Answering the Call for Help Reducing Prescription Drug Abuse by yhz16267

VIEWS: 73 PAGES: 160

									                                                           
                                                           

                                                           

                                                           


     Answering the Call for Help:
Reducing Prescription Drug Abuse
             in Our Communities
                                                           


                    Summary Report
                                                           

                                                           


         Sioux Lookout First Nations
                  Health Authority
                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                                                           

                 

                      Thunder Bay, Ontario
                      February 10–12, 2009
                                                           
                                                           
                                                           
                    Prepared by The Conference Publishers 
                                     Revised July 21, 2009 
Table of Contents

Opening Ceremony and Welcome .......................................................................................................... 1 
    Opening Remarks .................................................................................................................................. 1 

Video Presentation:   
Martha’s Story ............................................................................................................................................. 4 

Community Solutions and Changing the Culture ............................................................................... 5 

Engaging the Healing Power of Communities:   
Building upon Resiliency, Cultural Values, and Identity .................................................................. 7 

Community Strategies to Address the Challenges of Prescription Drug Use / Abuse:  The 
M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy ..................................................................................................................... 11 

Health Care Panel ..................................................................................................................................... 14 
    Opiate and Benzodiazepene Use and Abuse .................................................................................. 14 
    The Role of Methadone and the Work of the OpiATE Project ................................................... 17 
    A Physician’s Perspective on Prescription Drug Use .................................................................... 19 
      Discussion ......................................................................................................................................... 20 

The Private Sector Perspective ............................................................................................................... 25 
    Drugs, Alcohol, and Contraband:   
    Reducing the Flow at the Airline Transportation Level and the Issues Surrounding That 
    Challenge............................................................................................................................................... 25 
    Contraband on Airplanes:   
    Smuggling of Alcohol and Drugs to All the Fly‐In First Nation Communities ...................... 28 
      Discussion ......................................................................................................................................... 30 

             .
Justice Panel .............................................................................................................................................. 33 
    The OPP and Prescription Drug Abuse ........................................................................................... 33 
    Lawyers’ Perspectives ......................................................................................................................... 34 
      Discussion ......................................................................................................................................... 35 

Day 2 ........................................................................................................................................................... 39 
    Overview and Process ......................................................................................................................... 39 

Breakout Group 1:   
The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages ....................................................................... 40 
    Meeting 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 40 
     Discussion of points ......................................................................................................................... 40 
     Participants’ ideas as posted on the wall ...................................................................................... 42 
    Meeting 2 ............................................................................................................................................... 45 
     Discussion of posted points ............................................................................................................ 45 
    Meeting 3 ............................................................................................................................................... 51 
        Discussion of posted points ............................................................................................................ 52 

Breakout Group 2:   
Current Support Systems (Health and Others) ................................................................................... 59 
    Meeting 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 59 
    Meeting 2 ............................................................................................................................................... 61 
     Summary points ............................................................................................................................... 63 
    Meeting 3 ............................................................................................................................................... 64 

Breakout Group 3:   
Community Responsibility and Ownership ....................................................................................... 69 
    Meeting 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 69 
    Meeting 2 ............................................................................................................................................... 71 
    Meeting 3 ............................................................................................................................................... 74 

Breakout Group 4:   
The Law and Security .............................................................................................................................. 77 
    Meeting 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 77 
    Meeting 2 ............................................................................................................................................... 79 
    Meeting 3 ............................................................................................................................................... 82 

Breakout Group 5:  The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face ....................... 85 
    Meeting 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 85 
    Meeting 2 ............................................................................................................................................... 87 
    Meeting 3 ............................................................................................................................................... 92 

Plenary Discussion for Planning Committee 1 ................................................................................... 97 
    Breakout Group 1:   
    The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages .................................................................. 97 
    Breakout Group 2:   
    Current Support Systems (Health and Others) .............................................................................. 98 
    Breakout Group 3:   
    Community Responsibility and Ownership .................................................................................. 99 
    Breakout Group 4:   
    The Law and Security ........................................................................................................................101 
    Breakout Group 5:   
    The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face .....................................................102 

Day 3   
Breakout Group 1:   
The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages ......................................................................104 
    Meeting 4 ..............................................................................................................................................104 
    Meeting 5 ..............................................................................................................................................105 
     Youth and adults .............................................................................................................................105 
                    .
     Leadership .......................................................................................................................................106 
     Community ......................................................................................................................................107 
                                             .
     Children and adolescents  ..............................................................................................................108 
               .
     Families ............................................................................................................................................109 
     Elders ................................................................................................................................................110 
     Discussion ........................................................................................................................................111 

Breakout Group 2:   
Current Support Systems (Health and Others) ..................................................................................112 
    Meeting 4 ..............................................................................................................................................112 
     Linkages, networking, and dialogue ............................................................................................112 
     Prevention / promotion and prevention / education .................................................................113 
     Protocols / policies, accountability, and professional development ........................................113 
     Treatment development, and healing and wellness ..................................................................114 
     Discussion ........................................................................................................................................114 
    Meeting 5 ..............................................................................................................................................116 
     Strategic direction:   
     Prevention / promotion and prevention / education and linkages, networking, and dialogue
      ...........................................................................................................................................................116 
     Strategic direction:   
     Protocols / policies, and accountability and professional development .................................117 
     Strategic direction:   
     Treatment development, and healing and wellness ..................................................................118 

Breakout Group 3:   
Community Responsibility and Ownership ......................................................................................121 
    Meeting 4 ..............................................................................................................................................121 
    Meeting 5 ..............................................................................................................................................123 
     Work plan development ................................................................................................................123 
     Discussion ........................................................................................................................................126 

Breakout Group 4:   
The Law and Security .............................................................................................................................127 
    Meeting 4 ..............................................................................................................................................127 
    Meeting 5 ..............................................................................................................................................129 

Breakout Group 5:   
The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face  .........................................................133 
                                                          .
    Meeting 4 ..............................................................................................................................................133 
    Meeting 5 ..............................................................................................................................................136 
     Toward: Increased communications ............................................................................................136 
     Toward: Increased strength and creativity ..................................................................................138 
     Toward: Supportive leadership ....................................................................................................139 
     Toward: Increased community ownership .................................................................................139 
Plenary Discussion for Planning Committee 2 ..................................................................................143 
    Breakout Group 1:   
    The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages .................................................................143 
    Breakout Group 2:   
    Current Support Systems (Health and Others) .............................................................................144 
    Breakout Group 3:   
    Community Responsibility and Ownership .................................................................................145 
    Breakout Group 4:   
    The Law and Security ........................................................................................................................146 
    Breakout Group 5:   
    The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face .....................................................148 

                                                                           .
Panel of Governance Representatives and Chiefs ............................................................................150 
     Discussion ........................................................................................................................................154 
 
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 1




   Opening Ceremony and Welcome
   EMCEE
   Wally McKay
James Morris, Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority (SLFNHA), welcomed 
participants and introduced the NAN drummers. Their performance was followed by an 
opening prayer by Elder Moses Nothing.  

“The gravity of the situation warrants that each of you make a contribution in terms of finding 
solutions to deal with prescription drug abuse,” said Wally McKay. As it is a working 
conference, he said, participants are expected to produce results. Tuesday’s panels are designed 
to give delegates the information they will need in their working groups in the following days’ 
breakout sessions. Participants will be working on their selected topic for the entire conference, 
to focus on solutions.  

“If we spend the next three days here and all we do is talk, then we have wasted time,” said 
McKay. The work accomplished during the conference will show how serious participants are 
about the issue. The previous way of dealing with addiction issues—be it alcohol or street 
drugs—was to ignore them, and “brush it under the carpet.” However, the prescription drug 
problem is so rampant that a different approach is urgently needed and is why this forum is 
important as an avenue for solutions.  

“We have a very ambitious agenda,” said Morris, but “we want you to know that it is possible 
to kick the addiction.” He noted that participants will learn of communities that are dealing 
with the problem and have had some success.  

   Opening Remarks
   SPEAKER
   Grand Chief Stan Beardy
   Nishnawbe Aski Nation
Grand Chief Stan Beardy greeted fellow chiefs, Elders, frontline workers, professionals, and 
guests. He acknowledged and thanked the Creator for this day, and for the work that 
participants would be doing over the next few days for their communities and families. “Thank 
you for the work that we do for the people we serve,” he said. 

Grand Chief Beardy acknowledged that chiefs have recognized the seriousness of the 
prescription drug abuse issue.  



             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 2


“I hope that everyone on Nishnawbe Aski territory will work collectively to address this 
problem.” He asked for the continued support and commitment of Health Canada and the 
province of Ontario in implementing the strategy and addressing any gaps.  

“Why focus on prescription drug abuse? Why now?” asked Grand Chief Beardy. He indicated 
that while First Nations have already struggled with youth suicide, drugs, and alcohol, the 
emergence of prescription drug abuse adds a new dimension. While substance abuse is 
sporadic, the abuse of prescription drugs is non‐stop, with more tragic and violent effects.  

“We are saying ‘this is where it stops.’” A strategy is needed that is also transferable to 
emerging issues like crystal meth, which has become the drug of choice in Thunder Bay and 
will be making its way into the communities.  

Grand Chief Beardy said that it is the responsibility of the community to work on parenting 
skills and preserve cultural values and indigenous philosophy, in order for First Nations 
generations to survive.  

“We need a collective vision that requires that we have jurisdiction over our reserves and 
traditional lands.” He suggested that one of the first steps is self‐government, which is built on 
healthy individuals, families, and communities. 

We must look at reality, “We often pay lip service about solving social problems,” noted Grand 
Chief Beardy, saying that communities face many challenges including the high cost of living 
and poor housing conditions. However, the purpose of the forum is to focus on one particular 
issue with existing resources.  

When I talk about reality, we also need to take an honest look at ourselves and what we are 
doing.  In our communities, there is, at times, a core group of people who have the power to 
influence the action that is taken on the perpetrators of sexual abuse, incest and other forms of 
violence.  Often, the failure to help those who are most vulnerable – the victims of sexual abuse 
and incest, is because people who hold power in the community may choose to protect 
members of their own family. 

This is the same for bootleggers and drug dealers.  Every community knows who the 
bootleggers and drug dealers are, but there are instances where they are protected because 
those with power and influence intervene.  In all of this, it is the most vulnerable members 
within the community who suffer the consequences of alcohol and drug abuse: our children and 
our elders. 

Rather than blame others for the situation or feel powerless, communities need to take action. 
The suicide epidemic is a clear example of desperation and hopelessness experienced by First 
Nations children and youth.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 3


“Yes, we have a history of colonization, assimilation, and residential school, which had an 
impact on every aspect of our culture,” said Grand Chief Beardy. But he suggested that rather 
than blaming the government, communities should focus on the issues that lead to suicide and 
self‐destructive behaviour. “What can we do to make sure that everyone is involved in the 
solution?”  

First Nations are viewed as a broken people, but “we are not.” When there is a sincere desire to 
change, “there is nothing we cannot overcome.” Grand Chief Beardy said that in every 
community, there are “natural helpers” who are strong and who know what works and what 
does not. He said that the focus should be on developing the strategies that can be implemented 
immediately, rather than on describing the problem endlessly.  

We are aware our elders are being targeted, both financially and for the prescription drugs they 
have been prescribed for medical conditions. 

“Kids are gifts to us by the Creator,” said Grand Chief Beardy, noting that parents need to care 
for them properly, to support and teach them, so that they have the foundation to succeed as 
adults. Prescription drug abuse not only affects all community systems including health and 
education, but also severely impacts the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual well‐being of 
the individual.  

Although many are working tirelessly to deal with the problem, priorities need to be set, said 
Grand Chief Beardy, in response to the following questions:  

       What can be done for those who are addicted? 
       What support exists for them, and what is still required?  
       What can be done to work on the core issues that lead to prescription drug abuse? 
“I want to emphasize that change must come from within,” said Grand Chief Beardy. While 
mental health professionals and social workers can help, the real change will only occur if all 
community members are willing to work together in a respectful manner. First Nations people 
have the answers in their culture and traditions, which need to be used to mobilize change.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 4


   Video Presentation:
   Martha’s Story
   PRESENTER
   James Morris
   Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority
James Morris acknowledged that all participants have been or are being directly or indirectly 
affected by prescription drug abuse. Since there was not time to listen to all of their stories, he 
asked participants to listen to one—Martha’s Story, on video. The stories are similar in a number 
of ways: 

       Something caused an individual to take drugs. 
       The individual experienced a struggle. 
       Something caused them to stop. 
Martha’s Story follows that pattern. Participants viewed the short documentary about Martha, 
who as a child experienced freedom on camping trips with her grandparents. Her loss of 
innocence came when she was six years old, when she and her friends, bored, got into smoking 
and glue sniffing. Drunk first at eight years old, and then pregnant at age 13, Martha lost her 
faith in the Creator and felt very much alone.  

At 21, she was pregnant again with her daughter Nadine; three years later, Nadine’s father 
committed suicide. That was when Martha’s happiness disappeared completely and she first 
tried OxyContin to avoid feeling the pain. When she was later gang‐raped, she lost all self‐
respect and felt shamed, and fell deeper into prescription drug dependency.  

Once the drugs wore off, all the worries and pain returned, and Martha needed more drugs to 
numb the pain again. Once she took the wrong pill, ended up at the clinic, and was lucky that 
she did not die. After that, she decided that the drugs were not worth the havoc she was 
causing, which included selling her daughter’s and her parents’ belongings to buy pills.  

Her desire to be a better person and mother turned Martha’s life around. She found it 
challenging to reintegrate into the community when she had changed but the community had 
not. In addition, relapse can happen as soon as on the way home from treatment. However, 
Martha had tasted freedom again, was close to finishing her high school diploma, had dreams 
of going to college, and was experiencing the joy of picking up her daughter from school.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 5


   Community Solutions and Changing the Culture
   SPEAKER
   Chief Arthur Moore
   Constance Lake First Nation
“Wacheeya, booshoo, ahneen, and welcome,” said Chief Arthur Moore as he briefly described his 
community. Accessible by highway, Constance Lake First Nation has an on‐reserve population 
of 800 and a total of 1,400 with the off‐reserve community.  

The Chinese symbol for crisis is a combination of danger and opportunity; therefore, a crisis can 
be an opportunity for learning, said Chief Moore. Crises are too often seen only as situations 
that can harm communities, families and individuals although there are also opportunities 
within them.  

“We allow crises to cut the very existence out of the comfortable social fabric of our 
community,” he said.  

Quoting from an article by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Chief Moore said 
that communities need four elements to help them respond to crises: 

       Resources to help communities through crises 
       Information about how to deal with life crises, with a goal of bouncing back 
       Support before, during, and after a crisis, which can make a positive difference in 
        someone’s life, especially for youth 
       Greater cohesiveness as a community, to assist people to move through and overcome 
        crises  
Constance Lake First Nation was faced with such a crisis in 2005 when prescription drug abuse 
was undermining both the family structure and the social structure. Chief Moore said that the 
leadership responded quickly by addressing the issue at their general monthly meetings with 
Elders, health personnel, and education and social development workers. As a team, they 
looked at how they could tackle this problem and also identified existing and external 
resources, and additional external resources they would require.  

Prescription drug abuse was affecting school attendance, resulting in children being neglected 
and in addicts selling personal property, which in turn affected the family and the community. 
Crime was on the increase, as addicts were stealing to feed their drug habits.  

The Constance Lake leadership was able to participate in a methadone clinic in Longlac, 
Ontario. It also instituted “a weaning‐off program,” which helped individuals to some extent. In 



             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 6


2006, the first methadone clinic serving Aboriginal communities opened for members of the 
Constance Lake First Nation and other nearby communities along the Highway 11 corridor.  

Chief Moore said that “there were many dynamics involved, and it was a lot of work.” The 
methadone clinic was criticized by many, but the Constance Lake leadership used the feedback 
constructively. For instance, when it was pointed out that individuals could abuse the system, 
the community’s health providers tried to identify these individuals, counselled them, and 
dropped from the program those who were not serious. Though a small percentage, some of the 
clients have turned their lives around by successfully completing the weaning‐off process.  

Dealing with the pharmacists who were dispensing the medication at the methadone clinic 
presented another challenge. They raised concerns over regulatory compliance and liability 
should a client have complications. After many meetings with physicians, pharmacists, other 
health officials, and community members, the issue was resolved.  

As an indicator that the clinic was having a positive effect, police statistics indicated that break‐
and‐enter incidences declined, as did crime in general, said Chief Moore. While domestic 
violence still exists, it was stabilized.  

The Constance Lake health centre conducted a pre‐project survey in January 2008, delivering 
205 surveys to every household and having a response rate of 81%. Chief Moore shared some of 
the results with participants that act as vital baseline information for the community: 

       53.3% of community members abused drugs, prescription or otherwise. 
       37.1% percent of members said no one abuses drugs in their household. 
       46.3% abuse prescription drugs, while 39.6% abuse illegal or street drugs. 
Lack of employment was seen as the root of the drug problem, while 16.1% attributed it to past 
emotional trauma, nearly 16% to poor parenting, about 11% to poor living conditions, and 14% 
to lack of after‐school programming.  

Respondents suggested programming ideas such as computer training, babysitting courses, 
volunteer placements for future jobs, after‐school programs, and traditional healing.  

Survey results indicate that prescription drug abuse is a serious problem in the community, and 
that there is substantial work to do. Chief Moore said that the professionals in the community’s 
drug utilization, prevention, and awareness promotion working group are proactive in dealing 
with this issue and meet on a regular basis. The working group members conducted the pre‐
project survey, the results of which have helped them better understand the situation and find 
further funding for programs. The working group also provides support to community workers 
and related organizations. 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 7


Underlining the importance of a sustainable economy, Chief Moore said that Constance Lake 
has a number of legal entities, including Weekoban, a hauling truck company, and Amik 
Logging, which employs 30 seasonal employees. Both companies have instituted a zero drug 
tolerance policy, which was initially met with resistance by some employees. The latter were 
asked to go through a treatment program before returning to work. The community also has a 
privately owned sawmill that employs 60 employees, and while the community leaders cannot 
influence the company’s policy, they communicate with the management regularly to offer 
solutions.  

The Mamawmatawa Holistic Education Centre, another tool for addressing drug abuse, 
promotes after‐school programs and activities for youth and adults, and provides upgrading 
classes and traditional teaching.  

Chief Moore said, “I believe everyone in the community has to be involved by first 
acknowledging that there is a problem or danger.” Once acknowledged, the opportunity can be 
identified, as well as existing and required resources. For example, Constance Lake is currently 
negotiating with mining companies for revenue sharing, as well as funding for scholarships for 
young people and for programs in the education and resource sectors. “The only way we can 
survive is not to depend too much on government funding.”  

Chief Moore reminded participants of the many elements in the fight against drug abuse, 
including the fear of change and the difficulty in dealing with human behaviour and attitudes. 
To deal with the crisis, the community must want to change and to support all members. In 
closing he said, “Meegwetch for listening.” 


   Engaging the Healing Power of Communities:
   Building upon Resiliency, Cultural Values, and Identity
   SPEAKER
   Andrea Williams
   Williams Consulting
Although Andrea Williams has an academic background, she considers it less important than 
people who have “taken me under their wings and shared with me,” she said, referring to 
Elders and traditional teachers.  

Williams said, “Despite all the efforts to extinguish our rights and titles, we’re still here. First 
Nation people are still here.” Problems do exist, but it is important to rebuild values and 
cultures, and to live a healthy life. A clear vision and strategic planning are key to successfully 
achieving their goals, she said, and the community needs to define the vision.  



