through 2014.
Supporting additions to secondary education faculty are faculty members in Dixie State College‘s successful
and state-approved elementary education program. Approximately ninety percent of the graduates of this
program are working in the Washington County School District. The other ten percent of the 2006
graduating class were hired in Logan, Salt Lake (Granite and Jordan school districts), Sevier County,
Mesquite and Las Vegas.
In 2006, DSC graduated 30 students from its elementary education program. The 2006-2007 cohorts
(already in the program and about to finish their first year) have 40 students who will graduate in May 2008.
The 2007-2008 cohorts will have a projected total of 60+ students (30+ who are projected to finish in May
2009 and the other 30+ who finish in December 2009). This projection reflects the current program. If the
demand increases, plans include the addition of another Fall Cohort as needed and resources allow.
Another interesting and growing need for educators in the area is a cross between business, education and
health care. Climate, culture and location have combined to produce a growing service area for troubled
youth. Not only do providers require highly qualified content teachers, they also require enhanced
backgrounds in psychology, sociology, counseling and educational pedagogy. Most providers also employ
for positions that require at least basic knowledge of appropriate law enforcement principles.
The need for additional opportunities in fine and performing arts is supported within WCSD and within the
broader community. The Washington County School District lists music educators as a critical need area.
In addition, the County‘s proximity to professional opportunities in the arts increases the demand for
expanding educational opportunities in the fine and performing arts. Preparing students for business and
performance opportunities in Nevada and California markets is a realistic secondary goal; markets in Los
Angeles are as close for DSC students as those in Salt Lake.

Program Development: Issues and Impacts
Dixie State College‘s programmatic growth is not about size; it is about basic educational opportunities that
will provide a reasonable basis for economic opportunities to local community members. The institution‘s
strategic planning committee spent an entire year (2004-2005) meeting with representatives from local
business and industry, the school district, community groups, and local government agencies to help identify


                                                    - 19 -
these needs. Fortunately for Dixie State College, degrees that are core to a basic baccalaureate-granting
institution and the region‘s high demand degrees are synchronous.
Faculty Needs: The anticipated impacts on instruction include approximately 40 new faculty members
needed to enhance the academic infrastructure and implement new programs, both at the associate and
baccalaureate level. Depending upon available funding, 3-5 new programs are anticipated yearly.
Obviously space issues will also require attention. Although potentially daunting, the size and scope of this
growth is manageable. Close connections and support from the major employers for all three of DSC‘s
Strategic Clusters not only contribute theoretical support, but contribute substantial monetary and spatial
needs as well. For instance, each of the three major employers provides tuition reimbursement for their
employees or is working towards that goal. Numerous small business owners also support student workers
with tuition reimbursements. In addition, WCSD and Dixie State College are actively pursuing potential joint
appointments along with dedicated teaching labs in each of the new schools in the county. Finally,
Intermountain Health Care and WCSD provide money and support in order to obtain educational
opportunities for their employees.
Currently, approximately 60 percent of Dixie State College‘s faculty members hold terminal degrees. The
related five-year goal is to have 75 percent with terminal degrees; a realistic goal as hires for new programs
and replacements for retiring faculty members are made. In addition, the adjunct pool qualifications will be
strengthened and dependency upon adjunct delivery will be reduced from 50 percent to a range between 35
to 40 percent across campus. The following chart shows the steady improvement in terminal degree
preparation of Dixie State‘s full-time, tenure-track, non-vocational faculty. IF all funded positions are filled for
the 2007-2008 academic year, the faculty will be comprised of 77 percent faculty who hold terminal degrees.

                                          Percentage of Terminal Degrees for Full -Time , Tenure-
                                                      Track, Non-vocational Faculty

                                     70
             Percentage of Faculty




                                     60
                                     50
                                     40
                                                                                              Terminal Degrees
                                     30
                                     20
                                     10
                                     0
                                          2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008    Fully
                                                                                    Staffed
                                                           Academ ic Year



(Information provided by DSC Human Resources Department.).
A breakdown of additional faculty needed by discipline for new degrees is on file with the Commissioner‘s
office. The projected salaries are based on four-year CUPA-HR mean salaries as identified discipline and
rank. Also included is the instructional component for unique Lecture/Advisor positions, which are
institutionally approved to be connected to every new academic program.
Each new degree program helps to address the lack of qualified faculty needed to meet the core mission,
undergraduate education. When a degree is developed for an existing department, such as English or
biology, new hires serve two roles. First, they teach the introductory courses that are needed for general
education even without the degree. Second, they teach the upper division courses on a rotating basis to
cover the needs for the baccalaureate degree. For example, in the English department, the institutional
need is for composition instructors to teach freshmen and sophomore writing courses. As a result the
content faculty teaches a 3:1 ratio of writing to literature or upper division. This means that each faculty
hired for a degree program housed in an existing department spends approximately 75-80% on lower
division courses that serve general education.

                                                                       - 20 -
Implementation Strategies: The dramatic increase in faculty and subsequent support personnel that will be
required to support the identified programs requires careful planning and stewardship of resources. In order
to develop quality programs with verifiable excellence highly qualified instruction, the Dixie State College
instructional budget needs $6.5 million dollars in base funding adjustment.
In order to advance the needed programmatic changes, Dixie State College, with the support of its students,
will raise tuition over three years (2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009). The target rate is the WICHE
average for four-year institutions. (This benchmark will be precisely determined as soon as the College and
the Commissioner‘s staff agree upon an appropriate peer group for the institution.) Raising tuition to the
region mean will generate approximately $3.5 million dollars. According to the Heller Tuition Elasticity
Model, enrollment may decline by 551 students, if calculated as a community college, and 110 students if
measured as a baccalaureate school. After the first tuition increase in Fall 2006, there was little over 300
FTE decline, indicating that students perceived the institution as neither of the two alternatives. This is
further supported by analysis of the enrollment drop, which included organizational and curricular changes
that significantly impacted the Fall 2006 enrollment report.
In addition to the increase in tuition revenue, the institution needed approximately $6.5 million additional
from state appropriations in 2005-2006. After appropriations from the 2007 Utah State legislative session,
the current financial need forecast is approximately $3.2 million. Although vocational programs are strong at
Dixie State College, the shift is toward health science occupations. These programs are expensive and
limited in student cohort size, requirements placed on the programs by outside accreditation agencies. In
order to meet the growing needs of these specialized fields in the region, additional, above-the-line funding
needs to be considered. Industrial partnerships are funding start-up costs, but program continuations
depend upon an infusion of monetary support.
As enthusiastically as Dixie State College is to embrace new technical and health care degrees, it requires
above-the-line support for these very expensive programs. Even its original, previously awarded four-year
programs, such as business, computer science, and nursing, are expensive due to equipment or faculty
wages. Compared to degrees such as psychology or Spanish, which require only moderately priced wages,
future health care and engineering technician associate degrees require major investments in faculty,
space, and equipment.
Even expanding elementary education to twice its current size requires new space, additional travel costs
due to the probable need to expand placements into Mesquite, and approximately $625,000 in new faculty
for 60 additional graduates. Compared to a psychology degree that needs only two additional faculty
members for approximately $265,000 to serve the same number of graduates each year, expansion is often
an expensive alternative to new programs. Of course adding the third most popular baccalaureate degree
(psychology) in the nation would also help attract and retain students, which is an additional benefit.
Students: Degree implementation presumes that there will be students enrolled in the new programs. In
order to project staffing needs and insure program viability, DSC has undertaken a study of recruitment,
enrollment, and retention. An evaluation study was conducted by Noel Levitz during February, 2007. This
organization is a recognized authority on student retention, and the results of this study are expected
sometime in early March.
The Noel Levitz study will help the institution to look forward and, hopefully, maximize its growth potential.
Until that report is completed, history is a reliable indicator of future growth. The chart below indicates that
the more programs available, the more students declare themselves as baccalaureate degree seeking.
Most years when only one new program began, there was a twenty percent increase of degree-seeking
students over the previous year. Two new programs, English and Biology, both without cohort or applied
education restrictions, began during the 2006-2007 school year, and there was a forty-eight percent
increase in degree-seeking students, approximately ten percent of the institutional headcount for the year.
Although this is not conclusive causality, there appears to be a distinctive pattern: new programs equal
student enrollment in those programs. Enrollment numbers by degree and year can be found as an
attachment to this plan.




                                                      - 21 -
                                                                           Bachelor Degree Seeking Students
                                                                                 For Current Degrees


                                                      1000                                                                               929
                                                      900
                                                      800



                                 Number of Students
                                                      700                                                                   625
                                                      600                                                      519
                                                      500                                               399
                                                      400                                335
                                                      300
                                                      200
                                                      100           0          0
                                                        0
                                                                   2001      2002       2003            2004   2005        2006          2007
                                                                                                        Year


                                                         Compiled by DSC Institutional Research Office from IPEDS Data
Student population is also projected on another recent event. During Spring 2006, a joint DSC and
Washington County School District (WCSD) community survey was sent home to every elementary school
student in the district. The survey asked a series of demographic questions, questions about educational
attainment and educational goals. Of the 17 percent who responded, two thirds were interested in
secondary education, and one third of those already had a bachelor‘s degree and wished to become
licensed to teach in secondary schools. The chart below indicates the number of respondents with degrees
interested in licensure, the number without degrees interested in obtaining degrees and licensure, and the
number of students on campus self-declared as secondary education majors at the time the community
survey was completed.

                                                                    Washington County School and Community Survey 2006
                                                                   People Wanting to Earn a Degree or Certificate in Education

                           500


                           450


                           400


                           350
  Total Number of People




                           300                                                                                        Number of People Wanting to Earn a Teaching
                                                                                                                      Certificate
                                                                                                                      Number of People Wanting to Earn a BS in
                           250
                                                                                                                      Secondary Education
                                                                              453
                                                                                                                      2006 CIPS Dixie Students Majoring in Secondary
                           200                                                                                        Education


                           150
                                                             261

                           100


                           50
                                                                                               58
                            0
                                                                             Totals
                                                                            Category



Compiled by DSC Institutional Research Office from Joint Survey Data



                                                                                               - 22 -
Washington County School District is very interested in these 714 potential teachers. The lack of affordable
workforce housing is an important factor in the district‘s inability to hire educators. The survey respondents
represent current residents who already have housing, which subsequently, increases their interest to the
district. In addition, those who possess baccalaureates can teach for up to three years as they complete a
licensure program.
In addition to the joint survey data, Dixie State reviewed data from the American Community Survey. The
information obtained through this US government survey shows that Washington County must address
educational attainment of three simultaneous generations. The in-migration of 24-35 year olds doubled the
county population in that age group in only five years. To address the needs of this group as well as the
35-44 year olds requires degrees geared to the adult learner. Consecutive, not concurrent, delivery,
focused, targeted content, and relevant and experientially based courses are important characteristics of
successful programs that target adult learners. Consequently, Dixie State College has developed two of its
three proposed Adult Completion Degrees, which allow an adult learner with an associate degree or
equivalent to complete a coherent plan of study for a baccalaureate degree in consecutive 18 months with a
combination of one-night-a-week lectures and technology support. Currently there are 17 SkyWest
employees ready to begin the program designed for that organization. These self-supporting programs
require approval; students are waiting for their chance to complete a program designed to provide value-
added to them and their place of employment.
Below is a spreadsheet reporting the number of degree-seeking students by CIPS coding. Note that the
information for 2007 includes only two of the three semesters. The omission of Spring 2007 information
results in a lower total for the year than will actually exist for the year.


                                Distinct Headcount of Students Enrolled in Four-year Programs
                                    Sorted by CIP Code ( Classification of Instructional Program)
                                             As of Spring 2007 3rd week Feb 21, 2007
           Bachelor Degree Seeking CIPS only (Distinct Headcount from either 3rd week or end of term enrollment)
                                                                                                                     2007 *
                                                           2001         2002     2003        2004   2005   2006    Incomplet
                                                                                                                     e year
090720 - Communication for New Media                                               0           0     0     73         156
110101 - Computer & Information Sciences, General                       42         83        102    96     98        128
131202 - Elementary Education and Teaching                  12          24         64         98    106    124       153
230101 - English Language & Literature, General                          1         1           1     3      2         42
260101 - Biology/Biological Sciences, General               15          15         20          9    17      8         81
510602 - Dental Hygiene/Hygienist
511601 - Nursing - Registered Nurse (RN)                                                            91     74         86
520201 - Business Administration & Mgmt, General            92          155       182        205    214    255       301
                          Total enrollment in BS CIPS       119         237       350        415    527    634       947

Career-Ladder Pathways
―Career-ladder‖ is a term used to relate a series of educational goals for training programs, which are mostly
vocational in nature. Each goal within these series is distinguished by a certificate, licensure or degree
opportunity and offers an exit point from higher education into the workforce. The most well known and well
defined career-ladder is in the field of nursing. This career path includes a CNA, LPN, RN-ADN, BSN, MSN,
and finally the doctoral level. Each level within nursing has prescribed and clearly defined roles, skills, and
responsibilities. It is important to note that even in nursing, students have the option to select whether to
receive any certificate or option below the BSN. Students could choose to take the initial CNA license and
then proceed through to the BSN. Another option students could choose is to enter a BSN program without
the previous certificates or associate degree. Having options available is good planning; turning options into
requirements imposes artificial barriers to student progress that are not required by national accrediting
bodies. Additionally, some disciplines have certificates that enhance degrees and, therefore, are not
technically career-ladder components (i.e., Sonography is a certificate of enhancement after obtaining the
Associate of Applied Science in Medical Radiography).


                                                               - 23 -
In foundational and core academic areas, the entry-level credential is the baccalaureate degree. An
associate of mathematics, English, chemistry, or communications is nonsensical. It is the depth of content
in the junior and senior course offerings that increases a student‘s skill level and knowledge base sufficiently
to allow an individual to work on tasks within the chosen field. The career ladder in traditional academic
areas begins with a baccalaureate that prepares for a masters degree and leads to a doctorate in limited
cases. Requiring an associate degree in an academic field serves only one purpose: to front load general
education courses. Although there may be some limited value in this approach for traditional, undecided
students, it is definitely an almost insurmountable barrier for re-entry students and transfer students.
Dixie State College must respond to both transfer and re-entry students. The institution‘s move to NCAA
Division ll resulted in approximately ten percent of the student population transferring from more traditional
schools. These student-athletes must show progress towards a four-year degree in a specific major. They
come to Dixie State College with some generals completed, but they may well have upper level credits in
their field as well. In order to show progress toward a degree, Division ll student-athletes need to articulate
into the major upon arrival. Pre-major roles do not satisfy compliance issues.
The second population disadvantaged by a required associate degree in traditional fields is the adult
returning student. The Washington County population of 24-35 year olds doubled between 2000 and 2005.
The county‘s baccalaureate attainment rate decreased over the same timeframe, which indicates that this
large group has not contributed a substantial amount of degree holders to the county population.
Adults have research-defined learning characteristics. Among those characteristics is the need for
relevancy in coursework. These highly motivated individuals do not want to take multiple courses of general
education up front. The proverbial ―hook‖ to keep adult learners in a post-secondary setting is providing
value-adding interest courses ―up front‖ and regulating general education requirements to a secondary role.
If adults do not become fully engaged in a program in the beginning, they have no hesitancy to walk away;
often they will not even withdraw from the institution.
So where and when do career ladders make sense? Below is an attempt to bring career ladder experiences
into balance with the projected degrees identified for Dixie State College. Accrediting agencies often dictate
those reasonable exit points in vocational areas. In the final analysis, for discipline–specific cases, such
requirements are a curricular decision, and curriculum, according to Northwest Commission of Colleges, is
the responsibility of the faculty.




                                                     - 24 -
                                 Dixie State College of Utah: Program Three-Year Ranking with Career Path Information
Core      New    New   Program            Program                                Comments                         Degree            Career Path Information
Faculty   FTE    FTE    Costs
                          $
   0       4     4.0   340,000      Secondary Licensure       Program Coordinator, Lecture/Advisor, Practicum              Licensure first, endorsements added
                                                              and Student Teaching Supervisor
   0      2.5    2.5   250,000      Respiratory Therapy       New Program: Intermountain Health Care Critical      AAS     Degree awarded first, certificates are
                                                              Area currently under development                             specialties added after the degree.
   3       3      6    500,000            Fine Arts           Supports WCSD‘s critical need for music and band    BS,BA    Entry level credential.
                                       (Music/Theater)        teachers.
   0      1.5    1.5   180,000    Health Care Management      Program Coordinator and Lecture/Advisor              BS      Entry level credential.
                                                              Core Area: business
   1      1.5    2.5   260,000      Aviation Management       Coordinator and Lecture/Advisor                      BS      Associate completion required before
                                                              Core Area: business                                          graduation.
                       Growth           Accounting            Emphasis with 106 students declared in major         BS      Entry level for CPA pathway
                       Growth         Communication           Traditional Degree that makes sense for students.   BS/BA     Entry level credential
                       Related                                Replaces CNM, although department could
                                                              support
          1. 0   1.0   125,000        Early Childhood         One faculty member to support the introductory      AS,AAS   Certificates are common, but not
                                                              education/elementary education and one will                  prerequisite to degree.
                                                              specialize in early childhood.
   2       1      3    275,000      Integrated Studies         Core faculty to support emphasis options.          BS,BA    N/A
          3.5    2.5   385,000   Physical Therapy Assistant   New Program: Intermountain Health Care critical      AAS     Degree awarded and certificates are
                                                              area and core prerequisite instructors                       enhancements to degree.
                                                                                                                           Articulation to baccalaureate programs
                                                                                                                           required for career path.
   1      1.0    2.0   200,000   Communication/Leadership     Core communication and business areas and            BS      Degree completion program Associate
                                                              Lecture/Advisor                                              degree or equivalent expected before
                                                                                                                           entry into program.
   2      3.5    5.5   550,000       Medical Laboratory       New Program: Intermountain Health Care Critical      AS      Two specific steps in hospital
                                        Technology            Area Biology and science core                        BS      employment. Both levels are needed.
   2      0.5    2.5   265,000          Psychology            Core and foundational with a half time              BS,BA    Entry level credential
                                                              Lecture/Advisor.
   1       2      3    290,000     Mechanical Engineering     Content faculty and supporting general education     AS      Entry Level credential
                                        Technician            faculty.                                                     Articulation to BS for career path




                                                                           25
Current Program Expansion vs. New Program Implementation

One common misconception is that expanding current degrees is less expensive than implementing new programs.
Certainly current programs should be expanded as growth and student demand warrants. As Dixie State College
matures into a balanced institution, one of the key concerns will be how to and when to expand current programs
versus adding new programs that will appeal to a new segment of the student population, thereby increasing
retention. Given the expensive nature of five of DSC‘s current baccalaureate degree programs, implementing new
degrees are actually less expensive than expansion. Dixie‘s first five baccalaureate programs are, by virtue of
content and design, expensive programs. In part, the cost differential between expansion and new program
implementation can be contributed to the quality of faculty hired to deliver general education courses that support the
current associate and baccalaureate degree programs.

In the fall of 2005, every department developed a five- to ten-year projection of new courses with faculty composition
that would be needed to implement a standard core degree in discipline. With careful planning, new hires in general
education have academic credentials and content diversity that also support future degrees in specific content areas.
An analysis of comparison of the two issues shows that expanding all the current baccalaureate programs
concurrently (equating to 157 additional baccalaureate degree awards) will cost approximately $4.95 million
compared to implementing six new baccalaureate degree programs (projecting 155 additional degree awards) that
will cost $1.9 million. This lower cost is due in part to maximizing faculty backgrounds and work loads, given that
faculty spend about 25 percent of the workload on upper division courses and the rest on core and foundational
areas; furthermore, key faculty are currently delivering courses that support other degrees and will be components of
the proposed degrees.

The following charts show the costs and the anticipated number of degrees using the percentage of USHE 2005-
2006 degrees awarded in the appropriate content areas. It is noteworthy that, with the exception of the business
degree, each of Dixie State College‘s baccalaureate programs are at capacity or exceed capacity for awards based
on the 2005-2006 USHE percentage distribution of degree awards by field. For example, according to state data,
10.7 percent of all baccalaureate degrees in 2005-2006 were awarded in elementary education. In 2006-2007, 11.7
percent of DSC‘s degrees were in elementary education. In order to expand this program, which already yields the
expected number of degrees, a full complement of instructors and strategic ―pipeline‖ instructors, such as instructors
in math for elementary teachers, counselors and technological support, would be needed. To create a new cohort of
30 students requires a full set of new instructors.