             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 8


“Communities know what the issues are intuitively, and they know how to achieve the vision,” 
she said. 

Attending this conference is an example of community engagement. It is also bringing 
awareness to the problem of prescription drug abuse and educating the participants on the 
topic. Williams said this conference will “give you a chance to hear what others are doing and 
how it will confirm what you are doing.” 

Prescription drug abuse ranks in the top four drug abuse problems in Ontario. The highest‐
ranking problem continues to be alcohol, but prescription drug abuse is a near second; poly‐
substance abuse is common also. For example, users may smoke marijuana laced with crystal 
meth and unwittingly become addicted to the crystal meth. Williams said she is confirming 
what the participants already know: younger people are quickly gravitating to highly addictive 
opiates.  

One concern is the extremely high correlation between addiction and mental health problems. 
Often, addicts suffer from mental health problems like depression, anxiety, and post‐traumatic 
stress disorder.  

Common reasons to start taking drugs, specifically in the Sioux Lookout area, are peer pressure, 
cultural loss, grief, lack of self‐esteem, trauma, housing problems, domestic violence, and other 
mental health issues.  

Williams structured her presentation using three working models. Although the models she 
used are not spiritual wheels, she recommended using them as a method of organization to 
incorporate spiritual thought. The models function as models of balance, and they symbolize 
people uniting in a circle. They also encourage teamwork, and Williams said working in a team 
is preferable to working in isolation. Balance is important too, she said. Individuals sharing 
their diverse gifts create balance; balance can be seen in individual lives, in families, and in 
communities. 
   Model 1

The first wheel, or model of balance, that Williams introduced covered the four directions: 
Relationship (South), Knowledge (West), Action (North), and Vision (East).  

Relationships are built over time. Building relationships is challenging when relating to people 
outside the community who lack a historical perspective. It is important to inform other 
people—specifically outside the community—that, as Williams said, “What happened in the 
past has a strong impact on our health today.” 

Williams recommended enabling every community member, to build a mutually safe 
environment and establishing cross‐cultural relationships that work well. An understanding 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 9


that existing protocols are not the same everywhere will help in ending prescription drug 
abuse. 

Williams also said to make the issues human, rather than give just statistics and numbers. 
Personalizing issues will help people care about the problems in a different way. Addicts need 
support, and judging them will not help them. To avoid judging requires care. It also requires 
educating media people, policy makers, and the general public. 

Learned knowledge represents reflecting on ideas and developing a solid plan. It confirms 
intuitive knowledge and is important for policy development that draws on cultural values and 
cultural knowledge.  

Developing programs can activate positive change within a community. Williams said that First 
Nations should design, manage, and deliver the programs. There are constantly changing needs 
in mainstream society, and capacity must be integrated in all programs to accommodate this 
challenge.  

Although the assumption is that problems can be fixed with funding and leadership, change 
also requires political will and community engagement. The community needs to work 
together, supporting each member. In addition, trained and appropriately paid staff will care 
for and assist community members and encourage their diverse gifts.  

Williams said the individual, the family, and the community need protection. One way is for 
the community to have access to trained counsellors and to recovering ex‐addicts. Community 
members need to experience that they can feel safe. It is important to avoid judging them, and 
to avoid judging addicts who relapse, because relapse can happen often.  
   Model 2

The second wheel Williams showed was titled “Aboriginal Culture as a Tool to Wellness.” The 
segments on this wheel were Nourishment (South), Wholeness (North), Protection (East), and 
Growth (West).  

Physical nourishment is the first step to helping a person recover. An important aspect of the 
community, food encourages a sense of belonging. Food also increases strength. Other types of 
nourishment are mental, emotional, and spiritual nourishment.  

Williams gave examples of doing beadwork, picking medicinal plants, speaking with Elders, 
singing, smudging, fasting, and holding sweat lodges. Nourishment should encourage new and 
positive experiences while moving toward growth.  

“When we learn something new, we get a deeper meaning in life,” Williams said. Nourishment 
also helps people to look more objectively at themselves, and to treat other people with respect.  



             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 10


Encouraging self‐esteem also helps nourish people. Community members need to learn 
forgiveness and to focus their energy on positive experiences. Individuals struggling with 
addiction need to increase their self‐esteem and understand their identity. Often, clients need to 
repeat the detox cycle many times before reaching the goal of wholeness. The second model 
teaches that everyone has a unique gift to offer.  

The community as a whole needs educating. Its members need to recognize that reaching those 
people who need help the most is challenging. Williams suggested starting or improving 
prevention programs, to teach members of the community as early as possible. In some case 
studies, some clients have admitted to starting smoking at age eight and then trying marijuana 
at age 10. Youth need to be encouraged in many ways, and family‐based activities, such as 
going onto the land, are a good idea. However, Williams said not to take someone who is in 
detox or is experiencing withdrawal out onto the land, to ensure their safety. 

Once a pregnant woman is considered to be at risk, there are programs in Vancouver and other 
cities that take the woman in until the baby is 18 months old. Further research on these 
programs would be useful for communities wishing to implement similar programs. Vancouver 
was successful at involving parents in its program, but in communities that do not have a 
program, other tools can be used to engage parents, such as emphasizing the value of 
strengthening the culture. Williams said culture is the “motivational hook.” 

Williams said that communities are most likely aware that teenagers are using prescription 
drugs. When some babies are born, they experience withdrawal. Although there is no literature 
on OxyContin withdrawal in babies, there is literature on heroin withdrawal. Learning about 
withdrawal in babies can help in a better understanding of OxyContin addiction. 

Elders need to be educated about prescription drug abuse. Sometimes, younger community or 
family members bully them into handing over their prescription drugs or their money. Williams 
said the seniors might do so as a consequence of colonization. The seniors may still fear losing 
the young.  
   Model 3

The third model featured Training and Supportive Resources (North), Education and 
Awareness (East), Crisis Intervention and Direct Treatment Services (South), and Aftercare and 
Promotion of Stability (West).  

Communities need to start taking action quickly. Once a person has a substance addiction, other 
areas in their life suffer. Prescription drugs are highly addictive, and withdrawal services are 
needed in the North. 

Often, prescription drug abuse is not only a problem with the drugs, but also with the person’s 
mental health. Addiction and mental health issues happen at the same time, and it is impossible 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 11


to deal with one issue without dealing with the other; both problems need to be addressed at 
the same time. 

Particular treatment strategies are needed for polysubstance abuse. Treatment strategies require 
more extensive aftercare to help promote stability. More aftercare programs need to be 
immediately built. Working together as a community is key in constructing aftercare programs 
and especially in providing support. 

Leadership should work to alleviate the underlying social factors such as poverty and poor 
housing that contribute to prescription drug abuse. More funding can help, as it can increase the 
level and degree of care that addicts receive. Encouraging awareness, treatment, and aftercare 
within the community can also help.  


   Community Strategies to Address the Challenges of Prescription
   Drug Use / Abuse:
   The M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy
   SPEAKER
   Leslie Corbiere
   Healthy Lifestyles Project Coordinator
   M’Chigeeng First Nation
In March 2006, the M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy team held its first meeting, which consisted of 
introductions, roundtable discussions, and drafting of procedures. The team was formed 
because of a need for “broad‐based community involvement” in addressing prescription drug 
abuse.  

Leslie Corbiere said the team’s broad base of members share information that has helped it to 
develop an integrated approach. He said that the audience should remember that his 
presentation looks at the community of M’Chigeeng and the surrounding area only; the 
statistics, results, and effectiveness of the M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy are not reflective of all 
communities. 

Initially, the team was a partnership between the Healthy Lifestyles Project and the local health 
services. Currently, the team’s members also include the UCCM Anishinaabe Police Service, 
Ontario Works, the Noojmowin Teg Health Centre, the Mindemoya Medical Clinic, 
pharmacists, educators, and community members—the chief and council, youth, and Elders. 

The team’s objective is to “provide our membership with the skills and knowledge needed to 
make informed decisions pertaining to the effects and consequences of drug use and misuse” 
and ultimately, to decrease prescription drug abuse within the community. The M’Chigeeng 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 12


Drug Strategy has four pillars: prevention, treatment and counselling, harm reduction, and 
enforcement.  

The M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy has three main coordinators who meet monthly. One 
coordinator manages prevention (one of the four pillars), updates the work plan, and ensures 
follow‐up activities are completed. Another coordinator manages treatment and counselling 
(another pillar) and organizes annual planning sessions. Corbiere, the third coordinator, 
manages the remaining pillars (harm reduction and enforcement) and organizes all information 
about meetings, including taking minutes. The coordinators jointly produce a quarterly Drug 
Strategy Newsletter. 

Corbiere gave statistics on OxyContin, as the M’Chigeeng community has experienced 
problems with this prescription drug. In April 2008, M’Chigeeng received 2,778 OxyContin 
pills, with a pharmacy value of $7,107. The street value of OxyContin is $1 / mg. 

The key priority of the drug strategy team is to reduce prescription drug abuse by 
implementing prevention programs. To do this, workshops were held to raise awareness of the 
dangers of prescription drugs, with a focus on OxyContin. The target age for the workshops 
was youth (ages 14–20); 15 youth have participated in the workshops to date.  

The M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy offers treatment and counselling services that promote an 
understanding of substance abuse and encourage people to “live healthier lives.”  

As a next step, the team wants to implement a peer‐mentoring program that will involve the 
National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program (NNADAP), a youth coordinator, and 
mental health workers. The 10‐week program is scheduled to run from September 2009 to 
January 2010, and ideally, 10 participants will complete the program.  

For harm reduction, the goal is to increase accessibility to health care services by substance 
users, to reduce some of the harmful effects of the drugs. Family resource workers, mental 
health workers, educators, and a community wellness worker helped in setting up another 
program, known as the “Strengthening Families for the Future” program. From September 4 to 
December 11, 2008, three families completed the program. 

Regarding enforcement, the goal is to increase awareness and understanding of enforcement 
and community safety through a partnership with the police services and justice services on 
Manitoulin Island. In September 2008, the M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy hosted a workshop and 
information session to educate attendees about Crime Stoppers. The UCCM police, the Ontario 
Provincial Police (OPP), and Manitoulin Family Resources worked together to put the 
workshop on; 25 participants successfully completed the workshop. 

The drug strategy team has also incorporated two programs into the elementary school 
curriculum: the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program and “Walking the Path.” 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 13


These programs involve participation from the students, teachers, and Elders. A UCCM police 
constable also taught a program encouraging self‐esteem, respect, and a positive self‐image 
through healing circles, traditional teachings, and role modelling.  

Another strength of the team is the excellent rapport between the UCCM police and physicians. 
The police will phone the physicians and tell them who is selling the drugs. The pharmacy also 
assists the team’s work by red‐flagging narcotics prescribed to an individual when the 
individual has irregular refills. The irregularity can signify that the individual is selling the 
prescription drugs. If there is a concern, it will be recorded for future reference.  

The M’Chigeeng Health Centre has a policy stating that no narcotics are to be stored within the 
building and no prescription drugs are to be delivered to community members. In addition, a 
notice at the reception desk in the walk‐in clinic makes clear that patients must see their family 
doctor for prescriptions; the walk‐in clinic will not prescribe narcotics. 

Before prescriptions are administered, physicians have patients sign a physician / patient 
contract. An ethical review board of three doctors oversees all medication prescriptions, 
particularly for OxyContin. Doctors, pharmacists, and community staff need to work together 
to stop prescription drug abuse.  

The M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy has the support of the leadership, with the chief and council 
making the initiative a top priority. Currently, the chief and council are working on a 
declaration advocating a drug‐free community. The community has already adopted an 
“Alcohol Harm Reduction Policy” for band‐owned property and businesses, and the leadership 
is looking at a policy for “drug‐free workplace testing” for other community businesses. The 
community also wants to reduce alcohol use at events such as weddings and dances. 

Corbiere said that the most important route for success is teamwork, especially as no one 
individual or agency can handle the issue of prescription drug abuse. Many people expect the 
police to do most of the work, but that is not what is needed.  

“It takes a community to raise a child,” he said, and the entire community needs to work 
together toward a clear goal. 

The M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy does face a number of challenges. Corbiere said that there is a 
lack of funding for program development, team coordination, and planning. Also, there is a 
general acceptance of alcohol within the community, which makes it difficult to address that 
issue. There are also safety issues, such as crime that directly results from drug abuse. In 
addition, people are afraid to “snitch” because of the fear of being hurt. This problem will 
ideally change as safety within the community increases. The police need to have search 
warrants as well.  

Corbiere left the audience with a list of the next steps for the M’Chigeeng Drug Strategy: 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 14


       Seek core funding. 
       Continue development of the drug strategy team (maintain a networking team). 
       Have an annual planning session. 
       Expand the drug strategy team meetings (to increase awareness and promotion work). 
       Reduce the level of drug and alcohol misuse. 
       Reduce the rate of crime. 
       Evaluate the drug strategy initiative. 


   Health Care Panel
   MODERATOR
   Wally McKay
   PANELISTS
   Marnie Mitchel
   Ontario Regional Pharmacist
   First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
   Mark Erdelyan
   Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
   Claudette Chase, MD
   Sioux Lookout Zone Family Physicians

   Opiate and Benzodiazepine Use and Abuse

Marnie Mitchel presented data from the Non‐Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program on 
opiate and benzodiazepine abuse. As the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) pays 
for essential services, including prescription drugs, she has access to information that allows her 
to study use trends for different medications in various communities. She also outlined what 
the NIHB Program is doing to support First Nations in their efforts to combat prescription drug 
abuse. 

Before presenting her information, Mitchel reviewed the properties of opiates or narcotics and 
benzodiazepines. She said that opiates or narcotics, typically OxyContin or Percocet, are 
valuable for treating moderate to severe pain. While these drugs can be addictive, not everyone 
is affected in this way.  

Mitchel stated, “Taking one OxyContin will not necessarily turn you into an addict.” Other non‐
addictive painkillers are available, including aspirin and anti‐inflammatories. However, they 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 15


are best for mild to moderate pain only and may not be strong enough for severe pain, thus 
forcing doctors to resort to the addictive drugs.  

Mitchel said that drugs and treatments, such as antidepressants, anti‐convulsion medication, 
massage, and physical therapy, are available that can boost the effectiveness of painkillers. She 
asked the audience to remember, though, that “sometimes for certain conditions, opiates or 
narcotics are the only effective treatments”; she named cancer as one example. People who 
require these treatments should not lose access to them in the quest to reduce prescription drug 
abuse.  

Examples of benzodiazepines are Ativan and Valium. These drugs are used to treat sleep 
disorders, among other conditions. Alternatives to this treatment include low doses of 
antidepressants for sleep disorders or anxiety disorders. Unfortunately, antidepressants do not 
act the same as benzodiazepines when treating an impending panic attack. 

Mitchel outlined the limitations to her data and conclusions. If 20 people were prescribed 
OxyContin, there is no method of knowing if each had a legitimate need. Further, the drugs 
could be stolen and sold on the street. The known fact is what was dispensed and paid for 
through the program; Mitchel could not determine what ultimately happened to the drug. Also, 
as she drew results from prescriptions paid for by this program only, prescriptions paid for 
with cash or through Ontario Works were not included in her findings.  

As membership of a tribal council does not necessarily dictate where the person lives, Mitchel 
could not confirm who is living on or off reserve. Also, three communities are not affiliated with 
a tribal council and were grouped together under the name “Non Tribal Council Affiliated 
Communities.” Finally, some narcotics are distributed through a nursing station. As these drugs 
are not paid for by the program, their numbers were not counted, leading her study to conclude 
there is less use in some isolated communities, when in fact the drugs may be present and 
supplied by the nurse. 

Using charts displaying the percentage of First Nation adult claimants claiming one or more 
opiate prescription, Mitchel demonstrated that more men than women received prescriptions 
for opiate use—possibly, she said, because men tend to injure themselves more than women do. 
Conclusions on benzodiazepine use reflect an opposite result. More women than men, 
especially as they age, receive these types of drugs. Mitchel said that this situation, separate 
from addiction issues, is a concern across all of Canada, as older people who use these 
medications are more likely to fall, break bones, and go to hospital.  

Mitchel’s analysis included year‐by‐year use trends organized by tribal council. She reminded 
the audience that tribal councils with isolated communities may be receiving the drug from 
nursing stations. Her conclusion from these data is that there is not a “huge upwards trend” in 
the number of people receiving an opiate. Further, benzodiazepine use showed more variation 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 16


over the same period. While some tribes are higher than others, again there is no “shooting 
upwards” trend over the years. Mitchel reiterated that these numbers represented several 
communities grouped together, which could conceal communities facing trouble being 
balanced out by those that are doing well. She described this situation as having “your feet in 
fire but your head in a snow bank.” 

Reviewing more information, Mitchel said that some communities show an increase in use, 
while others show a decrease. She said that communities showing a decrease could share tactics 
or policies with those communities experiencing an increase. In the fall, all chiefs received an 
individual report for their community. She suggested they take home their copy of her findings 
and see where their community stands in comparison with the rest of the Sioux Lookout zone. 

Mitchel also presented information on methadone use in the zone. She said that these numbers 
are greatly influenced by geographical access. If it is an isolated community, then its members 
will not have access to methadone treatment.  

Next, Mitchel covered the NIHB Program’s response to client safety. The program recently 
distributed a report to all chiefs in the zone covering the past four years that specifically 
targeted narcotics and stated how many tablets of OxyContin has been distributed to 
community members. NIHB is currently updating its reporting format to increase the 
usefulness of community reports. Mitchel said that she is available for consultation on these 
reports, and can be reached via the contact information on the distributed handout. 

NIHB is also addressing the prescription issues. Mitchel and a colleague reviewed the 
prescribing practices of certain doctors. When they identified doctors with certain patterns, a 
letter was sent alerting them of this information and highlighting the concern for First Nation 
communities. In addition, a Prescription Monitoring Program is being implemented that asks 
individuals with a history of double‐doctoring and poly‐pharmacy to enrol in a program where 
they see one doctor and one pharmacist exclusively.  

An NE Code Alert (NIHB Electronic Code Alert) now notifies pharmacists when they are 
dispensing to clients who have received three or more opiates, three or more benzodiazepines, 
or methadone plus an opiate. The pharmacist can override the notice if necessary, as in the case 
of a patient with cancer, but it acts as a warning flag for pharmacists to investigate the situation. 

NIHB has also implemented a computer system that prevents clients from receiving more than 
a safe amount of acetaminophen from any source. Mitchel said this safeguard is a result of 
people “trying to get a buzz” from the narcotic component. This overuse can lead to liver and 
kidney damage as well as overdoses.  

Details on these and other programs that the NIHB Program has implemented can be reviewed 
on the program’s website or in its report on client safety distributed in May 2008. 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 17


   The Role of Methadone and the Work of the Opiate Project

Mark Erdelyan said that he has many years’ experience with methadone treatment and is the 
author of the resource, Methadone Maintenance Treatment: A Community Planning Guide. As he is 
not well versed in First Nation community issues regarding prescription drugs, he said he 
planned to learn and listen throughout the conference so he can take information back to his 
organization, while also sharing information on the Opiate Project. 

The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) set up the Opiate Project—which stands 
for Opiate Awareness, Treatment, and Education—in response to the March 2007 report of the 
Methadone Maintenance Treatment Practices Task Force. The report indicated a need for 
professional services, and for increased awareness of methadone treatment and its value. 
Methadone is one option for assisting persons with addiction. Some research shows that 
25%‐40% of addicts would benefit from this treatment. Erdelyan said that other treatments exist, 
such as abstinence, management / support, and other pharmacological treatments, but did not 
provide figures on the benefits of these options. 