                                                          26
Program and Graduation Development Comparisons

In addition to comparing projected numbers of degrees based upon statewide percentage distribution of degrees, one
way that might be used to determine when Dixie State should increase the number of program offerings or expand its
current baccalaureate program capacity is to benchmark against emerging institutions. In Utah, the most recent
institutional evolution is that of Utah Valley State College. Dixie State‘s offerings mimic those of UVSC ten years
earlier. When graduating class sizes for degrees with three or more years of available data at the institution are
compared, Dixie State‘s development of Computer Science and Elementary Education programs are remarkably
similar. The Business Management degrees are similar for the first five years and then Dixie‘s program levels and
UVSC‘s tripled in number of graduates. There are several known bottlenecks (such as economics and finance
offers) that require attention to open the pipeline of business graduates at Dixie. Source data for the following charts
are from institutional research offices at UVSC and Dixie State College.



                                    Initial Graduating Class Size Comparision
                                         Dixie State College and UVSC for
                                Computer Science and Elementary Education Degrees

                           70

                           60
   Graduating Class Size




                           50
                                                                                     UVSC Elementary Ed
                           40                                                        Dixie Elementary Ed
                           30                                                        UVSC Computer Science
                                                                                     Dixie Computer Science
                           20

                           10

                            0
                                Class 1   Class 2   Class 3   Class 4   Class 5




                                                                 - -
                                                                 27
                                                 Initial Graduating Class Size Comparison
                                                      Dixie State College and UVSC for
                                                            Business Management

                                           250

                   Graduating Class Size
                                           200


                                           150                                                      UVSC Business
                                                                                                    Management
                                                                                                    Dixie Business
                                           100
                                                                                                    Management

                                           50


                                            0
                                                 Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5

Recognizing this problem, resources have been allocated to double the faculty in economics. A similar effort must be
addressed in finance as well. Yet, the track of choice and graduate production must be considered. In a recent
report from Monster Worldwide about its first survey of high school graduates, it reported that 83 percent of the
respondents view the availability of their intended major as the most important factor in choosing their future
university, with financial aid packages second. Currently, Dixie has degrees that interest about 42 percent of Utah
students. The other 58 percent of those 83 percent have no reason to choose Dixie State College.
After seven years, Dixie has seven degrees. The following chart compares the number of baccalaureate programs at
Dixie State with graduating classes and the number at UVSC after the same number of classes following their
respective mission changes. Again the source data was received from the respective institutional research offices at
UVSC and Dixie State College. Review of the growth patterns of the two institutions indicate that Dixie State College
is falling behind in the synergistic number of degree offerings. Based on the Monster Worldwide information about
students‘ criteria for selecting colleges, in conjunction with program growth at UVSC, it would suggest that more
options attract and retain more students.
                                            Comparison of Number of Baccalaureate Programs
                                                            with Graduates
                                                     During Initial Four-Year Status
                                                     Dixie State College and UVSC

                                                   35
                                                   30
                  Programs with
                  Baccalaureate
                    Number of




                                                   25
                    Graduates




                                                   20                                                         UVSC
                                                   15                                                         Dixie
                                                   10
                                                    5
                                                    0
                                                          1   2   3   4   5   6     7   8   9 10 11 12
                                                        Number of Graduating Classes Post Mission
                                                                        Change


                                                                              - -
                                                                              28
Partnerships
Partnerships are vitally important to Dixie State College. Both public and private partnerships help Dixie State to
meet the needs of its rapidly expanding service area. They help the College to meet the educational demands in an
ever-challenging workforce development. Its history and its outward community orientation help develop an
unprecedented set of important partnerships.


Community
As mentioned in previous sections of this document, academic programs at the institution are driven by the economic
growth and development of the area. Lacking a magic pot of gold, or a funding mechanism that has predictive value
in developing new programs, the institution creates entrepreneurial partnerships as various employers and industrial
leaders seek educational opportunities that will provide the educated workforce to grow their interests. Most notable
are partnerships with Intermountain Health Care, Washington County School District, SkyWest Airlines, the local arts
community, and the local law enforcement community. Money, dual appointments, facilities, recruitment, and
marketing are just a few areas in which these partners provide for development and delivery of needed programs.


Intermountain Health Care
With plans to expand into a regional tertiary care facility, Intermountain Health Care projects an increase of 3500 new
employees over the next few years. In order to provide that educated workforce, it has developed an exemplary
partnership with the College. Within the last two years, this organization has committed over 1.32 million dollars for
new program development and for support for the nursing program, for two shared positions, for land on their
campus for Dixie State‘s new health science building, and it has involved the College in its strategic planning
process.


Washington County School District (WCSD)
The critical need for secondary teachers within Washington County School District has cemented a partnership with
the College and Southern Utah University to develop a program to resolve the need. Like many other employers in
the area, the Washington County School District looks to Dixie State College to provide the required training needed
to fit their desired outcomes. The District recently committed an ongoing position to develop this critical program. It
has also indicated support through providing potential facilities, paid internships and preferential hiring programs for
graduates.


SkyWest
Rapid expansion of SkyWest has contributed to an urgent need to provide educational opportunities for its
employees. Increasing the level of educational attainment of its local, home-grown employees is now a priority
needed to support its industrial competitiveness. The corporation has provided invaluable resources, materials and
facilities to help create an appropriate, flexible learning environment for its technically savvy workforce.


Local Arts Communities
St. George and its surrounding area have an active and vibrant community dedicated to the arts. Several of these
entities have created formal relationships with Dixie State College, including St. George City, St. George Musical
Theater (SGMT) and musical groups, such as Heritage Choir and Southwest Symphony. In addition to these
community-based programs, Tuachan employs Dixie students in all aspects of its musical productions, which draws
over 130,000 patrons from across the country and features Actors Guild members in leading and supporting roles.
The synergy between college and community is evident in the number of performances and growth in local
productions. Below is a comparison in the growth of jobs in performing arts in Washington and Iron Counties. Note
that Washington County employment is private industry, whereas Iron County jobs are state funded positions.


                                                           29
               Performing Arts

                                                                Iron County, Private


                 Washington County, Private




                                                                Iron County, State Employer




Sources: US Census, Utah Population Estimates Committee, Governor's Office of Planning and Budget, 2005
Baseline Projections


Local Law Enforcement Agencies
The final example of community partnerships is the valuable commitments made by the local law enforcement
communities. City, county, state and federal agencies personnel have created an advisory board, committed
instructor resources and physical resources for the new POST (Police Officer Standards and Training) Academy at
Dixie State College. Time, money and personnel, although limited in the agencies, are generously dedicated to
create this valuable training opportunity.
In response to requests by Utah‘s Police Commissioner and Utah‘s Director of Public Safety, as well as local sheriffs
and police chiefs, Dixie State College sought approval of a unique educational opportunity, Criminal Justice degree,
that provides future law enforcement personnel an opportunity to earn a bachelor‘s degree locally. The leaders of
the law enforcement community, both locally and at the state level, believed that the hybrid criminal justice degree
would prepare officers with a broader educational background, which visionary leaders believe will increase the
professional capacity of their officers to interact with an increasingly diverse population. Although this degree is on
hold, DSC and Southern Utah University departments have worked on a strong partnership arrangement for a
traditional degree in the discipline to begin in the Fall 2007. This agreement builds on SUU‘s strengths and
experience, yet allows DSC to begin to develop its own staff and offerings. These two departments have produced
and committed to a laudable plan that is exemplary.




                                                          30
Institutional
Two major partnerships were recently established through the 2007 session of the Utah state legislature. One was
established with the University of Utah in order to provide graduate programs in selected areas. The other is with
Southern Utah University intended to grow regional access to educational undergraduate programs.


University of Utah
Three initial programs are targeted in the establishment of a permanent University of Utah Graduate Center on
DSC‘s campus. The proposal was jointly created to include degrees in critical areas not locally delivered. These
areas are the master‘s in nursing, the master‘s in special education, and the executive MBA opened to non-business
degreed graduates with five or more years of experience. Requests for these specific degrees were generated
through discussions with local major employers. Additional discussions include official partnership oversight for
future allied health degree programs, as well as, developing official relationships that would provide enhanced library
services to Dixie State College students. Library discussions range from license extensions to outsourcing library
functions at Dixie to the Marriot Library. The University‘s offerings are the most comprehensive available, given the
medical holdings and the potential relationship developing between the two institutions.


Dixie ATC
Dixie State College and the Dixie Applied Technology College (DXATC) have a co-operative and supportive
partnership. When legislation created the DXATC as part of the UCAT institution, DSC‘s Dean of Vocational
Education became the founding president. As a result, these two institutions have been ―in sync‖ since the
beginning. Not only did DSC agree and contract to provide space on its campus, it provided payroll and other
administrative assistance until DXATC gained enough financial independence to stand alone. DXATC in return
agreed to have its president continue to serve as DSC‘s Director of Vocational Education. In addition to attending
Regional planning meetings for vocational educational opportunities, the two institutions meet with prospective
employers and determine the best way to achieve training goals set desired. Sometimes meetings result only in
short-term, intensive training opportunities offered at DXATC. Sometimes they result in a certificate or degree
approach through DSC, and sometimes they result in a hybrid that offers DXATC opportunities that will articulate into
degree electives at DSC.
Southern Utah University
Potential program partnerships with Southern Utah University fall into two main categories. The first is the
Development/Delivery Model and the second is the long term Two-Plus-Two Model. Currently departments from the
two institutions have created a delivery plan for the Criminal Justice baccalaureate degree. They have identified
courses and specific timelines for the delivery of courses and the simultaneous development of Dixie courses. They
have plans for at least one shared position as the program progresses to completion and maturation.
New discussions are beginning in other social science areas, languages, and athletic training. Unfortunately,
programs that require dual enrollment create, as yet, unresolved eligibility questions for our new Division II athletics.
Although such partnerships as Criminal Justice and Athletic Training may make sense for institutional efficiency, they
may not serve students best. Two enrollments, two financial aid systems, two tuition structures, and two advising
structures are cumbersome at best and punitive at worst. It is necessary to create seamless opportunity for students
and may require the Utah system to accept modifications in FTE reporting, financial aid distribution from a central
location and shared ownership between institutions of degrees.
Some content areas are what the consultant Longanecker referred to as ―forced, unnatural alliances.‖ These areas
are those that are so integral to Dixie State College‘s responsive outreach to its service area that the cumbersome,
multi-institutional approach poses more barriers than solutions. Forced partnerships in secondary education and in
fine and performing arts are two such areas and would threaten active, vibrant partnerships with community entities


                                                           - -
                                                           31
and Dixie‘s ability to respond to changing local needs. Even within student access limitations is a developing
partnership in Secondary Education between the two institutions.
At this time, it is anticipated that Dixie State College will have a stand-alone secondary licensure program for degrees
that are residential and for areas that offer coherent courses leading to endorsement, such as mathematics.
Progress is being made on articulating the two sets of pedagogy courses in the respective programs. In a
memorandum dated July, 2006, SUU‘s Dean of Education confirmed acceptable articulation with current DSC
courses offered in elementary education for the first four courses listed in the chart below. In a subsequent meeting
of representatives from the two institutions, a request for full articulation of all courses for the two programs was
discussed. This articulation is needed in order to support student participation in the larger area of cooperation within
the secondary education partnership.
Dixie State College currently does not have a complete set of teaching majors needed within the Washington County
School District. The college has proposed additional degrees specifically noted by the District that are considered
critical. In addition to the critical areas of need, other majors are needed to fulfill the growing needs in the districts of
Washington and Kane Counties. In order to provide the greatest access to Washington County residents in the most
convenient and cost-effective opportunity, Southern Utah University has agreed to offer two-plus-two teaching
majors. In this scenario upper division courses in a specific discipline not offered in DSC curriculum will be offered
via IP video or in face-to-face courses on Dixie State‘s campus. Lists of SUU courses and disciplines with time lines
will be constructed to aid students in planning course sequences. The degrees in these content areas will belong to
SUU; however, it is anticipated that some on-campus licensure courses may be taken at Dixie and articulate to SUU,
as will SUU courses articulate to Dixie‘s program.




                                                             - -
                                                             32
                                                                            DSC Proposed
                  DSC Current Courses               SUU Courses             Courses in SET
                                                                               Program
                                                                       SCED 3100, Introduction
                                               EDUC 2000, Exploring
                        EDUC 1010,                                       to Teaching and Best
                                                       Education
                                                                               Practices
                                                                           SCED 3300, The
                                                                         Inclusive Classroom;
                                                     SPED 3030,
                                                                              SCED 3050,
                        EDUC 2010              Foundations of Special
                                                                             Foundations of
                                                       Education
                                                                       American Education and
                                                                                Diversity
                                              SCED 3200, Educational PSY 3210, Adolescent
                        EDUC 3110
                                                      Psychology              Development
                                                   EDUC 3170, Inst
                                                                       SCED 4550, Technology
                        EDUC 4500                   Technology for
                                                                       for Secondary Teachers
                                                 Teachers/e-Portfolio
                                                                        SCED 3720, Reading
                                                SCED 3720, Content
                                                                           and Writing in the
                                                        Literacy
                                                                             Content Areas
                                               SCED 3570, Motivation
                                                 and Management of     SCED 4600, Classroom
                                                 Diverse Instructional        Management
                                                    Environments
                                                                       SCED 4100, Standards-
                                                     SCED 3590,           Based Assessment,
                                                Instructional Planning Curriculum & Instruction
                                                     and Delivery      (Taken during semester
                                                                       before student teaching.)
                                                     SCED 4520,        SCED 4800, Secondary
                                                  Practicum/Seminar       Teaching Practicum
                                                                       SCED 4900, Secondary
                                                 SCED 4980, Clinical    Student Teaching and
                                                        Practice         SCED 4910, Student
                                                                           Teaching Seminar


(Comment notes: Last fall, members of the education departments at SUU and at Dixie developed a
delivery/development model that provided licensure to students. Some classes belonged to SUU and some
belonged to Dixie. Several issues came up that need to be addressed.
    1. How do athletes in Division II qualify to make progress towards a degree when the degree is not on Dixie‘s
       campus (the home campus)? A ruling came from NCAA to Dixie State College‘s compliance officer that it
       was not possible. Ownership of degree must be Dixie‘s. Student athletes may take courses at the external
       institution, but at least 12 hours must be Dixie State credit each semester.

    2. NCATE accreditation also accredits content areas in secondary education, not just pedagogy. In other
       words biology courses would need to come under SUU‘s accreditation rather than Dixie. Degree
       requirements are different at the two institutions, creating the need to standardize our current degrees. This
       represents a restriction on Dixie‘s ability to create programs that focus on local need and respond to national
       trends. It limits the institution‘s responsiveness to local employers and to the local population base.



                                                         - -
                                                         33
3. Washington County School District is in the middle of an educational reform. It wants teachers ready ―to hit
   the ground running,‖ as stated by the superintendent. The District hires virtually every graduate from Dixie‘s
   elementary education program for this very reason. Joint development of training and common experiences
   within the District uniquely prepares Dixie‘s graduates to give an almost disproportionately high amount of
   value-added during the first year of teaching. The College and the District want to build on this success to
   create an exemplary program in secondary education.

4. Students should be our first and foremost consideration. Students at Dixie, because they live in Washington
   County, should not be penalized. They should not be required to apply to two different institutions
   simultaneously, qualify for two financial aid procedures, make two sets of appointments for advisement, and
   pay the additional tuition for upper division courses through SUU.

5. If SUU credit is generated on Dixie‘s campus with Dixie students in Dixie classrooms, how does it help Dixie
   State College‘s headcount and FTE? Dixie was told it needs a 1000 more students, so how does it help
   Dixie to give away credit?)




                                                     - -
                                                     34
                                                          Projected Costs for New Programs
                                                                   Three Year Plan
                                                                  Dixie State College
          Degree Name                   Degree Type                   Program Costs           Degree Projection at Maturity Based on 600 DSC degrees
                                                                                                               and % USHE Awards

          Early Childhood                    AS                         $125,000                                        10

         Integrated Studies                 BS,BA                        275,000                                        10


     Physical Therapy Assistant             AAS                          385,000                                        24


     Communication/Leadership                BS                          200,000                                        12
                                                                       Self-Support
                                             AS
   Medical Laboratory Technology             BS                          550,000                                        24


            Psychology                      BS,BA                        265,000                                        30

 Mechanical Engineering Technician
                                            AS                           290,000                                        10
     Construction Management               AS, BS                        240,000                                         5


       Mathematical Sciences                BS,BA                        325,000                                        4

          Social Sciences                   BS,BA                        315,000                                        68

               Total                                                $1,040,000 AS/AAS                               39 AS/AAS
                                                                     $1,930,000 BS/BA                               155 BS/BA
Enrollments based upon percentages of awarded degrees from IPEDS, USHE 2006-2007 Databook. Dixie State College‘s mature degree uses 600 baccalaureates.




                                                                         35
                                                     Current Baccalaureate Program Capacity and Expansion Costs
                                                                            Dixie State College

BS/BA Degree Program       Current Degree   Projected Number for          Expansion Unit              Costs per                       Facilities Expansion after X Enrollment Exp
                                                                                                                                      and Comments
(Start Date)               (# of Degrees    Mature Degree (BS Base =      Additional Degrees          Expansion Unit
                           06/07)           600 degrees and % USHE        when current capacity is
                                            Baccalaureate Awards 05/06)   maximized.

Biological Science (‘07)   0                20     (3.2%)                 20 Degrees                  $ 720,000                       Current facilities inadequate for health science
                                                                                                                                      support role. 1.5 million dollar remodeling will
                                                                          (Approximately 200          Instructors (4)
                                                                                                                                      support current operations.
                                                                          undergraduate students)
                                                                                                      Lab Prep (2)
                                                                                                                                      Current Capacity serves USHE percent
                                                                                                      Advisor (1)                     degree award projections.
                                                                                                      Tutors (5)        Dept. Funds

Business (‘01)             54               108     (18.0%)               27 Degrees                  $ 620,000                       Current bottlenecks in the degree program.
                                                                           (Approximately 200         Econ (1)          Finance (1)
                                                                          undergraduate students in
                                                                                                      Math/Stats (1) Advisor (1)
                                                                          the pipeline.)
                                                                                                      Business (1) Dept funds

CIT (‘01)                  23               21      (3.5%)                20 Degrees                  $ 520,000                       Expanded Computer Labs and Tech support
                                                                          (Approximately 150          Instructors (4) Advisor (1)     Currently Above the USHE discipline
                                                                          undergraduate students in   Recruitment (1) Student Help    percentage.
                                                                          the pipeline.
                                                                                                      Equipment                       Current Capacity serves USHE percent
                                                                                                                                      degree award projections.

Communication (CNM ‘06)    7                34      (5.3%)                30 Degrees                  $ 570,000                       Current Capacity serves USHE percent
                                                                                                                                      degree award projections.
                                                                          (Approximately 150          Instructors (4)
                                                                          undergraduate students in
                                                                                                      Equipment, Dept Funds
                                                                          the pipeline.)




                                                                                       - -
                                                                                       36
BS/BA Degree Program         Current Degree    Projected Number for            Expansion Unit               Costs per                        Facilities Expansion after X Enrollment Exp
                                                                                                                                             and Comments
(Start Date)                 (# of Degrees     Mature Degree (BS Base =        Additional Degrees           Expansion Unit
                             06/07)            600 degrees and % USHE          when current capacity is
                                               Baccalaureate Awards 05/06)     maximized.