In Ontario, 30,000 people between the ages of 15 and 49 are dependent on opiates. Methadone 
treatment has been highly researched and its effectiveness is clear. It results in improved quality 
of life and reduced use of opiates and other drugs, and is beneficial for use with pregnant 
women. 

When Erdelyan first began work in 1996, he thought of heroin when speaking of opiates. After 
talking to members of police services, he was informed that the real problem is prescription 
opiates. The Drug and Alcohol Treatment Information System (DATIS) compiles information on 
clients entering treatment facilities. In 2003–2004, 7.2% used prescription opiates, while in 2007–
2008 it had jumped to 20%. In contrast, the statistic on heroin use remained approximately the 
same, at around 2%.  

Another area of concern is youth drug use. An Ontario study found that 21% of Ontario 
students in grades 7 through 12 reported using prescription opiates at least once during the year 
2007. The statistics for other substances were as follows: 61% had used alcohol and 26% 
cannabis. About 72% of those questioned reported obtaining these substances in their own 
homes. 

The use of methadone has grown over the years. As of January 2008, about 20,000 clients were 
involved in treatment. Treatment challenges include access to communities that do not have 
adequate services, such as First Nation fly‐in reserves and communities where clinics have 
opened but met opposition from some community members owing to a lack of consultation. 
Erdelyan said that his area of focus is awareness and education for communities about 
methadone treatment and opiate dependence. The Opiate Project has three main objectives: 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 18


       Increase public and professional awareness of the issues of methadone treatment and 
        opiate dependence. 
       Reduce the social stigma and marginalization that addiction clients experience. 
       Increase access to methadone treatment. 
Erdeylan works to break myths about methadone treatment. Often, people believe that the 
treatment is merely substituting one drug for another. In reality, this is incorrect, as the 
treatment is a prescription and research has proven its effectiveness. Ideally he would like to 
implement a model in which case management, counselling, and support are readily available 
for all clients. 

The Methadone Maintenance Treatment guide, which is available from CAMH and online, is 
written for clients, family members, friends of clients, and interested people. Other CAMH 
resources include a website (www.methadonesaveslives.ca) designed to help people make 
informed decisions about methadone treatment. The website has a section for the general public 
and a section for health care professionals. Brochures for the public, addiction counsellors, and 
health care professionals are available, as is a documentary, titled Prescription for Addiction, 
highlighting the issue of opiate dependence. This video relates stories from individuals with 
issues and from communities facing problems resulting from prescription opiate use, and 
comes with a user guide. 

Community engagement is an important element of the project. Four communities were 
selected: Ottawa and Thunder Bay, which had existing methadone services that needed to be 
expanded, and Chatham‐Kent and Halton, which did not have methadone services. Working 
groups were formed to look at the issues and develop action plans to address opiate‐addicted 
individuals. 

Some challenges were recruiting physicians and locating resources, counselling support, and 
clinic sites. In one community, the project was able to use an individual whose family member 
had died of an opiate overdose to give talks and draw media attention to the issue. It is essential 
that communities are both educated about and actively involved in the development of 
methadone treatment facilities. 

Erdeylan spoke about developments in training and professional support. CAMH has created 
the Opioid Dependence Treatment Core Course, an accredited course on opiate addiction for 
nurses, physicians, pharmacists, case managers, and counsellors. The course has five online 
modules and a one‐day training session. The Opiate Project has also produced best practice 
guides for case managers and pharmacists, an opiate treatment telephone support line for 
questions from professionals, and a toolkit with guidelines for health care teams on the 
methadonesaveslives.ca website.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 19


   A Physician’s Perspective on Prescription Drug Use

Dr. Claudette Chase said that prescription drug abuse has affected her own family, and that she 
sees its effect in patients’ lives, their families’ lives, and communities. Patients tell her that it is 
very easy to procure these drugs, through friends or the Internet, and that there are multiple 
supply lines. Dr. Chase said that everyone must work together for the project to succeed. 

Among the negative impacts of prescription drug abuse she has witnessed are patients feeling 
guilty because they have no money to buy gifts for their children after spending their money on 
drugs. Dr. Chase also sees more marriage breakups, children in care, and financial difficulties, 
and stress for Elders worried about children and grandchildren who are using. Nurses have to 
store medications for patients who fear that having the prescription drugs in their home could 
lead to a break‐in or pressure from relatives to share. Dr. Chase pointed out that with more 
people in the community using, fewer people are available to organize and plan community 
initiatives. She said safety is more of an issue for caregivers than are break‐ins, as it is easy to 
“burn out when dealing with such an overwhelming issue” and when resources are so few. For 
these reasons and others, she found it exciting to be a part of the conference to find solutions. 

Dr. Chase reviewed what options physicians in Sioux Lookout have to offer prescription drug 
abuse sufferers. They can prescribe medical withdrawal support in the community or in 
hospital, referrals to treatment centres, and supportive counselling on a monthly basis. She said 
that when she was Northern Medical Director with Sioux Lookout Zone Family Physicians 
discussions were held about improving prescription patterns and implementing a narcotic 
contract in the practice. A narcotic contract limits the patient to using only one physician, 
includes the possibility of random urine testing, and states there will be no early refills for lost 
or stolen pills. Dr. Chase also makes presentations to band councils, probation officers, and 
nurses on addiction issues, and has given a workshop on pregnancy‐related addiction issues. 

Challenges Sioux Lookout Zone Family Physicians face in helping those living with chronic 
pain include patients not being covered for travel to receive physiotherapy or for 
physiotherapists to visit their community (Interestingly, Valerie Gideon informed Dr Chase 
after her talk that patients were actually covered by NIHB for physio whereas the Sioux 
Lookout office has said it was no longer a benefit). She explained that you cannot ethically deny 
narcotics for people with severe pain, especially when so few other options (such as massage, 
acupuncture, physio, OT) are available. If trained counsellors were available to teach meditation 
or yoga to help deal with chronic pain and stress, perhaps narcotic prescriptions could be 
reduced. 

Dr. Chase shared some of her personal experiences of caring for those addicted to prescription 
narcotics with the group. For example, she had initially enthusiastically supported people going 
into the hospital for medically supervised withdrawal but found they would often relapse 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 20


immediately upon discharge.  Currently she admits people who have a treatment centre bed to 
go to directly after a week of hospital supervised withdrawal.   She discovered a pattern of 
people with no funds to support their addictions going into the hospital to receive drugs until 
they had some money and then relapsing almost immediately when they returned home. She 
said that she believes teaching people how to be drug‐free in their own communities and homes 
is an important way to reduce relapses once patients return from treatment. 

Research has made clear that 30% of people using opiates also suffer from depressive illness. If 
only the opiate addiction and not the depression are addressed, treatment will not work. Dual 
diagnosis should be looked for, as depression is associated with continued drug use during 
treatment and early relapse. Other elements that can make someone more likely to relapse are 
residential instability (homelessness) and prior completion of one course of treatment. Drug and 
alcohol abuse are symptoms of deeper problems. Dr. Chase said that Aboriginal power 
structures must be rebuilt and supported to deal with this crisis. Instead of treating the 
symptoms of despair, everyone must work together to treat the illness of oppression. 

Dr. Chase said that despite the difficult situation, she is inspired by the “amazing traditional 
resilience of First Nations people” and by the model of community treatment programs, in 
which trainers come into the community to train local people and help them learn to be drug 
free in their communities. She also supports methadone treatment programs as a possible 
answer, as they allow people to function, go to work, and take care of their families. Finally, she 
is made hopeful by the growth of partnerships among nursing stations, Nishnawbe‐Aski Police 
Service (NAPS) offices, band offices, and committees specially created to look at opiate drug use 

Discussion 

A participant asked Dr Chase what her practiceʹs policy was on prescribing prescription 
narcotics.  She replied that the practice was overall trying to avoid Oxycontin and Percocets but 
that as with any large group of doctors there was a range of practice styles.  She said her group 
was aware of the challenges faced by First Nations on this issue and was working continuously 
to improve their care.  She mentioned there were discussions currently to update the narcotic 
contract. 

Bernadette Wabonge of Migisi Sahgaigan (Eagle Lake) asked, “Regarding people in treatment 
programs, do they have the ability to sell the treatments they bring home with them?” She 
asked if their methadone use is monitored at all—for example, through a diagnostic test to 
ascertain if there is methadone in their system. 

Mark Erdelyan answered that the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario has guidelines, 
especially for take‐home products, and that the physician has the discretion to decide at what 
time the client is stabilized and can take them home. Physicians can randomly call in clients and 
ask them to produce the supplies. As methadone can be fatal for someone who has never taken 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 21


it, the prescribing physician must follow guidelines to ensure the client is responsible enough to 
be in charge of its use. 

Wabonge asked if urine or drug testing could be used to determine if the client is following the 
program. Mark Erdeylan said that if a physician is conducting tests on that subject, it could 
possibly be screened for.  

A participant asked if pregnant women are taking drugs, what effect they would have on the 
fetus. Also, in regard to treatment programs, he said that in the past, he was advised to only 
send clients to the Kenora and Thunder Bay facilities, which are sometimes full, and the only 
space then readily available is in Manitoba. 

Dr. Chase said that while narcotics are relatively safe for the fetus while inside the mother, 
problems begin once the baby is born and it goes through withdrawal. Also, it is rare that 
people are abusing only one drug, and alcohol is more dangerous than morphine or OxyContin 
to a fetus. Once the baby is born, the withdrawal can be extremely difficult, as these infants 
need special care and support. Also, the long‐term effects of these drugs on babies are not 
known. In regard to the second comment, Dr. Chase repeated her concern that attending 
treatment programs out of the community can lead to relapses, as clients have not learned to 
live in their own communities drug‐free. 

Regarding opiates in pregnancy, one participant said that withdrawals can cause miscarriages 
and stillbirths, and that any women who are pregnant and dependent on opiates are going into 
withdrawal once a day, which can also cause placenta separations. Such patients should be put 
on methadone fairly urgently.  

A participant asked Mitchel if methadone was covered by insurance and what needed to be 
done for it to be available in isolated communities. Mitchel answered that it is covered for as 
long as someone needs to be on it. However, only four months of travel is paid for the client to 
access the methadone. She also said it is more difficult to provide methadone treatment in 
isolated communities because of irregular flights. If the methadone is not available in the 
community for a week, people will risk going into withdrawal. 

Chief Adam Fiddler of Sandy Lake First Nation asked about the long‐term effects of OxyContin 
and Percocet. He said he heard that five years of abusing prescription drugs can destroy 
internal organs, and asked that the long‐term effects be clarified. Further, he said that “when 
someone in the community makes a decision, and realizes they are addicted to prescription 
drugs and they want to stop, there is usually a small window of opportunity to help them. Is 
there a policy in place for our nurses to help? Is there something the nurses can do, and how can 
we the community help that person, along with the nurses?” 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 22


Dr. Chase clarified that she meant that the long‐term effects of prescription drug abuse on the 
fetus were unknown, not the long‐term effects on adults. Chronic long‐term abuse with 
Percocet is damaging to the liver because of the amount of acetaminophen. Individuals using 
opiates often have other health issues such as nutritional problems, infections and that overall 
health is negatively affected. Some medications are available from nurses to support people 
through withdrawal. However, these medications will not take away all the muscle aches and 
pains, and it will be hard for the person, especially for the first three days. These three days can 
be physically hard and can invoke panic, anxiety, bone aches, and no sleep. The community can 
help by sitting with the person and managing the medications for him / her. The patient could 
also be sent to the hospital. 

Kevin Berube from Nodin CFI asked if methadone treatment would allow an individual to 
function normally in society, and “can these individuals be a truck driver?” while on 
methadone treatment. Mark Erdeylan answered that they could indeed be truck drivers or any 
other profession, and leads a full and normal life while being on methadone. 

A participant asked, “Who is responsible for counselling and management care? Because once 
people are home they often don’t get that.” Erdeylan said, “In terms of best practice, counselling 
is important to have better outcomes.” However, it is a question of funding, as many people do 
not have access to case management. Community action plans are asking for that type of 
support. 

The participant followed up by asking again if counselling is part of the policy for treatment. 
Mark Erdeylan answered that there is no set policy, but he does agree that clients should have 
access to counselling and case management support. 

Chief Celia Echum of Ginoogaming First Nation asked about the methadone program clinic in 
Longlac and a drug called “methadrug” that clients and the community are asked to pay for. 
Mitchel tried to clarify the name of the drug, but was unable to do so. She said that she would 
consult with the participant later to answer the question.  

Judy Desmoulin, Longlac #58 Health Director, said that she had not heard many success stories 
of methadone treatment and asked if anyone could share one. She also asked if there is a 
standard to measure success of treatment, and whether it is measured by abstinence or a low 
dosage level. In addition, she inquired how many other clinics in Thunder Bay offer a 
methadone maintenance program, and if the current contracts for those who deliver the 
methadone have a condition to provide counselling. 

Erdeylan said there were many success stories in terms of methadone, and research done over 
the past 40 years of its use has shown many positive results. The other clinic in the Thunder Bay 
area is Lakeview Clinic, through the local hospital. He asked for more details regarding the 
question on the condition to provide counselling.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 23


Desmoulin asked, “What guidelines or policies do these clinics have to provide methadone 
treatment, and how are they [the clinics] authorized?” Erdeylan said that the clinics are through 
the province and are paid for by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP). They are not under 
contract to Health Canada and do get some funding through the TeleHealth program, but there 
is no contract per se. 

Desmoulin responded, “So they can deliver the methadone program any way they choose?” 
Erdeylan said that doctors require a special methadone license to prescribe this program, but 
this is different from having a contract to deliver a service. The license simply states that they 
are qualified to dispense the product. 

Desmoulin asked, “So those with the license are not obligated to provide counselling?” 
Erdeylan clarified that they are under no particular obligation to provide counselling. Ideally, it 
should be available from either the physicians or another treatment provider, but currently 
there is no particular contract where it must be provided. 

A participant asked about the dispensing policy and if there were liability issues in dispensing 
drugs and pills. Mitchel answered that to legally dispense medication, one must be a 
pharmacist, physician, or nurse. However, handing a sealed bag to an identified person is not 
dispensing. If someone takes medication out of a bottle and hands it out, then it is dispensing. 

A participant asked where doctors stand on this topic and if they have a position in dealing 
with this issue of drug use. Dr. Chase answered that it is a frequent topic for discussion, but 
there is a tremendous range in practice style, as people will do things differently. She said this 
variation can help patients, since they can experience a range of strengths and knowledge 
among the practitioners. In the Sioux Lookout Zone, the doctors generally prescribe fewer 
narcotics, and she wishes there were non‐drug–oriented options to offer patients. The doctors 
are highly aware of the increased problems caused by OxyContin and Percocet. They have not 
developed a formal policy, but have changed their practices to reflect this knowledge. 

Shirley Kielly of Neskantaga First Nation said that more students are being affected by drugs 
at an early age, which is reflected in the school system by behavioural issues and attendance 
problems. She wondered if Dr. Chase had any suggestions for people as educators in terms of 
providing best practices and meeting the needs of students. 

Dr. Chase said that nursing stations, schools, and principals are now working together to assist 
children. The challenge is that people may say they are too busy. A worker might question 
whether to go to meetings about children, instead of seeing clients. She said that 
interdisciplinary work and partnerships can assist with such children. 

 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 24


The final speaker said that education in communities is an extremely valuable tool, as children 
tend to follow what is taught in schools. The speaker explained that the Sioux Lookout 
community is doing an excellent job in teaching students about healthy diets, as he has seen in 
his own son. 

Finally, the speaker reminded the participants, who ranged from educators to Elders, that the 
aim of the conference is to develop a framework that every community can use. 

 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 25




   The Private Sector Perspective
   MODERATOR
   Wally Mckay
   Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority
To introduce the session, Wally Mckay said that the conference planning committee had 
included presentations from a variety of services and groups, to give a wider perspective of the 
issues involved in prescription drug abuse. This session represented private sector interests. 
Participants can use information from this first day in developing action plans during the final 
two days of the conference. 

   Drugs, Alcohol, and Contraband:
   Reducing the Flow at the Airline Transportation Level and the Issues
   Surrounding That Challenge
   SPEAKERS
   Tom Morris
   President and CEO
   Wasaya Airways
   Norm Weiss
   Director of Operations
   Wasaya Airways
Tom Morris, president and CEO of Wasaya Airways, said that he has long been involved in 
First Nations development. He has served on his band council and on boards at the regional 
and the community level. Tom Morris introduced Norm Weiss, who was to make the 
presentation.  

In his presentation, Weiss said substance abuse is a vast and complex problem. Reducing the 
flow of contraband through airline transportation, along with increased policing, helps address 
the problem. 

When roads in winter are unavailable, smugglers use air transportation—and they have a wide 
range of options, Weiss said. They can choose large or small air carriers, scheduled service 
flights, cargo flights, or charter services. They can use commercial shipping services, Canada 
Post, or third‐party forwarding services. 

During his presentation, Weiss considered the following options for slowing the flow of 
smuggled goods: 

       Using the X‐ray and scanning technologies in place at Thunder Bay 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 26


       Purchasing technology independently and putting it in place at regional airports 
       Using trained alert dogs 
       Searching checked and carry‐on baggage when passengers check in for flights 
       Searching cargo and freight at drop‐off facilities 
       Requiring mandatory photo identification for people shipping cargo or freight 
       Searching passengers and planes on First Nation lands 
Weiss gave background on screening and scanning technology at airports in Canada. Transport 
Canada is responsible for the safety of Canada’s airports. The Canadian Air Transport Security 
Authority (CATSA) is responsible for carrying out Transport Canada’s safety regulations.  

CATSA provides security screening at 29 airports. Thunder Bay is the only airport in this region 
on that list. The mandate for these 29 airports covers only X‐ray and other scanning of 
passengers, checked baggage, and carry‐on baggage. Cargo is not screened. 

Weiss said that CATSA has the authority to search only to secure airports and aircraft. 
Searching for prescription drugs or other contraband items is not within CATSA’s legal powers 
or mandate. Therefore, Weiss said, except for illegal drugs, it is legal to transport other items 
considered in this discussion to be contraband. 

Weiss said no legal grounds allow for search and seizure of contraband. Attorneys have 
successfully used Section 8 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which specifies the 
right to protection from unreasonable search and seizure, to protect traffickers from 
prosecution.  

Weiss then considered the option that a private group could buy X‐ray and other scanning 
technologies. He said two technology issues make this option prohibitive. First, the technology 
itself is expensive and requires maintenance and inspections, which are also expensive. Second, 
the sheer volume of the problem adds exponentially to the cost: “How many aerodromes need 
the technology, and how many units are required?” Legal issues also make private technology 
problematic, Weiss said. “Under which legal authority could a community mandate all air 
carriers to use private screening? It wouldn’t stand up to the constitutional challenge.” 

The third option Weiss discussed was using trained alert dogs. He described two cases in which 
“sniffer dogs” had been used to arrest suspects in drug possession cases. Both cases were 
overturned based on privacy issues, which means trained alert dogs are not a good solution. 

The fourth option was for airlines to search carry‐on and checked baggage. Weiss said airlines 
should seek a legal opinion before adopting a policy, but “consent” is a determining factor in 
legal searches. Therefore, it should be possible for an airline to include disclaimers in various 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 27


places, such as public signs, the company’s website, and travel itineraries. The disclaimer could 
say that “at the request of First Nations serviced by this airline, all checked and carry‐on 
baggage will be subject to search for contraband,” and that if passengers refuse to comply, the 
airline can refuse to carry them. 

Weiss listed a few potential problems with instituting an airline search policy. First, the airline 
would need a private area to perform searches discreetly and respectfully. The check‐in 
procedure would be prolonged, and passengers would be required to check in earlier. Airline 
staff would not be qualified to judge what is contraband and what is not, especially in the case 
of prescription drugs. Also, smugglers will adapt to new regulations. They will carry 
contraband on their person instead, and, Weiss said, “body searches can’t even be considered.” 

The fifth option Weiss discussed was scanning or searching cargo and freight at drop‐off 
locations. Typical types of cargo and freight are mail, envelopes, packages, and boxes of food. 
These types of items could conceivably be searched, if airlines obtain a legal opinion and again 
focus on “consent.”  

Some of the considerations of this approach are the same as for searching passengers and 
baggage. Again, the airlines would require a private area, and the airline staff would not be 
qualified to judge what is and is not contraband. In addition, third parties make some legitimate 
shipments. Courier services, businesses shipping ordered goods, and people dropping off 
packages that they are not sending personally would not be covered by “consent” under current 
case law. 

Weiss said the sixth option, requiring photo identification for shippers, is in place at Wasaya 
Airways as of February 1. Requiring photo identification does not determine whether a package 
contains contraband; however, it serves as a psychological deterrent to a casual shipper. Its 
other advantage is that accurate waybills, confirmed with positive identification of the shipper, 
give law enforcement officials a legal chain of custody. 

The final option Weiss discussed was searching passengers and cargo on First Nation lands. He 
said again that obtaining a legal opinion would be important before adopting policies. 
However, Wasaya’s “limited understanding,” said Weiss, is that bands can adopt bylaws and 
band council resolutions (BCRs) to allow search and seizure of contraband on First Nation 
lands. Bands should check whether BCRs have authority outside the Canadian Charter of Rights 
and Freedoms. If so, this path could be the best option, Weiss said. 

This last option has some of the same issues as previously discussed. The airport or airline 
would need a private area. Because flights into an area can have “somewhat uncontrollable 
arrival schedules,” Weiss said, the search service would require the flexibility to accommodate 
weather, varied schedules, and other delays. Airlines would need accurate contact information 
for the community, and the service should be available 24 / 7, which could be expensive. 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 28


Finally, Weiss cited the same issue around the definition of contraband, especially prescription 
drugs.  

In summary, Weiss said many perceived solutions are complicated by legal issues of search and 
seizure. However, he suggested some short‐term solutions airlines can implement to help 
reduce the flow of contraband: 

       Require photo identification for all cargo shipments. 
       Compile a confidential watch list identifying known high‐risk shippers or passengers. 
       Contact local officials when a “high‐risk” person is travelling or shipping goods.  
At the end of his presentation, Weiss returned to the topic of photo identification. He read 
through a memo sent to Wasaya staff. It defined “known shipper” as “someone who sends two 
shipments in a six‐month period,” or a shipper with an existing, established account. In the 
memo, Wasaya staff members were directed to ask for government‐issued identification for 
unknown shippers. Weiss listed many acceptable forms of identification, including a work or 
study permit, a government employee identification card, a Certificate of Indian Status identity 
card issued by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), and a Canadian Border Services 
Agency’s NEXUS card. Also, Weiss said, “When an agent or customer services representative 
personally knows a shipper, photo identification is not required.” 

Weiss said, “A motivated person who wants to ship contraband into a community will find a 
way to do it.” He said prescription drugs present a particularly difficult case, because they have 
a legitimate purpose in a community. Wasaya wants to participate in the group’s discussions of 
solutions because, Weiss said, “many people and packages travel the North using our airline, 
and we have a responsibility.”  

   Contraband on Airplanes:
   Smuggling of Alcohol and Drugs to All the Fly-In First Nation
   Communities
   SPEAKER
   Brad Duce
   Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service
For his presentation, Brad Duce defined contraband to include Percocet, marijuana in various 
forms, yeast, and alcohol. He said Percocet tablets are sold on the street in Thunder Bay for $5–
$7; in the North, a tablet could fetch $60–$80. An 80 mg OxyContin pill goes for $300 in a remote 
community. Alcohol that costs $10 in Thunder Bay is $100 in the North.  

“People take contraband up north to triple their profit,” he said. 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 29


Duce listed many ways that contraband moves north. It travels in cargo, and the signs may be 
as inconspicuous as packaging that has been tampered with or an item that weighs more than 
normal. Other ways to send contraband include envelopes, repackaged goods, and wrapped 
boxes.  

“It’s tough to tell your community not to send presents pre‐wrapped,” Duce said. 

Duce showed a photo of a confiscated radio. Ordinarily, brand‐new items are still in boxes with 
the original packing materials. In this case, officers noticed plastic sticking out of an inner 
compartment of the radio; the plastic contained smuggled pills. 

People also smuggle contraband on their person: carried in pockets, taped to their bodies, 
stuffed into their undergarments, and hidden in tikanagans (cradle boards). Duce said he had 
recently talked with a woman who is no longer involved in drug trafficking. She told him she 
felt incredible guilt for bringing drugs into the community taped to her child. 

Airline counter agents can play a role in halting smuggling, Duce said, by being attentive when 
handling packages and cargo and when observing people. He said that if agents or charter 
pilots suspect or find contraband before the flight takes off, they should not confront the owner. 
Instead, they should call airport security or police in that jurisdiction. 

Duce said smugglers can pop the head off a hockey stick and stuff the stick with contraband; 
they can smuggle drugs in food too. Smugglers have also cut logs in half, hollowed them out, 
filled them with narcotics, and screwed the halves back together.  

Other suspicious items include containers from food, shaving cream, or soft drinks, which can 
be fitted with twist‐off tops. He said that when people ship groceries, soft drinks, and water, 
they usually ship by the case. Officers should be suspicious of a person who has packed one soft 
drink can or water bottle. 

In communities, band constables recover contraband and turn it over to the police. “They’re one 
of our greatest assets up north,” Duce said. Band constables, under the direction of the chief and 
council, may or may not have the authority to search. After receiving contraband, the police 
investigate and can conduct searches under federal and provincial statutes. They also have 
access to specialized units, such as dog units. 

Duce said drugs and alcohol “aren’t just a police problem; they’re a community problem.” He 
said anyone who suspects smuggling should report it. Community members can report to their 
local police services through police administrative support numbers, or those who want to 
remain anonymous can report to Crime Stoppers, by phone, online, or text message. 

Duce says he is sometimes asked why police cannot check people and packages at airports. He 
said police must act under the limitations of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 30


Criminal Code. According to the Charter and the Code, police constables can search without 
warrants only in exigent circumstances. Duce said exigent circumstances include the danger 
that evidence will be destroyed or that someone will suffer bodily harm or loss of life. In other 
words, the police must have “all the conditions of a search warrant without the time to actually 
get it.” 

However, Duce said, officers can accept as evidence drugs and other contraband confiscated by 
band officers, and then investigate. Any search must be performed within search parameters, or 
the police will have no case. 

In considering what can be done about smuggling, Duce said airlines need to change the way 
they do business in Northern and remote communities. Requiring photo identification, along 
with a current address, to ship packages is one step. Otherwise, Duce said, “we know that 
anyone can send a package by shipping and paying for it.”  

Duce closed by discussing an example. In 2008, NAPS arrived at an airport to help band 
security perform baggage checks. The band security officer saw hand cream with a broken seal. 
Inside the hand cream container, police found 140 prepared marijuana joints. At that point, the 
drugs were turned over to police. The container was resealed and put in the waiting area, to see 
if anyone would claim it. No one did. The box used to ship the drugs was addressed to an 
Elder. Police had no way to link the shipper with the item. 

Duce said band councils should keep in mind that searching on the tarmac is not as effective as 
setting up an inside room, even a temporary space. “On the tarmac, you’re in sight of 
passengers and you’re in the weather. Inside, you might be more effective,” Duce said.  

Weiss from Wasaya Airways asked if he could clarify a point from his own presentation. He 
reminded participants that Transport Canada requires screening at 29 airports in Canada, 
including the Thunder Bay airport. He said the screening regulations cover only passengers and 
goods travelling to one of the other 29 airports. So the flights from Thunder Bay to Sioux 
Lookout, for example, are not screened, while flights from Thunder Bay to Toronto are. The 
government’s concern, said Weiss, “is another Trade Center bombing, and they don’t see an 18‐
seater as a risk in that way.” 

   Discussion

Wally Mckay opened the session to questions from the floor. 

Adam Fiddler, Chief of Sandy Lake First Nation, asked specifically about canine units. Chief 
Fiddler said he knew NAPS had no funding for a dog, but his community recently received the 
offer of a drug‐sniffing dog from a private group in Thunder Bay. He asked whether a trained 
canine unit could come randomly every month or every week to search the cargo area, and then 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 31


whether the police could investigate based on the dog’s response. Chief Fiddler also asked 
about allowing the dog into the cargo area, and if the dog responded to a bag, note the name on 
a bag, forward that name to the band, and allow them to do a thorough search. “Is this 
something that can be done legally?” 

Weiss said his understanding is that the Supreme Court of Canada has struck down the use of 
sniffer dogs. He said that for airlines, “the operative word is ‘consent,’ and we need to request 
consent in the process of taking baggage and cargo.” If a passenger refuses consent, the airline 
can take that as an indication of contraband.  

Weiss said that, from his years of experience, “I can almost spot someone shipping contraband 
from 10 feet away.” He added that Wasaya Airways needs to train its staff to be more vigilant. 
However, he said, a search without consent is not possible from the airline’s perspective.  

Weiss said airlines can work more closely with First Nation communities. Wasaya has had 
“mixed results” when contacting bands about shipments that are suspicious. Because airplanes 
come and go 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, band officers are sometimes not available to search 
a plane when it lands. Weiss said he wanted to work with communities to overcome the 
challenges of staffing level and time of arrival. Perhaps a list of individual procedures for each 
community, including lists and times for contacting them, would be possible. 

Duce said drug‐sniffing dogs are like any other police service. If a person calls in a tip to Crime 
Stoppers or communicates a tip to a police service in another way, police can legally take in a 
dog to confirm it.  

Tom Morris of Wasaya said that in the past, Wasaya had allowed dogs into its facilities. Police 
had performed searches randomly in Sioux Lookout, Red Lake, and Thunder Bay. One issue 
arose was who controlled the dog.  

Chief Clifford Bull of Lac Seul First Nation asked how to detect smuggling when people at 
airports swallow drugs. He also asked if detecting that practice is an infringement of the 
charter. Duce said it is difficult for police to receive authorization to perform a cavity search, 
“and smugglers know that.” However, if a tip comes from a confidential informant or through 
Crime Stoppers, police can investigate.  

Duce said the more communities come together and share information about smugglers with 
the police, the easier it is for police services to obtain search warrants. 

Elena Chapman from Windigo First Nations Council said most communities know the 
traffickers. She asked whether airlines can alert a community that a known trafficker is 
travelling, so that people can be there when the person arrives. “Is that infringing on the 
person’s privacy travelling?” Tom Morris said Wasaya has a confidential watch list and would 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 32


be happy to add names to it from the community, as well as the names of people to notify in the 
community. Weiss said watch lists are used throughout North America.  

Chief Peter Moonias of Neskantaga First Nation expressed frustration that many solutions 
seemed to be blocked. “Everything is unconstitutional,” he said. In his community, people are 
obviously making money somewhere without working. The post office is another arrival spot 
for contraband, he said. “We were told 10 years ago we can’t have our own post offices, so 
they’re run for us,” but he said the community knows illegal shipments are taking place.  

Paul Johnup from Weagamow First Nation asked police officers about the confidentiality of 
Crime Stoppers tips. One of his band members had phoned Crime Stoppers. The suspects 
named were caught, charged, and convicted in court. However, the lawyer for the accused tried 
to get the name of the person who contacted Crime Stoppers. Although the attorney was 
unsuccessful, word has now gone around that “we can’t trust Crime Stoppers.” That lack of 
trust would be true for people providing names to Wasaya. Johnup asked whether attorneys 
can find out who submitted a tip. 

Duce said one of the major problems with people who share information is that “they like to 
talk.” He said that in his experience, the person who gave the tip most often breaches 
confidentiality. One of the primary features of Crime Stoppers is its anonymity; callers are given 
an ID number. Lawyers cannot subpoena that information from Crime Stoppers. 

Chief Sol Atlookan of Eabametoong First Nation said he also wonders whether individuals 
involved in illegal activity have more rights than the people “who are trying to do something 
right in their lives.” He said his community members will be disappointed that they “can’t do 
anything because of legislation and [the] Charter of Rights.” He said his band had given NAPS 36 
names to watch, but the band has heard nothing in response, because searching violates the 
charter. His community feels discouraged. 

Tom thanked all the participants who spoke up. He said Wasaya as a company wants to 
address the issue. Based on the recommendations from the reports that will be created at the 
conference, Wasaya will be receptive to new initiatives. “We need to work together,” he said. 

Duce said, “Up north, the police are always the last to know everything.” He encouraged 
community members to talk with officers, because “it’s all about the community and the 
community response.” The community can help police services do a better job.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 33


   Justice Panel
   PANELISTS
   Detective Sergeant James Graham
   Ontario Provincial Police
   Trevor Jukes
   Assistant Crown Attorney
   Thunder Bay
   Mike Montemuro
   Federal Crown Standing Agent for the Department of Public Prosecution

   The OPP and Prescription Drug Abuse

“Prescription drugs are a real problem for drug enforcement,” said James Graham, noting that 
while street drugs are illegal at every level, prescription drugs come from a legal supply and are 
later diverted into the drug culture. The difficulty for police is to determine where the diversion 
occurs and who is distributing the drugs.  

Opiates, codeine, Hydromorph Contin, and OxyContin are the major drugs of concern, 
although there “are a pile of them in the same family.” An opiate is basically a legal form of 
heroin, which is extremely addictive. More recently, the police have seen traditional heroin 
addicts moving to opiates, which are arguably even more addictive given that the withdrawal 
symptoms are both physical and psychological.  

In Northwestern Ontario, prescription drug abuse is a huge problem as a result of the easy 
access to those drugs through prescriptions. The drugs are prescribed for a wide variety of 
ailments. In the past, drugs like OxyContin were administered only to the most serious, 
terminally ill cases; now they are prescribed for less serious ailments.  

“It is difficult to get an accurate picture of what is legal and illegal,” said Graham. To address 
the issue, the OPP has adopted a number of strategies over the past five years. It has met with 
physicians and pharmacists to discuss emergency room practices where it is not uncommon to 
prescribe 300 to 400 pills to an individual who is not mobile or who resides in a remote area. 
With such large prescriptions, it is difficult to determine if one person is using all the pills. 

Graham said with only nine drug enforcement staff covering much of Northern Ontario, the 
OPP does not have the people to do individual education. He indicated that there has been 
some success in raising awareness, but much more work is needed.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 34


   Lawyers’ Perspectives

Trevor Jukes said he deals with charges under the Criminal Code, including theft, homicide, and 
break and enter. It is no surprise that other problems such as family violence and property theft 
occur with drug addiction.  

Noting the importance of communication, Jukes said government in particular tends to work in 
silos; these must be broken down to find solutions.  

Mike Montemuro said that in his travels to remote communities for drug trafficking or 
possession for the purposes of trafficking, he has seen an increase in OxyContin use. While only 
one or two cases had been reported in the past, addiction is now rampant. The individuals 
bringing in the drugs are often the most vulnerable and addicted themselves.  

Montemuro said communities do have some opportunities to counter the flow of drugs: 

       Chiefs have intimate knowledge of the community. 
       Bylaws exist permitting the searching of parcels. 
       Police and peacekeepers have been ingenious at outsmarting drug smugglers.  
Montemuro asked where the drugs come from. Some sources are legitimate, he said, and very 
few drugs come from drugstore robberies and prescription fraud. Organized crime could be 
operating in communities or several small organizations; “the chiefs know,” said Montemuro. 
Individuals acting as mules could also be bringing in drugs.  

Montemuro said it is difficult to identify the responsible individuals, since “people don’t like to 
rat on others.” A community approach to treatment is needed, he said, one that starts with 
education so that people do not become addicted in the first place.  

Noting how slowly the court system works in remote communities where the court might only 
meet four times a year, Montemuro said that from start to finish, a trial might take a year to a 
year and a half. Drug addiction does not stop simply because charges have been laid, since 
treatment centres are lacking.  

Toronto is the only jurisdiction to have a special drug treatment court that offers drug addicts 
some treatment options. Still, its success is limited, said Jukes, since it is difficult to change 
behaviour. A jail sentence may deter some individuals, but there are drugs in jails as well. “All 
we seem to be doing is putting a band‐aid on the wound while the wound is getting bigger.”  

The law on sniffer dogs is unclear, said Montemuro; “Judges will say one thing one time and 
another thing at another time.” The law states that the police can use sniffer dogs if there is a 
reasonable suspicion of drug possession. However, the definition of “reasonable suspicion” is 
also unclear. Lawyers often argue this point.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 35


Montemuro said individuals charged with trafficking or possession for the purpose of 
trafficking drugs could be asked to leave the community until they seek treatment, rather than 
being held in custody in the community until their bail hearing. It would be legally possible to 
put such a restriction on charged individuals. Search provisions could also be applied where 
individuals have to agree to personal searches or searches of their surroundings.  

Jukes said while the balance between the rights of the state and those of the individual is a 
complicated issue, the courts generally defer to Northern communities. In this case, the focus is 
more on the consequences for the individual and the community than on the laying of charges. 
“But unless you find out who is really responsible and bring them to justice, you won’t ever 
truly stem the tide.”  

Graham related what an addiction counsellor had told him at a drug abuse forum several years 
ago. She had said once individuals get into the system as addicts, they typically stay with the 
system for the rest of their life. Addicts will need the lifelong support of the community to help 
them stay clean. The same woman had advised that in order for counsellors to help those 
already in the system, fewer people have to come into it.  

Jukes encouraged chiefs and councillors from all communities to establish a relationship with 
their Crown attorney and defence prosecutor. This connection enables those lawyers to be 
sensitive to what is happening in the community. He added “we rely on First Nations court 
workers and others closely connected to the community to provide us with information, and the 
more information that flows back and forth, the better.”  

   Discussion

   Search and seizure options for Wasaya Airways

Norm Weiss asked if any law would be broken if an airline used sniffer dogs for search and 
seizure purposes. Montemuro indicated that while he could not speak to the legal issue that an 
airline might have if it opened bags, such action could result in a private civil suit. However, if 
drugs were found and no charges were laid, it would result in the diversion of drugs from the 
community. “In terms of harm reduction, this would be something to be explored,” he said.  

Weiss suggested that a ticket disclaimer could give the airline the right to search and could 
eliminate a civil suit. Montemuro said that such a disclaimer “would go a long way by 
providing the passenger with the option to consent.” The airline provides a service that requires 
that passengers follow certain preconditions; if they are not followed, there is no contract.  

Graham said that Purolator has a policy on its bill of lading that asks clients to agree not to send 
cash, dangerous goods, and other items. If Purolator has any indication that that contract has 
been contravened, it has the right to open a package. The police cannot open the package, but 
the manager can. If the content is illegal, it is turned over to the police.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 36


If passengers undergo body searches prior to boarding a plane at the Thunder Bay airport, then 
this should be possible for Wasaya Airways to do as well, stated Chief Adam Fiddler, Sandy 
Lake First Nation. At the airport, if individuals do not want to be searched, they do not enter 
the plane. Chief Fiddler asked whether Wasaya could therefore have passengers sign something 
that obligates them to a search if they want to enter the plane.  