Dental Hygiene (‘08)         0                 12       (2.0%)*                15 Degrees                   $ 235,000                        BS will be electronically delivered. Scheduled
                                                                                                                                             to begin ‘08.
                                                                               (Approximately 60            Instructor (2)
                                                                               students in the pipeline.)
                                                                                                            Department Funds
                                                                                                            Licensure Updates

Elementary Ed (‗02)          50                70     (11.7% USHE only         35 Degrees                   $ 625,000                        Currently above the USHE degree production
                                               10.4%)                                                                                        percentage for category.
                                                                               (Approximately 150           Instructors (4) Clinical (1)
                                                                               undergraduate students in
                                                                                                            Technology (1) Math Prep(1)
                                                                               the pipeline.)
                                                                                                            General Ed (1) Dept. Funds

English (‘07)                 0                18       (2.9%)                 15 Degrees                   $ 375,000                        Current build-out for new degree.
                                                                                                            Instructors (3)                  Current Capacity serves USHE percent
                                                                                                                                             degree award projections.
                                                                                                            Department Funds

Nursing (‘05)                11                12       (2.0%)*                12 Degrees                   $ 500,000                        Current Capacity serves USHE percent
                                                                                                                                             degree award projections.
                                                                               (Approximately 300           Instructors (4)
                                                                               undergraduate students in                                     Expansion limited by clinical space availability.
                                                                                                            Department Funds
                                                                               the pipeline.)
                                                                                                            Licensure Updates

                                                                                                             $ 640,000
                                                                                                            Library/Infrastructure Support

Total                                                                          157 BS/BA Degrees            $4,905,000
         Part of a total USHE Health Care 6.0% total of degrees awarded.
         Enrollment projections are based upon percentages of awarded degrees from IPEDS, USHE 2006-2007 Databook.
         Dixie State College‘s mature degree projections use 600 baccalaureate degrees as a base within ten years.



                                                                                            - -
                                                                                            37
DSC’s Strategic Enrollment Plan
What kinds of students will enroll in the academic programs in the academic plan above? Where will students come
from, and what will be their academic and demographic profiles?

The College‘s overall strategic enrollment goal is to meet Southwest Utah‘s need for an educated workforce, and
meeting these needs will require that enrollments grow. The College‘s enrollments will grow significantly because of
three trends: First, significant population growth in DSC‘s service region will lead to increased headcount and FTE,
almost regardless of what the College does. Second, the College will develop academic programs and outreach
services that address currently unmet needs for higher education that exist in identifiable segments of the population.
If DSC cannot provide an attractive range of certificate, associate, and baccalaureate offerings, the currently unmet
regional need for higher education will continue or worsen. And third, the College will retain students at a higher
rate.

Enrollment is often described as a ―pipeline.‖ The College will meet its overall strategic enrollment goal of by
focusing on three broad phases of the enrollment pipeline – the Input Phase, the Maintenance Phase, and the Output
Phase.
     Input: In the first enrollment phase, students come into the educational pipeline. The chart on page 39
         below shows a number of ―Input Factors‖ that indicate a healthy flow of enrollments into the pipeline: new
         freshman, overall FTE, total headcount, etc.
     Maintenance: In the second enrollment phase, student flow through the pipeline of the College‘s academic
         programs. The chart on page 47 below shows a number of ―Maintenance Factors‖ that indicate appropriate
         continued enrollments: first- to second-year retention, a growing proportion of upper-division FTE as
         academic programs mature, and increased numbers of declared majors in the College‘s academic
         programs.
     Output: In the final enrollment phase, students complete their academic programs and leave the institution
         having fulfilled their goals. The chart on page 54 below shows a number of ―Output Factors‖ that indicate
         successful completion of academic programs: completion within six years, and the annual numbers of
         degrees and certificates awarded.




                                                          38
The following discusses enrollment goals related to these three phases.

Enrollment Input Factors:

                                       (i.e., getting new students into the pipeline)



                                                                       Current            Yearly      Yearly      Yearly
          Factor                         Description                   Status,            Goal,       Goal,       Goal,
                                                                      2006-2007         2007-2008   2008-2009   2009-2010

     1.   New Freshman
                            Number of new freshman students                 1,339            1366        1448        1549
          Students
                            enrolled fall term as measured at third
                            week.



     2.   Overall FTE
                            Total full-time equivalent students at          3,982            4062        4305        4650
                            DSC as of third-week in fall term.



     3.   Total Headcount
                            The headcount of all enrolled                   5,967            6086        6573        7165
                            students as of third week of fall term.



     4.   Non-Traditional
                            Unduplicated headcount of degree-                1034            1241        1489        1787
          Headcount
                            seeking students 25 through 64 years
                            of age, as of third week in fall Term

                                      Percent of Total Headcount:          17.3%           20.4%       22.7%       24.9%



     5.   Ethnic
                            The headcount of non-white students               531             616         715         829
          Headcount
                            as of third week of fall term.

                                      Percent of Total Headcount:            8.9%          10.1%       10.9%       11.6%




                                                             - -
                                                             39
New Freshman Students: (Number of new freshman students enrolled fall term as measured at third week.) This is
the most important factor indicating a healthy flow of students into the enrollment pipeline. While enrollment growth
is impacted by retention and transfer, the flow of new freshman students into the pipeline shows that the College is
successful in bringing new students to the institution.


In general, DSC is quite dissatisfied with recent performance on this enrollment factor. New freshman enrollments
have been flat and falling at DSC, a fact that is often attributed to a general decline in the number of Utah‘s
graduating seniors, to a decline in the college-going rate among high school graduates, and to a robust state and
regional economy that offers high school graduates attractive alternatives to college study. Regardless, DSC is
committed to increasing new freshman enrollments, especially among students in DSC‘s service region, Washington
and Kane Counties.


In recent years, the number of new freshman students coming into DSC‘s enrollment pipeline has been flat and
falling, as the following chart indicates.



                             New Freshman Students (Fall Term)

   1550


   1500            1502                           1506
                                                                  1495           1489

   1450                            1458


   1400


   1350
                                                                                                1339
   1300


   1250
               2001           2002            2003             2004          2005           2006




                                                         - -
                                                         40
The number of high school graduates in Utah is currently in a years-long pattern of decline or low growth as
illustrated by the following WICHE chart3. All USHE institutions are responding by increasing their recruitment and
institutional aid efforts, such that there is a generally heightened atmosphere of state competition for the limited
number of high school graduates. The marketing and institutional aid programs at USHE institutions show a marked
increase in quality and intensity during recent years.




Despite the fact that the number of high school graduates in Utah is either flat or falling, the number of high school
graduates in Dixie State‘s service region is growing. The Census Bureau reports that Washington County‘s
population aged 18-24 grew by 26.4 percent between 2000 and 20054. Also, the 2005 Teacher Supply and
Demand Study projected Washington County to have the highest growth rate in school age population in Utah, at
nearly sixty percent growth by 2012.


Interestingly, the recent decline in DSC‘s new freshman student enrollments is primarily due to a decline in
enrollments of students from northern Utah, and not due to a decline in students from Washington County. At the
same time that the number of northern Utah new freshman students has declined by 28 percent, the number of
Washington and Kane County new freshman students has remained constant or increased slightly. To achieve its
annual goals related to new freshman students, DSC will focus on students who live in its service region and will
avoid a ―marketing and financial aid arms race‖ that involves heightened competition for northern Utah students.


3From WICHE Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates by State, Income, and Race/Ethnicity,
December 2003, http://wiche.edu/policy/Knocking/1988-2018/profiles/ut.pdf.
4The Census webpage, http://factfinder.census.gov, reports that Washington County‘s population aged 18-24 was 10,487 in
2000, and this age group had grown to 13,264 by 2005.
                                                            - -
                                                            41
While DSC will continue its traditional efforts to recruit and enroll students from all parts of Utah, it will redouble its
energy and resources on meeting regional students‘ needs. It will partner with Washington and Kane County School
Districts to increase the college-going rate among the high school graduates of Southwestern Utah.


Relevant to the atmosphere of increased institutional competition for declining numbers of Utah high school
graduates, recent research points out that recruiting the most highly attractive high school graduates may not be the
most efficient tactic for a regional college. Thomas and Reznik (2001) point out that ―the students who are ‗hot
prospects‘ because they are desirable are not the ‗hot prospects‘ with high enrollment probabilities.‖ Because these
students are offered a greater number of enrollment options including institutional aid and recruitment enticements,
aggressively seeking such students may lead to ―inefficient use of recruitment resources.‖ These authors suggest
that recruiting students who have fewer options but who are still academically prepared will result in a recruiting
program with greater ―marginal impact.‖ DSC will avoid costly involvement in a statewide recruitment arms race that
leads to inefficient use of recruitment resources5.


Overall FTE and Total Headcount: (Total full-time equivalent students at DSC as of third-week in fall term and the
headcount of all enrolled students as of third week of fall term.) Two other factors that indicate a healthy flow of
students into the enrollment pipeline are overall FTE and total headcount. In the recent past, the both of these
factors have fallen off at DSC. Traditionally, DSC had a dominant enrollment goal to increase headcount. The
College sought this historic enrollment goal through several programmatic and administrative means. First, the
College established a pricing strategy that was particularly attractive for part-time students, the ―Three-Credits-or-
Less Program‖ in which students taking a small number of credits did not pay student fees. Also, the College used a
reporting technique that included participants in credit-bearing sport workshops, thus increasing the number of
headcount substantially.




5Thomas, Emily and Reznik, Gail (2001). Using Predictive Modeling to Target Student Recruitment: Theory and
Practice. The Association for Institutional Research, Policy Analysis, and Planning, Number 78.


                                                            - -
                                                            42
The following chart shows FTE (lower line) and headcount (upper line) for the past six years. The enrollment
patterns reflected on this chart may be directly related to DSC‘s overall pricing strategy. For years, DSC‘s strategy
was to be a low-priced institution, with tuition levels that were well below those of other four-year institutions. This
pricing strategy resulted in high rates of part-time instruction and introduced limits on the quality that DSC was able to
provide. During the 2005 and 2006 years, DSC shifted its strategy toward quality, and the College increased its
tuition levels substantially, investing the net revenues into quality initiatives in instructional programs. This strategy
has been healthy overall for the institution, but the price elasticity has resulted in reductions in overall FTE. Also,
after the 2005 year, the College abandoned a reporting technique that included participants in credit-bearing sport
workshops, and gave less emphasis to attracting single-class-taking students, resulting in the following reductions in
overall headcount.




                                         FTE and Headcount

                10000
                                                                           8737         8996
                 8000
                                                 7251         7490
                                    7001
                 6000                                                                               5723
                                                 4260         4425         4518         4495
                 4000               4087                                                            3982

                 2000

                       0
                              2001         2002         2003          2004         2005         2006




An important enrollment feature is the ratio of headcount to FTE. In the 2005 year, for example, the ratio was slightly
below 50 percent; however, by the following year, the ratio was nearly 70 percent. This latter ratio is more typical of
a maturing state college, with a greater portion of students pursuing their goals on a full-time basis. As a part of its
enrollment goals, the College will maintain a ratio of headcount to FTE in the range of 65 to 70 percent.




                                                           - -
                                                           43
Non-Traditional Headcount: (Unduplicated headcount of degree-seeking students 25 through 64 years of age, as
of 3rd week in fall Term.) DSC is concerned to address the needs of important segments of the population in its
service region, including those of returning adult students. While new freshmen students (those recently graduated
from high school) are the ―traditional college student,‖ there is a growing need in DSC‘s service region to serve the
needs of older adults. The following chart shows the number of students aged 25 and older who have enrolled at
DSC during the past six years:




                            Number of Students Aged 25 and
                                         Older

                   1400
                   1200                                                             1154
                                                            1011        1056                  1035
                   1000
                                                874
                     800
                                    735
                     600
                     400
                     200
                        0
                               2001        2002        2003       2004        2005        2006




                                                          - -
                                                          44
Recent Census data indicate that age composition of Southwest Utah‘s population is changing through immigration,
such that persons aged 25 to 34 has grown into a demographic segment whose needs must be addressed. The
following chart shows age groups in Washington County in 2000 and 20056:




Census data show that the number of persons aged 25-34 in Washington County more than doubled in the five years
from 2000 to 2005. Also, educational attainment data show that these persons have ongoing need for educational
services to upgrade skills and achieve credentials needed for success in the regional economy.


Because this age group has become such a large demographic segment with unmet educational need, DSC will
devote a great deal of resources to recruiting these adult students. Whereas non-traditional students now constitute
just over 17 percent of DSC‘s headcount, within three years, they will constitute a fourth of all students at DSC. Such
a change will require a basic re-tooling of educational and student services at DSC. These students will desire more
―packaged‖ educational offerings and scheduling that is flexible. Also, these students have fundamentally different
kinds of needs than traditional students (child care, advisement, career services, etc.), and DSC will devote
considerable resources to meeting these students‘ needs.




6The Census webpage, http://factfinder.census.gov, includes this data, from the 2000 decennial Census and the 2005 American
Community Survey, showing that the number of persons aged 25-34 in Washington County more than doubled in these five
years.
                                                            - -
                                                            45
Ethnic Headcount: (The headcount of non-white students as of third week of fall term.) Interestingly, the percent of
Washington County‘s non-white population was precisely the same as the percent of DSC‘s non-white population,
8.9 percent, with 91.1 percent being white7.


While DSC may be satisfied that its ratio of non-white students matches that of the ecological community, there are
demographic indicators that concern the College. For example, Washington County School District‘s student
population is 84 percent white and 11 percent Hispanic8, and a comparison of the composition of ethnic groups within
the County and the College populations shows that some ethnic groups are underrepresented at DSC, principally
persons of Hispanic origin. In Washington County, 7.1 percent of the population is Hispanic; however, at DSC this
group comprises less than three percent of the student body.


The following chart shows the number of students enrolled by ethnicity over the past several years:




Many reviews of literature on the student experience describe the positive impact of diversity on the experience of all
students in higher education. Pascarella and Terenzini (2005) review dozens of studies that are in consensus that ―a
diverse student body in an institution will have an indirect, positive influence on student learning by increasing the
likelihood of student exposure to, and involvement in, diversity experiences‖9.


Because some groups continue to be underrepresented, and because increased diversity enhances student learning,
DSC will increase both the non-white headcount and proportion of its ethnic student enrollments. While currently 8.9
percent of DSC‘s students declare that they are non-white, within the next three years, this proportion will increase to
almost 12 percent and the proportion of Hispanic students at DSC will more closely reflect the proportion of Hispanic
persons living in Southwest Utah.




7The County‘s ethnicity is available from Lecia Parks Langston at lecialangston@utah.gov, or http://jobs.utah.gov.wi, and the
College‘s ethnic enrollments are available at http://www.dixie.edu/ir/dscirenrollment.htm.
8The Washington County School District‘s October 2007 ethnic composition is available at
http://secondaryed.washk12.org/module/storage/116-116-ENROLLMENT.html.
9Pascarella, Ernest T. and Terenzini, Patrick T. (2005.) How College Affects Students, Volume 2: A Third Decade of Research,
p. 130.
                                                               - -
                                                               46
Enrollment Maintenance Factors:

                                       (i.e., keeping students in the pipeline)



                                                                                        Yearly   Yearly   Yearly
                                                                             Current
                                                                                        Goal,    Goal,    Goal,
           Factor                             Description                    Status,
                                                                                        2007-    2008-    2009-
                                                                            2006-2007
                                                                                         2008     2009     2010

                                 Number of New Freshman who Return
   6.   First- to Second-Year
                                for the Subsequent Fall Term, as of third                629      676      753
        Retention
                                             week fall term.

                                         Percentage increase:                43.4%      47.0%    49.5%    52.0%




                                FTE generated by courses numbered at
   7.   Number of Upper-
                                 3000 and above, as of third week fall        301        350      405      470
        Division FTE
                                               term.


                                        Percentage of total FTE:              7.6%      8.6%     9.4%     10.1%




                                Number of students who have declared
   8.   Headcount of Declared
                                   majors in one of DSC's approved
        Baccalaureate Degree                                                  460        534      619      718
                                baccalaureate degrees, as of third week
        Majors
                                               fall term.




                                Number of students who have declared
   9.   Headcount of Declared       majors in one of DSC's approved
        Non-General-            discipline-specific associate degrees, as
                                                                              867        919      974     1033
        Associate Degree         of third week fall term (AAS, AB, APE,
        Majors                  ACJ, etc. -- all associate degrees except
                                                AA and AS).




                                                         - -
                                                         47
First-to-Second-Year Retention: (Number of new freshman who return for the subsequent fall term, as of third
week fall term.) This factor shows the College‘s ability to keep students in the pipeline once they have entered.
Quite frankly, the College has never performed well on this enrollment factor. The following charts show that, of new
freshman students entering in a fall term, approximately 65 to 75 percent return for the subsequent term, and
approximately 40 to 45 percent return for the following year. This pattern is clearly unsatisfactory.




Clearly, DSC must move aggressively and intelligently to resolve its retention problems. DSC will initiate and
maintain a persistent, campus-wide retention strategy that will involve all members of the campus community in
improving the retention of enrolled students. Whereas, currently new freshmen students are retained to the second
year at a rate of between 40 and 45 percent, within three years, that rate will be improved to 52 percent.



                                                         - -
                                                         48
The campus retention strategy will be based on widely held theories of student retention, the most commonly
accepted of which is that of Tinto (1993)10. In his studies of student retention, Tinto noted Durkheim‘s assertion that
suicide is basically a failure to participate in the norms and values of one‘s society. Not finding a strong connection to
the values of one‘s society, one simply drops out. In a similar way, Tinto suggested that students drop out of college
because they are not ―integrated‖ into the norms and values of higher education.


Pascarella and Terenzini (2005) describe Tinto‘s theory as follows:


            . . . Students enter a college or university with a variety of patterns of personal, family, and academic
            characteristics and skills, including initial dispositions and intentions with respect to college attendance and
            personal goals. These intentions and commitments are subsequently modified and reformulated on a
            continuing basic through a longitudinal series of interactions between the [student] and the structures and
            members of the academic and social systems of the institution. The academic and social communities
            within an institution are seen as nested inside an external environment of family, friends, and other
            commitments that places its demands on students in ways largely beyond the students‘ institutional worlds.


Now, Tinto‘s insight is that if students are ―integrated‖ into the norms and values of the institution, they will accept the
standards and methods of the institution and feel commitment and resolve that will cause them to persist at the
institution. This is essentially a process of socialization – of coming to accept standards and methods and creating
an inner sense of commitment. This socialization occurs through two important kinds of interaction – student-faculty
and student-student. Pascarella and Terenzini (2005) describe these kinds of interaction as follows:


            Rewarding encounters with the formal and informal academic and social systems of the institution
            presumably lead to greater student integration in these systems and thus to persistence. Integration is the
            extent to which the individual shares the normative attitudes and values of peers and faculty in the institution
            and abides by the formal and informal structural requirements for membership in that community or in
            subgroups of it. As integration increases, it strengthens students‘ commitments to both their personal goals
            and to the institution through which these goals may be achieved.




10   Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving College: Rethinking the Causes and Cures of Student Attrition (2nd ed.).
                                                                 - -
                                                                 49
The following is a visual representation of Tinto‘s famous model11. DSC will improve its retention by increasing both
the amount and the quality of student-faculty and student-student interactions, thereby enhancing students‘
―integration‖ with the norms and values of higher education, and thereby increasing students‘ commitment to
educational goals. The student-faculty interactions will be, as the following model suggests, both formal (within the
classroom) and informal (within the general campus environment and student activities). Likewise, the student-
student interactions will be both formal (within academic and extracurricular activities) and informal (within the
general campus environment via such things as the open Fitness Center, intramurals, student activities, and outdoor
recreation).




A more contemporary and perhaps detailed version of Tinto‘s concept of ―integration‖ is Kuh‘s concept of
―engagement,‖ which is ―defined as the time and energy that students devote to educationally purposeful activities
and the extent to which the institution gets students to participate in activities that lead to student success12‖ (Kezar
and Kinzie, 2006). DSC will first assess its current levels of student engagement through a nationally normed
instrument, the NSSE, and once having discovered areas of strength and weakness, it will devote itself to
improvement.


Number of Upper-Division FTE: (FTE generated by courses numbered at 3000 and above, as of third week fall
term.) Another factor that indicates that students are appropriately maintained in the pipeline is upper-division FTE.
This factor suggests that students are advancing from entry-level coursework toward more advanced coursework,
and it therefore is a chief indicator of both institutional maturity and students‘ satisfactory progress toward academic
goals. The following chart shows that since the time of DSC‘s 1999 mission change to add four-year programs, the
number of upper-division FTE has grown steadily:




11   From Pascarella and Terenzini (2005), p. 55.
12Kezar, Adrianna and Kinzie, Jillian (2006). Examining the ways institutions create student engagement: The role of mission.
Journal of College Student Development, 42:2, p. 150.
                                                              - -
                                                              50
                               Number of Upper-Division FTE

                    350
                    300                                                                            301
                    250                                                                260

                    200                                                   211
                                                              185
                    150                          145
                    100             96
                      50
                       0
                               2001        2002         2003        2004         2005         2006



Despite a pattern of growth, at present, only 301 of the College‘s 3,982 FTE is upper-division – a relatively small
portion, or 7.6 percent. Within three years, this number will grow to 470 FTE, comprising a larger portion of the
overall FTE, at over ten percent.