Montemura agreed that at airports, passengers have a reduced expectation of personal privacy. 
Searches prior to boarding the plane would also be easier than at the other end—in the 
community. He said that such a policy would have to take the safety angle. With such a policy, 
passengers would have prior notice and would therefore have less of an argument to resist a 
search.  
   A question of rights

Chief Connie Gray‐McKay, Mishkeegogamang First Nation, said that her band’s work with 
police and efforts to deal with the prescription drug issue have yielded little, as they are often 
confronted with “all the things we can’t do” because of the charter of rights. The individuals 
who are involved in this drug trade know the system well enough to manipulate it.  

“What about the rights of the child?” asked Chief Gray‐McKay; the consequences of drug abuse 
are an infringement on children’s rights, not to mention those of Elders and other community 
members who do not abuse drugs. She had also been told that community bylaws on public 
intoxication are not enforceable. “Are we going to have to become law‐breakers in order to 
make our communities safe?”  

Chief Gray‐McKay made a number of other points: 

       Dogs are not allowed into schools and should be. 
       Gangs are the real issue, and prescription drugs are coming from organized crime.  
       People do not say anything out of fear, since there is no one there to protect them. 
       The problem comes down to spiritual bankruptcy in the community.  
       Better dialogue with the Crown is needed. 
If the government cannot provide the resources to address the issue, then all the discussion 
during this conference will have been useless. Government has to play an active part and show 
fiduciary responsibility, said Chief Gray‐McKay.  

Montemuro said that communities having one access point and prescription drug abuse being 
an epidemic should provoke action. The courts will defer to the community as much as possible 
so that the community can protect itself. There is a recognition that the issue of prescription 
drug abuse is just not about the individual and the state, but is more “familial.” Something can 
be done by using legal tools to protect the community, he said.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 37


The Indian Act presents “many hoops and hurdles” to successfully pass bylaws, said Jukes. He 
also said that all community bylaws should be reviewed. The public intoxication bylaw, for 
instance, could be revised to redefine or more closely define what is meant by intoxicants.  

Chief Leslie Cameron, Wabauskang First Nation, agreed with Chief Gray‐McKay, asking how 
communities can protect themselves from gangs and not live in fear of speaking out. “Gangs are 
a different ball game,” said Montemuro, noting that while gangs are less of a problem east of 
Kenora, there are more gangs north of the area.  

Graham said that while the police do not want to discourage people from speaking out, he 
understands that there is always an impact when people take an active role. It is easy to target 
someone who speaks out. Law enforcement officers always ensure confidentiality and would 
never provide names; even a defence lawyer cannot ask for names to be divulged. “You need to 
speak out as a community; individuals can’t stand on their own too long.”  

Referring back to an earlier discussion about leaked Crime Stoppers information, Jukes said that 
it must have been a case of someone overhearing something they should not have. The only 
way for confidential information to get out is for defence lawyers to ask the judge to force the 
Crown to do so, and this request is rarely successful.  
   Opportunities for action

James Morris explained that the Nishnawbe‐Aski culture focuses on the collective, while the 
Canadian culture is all about the individual. Canadian law breaks down in our community; “All 
I hear is that you can’t do that—it’s like a stuck record.”  

Participants are here to create strategies against prescription drug abuse. While First Nations 
have been struggling with suicide, drugs, and alcohol for years, they have been sporadic 
problems. Prescription drug abuse is non‐stop. The chiefs “have put their foot down, saying this 
is where it stops. Your rules are more important than our children.”  

Morris asked about the possibility of obtaining a screening machine for the Sioux Lookout 
airport to screen passengers and of having sniffer dogs for spot checks. He said he could not 
understand why no one can be prosecuted for bringing liquor from Sioux Lookout, where it is 
legal, but it is prohibited to bring a bottle of water through security. He wondered how that law 
was implemented so quickly.  

Not allowing bottles of water through security is part of the contract, not a law, said Jukes. 
There may be ways that aircraft carriers can set out preconditions. “If you don’t want to fly on 
my plane that is fine.” Individual corporations can look at setting out preconditions as an 
option. Jukes said that the issue of sniffer dogs is not clear, since judges do not agree. Lawyers 
then look to politicians, who sometimes do not have a lot of will to provide direction.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 38


Morris reiterated that communities need sniffer dogs to keep drugs out and to safeguard the 
collective. Montemura said that “there will always be defence lawyers” arguing the other side 
(i.e., against the use of sniffer dogs). Community leaders need to work out strategies and 
implement them, and “we will do what we can in the courts.” The courts will definitely listen to 
the argument and will often defer to the collective, but there will always be challenges.  

Wally McKay summarized the key points made during the day. “We must talk as governments, 
as we—the people.” First Nations do not have to ask permission of “the colonizers; we are 
simply going to do it.”  

Kyle Peters, band councillor, asked if it is possible for First Nation people to have their own 
judicial system. The Canadian judicial system only makes offenders better criminals when they 
get out. First Nations could benefit from a good system—better than the current one, which is 
not right for them.  

“I believe the government owes us a lot; we don’t make the drugs that enter our communities,” 
said Peters, adding that the least the government could do is give First Nations control over 
their people so they could heal.  

“Believe it or not but courts would probably agree with you,” said Jukes, since they recognize 
the problem of over‐representation of Aboriginal people in prison because of government 
mistreatment and direct policies. Prosecutors have to look for alternatives in the system, 
although the courts have given little direction in setting up restorative justice systems. Little 
funding is available. Jukes said that he keeps raising the issue of the Canadian judicial system 
not working for Aboriginal people, but no one is listening and the people in power are not at 
this conference.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 39




   Day 2

   Overview and Process

Prior to the second day of the conference, participants selected one of five breakout sessions 
with the following themes:  

       The abuse of prescription drugs affecting all ages 
       Current support systems (health and others) 
       Community responsibility and ownership 
       The law and security 
       The role of leaders and the political challenges they face 
The group in each breakout session would meet five times over the next two days. In order to 
immerse themselves in one theme and generate real, practical solutions, participants were asked 
to remain in the same breakout session for the duration. The ultimate aim of the meetings was 
to design a work plan with achievable goals and objectives, specific activities, and timelines. 
Participants would also identify who in the communities would carry out the activities.  

During the first three meetings of each breakout session, two facilitators asked participants to 
brainstorm and prioritize ideas around specific questions related to their theme. The ideas were 
posted on the wall for all group members to refer to during the discussions. In the fourth 
session, participants would look back on their work of the previous day, and prioritize some 
key goals and activities while the fifth and final meeting was dedicated to the work plan.  

The five breakout sessions proceeded differently. While some followed a more structured 
format, with table discussions followed by general comments on the priorities generated, others 
had general discussions throughout, with points raised along the way. All breakout sessions 
came up with work plans at the end of five meetings. 

In each breakout session, the  discussions of the larger group were recorded. The individual 
table discussions were not recorded; instead, the points on the wall were recorded as they were 
originally written. 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 40


   Breakout Group 1:
   The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages
   FACILITATORS
   Frank McNulty
   First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
   Francine Pellerin
   Mawata

   Meeting 1
   Discussion Question:
   “What is your vision for creating a community that is free from prescription drug abuse?”

The facilitators asked participants to brainstorm and prioritize some key ideas that flowed from 
the question.  

   Discussion of points

After considerable discussion in groups seated at individual tables, participants put their ideas 
on the wall. All agreed that the points fell broadly into the categories of cultural, healthy and 
supportive families, economic, education / awareness, and community works as a whole.  

A number of points focused on community leadership, and it was suggested that leadership 
should be a separate category. The group decided that freedom from drugs will require the 
whole community. Families have just as much responsibility as chiefs and band councils, who 
are just another part of the community.  

The whole group then reviewed the various points on the wall and moved a few points to other 
categories. For example, increased security at airports was moved from Education / Awareness 
to Economic. Successful youth methadone weaning program was under the Healthy and 
Supportive Families category, but after some discussion this point was moved to Education / 
Awareness.  

One participant said some people who go for methadone treatment still come back to the 
community high. “They are not serious and need to be cut off.” After‐hours care was added to 
the Cultural category.  

The facilitator said that many of these points would be a part of the work plan that is to go to 
each community. He asked participants if there was one area where a community could 
realistically start work on prescription drug abuse.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 41


One participant said that it is important to consider many aspects and to have a suite of support 
systems and programs when dealing with a prescription drug addict. “You need to know their 
background.” In order to recover and move forward, that person will need to participate in 
support programs, to benefit from community economic development, and to have training. “If 
you don’t have a job, you can’t deal with despair or hopelessness.” A complete community 
approach is needed. He added that “we still have it in our blood to be on the land.” The results 
of such an approach will likely not be evident for another 20 years, but “we need to kick‐start 
it.”  

Margaret Wabonge, Migisi Sahgaigan First Nation, said more education is needed on 
addictions—how they start and where they can take people. Greater funding for such programs 
is also required, as are special treatment centres for prescription drug users. “Focus on the fact 
that it is a heavy addiction to get off of.”  

“When a person is in trouble, it is a reflection of spiritual problems,” said Lucas Tait, SLFNHA 
board member. The farther a community is away from the Lord, he said, the more spiritual 
emptiness there is. Empires fell because of a lack of knowledge of God.  

“A long time ago, our parents had lessons in the evening,” said Tait, asking how many parents 
have kept up that tradition. Families have problems because they do not communicate with 
their children. “He created us, and we don’t recognize Him.” He said that nothing has been 
mentioned about daily devotions in the discussions so far. The group agreed to add a point 
about family devotions into the Cultural category.  

Translator Jerry Sawanas suggested that since First Nations have some control over their 
educational system, children should be educated about substance abuse. “Drinking and doing 
drugs seems to be accepted,” so something is needed that teaches children what is wrong. 
Children believe what they see, and they see it as normal. If they were taught from kindergarten 
to grade 12 about “what it is that we have living with us,” they can at least make a choice. Right 
now, they do not have one. Children are either part of the group or become outcasts.  

Participants agreed that this kind of education is necessary and should even be mandatory. This 
point was added under the Education / Awareness category. Judy Desmoulin, Longlac #58 
health director, said that such educational units already exist, but “it is up to the individual 
community to make sure that it is there.”  

Lucas Tait said that church leadership was missing. “The church should be more involved and 
go into the community.” Many agreed that individuals who lack spiritual knowledge and 
beliefs feel dead inside.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 42


Wabonge wanted a point added about “our own education about assimilation—the history of 
our Aboriginal people.” The need for more recreational opportunities was also added to the list 
of key points.  

   Participants’ ideas as posted on the wall

   Cultural

       After‐hours care 
       Elders included 
       Spiritual nurturing—acceptance by community / family and unconditional love 
       Institute traditional and cultural teachings (7 sacred teachings) 
       Youth forum 
       Use alternative medicines, and do not rely so much on nurses / physicians 
       Family doing devotions (church) 
       More spiritual activities / events for all ages in communities 
       Recreation (e.g., hockey, family activities) 
   Healthy and supportive families

       Counselling for users and families (i.e.: methadone enforcement) 
       Healthy children (i.e., proper nutrition, adequate sleep, needs met, proper education, 
        violence‐free upbringing, parental guidance, good self‐esteem, and learning their 
        language) 
       Successful youth (i.e., goals, positive outlook on life, value traditional ways of thinking, 
        speak their language, role models) 
       Elders (i.e., respect, seek their counsel, taken care of, active in the school and 
        community) 
       Responsible, caring adults (i.e., clean way of life, self‐care, active members, children’s 
        needs put first, good role models, spiritual and traditional strengths, drug‐ and alcohol‐
        free) 
       Seeing families / parents walking their children to and from school 
       Children to be with parents—families need to be connected 
       Children need to be cared for—no more losing our kids to Children’s Aid 
       Address obesity, diabetes, cancer—generally people should be in better physical health 


              SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 43


       No more lateral violence—lateral violence training 
       Treatment for families and individuals 
   Economic

       Financially stable community = healthy community 
       Higher employment rate 
       Jobs available for those who want them 
   Housing

Housing issues need to be solved (e.g., homes for everyone, furniture and basic needs in home, 
suitable homes for family size) 
   Education / Awareness

       Education/Awareness presentations (in curriculum and must be age appropriate) 
       Learn from prescription drug users 
       Educate community (i.e.: assimilation, residential school, methadone treatment, Tylenol 
        1, 2, and 3) 
       Methadone weaning program (learn more about it) 
       Screening for other drugs 
       Education—lots of awareness in school; teach the young early (Prevention! Prevention!) 
       Parenting education 
       Adult education opportunities available (added income $$) 
       Have a truant office (i.e., keep kids in school) 
       Sober walks, drug rallies, more drug awareness 
       Workshops on addictions, self‐esteem, and family violence (need to fund these)  
       Develop drug and alcohol education units to be implemented in school—make them 
        mandatory 
       Address the “pathology of normalcy” theory 
       We need to learn our history—residential school, Indian Act, colonization, assimilation, 
        spiritual history, the Sixties Scoop, diseases (e.g., TB, smallpox) 
   Community works as a whole

       Chief and council provide strong leadership and are active in community 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 44


       Chief and council to abstain from drugs and alcohol as role models for community 
        members 
       Chief, council, and program workers to work together to tackle what we need to do 
       Active and involved leadership 
       More national and international exposure for our problems 
       Methadone free! More education for frontline workers to understand this problem 
       No more illegal drug dealing or illegal drug use 
       More awareness in government; we need more resources 
       Positive peer groups—Big Brothers Big Sisters, sponsors (like they have in AA), 
        Neighbourhood Watch 
       Positive programs (e.g., promoting alcohol‐ and drug‐free events / activities) for young 
        people and adults 
       Community organizations meet every two weeks to discuss issues and brainstorm 
        strategies and enact them (e.g., Health and Social Services, NIshnawbe‐Aski Police 
        Service (NAPS), Healthy Babies / Healthy Children, band council, Elders organizations, 
        nursing station, and the school) 
       Program workers more active—work together (e.g., Community Wellness Worker, 
        Building Healthy Communities, Brighter Futures, Community Health Representatives ) 
       Community members should rely less on health and nursing staff 
       Alcohol‐ and drug‐free community 
       Elders / youth—more positive interaction 
       Parents, leaders, community people—becoming more understanding of each other 
       Community (i.e., proper housing, group activities, proper policing for youth, leadership 
        involved in their communities, support services put in place, adequate health care, good 
        and safe drinking water, schools to meet children’s needs, community supports healthy 
        living) 
       Intervention programs / plans for families and the addicted 
       Reaching to the grassroots level 
       Community treatment programs 
       Community teamwork 
       Resource workers 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 45


       Leadership to show a caring attitude and commitment 
       Leadership supports resource workers and promotes activities 
       Networking with other communities (e.g., via Internet, videoconferencing, radio) 
       Increase security at airports 
       Motivated resource people with a consolidated work plan that everyone follows  

   Meeting 2
   Discussion Question
   “What are the challenges of prescription drug abuse as it applies to all ages within your community?”

In answering the question, the facilitators asked participants to keep in mind all community 
members, including community leaders, men, women, children, youth, Elders, single mothers, 
families, and the First Nation workforce. 

   Discussion of posted points

After considerable discussion at individual tables, participants proposed some major points and 
broad categories, which were pinned on the wall. As a group, the participants reviewed and 
discussed each point.  

Judy Desmoulin, Longlac #58 health director, said that smoking “is another gateway to drug 
addiction” and should therefore be on the list.  

Another participant clarified the point about iPods. Today’s youth know what to do with iPods 
but have no clue how to lay a trap or other traditional activities. “Show them ways to become 
interested in other things [than technology].”  

Participants agreed to change the ages of the youth category from 16–25 to 17–29, and added an 
adolescent category (ages 13–19), although they did not add specific points under the latter 
category.  

The group did not identify issues specific only to men or women, noting that issues like family 
violence can go either way. Beverly Taylor, Constance Lake First Nation, added that addicts 
depend on spouses for money; the spouses may be beaten if they have no money to hand over.  

Clovis Meekis, Sandy Lake First Nation, said he wanted to see a point added about “the next 
level of drug addiction—suicide.” It can happen when addicts are “detoxing,” when life is so 
terrible. Participants agreed that communities need to recognize that prescription drug abuse 
plays a role in suicide.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 46


One participant said that methamphetamine will be the next big thing. The production of 
crystal meth is easy, with recipes on the Internet. All that is needed are household products. 
Increasingly, formulas for new drugs will be available online. Police can track the Internet 
Protocol (IP) address, but they cannot determine who downloaded the information. Meth labs, 
which can be run in the community, are a real challenge for law enforcement.  

Given the many points that related to the family unit, Taylor proposed that a new category, 
families, be created. Participants agreed, and a number of points were moved under this new 
heading.  

Lucas Tait asked where under the headings “the consequences of drug running” would go. 
While providing a proactive message to the community, converted drug runners would still be 
haunted by their previous life. How can drug addicts or drug runners restore their future and 
their health?  

Participants’ ideas as posted on the wall:  
   Children (ages 0–6)

       Being born with substance abuse [mother] leading to medical issues, special education, 
        behavioural issues, neglect, lack of nutrition, placed in other homes (displacement) 
   Children (ages 6–12)

       Behavioural issues, experimenting, peer pressure issue, lack of nutrition, no home 
        support, neglect, becoming addicted  
       Learn that drug addiction is the normal way of life 
       Attendance at school, involvement in crime, lack of sleep, lack of recreation, other 
        addictions, sexual abuse 
       Trying to stop the younger ones when their parents are doing drugs 
       Not enough organized activities for children and youth 
       Educating very young children—what does drug use look like? 
   Adolescent (ages 13–19)

   Youth (ages 17–29)

       Smoking 
       IPods—they know it all; show a snare wire—what is that?  
       Young people don’t know what the consequences are of drug use 
       Not enough youth pursuing educational goals 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 47


       Using a young person as a drug mule, but then leaving that person to fend for him / 
        herself in court 
       Marijuana being cut with other drugs; leads to pill addiction 
       Codependency, lack of sleep, nutrition, financial issues (crisis), education, sexual 
        promiscuity, theft, denial, addiction, fraud, drug dealing, neglect, relationship issues 
        (applies to female and male youth) 
       Peer pressure 
       Boredom, lack of recreation, and jobs 
       Children  / youth—no future goals; low self‐esteem (their social needs are not being 
        met); day‐to‐day living, physical needs are not being met; need education to meet their 
        needs 
       Innocent people are being used to transport illegal drugs (don’t carry packages if you 
        don’t know what is in them) 
       Internet drug orders 
       Anger and stealing due to lack of funds to sustain the addiction 
       Unaware of addiction dependency 
       Rejection and lack of safety net and support system (drug addiction) 
       Lack of support mechanisms within the community 
       Prescription drugs are legal—harder to control 
       Young drug addicts work together to protect their illegal activities—they threaten 
        people who try to expose them 
       Withdrawal from drugs—suicide ideas 
   Adults (ages 25–35)

       Marriage, gambling, other addiction 
       Neglect of kids 
       Legal issues 
       Gangs 
       Family violence, abusive relationships, separation, abuse 
       Nutrition, hygiene 
       Employment issues 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 48


       Spirituality 
       No safe houses 
       Dishonesty in relationships (not committed) 
       Parenting skills need to improve 
       Not knowing limits (applies to both females and males) 
   Single mothers

       Not enough support from family and community 
       Not enough financial support 
       The need to provide more support programs (e.g., transportation to activities / events) 
   Adults (ages 35–55)

       No interest in traditional lifestyle; neglect, financial problems, and family violence 
        (applies to both females and males)  
       People too afraid of change—take a risk: anything is better than what is going on now 
       Lack of housing and overcrowding 
       Lack of drug awareness, its effects and side effects 
       Lack of communication 
       More men need to take up their warrior roles—protectors; our men are addicted—lost 
        their role 
       Addicts are lying and stealing from their own families—families don’t like to tell on 
        their own; they need “tough love” 
       Update training on addictions and treatment options for resource workers 
       Fear of disclosing prescription drug abuse 
       More information and translation for meds prescribed 
       Not enough frontline workers to do the work that is needed 
       No opportunities for adults to share or tell their stories (e.g., circles, workshops) 
       Women’s shelters don’t take methadone‐dependent individuals 
       Too much community protectionism—afraid to be a snitch, corruption, friends 
        protecting each other from prosecution (e.g., relatives) 
       Lack of human resources and information gathering 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 49


       Parents’ denial that their children / child has drug abuse problem for fear of losing them 
        to child welfare agency  
       There is no immediate help for people who want it there and then! Eventually we lose 
        them because we can’t provide the help  
       Meth labs formula from Internet—crystal methadone  
   Elders (both female and male)

       No transportation, false information, lack of knowledge from Elders, health issues, theft 
        (by family members), money, deal 
       Not enough Elders being used for advice, guidance, and their knowledge in all areas of 
        life 
       Elder abuse—drug abuser has Elder looking after his / her life so they can be high 
       Elder abuse in general 
       Elders: inadequate care, not respected, not being consulted, transportation issues, 
        homecare needed for Elders, protection needed for Elder abuse 
       Lack of communication—language barrier, translation (e.g., different dialects) 
       Lack of education and awareness of the purpose of prescription drugs 
       Addicted people harass the ones coming home after surgery or health treatment (bug 
        them for medication) 
   Families

       Families wasting all their income on drugs—how do we make families spend their 
        money more wisely? 
       Families enabling addicts—cleaning house for them, buying their food, looking after 
        their children 
       Lack of immediate help for those individuals and families (e.g., treatment facilities and 
        outside resources) 
       Families—breakdown of family support systems, parents aren’t there for their children, 
        children come home to an empty house, inadequate support if on social assistance 
       Family violence on the rise when their fix is not there—emotions / tempers rise 
       Treatment centres—not enough to accommodate prescription pill abusers and they don’t 
        take people on methadone, too far from home, individuals have to be away from family 
        too long  



              SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 50


       Not enough cultural  / spiritual knowledge passed on to families / children 
       Community members, especially family members, denying the problem or not willing to 
        address it 
       Some program people have become too territorial for their programs and budgets 
       Don’t know how to approach or confront a dealer or addict  
       Understanding / accepting / supporting the recovery / healing process and / or the 
        individual 
   Community leaders

       Lack of random screening for female / male band employees for drug detection (no 
        funds available) 
       Deal with issues (e.g., is there family drug dealing? Are they involved in dealing or 
        bootlegging?) 
       Need more counselling and treatment centres 
       Reaching for core issue (pain, abuse, rejection) 
       Everyone should be responsible / accountable, even if the addict/dealer is from the 
        family of a person in leadership 
       Being / getting involved with drugs, alcohol, and substance abuse 
       Dealing with community members and families who are abusing  
       Financial emergency service needs to be accountable 
       Some leaders don’t want to be on board in this fight against drugs 
       Focus on why there are addicts, not just the addiction 
       Bylaws—enforce them 
       Not admitting there is a problem 
       Very few committed volunteers—same ones always come out 
       Need police (NAPS, OPP) authorities to work closely with programs. Need court system 
        to work closely with community too 
       Nepotism 
       Chief and council to enforce recommendations from community—no more loans, 
        advance 
       The Canadian law has too much protection for individuals rights, even when what they 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 51


        are doing is wrong 
       No professional counselling service available (funds nonexistent) 
       Policies not implemented as they should or could be 
       Band Council Resolutions (BCRs) are not taken seriously in the legal system 
       Update community bylaws and amend to include prescription drug abuse 
       We need to prevent and prepare our members and address this issue before it becomes 
        totally out of control; learn from other communities that have experienced extremely 
        violent situations 
       Community‐driven BCRs supported by chief and council to deter drug dealers and drug 
        runners 
       Poverty is an issue—there is never enough money, especially for the addict 
       First Nation workforce—lateral violence; being on time is a problem; role models need 
        to be accountable, as does everyone; confidentiality (not abuse this); hiring should be 
        based on skills, not who you know 
   Police / authorities / doctors

       Doctors need to review their prescriptions to our members; don’t give out such heavy 
        medication 
       Prescription drugs are legal 
       Physicians prescribing multiple medications 
       Using medication to fix pill problem 
       Police should have tests for drug abuser, like the breathalyzer—automatic license 
        suspension for drug abuse 
       Prescription drug screening bylaw enforcement 
       No aftercare and support 

   Meeting 3
   Discussion Question:
   “What actions could be taken to reduce prescription drug abuse or misuse?”

McNulty encouraged participants to think of the community, and all aspects of the community, 
including the leadership, elderly, youth, men and women, and children. He asked each small 
group to list three to five items on how to help communities reduce prescription drug abuse. 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 52


After each small group began its discussion at the table, McNulty asked a focused question: 
“How can you start action within your community?”  

After small groups brainstormed the two questions, raising challenges and suggesting solutions 
to those challenges, McNulty and Pellerin led the discussion among the larger group. Each 
small group was asked to state their ideas in this discussion. Some of the points were discussed 
in detail, but other points were simply read aloud and the discussion moved on to other points. 

   Discussion of posted points

   Children (0–6 years; 6–12 years)

“Breakfast / lunch programs”  

Start breakfast and lunch programs, or promote existing programs. Creating programs to feed 
children (especially those with parents addicted to prescription drugs) is a small but beneficial 
step. Physical nourishment is important. 

“Parents can get involved”  

Incorporating parents into programs can instil a greater “sense of values” in both the parent and 
the child. Involving parents can also create better bonding between parent and child. If the 
parent is involved in the program, it can also help the program grow. 

“Community snowsuit funds” 

If the community can come together and provide snowsuits for those children requiring them, it 
will benefit the children’s physical health—particularly when a child’s parent is an addict and 
directs money toward the addiction instead of the child’s well‐being.  

“Activities that encourage children and parent involvement” 

Volunteers in the community can create or promote programs and activities that encourage 
parent and children involvement. These programs need to be promoting more family activities 
and to teach safety.  

“Safety” 

Safety is an important tool to teach to the children and parents. 
   Adolescents (13–16 years)

“Recreation can address health problems, boredom, improve community morale, etc.” 

Being active can lead to confidence and self‐esteem, which may help adolescents avoid using 
prescription drugs. Recreational facilities should be built, if they are not already provided. 
Involving adolescents in recreational activities should decrease boredom. 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 53


One participant said that communities should seek funding for recreational facilities. Pellerin 
replied that activity facilities are expensive and the funding needed to come from somewhere, 
but did not suggest specific funding resources. Even though communities would benefit from 
having a recreational facility, resources are lacking, and realistically, communities may be 
unable to afford them. 
   Youth (17–29 years)

“Regular drug education in school” 

Educating the youth is a valuable priority.  

“Volunteers” 

Youth can also be encouraged to volunteer in various programs in the community. 
Volunteering will circumvent boredom, and it can create a feeling of belonging. 

“Activities to keep youth actively involved in healthy, safe activities” 

Activities that are created for youth should promote safety and a healthy lifestyle—one that is 
free from drugs. 

       “Qualified counsellors to provide regular counselling” 
       “Annual learning plans” 
       “Chief and council for youth, to seek their input / solutions to problems affecting them” 
Youth can contribute their voice to the community and demonstrate that they can make positive 
changes. 

       “Promoting abstinence” 
       “Learning their language” 
Learning their language can encourage youth to value traditions and culture more, and to focus 
less on prescription drug abuse.  
   Adults

The suggestions raised were not gender specific, and the ideas represented men and women 
equally. 

“Volunteers in the community” 

Adults can volunteer within the community at various programs. Adults can be positive role 
models for younger community members.  

“Positive parenting workshops” 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 54


These workshops can be held within the community, and volunteers can run them. 

“Drug‐free dances and theme activities” 

For events, the focus can switch to a positive, drug‐free approach. Although communities 
generally accept alcohol, promoting drug‐free dances or weddings might encourage positive 
change. 
   Elders

“Elders should be given more opportunities to share their knowledge, impart their wisdom, 
and tell their stories” 

Elders can share their wisdom, both historically and culturally. Elders should also be 
encouraged to tell their stories—e.g., personal, family, community, and cultural history.  

“Need Elders to pass their traditional knowledge about herbal medicines to treat pain, etc.” 

Relearning and teaching traditional medicinal treatments can teach others that prescription 
drugs are not necessarily the only option to alleviate pain. 

“[Teach Elders that] it’s okay to say no to the addict when they want money” 

Encouraging self‐esteem and confidence in Elders will help them handle confrontations better.  

After the discussion on Elders, McNulty said that they did not have much time left in the 
breakout session. Discussion of the points decreased, and for many of the points, Pellerin 
simply read them aloud as they appeared on the wall.  
   Families

“Family support” 

Family support should be there when the addict wants to quit, but it also should be there before 
an addiction problem arises. 

       “Instill spirituality at a very young age” 
       “Single mother support group” 
       “Sharing past experiences (i.e., healing circles)” 
       “Intervention programs” 
       “Activities, recreation” 
Provide safe and healthy recreational programs and activities that encourage family bonding. 

“Intervention programs” 


              SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 55


Create programs, or improve existing programs. 
   Leadership

After seeing the numerous cards on the wall for the Leadership category, Pellerin said that it 
looked like leadership “has a lot of work to do for us.” 

       “Searches at community check points” 
       “Disciplinary actions for violators of community values (e.g., community hour)” 
       “Drug testing for people in crucial areas: health, education, band council” 
       “Community discussion: how aggressive should we be to stop the drugs and dealers?” 
       “Find mechanisms to control the influx of prescription drug issues on First Nations—i.e. 
        doctor, drug company, pharmacy / pharmacies, police” 
       “Program workers need to be told who the users are, to offer help” 
       “Clear message from the leadership that there will be zero tolerance for drug abuse” 
       “Chief and council: provide stronger direction to band staff, programs so that they will 
        work together to implement a strategy” 
       “Policies (e.g., housing, education, human resources, economy, development) should all 
        complement each other and all should address the drug problem in the same way” 
       “Have regular community meetings, not just once in a while. Issues build up when you 
        don’t have them regularly” 
       “Close monitoring of over‐the‐counter medications” 
       “Increased security checks (including surprise checks)” 
       “Chiefs and council need to provide clear direction and expectations to staff and band 
        programs through various policies (e.g., housing, human resources, education, program 
        regulations, finance, economic development). They need to monitor and evaluate the 
        strategy on a timely basis” 
While discussing these topics, Pellerin said that a number of the points in the Leadership and 
the Community categories overlapped. The participants agreed that some ideas did overlap and 
also agreed with listing the overlapping points in a separate category. 
   Leadership and community

       “Developing a good aftercare program in the community; need total community 
        support for recovered addict; follow up after T.C.” 
       “Community‐driven bylaw, and [for it] to be fully enforced by the chief and council and 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 56


        the law enforcement agencies” 
       “Preventive education approaches, to facilitate community awareness about drug 
        prescription abuse” 
       “Expose the dealers” 
       “Community bylaw” The community decides the bylaw, and the leadership (chief and 
        council) decides if it should be implemented and enacted.  
   Community

       “Community rallies; health care in schools; nurses; nursing station as a resource” 
       “Find mechanisms to control the influx of prescription issues in First Nations” 
       “Community hall for activities” 
       “Grocery voucher for people who are not using service properly but are buying drugs / 
        alcohol” 
       “Hold a community forum with community members for their input on how the 
        community can address this problem, and develop community wellness plan” 
       “Getting to the root of the problem; addict, addiction, and the healing process will begin 
        once the person admits problem” 
       “A community treatment program needs to be developed and implemented. There 
        needs to be an immediate place for people who want help immediately” 
       “Bring in counsellors’ circles” 
       “Prevention programs” 
       “Neighbourhood Watch in community” 
       “Community awareness of misuse or abuse of prescription drugs” 
       “Support help line / person in community” 
       “More community activities: camping, hunting, fishing, recreational” 
       “Take back community by doing Prayer Walk in community (ministers / pastors to 
        initiate)” 
       “Bring healing programs into the community (sweat lodges, sacred fires, pipes, prayers, 
        church, ceremonial healing)” 
       “Implement and make programs mandatory in our schools: drug awareness; our 
        history; our traditions / culture; spiritual teachings; language (ours)” 
     

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 57


       “Educate all workers—chiefs, councils, police, Children’s Aidʹs, health workers, courts—
        on the strategy adopted. Everyone needs to know how to carry out the strategy and 
        know their roles in that strategy” 
       “People could be educated more when voting for their community leaders (i.e., don’t 
        vote for a drug dealer, even if it’s your brother or uncle or aunt!)” 
       “Have vigils, sober walks, Mothers Against Drugs, rallies, etc., more often” 
During the group discussion, the participants created additional categories—“Fly‐in First 
Nations,” “Road Access Communities,” “Medical / Treatment,” and “Security.” 
   Fly-in First Nations

The participants who added this category said that fly‐in communities need separate 
suggestions from those proposed for communities that are road accessible. Fly‐in communities 
can have different needs and requirements than road‐accessible communities. 

“Airport and on‐reserve security”  

The airport can purchase an X‐ray scanner that will increase security and be used in taking 
preventive measures against people bringing illegal substances into the community. 

       “Enforce bylaws” 
       “Advertise” 
Advertisement can be a way of “promoting jobs, education, learning skills, and awareness,” 
said one participant. “There are commercials of Third World countries ... why don’t First 
Nations have commercials? We should make commercials to show what we, as First Nations, go 
through up north.” Another participant suggested “role‐playing, to let people know the effects 
of the addiction.” Included with this idea is having drama classes (own program) in the 
community. 
   Road access communities

“Mental health workers” 

McNulty said that including mental health workers is a good idea, but that mental health 
workers are relevant to all categories listed on the wall.  

“It’s a continuum,” he said. “People attempt to get sober, and it’s a lifestyle change and choice, 
so it’s really a community issue to provide support while the person is on the healing journey. 
It’s hard to classify mental health workers in just one category.” The group agreed that mental 
health workers should feature in all the categories on the wall.  

       “Community meetings” 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                     PAGE 58


       “Awareness” 
   Medical / treatment

       “Doctor involved in treatment of patients” 
       “Wean patients off pills” 
Help patients off addictive drugs, and instead, use safer non‐addictive medications. 

       “Mental health programs to community” 
       “Provide awareness to physicians on what’s going on regarding prescription drug 
        deals” 
       “Life skills programs (all ages)” 
Life skills programs should be created for community members of all ages. 

“Awareness of discussion of community’s action” 
   Security

“Purchase X‐ray scanner” 

Although this point was mentioned in the Fly‐in First Nations category, McNulty said it should 
also go in the Security category. 

“Have a community Crime Stoppers program. Get an anonymous system in place, to protect 
those who are willing to tell” 

McNulty and Pellerin ended the discussion, as time had run out. McNulty closed the session by 
introducing the program for the next day, which is to focus on “trying to put together a work 
plan.” 




              SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 59


   Breakout Group 2:
   Current Support Systems (Health and Others)
   FACILITATORS
   Lynda Roberts
   First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
   Raija Vic
   Ka-Na-Chi-Hih Specialized Solvent Abuse Treatment Centre

   Meeting 1
   Discussion Questions:
   “What do you see as the answers to effectively address prescription drug abuse in your community?
   What supports are needed?”

Following brief introductions, Lynda Roberts said that the original title of the workshop, 
“Health Care Panel,” was incorrect, because they are looking for what is needed in communities 
and not talking specifically about health care or nursing. Roberts and Raija Vic proposed two 
questions for the participants to discuss among themselves in small groups. The small groups 
were instructed to brainstorm three ideas addressing the questions. These ideas, which were 
posted on the wall for further discussion, were as follows (in no particular order): 

       Education and awareness on the harms of prescription drug abuse through workshops, 
        radio, community, KO Telemedicine, and health (physicians, nurses, CHR, NNADAP)  
       To train MHW, NNADAP workers so they are able to deal with the problem 
       Public education awareness, training parenting skills, effect on drugs 
       First Nation protocol leadership. Stick with the plan; don’t dismantle the plan  
       Chiefs to set protocol  
       Process to amend  
       Develop good supports for clientele aftercare 
       Peer program (mutual support groups, not just AA)—e.g., sharing circles, family  
       Community engagement  
       Develop working relationships with outside agencies, organizations, resources  
       Physicians to search for less addictive medications and prescription drugs 
       Gaps of treatment centres: all physicians to search for less addictive medications  
       Develop parenting skills (again) 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 60


       Prevention: recreation, increased land‐based activities for families and children and 
        youth  
       Promote cultural values and traditions to instill identity and build self‐esteem  
       Role models to share stories of those who have overcome their addiction 
       Community involvement: support from Elders and natural helpers for guidance and 
        teachings  
       Support from youth—give them their voice and an opportunity to share their visions for 
        the future  
       Find out what the needs of the youth are, and seek their input on community decisions  
       Support from council leadership to be more involved and visible on health issues, 
        events, and programming  
Roberts took some time to discuss the ideas generated by the small groups. She said some 
excellent dialogue was taking place, and a lot of good ideas were developed. She wanted to 
review the points, to see if they had captured everything and if there were any similarities 
among the ideas. Many of the groups came up with ideas on training and education, and these 
ideas are important to consider.  

Clarification was needed regarding the point of “First Nation protocol leadership: Stick with the 
plan.” Roberts asked what was meant by this point. Bertha Quisses, Eabametoong First Nation 
health director, said their group included this point because of First Nation political infighting. 
If a plan is developed within communities and the plan changes without notification, then the 
plan would essentially be “dismantled.” However, “we have to stick with it, no matter how 
many First Nations there are,” Quisses said. “Each First Nation and each chief has their own 
vision and their own view. If you bring something into a forum, I don’t see why you should 
take this home and dismantle it.” If a strategic plan is developed but needs to be changed, it 
should come back to a forum such as this one to be amended. “It is a collective plan; it has to 
be,” Quisses concluded. Roberts agreed, saying that depending on the circumstances, 
communities often implement specific plans to fit the needs of the community.  

Regarding support for clientele, Roberts said that after this forum, chiefs have to set their own 
protocols and make amendments so workers are able to implement ideas and plans. Because 
health and nursing staff are the ones working and implementing these protocols, the leadership 
needs to recognize that and be willing to amend protocols in line with the staff’s suggestions.  

The participants also discussed peer programs and mutual support groups. Roberts said that 
programs such as AA do not necessarily fit all cultures. Aspects like sharing circles need to be 
separate for addicted people. Peer programs and mutual support groups cannot be 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 61


exclusionary, as traditional AA groups have been. It needs to be much more inclusive, and 
mutual support groups need to be reborn.  

In addition, participants placed great importance on community engagement. The group agreed 
that all these ideas can be developed in this forum, but in order for the ideas to work, the 
community must be involved every step of the way. Health care workers may see addressing 
the problem one way, while community members may see it another way. To overcome such 
obstacles, communities need to be involved. Educators and leaders also need to be involved in 
sessions for developing strategic plans, to ensure the plans will work.  

Roberts commented on the point, “Develop parenting skills (again).” She said that she has 
heard this idea come up over and over in different forums and that it is self‐explanatory. She 
liked the inclusion of the word “again” as part of the development of parenting skills, because 
while parenting skills have been developed, they may need to be reassessed to handle the issue 
at hand. 