Headcount of Declared Baccalaureate Degree Majors: (Number of students who have declared majors in one of
DSC's approved baccalaureate degrees, as of third week fall term.) This factor also indicates that students are
maintained in the pipeline of the College‘s academic programs. In fall 2006, 460 students had declared majors in
DSC‘s seven baccalaureate programs. Within three years, that number will increase to 718.


One of the major impediments to progress on this factor is the number of available degree choices. With a very
limited menu of degree offerings, DSC is likely to struggle in its efforts to attract and retain large numbers of students.
In a recent nation-wide survey of 2000 high school graduates revealed that ―Eighty-Three percent view the availability
of their intended major as the most important factor in choosing their future university, with the availability of financial
aid packages as a close second‖13. If DSC is able to offer a viable and attractive range of degree choices, it will find
meeting its enrollment goals a good deal easier than if it cannot offer such a range of choices.


Headcount of Declared Non-General-Associate Degree Majors: (Number of students who have declared majors
in one of DSC's approved discipline-specific associate degrees, as of third week fall term – AAS, AB, APE, ACJ, etc.


13 From ―Monster Reveals Findings from Its First Annual Survey of High School Graduates,‖ published May 21, 2007
in BUSINESS WIRE, at http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=131001&p=irol-
newsArticle&ID=1004683&highlight= and repeated in the Chronicle of Higher Education web edition, at
http://chronicle.com/news/article/2348/intended-major-is-major-factor-in-students-choice-of-colleges-survey-finds.



                                                            - -
                                                            51
– all associate degrees except AA and AS.) This enrollment factor has to do with the ratio of general associate
degrees (the AA and AS) to discipline specific associate degrees such as the Associate of Business, the Associate of
Nursing, the Associate of Criminal Justice, and the Associate of Pre-Engineering. Several data sources (the USHE
Data Book, IPEDS, and the NCES Digest of Education Statistics) show the following percentages of general
associate degrees:


                 U.S., 34%
                 USHE, 55%
                 SLCC, 50%
                 WSU, 64%
                 DSC, 71%


Whereas in the United States only a third of associate degrees are general transfer degrees, with the complement
being discipline-specific associate degrees, at DSC 71 percent are general associate degrees and only 29 percent
are discipline-specific. DSC does not believe that this pattern reflects a healthy maintenance of students in the
pipeline. Too often, students assume that a general associate degree is a terminal degree, and once having
completed the general associate degree, they consider themselves finished with their higher education.


While the general associate degree (the AA and AS) was designed as a transfer degree, far too few students actually
transfer and complete their baccalaureate degrees. Therefore, DSC believes that reducing the proportion of general
associate degrees is a more responsible and healthy enrollment strategy – a strategy that will lead to the ultimate
best benefit of students and the state of Utah. DSC will achieve this enrollment goal through two means: First, DSC
will encourage students to enroll directly into baccalaureate programs, and second, DSC will encourage students to
enroll in discipline specific associate degrees. By this second means, the number of students who declare majors in
discipline-specific associate degrees will increase from the current 867 to 1033 within three years.


DSC will employ a marketing strategy to increase the number of students who declare majors in DSC‘s
baccalaureate programs and DSC‘s discipline-specific associate degrees. The College calls this marketing strategy
―internal marketing,‖ or marketing targeted at currently enrolled students with the aim of influencing them to pursue
the College‘s current offerings. In the recent past, this internal marketing campaign has had the logo, ―Achieve a
Degree of Success,‖ as follows:




                                                         - -
                                                         52
This internal marketing campaign has also included a variety of media, including newspaper, radio, and campus
banners, with messages that promote DSC‘s academic offerings, such as the following:




Through coming years, DSC will continue its internal marketing campaign with the aim of increasing the number of
students who choose to major in its baccalaureate and discipline-specific associate degree programs.




                                                        - -
                                                        53
Enrollment Output Factors:
                                  (i.e., students leaving the pipeline upon completion)



                                                                                          Yearly   Yearly      Yearly
                                                                              Current
                                                                                          Goal,    Goal,       Goal,
             Factor                            Description                    Status,
                                                                                          2007-    2008-       2009-
                                                                             2006-2007
                                                                                           2008     2009        2010

                                   The percent of a cohort beginning six
     10. Completion within Six     years previous who have completed
                                                                              34.0%       35.0%    36.0%       37.0%
         Years                       their associate or baccalaureate
                                                 degrees.



                                       Number of students awarded
     11. Certificates Awarded      certificates of one year or less during     404         412      433         454
                                             the academic year.




                                  Number of students awarded associate
     12. Associate Degrees
                                    degrees (AS, AA, AAS) during the           809         825      858         901
         Awarded
                                             academic year.




                                      Number of students awarded
     13. Baccalaureate
                                      bachelor‘s degrees during the            141         164      190         220
         Degrees Awarded
                                            academic year.




                                  Increase the percentage of persons in
                                  DSC‘s service region (Washington and
     14. Service Region
                                    Kane Counties) aged 24 – 35 who           16.8%       17.4%    18.1%       18.9%
         Educational Attainment
                                  have a bachelor‘s degree, as reported
                                         by the Census Bureau.




Completion within Six Years: (The percent of a cohort beginning six years previous who have completed their
associate or baccalaureate degrees.) Output factors are those that show students who came into the pipeline,
persisted through the pipeline toward their degree, and finally completed their degree. This factor does not
distinguish which degree program, but instead shows the percent of students who complete any degree program
within a period of six years. Because this factor is so closely associated with retention, and because DSC‘s retention
is so unsatisfactory, this factor has historically been very low, as indicated in the following chart:


                                                            - -
                                                            54
As can be seen, the rate of completion within six year‘s time has fallen within the range of 30 to 37 percent. Because
this factor has a six-year completion cycle, it is difficult to effect major changes over a short time period.
Nevertheless, within the next three years this percentage will increase, largely as a result of the College‘s sustained
attention to the problem of retention.


Certificates Awarded: (Number of students awarded certificates of one year or less during the academic year.)
The following chart shows the recent history of degrees awarded at DSC (with associate degrees on the top line,
certificate degrees on the middle line, and baccalaureate degrees on the bottom line).




                                               Degrees Awarded

                        900
                                          845                   846
                        800      801               811                     809
    Degree Completers




                        700                        667                                   Associate Degrees
                        600
                        500                                                              Certificate Degrees
                                          456
                        400                                                404
                        300                                     338
                                                                                         Baccalaureate
                        200      211                                                     Degrees
                        100                        102          94         118
                                 37       63
                          0
                              2002     2003     2004     2005         2006
                                                Year



The number of degrees awarded is the most important enrollment outcome factor. In three years time, DSC will
increase the number of certificate degrees awarded from the current 404 to 454.


                                                          - -
                                                          55
Associate Degrees Awarded: (Number of students awarded associate degrees (AS, AA, AAS) during the academic
year.) The number of degrees awarded is the most important enrollment outcome factor. In three years time, DSC
will increase the number of associate degrees awarded from the current 809 to 901.


Baccalaureate Degrees Awarded: (Number of students awarded bachelor‘s degrees during the academic year.)
The number of degrees awarded is the most important enrollment outcome factor. In three years time, DSC will
increase the number of certificate degrees awarded from the current 141 to 220.


Service Region Educational Attainment: (Increase the Percentage of Persons in DSC‘s Service Region
[Washington and Kane Counties] Aged 24 – 35 Who Have a Bachelor‘s Degree, as reported by the Census Bureau.)
DSC‘s most important enrollment goal is to meet Southwest Utah‘s need for an educated workforce. All previous
enrollment goals are in serve to this foundational goal.


Recently, there are alarming reports about declines in the college-going rates among young people and declines in
the educational attainment rates among older segments of the populations. For example, on 6 August 2006, the Salt
Lake Tribune reported, ―In the past 10 years, the percentage of Utahns age 25 to 34 with bachelor's degrees has
slipped from 41 percent to 26 percent.‖ In Washington County, results were as indicated in the chart below (from the
online Tribune):




                                                        - -
                                                        56
The following chart shows baccalaureate attainment level by age group, illustrating that, when compared to other
regions, Washington County‘s population‘s baccalaureate attainment is lowest for the working-age segment, or those
with the most pressing need to sustain their family economies.




Many have suggested that the causes for the low educational attainment in Washington County are a lack of
commitment to education among the general population or an economic environment that does not value educational
attainment. Neither is a valid explanation. The ―educational premium‖ for those holding the baccalaureate is higher
in Southwest Utah than in most other regions of the state. Perhaps a more complete explanation of the low
attainment would include the lack of educational offerings and the opportunity cost of traveling outside the region to
complete one‘s education.


DSC senses a moral imperative to address the need for an educated workforce. Doing so will improve the fabric of
the community and the prospects of the College‘s valued neighbors. For Southwest Utah‘s population to meet the
Utah state average educational attainment level, DSC would have to offer many more programs and increase
instructional expenditures considerably.


In the short range, the College will not be able to bring the service region‘s attainment level to the Utah state level.
The short-fall took years to develop and will probably require years to set right. Nevertheless, DSC senses a strong
commitment to make progress on this overall goal. Therefore, over the next three years, DSC will contribute to a
two-percent increase in the educational attainment of Southwest Utah.


                                                           - -
                                                           57
58
- -
59
- -
60
- -
61
- -
62
- -
63
DSC’s Strategic Financial Plan

Historical Perspective:
When DSC was granted the mission change to provide baccalaureate programs, funding to make the change was
anticipated coming from three different sources: first, ―New Enrollment Growth‖ funding; second, elimination of non-
productive academic programs; and third, University Center funding that was transferred from SUU to DSC. While
the second and third funding sources were realized, the first funding source never materialized. In fact, just the
opposite occurred as the State of Utah went through a period of deficit reductions and budget cuts that, in
combination with the lack of new enrollment growth funding, left the mission change of DSC essentially unfunded.
The absence of anticipated new enrollment growth funding during the following years of expanded enrollments
exacerbated the problem.

These funding problems combined with the already daunting challenge of converting a community college faculty to
the level required for offering baccalaureate programs have created a financial challenge for the institution.