   Meeting 2
   Discussion Question:
   “What are some of the challenges related to health services that prevent addressing the challenges of
   prescription drug abuse?”

Andrea Peddle of the Shibogama Tribal Council said that many addicts will talk about their 
pain only when drunk. Sober, they do not want to face their pain or admit to it. Without 
willingness to face their pain, healing is impossible. She also spoke of the readiness of some 
doctors to prescribe pain medication without investigation or question. 

Adrian Hynnes, MD, from Winnipeg said that one of the biggest challenges is denial among 
First Nations as a group, not just individual denial. He also mentioned the tendency to lay 
blame. “We’ll never get anywhere through blame.” 

Bertha Quisses of Fort Hope First Nations agreed that “there’s no shame in admitting that your 
community is sick.” She added that gender imbalances and the difficulties that single parents 
face add to the challenges, stating that single parents need the involvement and support of the 
other parent. “I raised up my kids as a divorced person. Where was the other parent? That’s 
why I speak out. We need those voices.” 

Another participant said that there is a lack of training and educational opportunities for 
frontline workers, resulting in a lack of the confidence necessary to help and intervene. 

Dave Engberg of St. Joseph’s Care Group in Thunder Bay raised the issue of health care 
professionals feeling overwhelmed and needing support. He also spoke of the problem of 
relapse when people left treatment programs in Thunder Bay and returned to their 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 62


communities. “There is that dilemma of whose responsibility it is, whether it is on reserve or in 
the city. They are totally non‐coordinated.” 

Dr. Hynnes cited the lack of leadership or “champions” across the disciplines in each 
community to combat the problem. 

One participant spoke about the problem of the leadership in communities ignoring known 
abusers—not wanting to “stick their necks out,” especially if the abusers had connections in the 
community. Family dynamics play a part. “You don’t want to report your uncle.” The fact that 
First Nations people are taught to respect your elders and not challenge them gives Elders 
much power in the community, which can make change difficult. 

Dr. Hynnes said that First Nations need to break out of the ingrained dependency syndrome, 
i.e., dependency on funding, programs, and medications, and “tap into our own ways of 
healing and use gifted Elders. We empower ourselves. Communities need to take back the 
power we have to help ourselves. Not to be pathologically optimistic, but we need to re‐
empower ourselves and work with what we can do, and break out of the learned helplessness 
and hopelessness mindset.” 

One challenge for people in health services is the current power imbalance between drug 
dealers and the people who are trying to prevent them. Dr. Hynnes acknowledged that there is 
a fear of backlash and increased violence as a result of taking back power from dealers. Among 
the dangers cited are incidents such as tire slashing and assaults. “It ends up being a battle.” 
That fear of retaliation contributes to learned helplessness. 

Quisses spoke of the need for “undermining the users. They are learning and gaining 
knowledge in a bad way. If they decide to step out of the box, they have knowledge in a good 
way. But right now they have knowledge in a bad way. There is not enough security in airports. 
They can take drugs in the airport washrooms. There is no liability.” 

This awareness that people are bringing drugs into the communities was a source of frustration 
for health care providers. One participant raised the issue of legal rights that protect both users’ 
and dealers’ rights to confidentiality. Where nurses are aware of a problem, they are unable to 
report it because of their professional mandate to respect confidentiality. Abusers take 
advantage of lack of opposition. One participant spoke of “the power that drug dealers have. 
They also have their own language.” 

High turnover of nurses and other staff is a factor that both abusers and dealers use to their own 
advantage. In addition, the lack of continuous health care is a challenge. For example, 
physicians typically come to Northern communities only once a month and see patients for brief 
periods of time. 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 63


Quisses also mentioned language barriers as an issue, and said that workshops are needed to 
educate seniors on their illnesses so that they can understand the nature of their illnesses and 
the proper use of medications. “It’s all white people,” Quisses said, indicating that too often 
instructions are in English, without translation. 

Bruce Beardy of NAN Legal Services in Thunder Bay said that there is a need for a more 
cooperative effort between First Nations. “We have to get past being autonomous. We need to 
find out, ‘Is this really going to solve the problem?’ We need to get back to how our ancestors 
did and the values that they had. There are parallels with blacks in the US and heroin. I don’t 
expect to find the answers today. It could take a lifetime. We have to rediscover our culture, our 
strengths.” 

One participant raised the issue of drug users accessing multiple physicians. Lynda Roberts of 
the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch said that in urban centres in particular this is a 
problem, where there is access to multiple dentists as well as doctors. “It’s a huge problem here 
in Thunder Bay because of physician access and patterns.” She said that there is currently an 
OPP task force to address the problem. 

Dr. Hynnes pointed out in connection with that issue that the pharmacies are not connected. 
“That’s one of the issues. For example, Shoppers Drug Mart does not share prescription 
information, because it’s a franchise.” 

In reference to this issue of pharmacies not being connected, Roberts said, “There are 
jurisdictions in Canada where this is not the case, and they don’t have as much of a problem. 
Ontario is the worst province for that.” 

   Summary points

       The lack of holistic programs (i.e., prevention and aftercare) to combat drug abuse 
       Loss of culture and the need to rediscover cultural strengths  
       Lack of both human and financial resources  
       No continuity for aftercare programs for patients on the METH program. 
       Roadblocks such as lack of treatment options, non‐insured health approval, and wait 
        times for intake into treatment programs 
       Lack of case management to prevent overlap of services 
       Better coordination is needed for prescription medicine delivery 
       Leadership often ignores known abusers and dealers 
       Rights of drug dealers create obstacles, e.g., confidentiality prevents nurses from sharing 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 64


        information about users or abusers 
       Shortage of training and educational opportunities results in frontline workers lacking 
        in confidence necessary to help or intervene 
       High staff turnover, e.g., agency nurses, results in limited knowledge of the problem 
       Language issues make it difficult to explain to Elders their illnesses and medications 
       Learned helplessness from ingrained dependency on funding, programs, and 
        medications 
       Lack of support for health care providers results in burnout and compassion fatigue 
       Family dynamics and structure can contribute to the problem, particularly the 
        unchallenged power of Elders 
       Gender imbalances and the loss of parental roles is an issue. Single parents need the 
        involvement and support of the other parent 

   Meeting 3

During this session, the participants were instructed to develop specific actions communities 
need to take regarding the problem of prescription drug abuse. Again, the small groups 
brainstormed and posted their ideas on the wall for further discussion. The ideas posted on the 
wall were as follows (in no particular order): 

       National Native Alcohol & Drug Program (NNADAP): Is NNADAP culturally 
        appropriate? The current program requires people to seek out help and the program is 
        based on non‐intervention, and this is not in accordance with our culture 
       There needs to be accountability from the workers, i.e., NNADAP and mental health 
        workers, to make sure they are actually doing their job  
       Need proper policies and procedures to be followed by all workers in the community  
       Look at and develop community‐based treatment models, sharing circles versus AA 
        groups  
       Need shorter waiting lists for clients who want to seek treatment; First Nation youth get 
        tired of waiting for treatment, and some end up committing suicide  
       Both levels of government should be involved in planning process of First Nations and 
        to better meet needs, treatment centres 
       Dialogue among all members of the community, to determine different ways to work 
        through challenges and identify how to best work together to address prescription drug 
        abuse  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 65


       Restore teachings, parenting, the role and rights of women, because the residential 
        school system, churches, and the child welfare system have caused damage to the social 
        and family structures 
       First Nation leadership, frontline workers, NAPS, education, band office staff, Elders, 
        and natural helpers should meet regularly, to ensure work on this issue is ongoing and 
        there is follow‐up on areas that need to be worked on  
       Target educational awareness programs and materials to appropriate age and audience  
       Focus groups—i.e., with Elders, men, women, youth, parents—to get their input and to 
        identify areas they would like to address  
       Write proposal to drug companies requesting funding to carry out the necessary 
        education / training sessions for our people  
       Immediate coordination of community programs related to health and well‐being  
       Take responsibility and ownership for our own actions and situations, so that we can 
        break out of the dependency mentality  
       Proper orientation for health care professionals entering our First Nations, to ensure 
        there is an understanding of issues  
       Develop linkages with other communities / organizations through the use of today’s 
        technology, via K‐Net, videoconferences 
       Retreats for health care providers and frontline workers, to prevent burnout and to help 
        manage stress  
       Create a strategy for education and training regarding prescription drug abuse and 
        treatment  
       Community engagement, forums, advertising, email, Facebook 
       Protocols for nursing and physicians. Some nurses have too much control over referrals 
        and have too much say on who can / can’t be seen by physicians  
       Physicians and pharmacists need to be involved in helping people who are addicted and 
        in the overall process for reducing prescription drug abuse  
       Examine safer transfer of prescription drugs into communities  
       NNADAP—detox—NNADAP workers do not have the medical training for detox 
       Evaluate and develop detox programming, pre‐treatment 
       Education, skills training, client, staff, community, life skills at all levels, individual, 
        family, school, community, Elders  


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 66


       Peer groups, role model program, technology, networking, websites, training 
       Break stigmas associated with drugs, and recognize and treat it as an illness  
The group reconvened to discuss some of the ideas posted on the wall. An issue was raised 
regarding accountability from First Nation employers and if this relates to personnel policies. 
All participants agreed that it does relate to personnel policies; because some communities have 
health staff that is not doing their jobs. 

Regarding First Nation leadership and groups meeting regularly to ensure work on the issue is 
ongoing, Roberts explained that some communities are already doing this, specifically for the 
prescription drug abuse issue.  

There was some discussion of orientation for nurses. Lynda Roberts asked if orientation 
happens for all the nurses, and several participants said not always. Using the Sioux Lookout 
area as an example, one participant said that orientation depends on the specific area; for 
example, the Sioux Lookout area has its own orientation. Lynda Roberts believed that tribal 
councils are doing extensive and appropriate orientation for nurses. According to another 
participant, there is orientation for nurses, but it has not always been done. 

Lynda Roberts then opened the floor for dialogue on any ideas that may have been left out and 
should be included. Some participants raised the issue of developing more communication 
between physicians and pharmacies. The participants also discussed the need to develop only 
one avenue for bringing medication into communities. Because medication is brought into 
communities in so many ways, it is nearly impossible to monitor. Communities need to ensure 
that there is only one way medication can be brought in, so it can be monitored more easily.  

This discussion led to the topic of patients’ rights. A participant said that once a prescription is 
given to the patient, it is the patient’s prescription, and therefore, monitoring it may impede the 
patient’s rights. Some communities are seeking a way to transfer the medication from the 
pharmacy to the nursing station that will ensure proper monitoring.  

Lynda Roberts asked the group if anyone talked specifically about treatment and the role of 
health services in that treatment. Dr. Hynnes said that they had talked about this area earlier 
and they talked about the reality as they understand it, that an external treatment centre is little 
more than a break for the community and addicted person, and long‐term treatment is needed 
for addicted patients. Dr. Hynnes also said that the number of workers should be based on the 
treatment required at the given time, and the resources available should also determine the 
number of workers. 

In developing a strategic plan, Lynda Roberts said that other models should be looked at, as 
well as new models developed to fit specific communities. Furthermore, support groups should 
be a type of sharing circle, rather than a traditional support group. To create a more inclusive 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 67


support system, these support groups should include patients and families, as well as groups of 
affected families and relatives. Different stages of treatment also need to be looked at, in order 
to work through the problem.  

Lynda Roberts then moved on to a discussion of the NNADAP and reported that the program 
has stated it does not have adequate support—a big problem, as NNADAP cannot handle the 
problem alone. The participants agreed with this assessment and said that even if a First Nation 
community has a treatment centre, sometimes it does not have staff who are qualified for detox 
work. This problem is not specific to First Nations, because facilities in general are not 
adequately equipped for detox. The participants agreed that communities need to evaluate the 
appropriateness of their detox programs and staff. 

Another challenge not addressed originally was the need for physicians to do the assessments 
of addicted individuals. The First Nation workers themselves are not always able to do an 
assessment to determine who is affected; therefore, a physician is required. Roberts recognized 
the need for a physician but also raised the concept of self‐referral. Dr. Hynnes said that 
templates are available for this type of assessment, and that a case manager can be trained to do 
appropriate assessments. In addition, such individuals can be seen via KO Telemedicine for the 
final assessment and a referral.  

Lynda Roberts asked what happens currently with referrals, and if there is a NNADAP worker 
right now in Sioux Lookout who can answer the question. Elder Moses Nothing of Wapekeka 
said that if individuals need treatment, they come to see him, and he fills out all the paperwork, 
which he then sends to a treatment centre.  It is up to the centre to approve it or not.  The actual 
assessment is done in the treatment centre.  The NNADAP workers are obliged to do an 
assessment, and they run into problems because they start the assessment and then realize that 
prescription drugs are involved, and as a result, may not accept the person as a patient.  Or they 
accept the person, who then goes into withdrawal and may leave shortly after.  One participant 
also said that withdrawal from opiates will not kill individuals to the extent that withdrawal 
from alcohol can.  However, people still need to be sensitive to people going through 
withdrawal. 

Returning to the topic of detox, Roberts said that some communities in British Columbia are 
trying home detox programs. Many nurses in First Nation communities support the idea of 
community‐based detox programs. One participant also said that First Nation communities are 
limited to sending NNADAP clients to NNADAP facilities; they cannot send them to provincial 
treatment centres. Roberts said that it is an option in Ontario but not in Alberta, which will not 
cover an Aboriginal person going through detox. First Nation Albertans are not eligible for 
Alberta health care. 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 68

Bertha Quisses concluded the session by telling of her personal experiences as a health care 
worker. She said that five years ago, her community of Fort Hope First Nation worked to have a 
local treatment centre built just outside the community.  It is still standing there, but it is only a 
shell, because that is all that the funding could pay for.  It has been an ongoing project, but 
needs money to be completed.  She said governments should be part of planning with First 
Nations, instead of giving them the leftover “cents.”  Quisses was previously a NNADAP 
worker and saw a high volume of substance abuse patients.  One client in particular who came 
into the office needed to be observed for a long period.  Quisses did have some support from 
the police, who would check in on her. 

Quisses told the story of a patient who required treatment but committed suicide. The patient 
was on a long waiting list for treatment, and Quisses had asked where the application for this 
patient had gone. This happens to a lot of people in a lot of communities, she said; people die 
because they are tired of waiting for treatment. “They want attention and treatment, and they 
should be given that right away, not be on a waiting list for three to five years,” Quisses said.  

Quisses also used the example of parents who are substance abusers who have young children. 
She said there is no reason to wait, that the kids should be looked at right away so they are not 
completely helpless in the future, or it will be twice as hard as what they are facing today. She 
also said that we cannot undermine the users and abusers.  

“If there were no users or dealers, we wouldn’t be talking like this right now,” she said. She also 
said the addiction is like an illness; the drugs are something people feel they need and there is a 
fear of not having the drugs. “I always asked them if there is anything I can do to help,” she 
said. “Words like that can make a big difference. It’s just a matter of understanding. I have to 
use my hands to feel the help I can provide. I have a shoulder to let people cry on, I can comfort 
people. I wish I could share my heart with everyone.” 

“Maybe we all should, and things will change,” Roberts said in response to Quisses. “There are 
a lot of people who really care about this issue and have a lot of compassion, and this is really 
starting to come through.” 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 69


   Breakout Group 3:
   Community Responsibility and Ownership
   FACILITATORS
   Cristine Rego
   Consultant
   Karen O’Gorman
   Consultant

   Meeting 1
   Discussion Question:
   “What is your vision for community responsibility and ownership as it relates to reducing the challenges
   with prescription drug abuse?”

Facilitators Cristine Rego and Karen O’Gorman introduced themselves to the six tables of 
participants. Rego indicated that she comes from a background of working with communities, 
and her role is to build capacities in Aboriginal communities. O’Gorman told the group that her 
experience is in the fields of addictions and mental health.  

The discussion question was presented to participants, who were asked to focus on developing 
solutions and considering what needs to be done to move the vision forward. Participants 
worked in groups at their table, and a scribe was selected to record the group responses on 
cards. The group was advised that the cards would be collected and displayed at the front of the 
room, to be organized into similar categories.  

Rego said that the questions in the series of meetings were designed to move the group toward 
articulating a vision of community ownership, understanding the challenges to implementing 
that vision, and developing strategies that would later be incorporated into a work plan. She 
asked participants to consider another question about prescription drug abuse: “What do you 
see your community doing?”  

There was considerable discussion between the participants and the facilitators before the start 
of the exercise. Participants raised several points related to communities needing to understand 
the issues that created the environment of prescription drug abuse in the first place.  

Participant Donna Roundhead said that the bigger picture needs to be examined when looking 
for visions and solutions. “There is a bigger picture here that we aren’t addressing,” she said. 
“We need to ask ourselves, what are the stressors in our community that are creating this?” She 
said that before communities look at solutions and strategies, they need to look at the reasons 
for these addictions occurring. Many participants nodded in agreement with her statement that 
“housing in our community is a real problem.”  


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 70


Roundhead said, “If we are not happy, we’re not physically well. If you want a healthy 
community, what are the resources that we need?”  

The facilitators responded to the points raised, and Rego said that although a community’s 
unhappiness and resulting ill health were understood, the participants could not begin to 
address all of the issues, and that a “community healing would be required to deal with all of 
these issues.” She said that participants should aim for a vision that is holistic in its approach.  

These comments precipitated further active discussion among the group, and another 
participant strongly agreed with the point made by Roundhead about needing to understand 
the stressors and added, “We were told to focus on the resources that we have, but I agree that 
there are underlying problems that are creating this.” 

Another participant, Elena Chapman, raised the issue of hope, or more specifically, the lack of 
hope. “Speaking for myself,” she said, “I have to have a purpose to get up every morning. For a 
lot of our people, there are no jobs, nothing to get up for. What are our leaders doing to give 
them hope that things are going to get better?” She said that educating the children does not 
necessarily eliminate the problem. “We educate them, but they have nothing to come back to. 
You have to have a purpose in your life.” 

Rego recognized that hope is an issue, and said that the larger exercise that the groups were 
participating in would empower the community as a whole, as well as the individuals in the 
community. “Activities like this build hope and communicate capacity,” she said. “You are all 
working together.”  

Another participant raised the importance of plans and solutions being implemented and 
driven from within the community. “We talk about our problems, but we never really do 
anything to make it work. What I‘ve seen is that plans come from the outside and are not driven 
from within the community. But we’re out here and not in our communities looking at this.”  

Rego responded to these comments by reminding participants that the ideas developed at the 
conference would be taken back to the individual communities. “That is your responsibility,” 
she said. “We’re not here to give you the answers. You already have them.”  

Following the discussion, groups began their brainstorming sessions at the table and recorded 
the results on the cards, which were read aloud and then posted on the wall. Participants were 
told that the visions identified would be grouped according to similarity and later developed 
into a vision statement that would become part of the larger work plan. 

Each of the six groups of participants identified their specific visions for community 
responsibility and ownership as they relate to reducing the challenges with prescription drug 
abuse, as follows:  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 71


       Culture and traditional values in education and curriculum and school; strong family 
        units 
       Community‐driven processes to admit to the problem; educate and understand the 
        issues; community pre‐treatment and aftercare; families admitting to problem and 
        taking ownership 
       Acknowledge drug problem exists; consistent response from the community in dealing 
        with members who abuse drugs; provide safe environment for reporting; focus the 
        community and the individual’s efforts on something greater than themselves 
       Promote self‐respect; support services and community prevention 
       Drug‐free community through education, teamwork, and commitment from all levels to 
        work together; march or rally to promote non‐tolerance of substance abuse in each 
        community; free treatment and aftercare programs working together; understanding 
        behaviour and the underlying issues that cause it 
       Empowering of individuals; good support systems for families; developing a strong 
        spiritual base; promote a respectful and supportive environment; promote taking 
        individual responsibility 
A short discussion followed the completion of the exercise as the responses were read out. Rego 
said that some of the visions identified, such as the promotion of a respectful, supportive 
environment and self‐respect, are actually strategies. She said that these would be valuable 
contributions to the next exercise, which would have participants identifying challenges to the 
vision and developing strategies to deal with those challenges.  