While the reasons for the funded deficit are things of the past, the need to correct the deficit is not. When compared
to other institutions, it was clear that DSC was under funded, even when compared to other community colleges.
Quick calculations showed that the funding gap between DSC and the average of Weber, SUU and UVSC was at
least $4,000,000.

                                                      Utah System of Higher Education
                                                  Tax Funds Per FTE - Fiscal Year 2004-2005



   $12.00
                       $11.40



   $10.00
                                         $9.28


                                                                                       $7.90                           $7.79
     $8.00                                                             $7.64

                                                        $6.87


     $6.00                                                                                                                               $5.43
                                                                                                     $5.35                                                $5.34



     $4.00




     $2.00




       $-
                University Of Utah   Utah State     Weber State   Southern Utah   Snow College   Dixie State   College Of Eastern Utah Valley State    Salt Lake
                                     University      University     University                    College             Utah            College         Community
 Source of Information: USHE Databook Tab H                                                                                                             College




Additional calculations based on funding models using Institutional Credit Hour Equivalents, (ICHE), showed that the
College was actually under funded by $6,533,500 for the FY 2005-06 funding year.
Financial Plan:
Dixie State College of Utah funding originates from four (4) primary sources: state appropriations, 41%; tuition and
fees, 29%; federal, state and local grants and contracts, 15%; and auxiliary revenue, 12%. Only revenues from
                                                                                  64
    tuition and fees and state appropriations can be used to address the funding shortfall. Therefore, the College has
    implemented a financial plan that has two major components:
        First:    Raise tuition over three years (2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009). The target rate is the WICHE
                  average for four-year institutions. (This benchmark is open for review as soon as the College and the
                  Commissioner‘s staff agree upon an appropriate peer group for the institution.)
                  a. The College raised tuition by 31.5% in FY 2006-07
                  b. The College raised tuition by 9% in FY 2007-08
             This leaves the College with a significant anticipated increase for the FY 2008-09 in order to come up to the
             WICHE average.
        Second:       Seek legislative support for the remaining $4,539,200 not covered by tuition increases to provide
                      for the critical mass of baccalaureate programs and to cover prior funding shortfalls.


    Implementation of the Financial Plan:
    In 2005-2006, Dixie State College needed an additional 42 faculty members to address core instructional needs at an
    estimated costs of $6,533,500. After raising tuition for the academic year 2006-2007 and the passage of SB90, as
    well as partnership allowances, the residual deficit is down to $3,460,800 as is shown in the following chart.
                                        Dixie State College of Utah
                                 Addressing the 27 ICHE Funding Deficiency
                                                                     Internal Budget                           Core Deficiency
                                                Tuition Revenue                             Legislature
                                                                      Reallocations                               Funding

    2005-2006 27 ICHE Core Deficiency                                                                              6,533,500

  Funding Used to Address The Deficiency

  2006-2007 Funding Addressing Faculty
                                                    1,194,400                -                    -                1,194,400
      Equity and Adjunct Reduction

2007-2008 Dual Purpose Funding Addressing
                                                     250,000              148,800            1,389,500             1,788,300
 Core Deficiencies and Balanced Expansion

2008-2009 Dual Purpose Funding Addressing
                                                         -                   -                 90,000                90,000
 Core Deficiencies and Balanced Expansion

   Total Funds Applied to the Deficiency            1,444,400             148,800            1,479,500             3,072,700


       Core Deficiency Remaining                                                                                   3,460,800




                                                               - -
                                                               65
    Balanced Expansion
    In order to take a balanced approach to strengthening the instructional core and at the same time continuing to
    develop regionally responsive educational offerings, Dixie State College proposes additional programs. The majority
    of these programs develop currently established departments. As new faculty members are added to the existing
    faculty, their workloads are comprised of both core courses and program enhancements that support the new
    degree. The workload ratio for most areas would be 80 percent core and 20 percent new courses.

    Based on the dual role of faculty members (reducing the core instructional deficit and supporting new certificate and
    degrees) and raising tuition to the Utah Non-R1 comprehensive college system average of $1,346 for an estimated
    6000 FTE, the remaining funding required to cover the original deficiency and provide for balanced expansion is
    $4,539,200.

    The following chart shows the anticipated tuition that could be raised by future tuition increases, ($2,123,300), and
    the amount of funding needed from the Legislature, ($3,541,700), in order to fund the balanced expansion and
    existing core deficiencies. Even after the funding for the balanced approach has been completed, there remains a
    $997,500 core funding deficit that needs to be covered. When this core deficit is combined with the balanced
    legislative funding of $3,541,700, the total legislative investment of $4,539,200 is established.

                                                                                              Funding for
                                                                                                                Core Deficiency
                                                  Tuition Revenue         Legislature          Balanced
                                                                                                                   Funding
                                                                                              Expansion

Proposed Funding for Balanced Expansion

Core Deficiency Remaining                                                                                          3,460,800

Proposed 18 programs to balance the Academic
Offerings at DSC (Programs would provide
                                                      2,123,300            3,541,700          (3,201,700)          (2,463,300)
academic base for DSC projected growth to 6,000
FTE students)



Remaining Core Deficiency                                                                                           997,500



Total Legislative Funding Required to Cover Deficiency and Provide for Balance Expansion                           4,539,200



(Tuition would be raised to Utah Non-R1 comprehensive college system average of $1,346 representing an 18% tuition Increase)




                                                              67
The following chart shows the expanded baccalaureate degrees that were funded from SB90 for FY2007-08 and the remaining degrees and associated costs that yet need to be
funded.
                                                                    Dixie State College of Utah
                                                            New Program Ranking with Associated Costs
                                                                      Updated April 12, 2006
        # Core
                    New Programs #     New      Program                                                                                                    Cumulative
     /Foundations                                                  Program (Cost $)                             Comments                         Degree
        Faculty     Faculty/Advisors   FTE       Costs                                                                                                     Cost Total
                                                                                             Program Coordinator, Lecture/Advisor, Practicum
          0                4            4.0     $340,000         Secondary Licensure                                                                      Funded SB90
                                                                                                     and Student Teaching Supervisor
                                                                   Dental Hygiene               Expanded two-year skill level. New building
          0                1            1.0      125,000                                                                                          BS      Funded SB90
                                                                     Expansion                          accommodates expansion.
                                                                                             New Program: Intermountain Health Care Critical                Funded
          0               2.5           2.5      250,000         Respiratory Therapy                                                              AAS
                                                                                                                  Area                                       SB90
                                                                      Fine Arts               Supports WCSD‘s critical need for music/band
          3                3            6        500,000                                                                                         BS,BA    Funded SB90
                                                                   (Music/Theater)                              teachers.
                                                                                                 Program Coordinator and Lecture/Advisor
          0               1.5           1.5      180,000       Health Care Management                                                             BS      Funded SB90
                                                                                                     Coordinator and Lecture/Advisor
          1               1.5           2.5      260,000         Aviation Management                                                              BS        15 5,000
                                                                                                               Core business
                                                                                             Core faculty to support each area of 14 emphasis
          6                2            8        625,000          Integrated Studies                                                             BS,BA      780,000
                                                                                                                   option.
                                                                                              New Program Intermountain Health Care critical               1,030,000
          0               3.5           2.5      250,000      Physical Therapy Assistant                                                          AAS
                                                                                                                     area
                                                                                               Core communication and business areas and
          1               1.0           2.0      200,000      Communication/Leadership                                                            BS       1.230,000
                                                                                                              Lecture/Advisor
                                                                                             New Program: Intermountain Health Care Critical      AS
          2               3.5           5.5      550,000    Medical Laboratory Technology                                                                  1,780,000
                                                                                                      Area Biology and science core               BS
                                                                                             Current need is 6 core faculties. Lecture/advisor
          3               0.5           3.5      325,000        Mathematical Sciences                                                            BS,BA     2,105,000
                                                                                                      is needed for the new degree.
                                                                                             One faculty member will support the introductory
          1               1.5           2.5      175,000           Early Childhood             education/elementary education and one will        AS        2,280,00
                                                                                                       specialize in early childhood.
                                                                                                  Core and foundational with a half time
          2               0.5           2.5      265,000             Psychology                                                                  BS,BA     2,545,000
                                                                                                              Lecture/Advisor.
                                                                                                  Core History and Political Science with
          2               1.5           3.5      315,000           Social Sciences                                                               BS,BA     2,860,000
                                                                                                              Lecture/Advisor
                                                                Mechanical Engineering       Content Faculty and supporting general education
          1                2            3        290,000                                                                                          AS       3,150,000
                                                                     Technician                                    faculty.


                                                                                        69
        # Core
                    New Programs #      New       Program                                                                                                    Cumulative
     /Foundations                                                    Program (Cost $)                             Comments                        Degree
        Faculty     Faculty/Advisors    FTE        Costs                                                                                                     Cost Total

                                                                                                          Core Business and Content
          1                 1             2       240,000       Construction Management                                                           AS, BS      3,390,000
                                                                                                    Core Sciences, advance Physics and
          2                1.5           3.5      350,000           Chemistry/Physics                                                              BS         3,740,000
                                                                                                                Lecture/Advisor
                                                                                                Support areas in human development family life,
          2                1.5           3.5      310,000           Family Life Studies                                                           BS,BA       4,050,000
                                                                                                      a coordinator and Lecture/Advisor
                                                                                                    Core support for education majors and
          2                0.5           2.5      250,000       Education Paraprofessional                                                         AS         4,300,000
                                                                                                                Lecture/Advisor
                                                                                                   Core Languages and Lecture/Advisor
          4                0.5           4.5      435,000                Spanish                                                                   BA         4,735,000
                                                                       Allied Health
          2                 0            2.0      210,000                                              Support areas for Health Sciences          BS,BA       4,945,000
                                                                                                Core geology and support areas with Coordinator
          2                1.5           3.5      335,000         Geology/Earth Science                                                           BS,BA       5,280,000
                                                                                                             and Lecture/ Advisor
                                                                            Art
          2                1.5           3.5      385,000                                             Core areas, VT and Lecture/Advisor          BS,BA       5,665,000

     Total 39       Total 36.5


*Projected salaries are based upon 2006 CUPA discipline survey data for peer institutions with 3.5 percent adjustment added. Benefits are included.
** The anticipated costs for the Accounting Degree include costs for shared high-impact support courses, such as economics, and are independent of the actual accounting degree.
Funded SB90 Identified
Additional Program Needs: 2 PE, 1 English




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