   Meeting 2

Before this session, the facilitators took the index cards with the ideas for the vision that were 
generated in the previous session and grouped them into five categories:  

       Drug Free 
       Responsible for / Respect Self 
       Strong Family Units 
       Support Services 
       Education and Information Building 
O’Gorman said that the categories would assist in not only clarifying the vision, but also 
identifying the challenges, and the strategies to overcome those challenges. “We need to 
identify them in order to build on them,” she said.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 72


The participants were free to change any of the categories or the placement of any of the cards. 
After some discussion, the participants agreed on the following wording for the categories: 
Community Values; Self‐Care; Core Values; Helpers; and Education. 

Solomon Mamakwa, Shibogama First Nations Council, said he could identify a pattern in the 
category titles. The titles go from “collective whole, to individual, to families,” he said, and the 
order would work better if the titles read from “individual, to family, to community.” Rego 
suggested the titles be re‐ordered, because the community needs “strong staff and leadership.” 
Also essential are “promoting self‐care and self‐respect and empowering the individual.”  

The participants then discussed intervention and prevention of prescription drug abuse, which 
they concluded must fall on the shoulders of the community or be outsourced as a support 
service. Patrick Patabon said that “intervention programs do need to be available, but the 
vision is ensuring that there are preventative programs.” Rego added that there must be 
“appropriate intervention for all age groups, and not just one.” With the participants’ 
agreement, the “intervention and prevention” index card was moved to the Helpers category.  

Chief Pam Pitchenese, Eagle Lake First Nation, said, “One of the issues that came up yesterday 
was the issue of individuals who are dealing or selling. Nobody wants to say anything, because 
there’s no safety or protection, not enough policing in communities.” Also, the “justice system 
doesn’t really work for our people, because for the people who come forward, there is no sense 
of safety for them.” She asked how to stop drugs coming into the community from the outside 
and how to encourage people to report their use if they do not feel safe.  

Mamakwa said, “To report, we need systems in place to work together [on] how to educate the 
people. My understanding is that for Crime Stoppers, it is in native language. Police need to 
know other languages. This may be a good opportunity for people to remain anonymous.”  

The participants considered whether people in the community or people outside the 
community and professionals should provide the services. The consensus was to look within 
the community for resources first, but to use outside sources and professionals if they are not 
available in the community. 

Rego said, “We need to work towards no prescription drug abuse.”  

She told a story of a mother who cannot do drugs if she wants to keep her children, but that 
having no drugs at all is setting her up for failure, and “we must not do that to our people. 
Telling someone to abstain instantly is setting them up for failure,” she said. “We need to work 
towards it.” The participants agreed to omit the “no abuse” phrase from the vision. 

Elena Chapman from Windigo First Nation said, “A vision statement should be three or four 
sentences—a strong statement about what your vision is.” Communities need zero tolerance 
against drug abuse, she said. The statement has to be strong enough to mobilize the community.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 73


When asked how as a group the participants would take ownership of the problem, and in turn, 
come up with a vision and then strategies to address it, one participant said the first step is to 
acknowledge the problem. The concern is that prescription drug abuse will be ignored in the 
community. Rego added, “We wouldn’t be having this [discussion] if there weren’t problems. 
We need to ensure that the community adopts the values that are consistent with the 
overarching values. The community [also] needs to ensure that they stay responsible to what 
the vision is.” 

Patabon said that it “depends where the communities are at right now . . . . Some communities 
may already be on their way, possibly being with OPP, for example. This has got to stop 
because of our kids . . . . However, when family gets involved, it becomes difficult.”  

The issue is also about what community leaders want to see for the community. Rego said, “We 
see community responsibility and ownership, but leaders need to consistently give the same 
message; no divide and conquer. It will be a challenge.” 

One participant said that this session is to use the points on the index cards to develop change, 
and to have “policies and practices in place [that] support and promote that.” He added, “In 
order to get there, you have to know what is your community responsibility.” Rego replied, 
“But there has to be a safe place to do this.” 

One participant said that the leaders must “empower communities through capacity building 
and training.” The community itself needs to have the capacity to take care of the problems. 

Mamakwa said that the “mission is important, but what’s more important is the vision itself. 
The community has to develop its own vision, which is about the process. It won’t mean 
anything until the process happens.” In addition, he said that vision statements do not translate 
into English perfectly, and that as a group they needed to decide if they want to do it in their 
own language, as the translation can be off when in a different one. 

The participants started working on the possible wording for a vision statement. Chapman said 
that the statement “needs to incorporate acknowledge, educate, and empower.” It should also make 
use of the Seven Grandfather Teachings. The participants agreed that the vision statement needs 
to fit with these teachings, and must incorporate the three words: acknowledge, empower, and 
educate.  

The participants settled on the following wording for the vision statement: “The community 
acknowledges, as a whole, that there is the problem of prescription drug abuse and agrees to 
work towards strengthening our families through supportive programming, advocacy, training, 
and education.” 

Once this statement was decided upon, the session ended. 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 74


   Meeting 3
   Discussion Question, written in two parts:
   A: “What are the challenges or what stops communities from taking responsibility and ownership as it
   applies to all ages within the community?”
   B: “If the focus is to decrease prescription drug abuse in communities, what are some of the things that
   can be done to increase community ownership?”

Facilitators Rego and O’Gorman introduced the question to six groups of participants and 
asked them to identify the challenges and develop a corresponding solution for each challenge. 
Using the same format as the previous breakout sessions, groups worked together in quiet 
discussion at their tables, and the appointed scribe entered the group’s responses onto index 
cards, which would be posted on the wall. The cards were later grouped into predominant 
themes as the result of discussion with the entire group.  

Prior to the small group discussions, a few participants said it would be difficult to define the 
challenges by looking at the community as a whole. Rego responded that the problems faced by 
the community affect more than one group, and the challenges can be broken down, because, as 
she stated, “We are all interconnected.” She emphasized that, in looking at solutions and 
strategies, the focus should be on making the individual accountable.  

At the end of the discussion and group work, each table reported back to the group by stating 
the identified challenge and proposed solution. In a few cases, a challenge was identified, but 
the group did not have a strategy or solution. Some discussion did occur during this period, but 
the comments were very focused and specific to the assignment and point being discussed. The 
following is a summary of each group’s responses; the few comments made during the larger 
group discussion are presented at the end.  
   Group 1

       Challenge: Fear and code of silence in communities Solution: Develop support groups, 
        education, and training for relationship building, to address the fear 

       Challenge: Lack of education and knowledge Solution: Multiple delivery options for 
        education and information, such as posters, radio shows, and incentives 

       Challenge: Not taking responsibility and blaming Solution: Creating awareness in the 
        community using role models, such as Elders, who demonstrate taking responsibility  
   Group 2

       Challenge: Fear of retaliation, shame and threats of being shunned by the community 
        Solution: Community members show leadership and provide support to workers to 
        address this 



             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                    PAGE 75

       Challenge: Misinformation, breakdown in communication Solution: Chiefs and council 
        should update and educate the community in simple and non‐judgmental ways and 
        language 

       Challenge: Community members sometimes pressure leadership in unhealthy ways 
        Solution: Educate the members of the community as to what their roles and 
        responsibilities are  
   Group 3

       Challenge: Social situations such as poverty that promote apathy and an “I don’t care “ 
        attitude 

       Challenge: Fear of reprisals Solution: Develop peacekeeping and community watch 
        programs in the community 

       Challenge: Peer pressure within the community Solution: Create awareness in the 
        community and then keep the momentum going, follow through on things  

       Challenge: Identification of unhealthy and negative influences within the community  
   Group 4

       Challenge: Denial Solution: Promoting education and understanding in the community 
        by using visual presentations and guest speakers 

       Challenge: Factions within the community Solution: Marches and rallies within the 
        community, family day activities, community activities that are drug‐ and alcohol‐free 
   Group 5

       Challenge: Loss of traditional roles and cultural identity within the community 
        Solution: Revival of traditional language and values within the community 

       Challenge: Culture of dependency on outside funding Solution: Develop more 
        programs at the grassroots level 

       Challenge: Jealousy and envy within the community  
   Group 6

       Challenge: Lack of community processes and protocols on issues Solutions: Develop 
        processes for the community from a training perspective  

       Challenge: Lack of direction and goals, no community plans present Solution: Develop 
        community plans that cover the next four to five years 




             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 76

       Challenge: No respect between groups in the community, such as Elders, youth, law 
        enforcement, and religious groups Solution: Start having community gatherings such as 
        feasts and other Christian activities  

There was very little discussion during the reporting‐back of responses, and the group 
remained focused on the task at hand.  

However, during the discussion of the community challenge of the culture of dependency on 
outside funding and resources, Verlin James further defined the term “ grassroots” as it related 
to his group’s proposal of developing more grassroots efforts. He said that a lot more could be 
done by using volunteers and interested parties within the community. “You can do a lot on a 
shoestring budget if you have people who are willing,” he said.  

Rego noted the inclusion of such responses as jealousy, envy, denial, and fear, and said that 
“these are negative traits within our communities that we want to get rid of.” 

The responses that had been displayed on the index cards, in the order that the small groups 
had presented them, were now regrouped according to themes that the group observed 
emerging during this process. Rego asked the group to look for four major themes and to 
subsequently title those themes using a category that everyone agreed to and was comfortable 
with. As a result, four major themes were identified:  

       Fear: Covered the responses related to fear to report because of gangs, leadership, fear of 
        reprisal, peer pressure, fear and code of silence, fear of retaliation such as shame, threats, 
        violence, and shunning by the community 
       Loss of Identity: Covered the responses related to lack of education and knowledge; 
        culture of dependency; loss of traditional roles; jealousy; envy, no respect between 
        groups; community factions such as economic, family, and lack of values, social issues 
        etc., abuses, violence, lack of funds, inadequate funds for programs, lack of training, 
        accountability of each person; and clarity in roles for youth, men and women, and Elders 
       Denial: Covered the responses related to denial, the individual, and the family, as well 
        as levels of the community not taking responsibility and engaging in blaming and denial 
       Unhealthy Processes: Covered the responses related to breakdown in communication or 
        misinformation and how it affects the whole community; lack of processes; lack of 
        direction of goals; community members sometimes pressuring leaders in unhealthy 
        ways; and social situations that people live in—such as poverty, lack of education, and 
        housing—sometimes creating an attitude of apathy and “I don’t care”  
All participants agreed to the four major themes, and the facilitators concluded the session by 
telling participants that the responses and themes that they developed would be explored 
further in the next breakout session.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 77


   Breakout Group 4:
   The Law and Security
   FACILITATORS
   Marty Singleton
   OPP Sergeant;
   North West Region Aboriginal Relations Team Coordinator;
   Eagle Lake First Nation
   Kevin Berube
   Director of Treatment Services
   Nodin Child and Family Intervention Services

   Meeting 1
   Discussion Question:
   “What is your vision for supporting policing services to help create a community that is free of
   prescription drug abuse?”

The purpose of the Law and Security sessions during days two and three of the conference, said 
Kevin Berube, is to develop “strategic plans and goals for community and individuals to assist 
police and combat problems with prescription drugs.” 

Each breakout session is to focus on a specific question. As the information from these questions 
is compiled, the group will begin to complete the directive for the Law and Security sessions as 
a whole. 

Each randomly seated table was asked to develop some ideas in answer to the question for this 
first meeting. The facilitators encouraged the participants to use innovative thinking and not 
necessarily build on or repeat ideas that have been attempted in the past. The suggestions could 
range from placing more officers in the community, to making sure people from the community 
are doing their part to police it. Focusing on the end result, the participants were to consider the 
challenges preventing them from reaching their goal and to acknowledge those barriers while 
brainstorming how to overcome them. Berube said to participants to “try not to be held back by 
what we can’t do.” 

After their discussion, a recorder in each small team wrote the team’s ideas on index cards, 
which were then collected and posted for the whole group to view. Working together with the 
group, the facilitators looked for similar ideas between the teams’ comments, categorized them, 
and chose appropriate headings. Finally, the headings were prioritized in order of importance. 

Some major points were reiterated throughout the discussion. Chief Vernon Morris, Muskrat 
Dam First Nation, argued for “more people working in the area of intervention.” Norm Weiss 
of Wasaya Airways highlighted the importance of “sharing information, [and] vigilance in 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 78


identifying contraband.” Building on this idea, another participant supported “more sharing of 
information in communities regarding high‐risk individuals.” Education and prevention were 
two recurring ideas that all groups identified. 

Commenting directly on the topic of policing, a participant said, “I think the present policing 
system we have in our communities is in shambles. Nishnawbe‐Aski Police Service is 
underfunded. There aren’t enough police officers for each community.”  

Louie Napish, Treaty 3 Police Service deputy chief, said that “when posted to [a] community, 
officers should become familiar immediately with the trials and tribulations of the community 
and [current] issues. The officer should have a grasp on every issue in the community. The good 
things too—what has worked [previously] in the community.”  

A fully developed and categorized chart was the result of the discussion. Berube said “each 
heading becomes a strategic direction, and the ideas become goals under that direction.” 
   Toward recognition of First Nations laws and jurisdiction to reduce prescription drug abuse

       Jurisdiction—limitations need to be more broad 
       Recognizing traditional laws and justice 
       Enforcement of band bylaws 
   Toward communication and networking to reduce prescription drug abuse

       More community policing, working with the community 
       Communities and businesses should work more closely together to alert law 
        enforcement of problems 
       Chiefs should have a community meeting, and the people should have a say 
       More sharing of information between police and communities regarding high‐risk 
        individuals 
   Toward more prevention and education to reduce prescription drug abuse

       Prevention:  
            Education—communities, officers, schools 
            Funding—education, enforcement, resources 
            Resources—more officers, sniffer dogs, frontline support 
       Officers should receive both good and bad background on the community, history, 
        view, and vision of future; designate single officer to educate other officers, 
        management, and funders on community issues 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 79


       More consultations with Crown attorneys, to learn how the law can protect communities 
        and not offenders 
   Uncategorized

       Forfeiture of funds / profits from drug‐related offences to the band council or programs 
        in the community 
       Community referendum on issues; development of bylaws to deal with issues; ongoing 
        treatment and care of those involved; increased sanctions 

   Meeting 2
   Discussion Question:
   “What are some of the things that can be done to reduce policing challenges in your community?”

The main group broke into smaller teams for brainstorming sessions, and then reconvened for 
discussion and the sharing of ideas. The concepts were sorted into similar categories and 
headings developed for each overarching topic. 
Towards stronger screening and security to reduce prescription drug abuse

       Create single, secure cargo area for fly‐in communities, good for businesses and sniffer 
        dogs 
       Post signs at airports and on waver bills for cargo that sniffer dogs may be used 
       Generate a watch list of high‐risk individuals  
Weiss described this final idea as similar to “no fly” lists, and said it would involve “dialoguing 
between community, police service and service providers in the community.”  He said that such 
monitoring would act as a “psychological deterrent” to possible criminals. 

Berube connected this idea to the concept of “community intimidation.” He related a story 
about a hundred citizens walking silently through a community and stopping in front of known 
drug dealers’ homes for two or three minutes as a way of communicating the town’s awareness 
of their activities. Several participants voiced approval of this idea. 
Towards developing our policing services to reduce prescription drug abuse

       Support auxiliary officers, funding for facilities, equipment, training, specialized 
        services  
       Advocate for funding: parity with other police services 
       Empower band constables as “peace keepers.” They could be trained to uphold band 
        bylaws 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 80


       More training of officers to understand community culture and realize that it is not the 
        same as urban communities 
       Train reserve dogs as drug‐sniffing dogs  
The issue of peacekeepers and the upholding of band bylaws generated more discussion. One 
participant said that, as an example, if a person is found with alcohol, it is destroyed. It would 
be helpful if there was a safe place to keep the intoxicated person until they are sober. Zacharias 
Tait of Wapekeka said, “Sometimes they’re [the intoxicated person] in a public place or 
somebody’s home, where the person wants the [other] person out, but unfortunately if a 
Nishnawbe‐Aski Police Service officer is not on duty, they don’t get charged.” 

Jackie George, NAPS constable, said, “What if the council on First Nations territory adopted 
the provincial act? If a person is intoxicated on the reserve, we can take the alcohol away and 
we can lock them up overnight for their safety, but we don’t really have anything to charge 
them with without having the liquor licence on the reserve.”  

All present agreed that accountability for actions was an important issue here. Berube gave an 
example to illustrate how a tribal council could hold people accountable for breaking band 
bylaws. In this instance, a man was setting nets across the river during spawning season, 
breaking a band rule. In consequence, the band decided that he had lost his rights to net for a 
period of time. While this could not be enforced by the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, it 
could be enforced by the First Nations bylaw.  

The final suggestion of training reserve dogs greatly entertained the whole group, and was 
greeted with light‐hearted enthusiasm. Singleton explained to the group, “That whole process 
for a canine is something crazy, like 20 weeks with your dog, to get a dog trained, and during 
that time, if the dog gets ill or something goes wrong with the dog . . . you’re done,” meaning 
the training has been wasted. 
Towards innovative approaches to reduce prescription drug abuse

       Implement community health programs to get members off prescription drug abuse by 
        providing alternative drugs, i.e., methadone treatment 
       Amnesty program before consequences 
       Random drug testing for band employees 
The final idea prompted significant debate. Weiss asked why such testing would be limited to 
band employees only and suggested the policy could encompass anyone who works on the 
reserve. Singleton said that it would be “a tall order to get all companies and services to 
comply” with that directive. Berube added to the discussion by saying that as a visitor to 
reserves, he follows the established rules—for example, about not bringing in alcohol. After the 
discussion, it was decided to revise the final point: 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 81

Revised: Random drug testing. This is not to state that everyone will undergo such testing, but 
to inform people that they may be subject to random drug testing 
Towards community declarations to be drug-free and promote First Nations beliefs

       Increasing understanding of traditional culture and community, adjusting lifestyle to 
        such community norms 
       Improve communication by educating Elders, children, government, to bridge 
        generation gaps and service gaps 
       Police asked to swear an allegiance to protect the First Nations values of the community, 
        similar to the oath they take for policing 
       Build trust between the community and their police force 
Berube shared a story from a previous visit to a reserve. The chief there “was talking about 
putting up signs in the community, saying ‘Our men are warriors,’ in the sense that they have a 
responsibility to protect us and to protect their families and they have responsibilities to be 
accountable for what they do.” Several participants were interested in this idea as part of 
increasing understanding of traditional culture and community.  
Towards stronger networking within community to reduce prescription drug abuse

       More networking of police with community (Community Consultation Committee), 
        bridge the trust gap 
       Better networking of police with health clinics, pastoral services, frontline workers 
       Regular meetings between police, chief, council, and community 
       Other ideas developed by teams that did not fit under any of the previous headings 
        were included as isolated single points on the wall: 
       Restore harmony: restorative justice, reintroduce value system 
       Ensure that Crime Stoppers tips are actually kept anonymous 
The Crime Stoppers procedure for anonymous call‐in tips was reviewed. When information is 
called in, the caller is assigned a number. He / she is to call back later to check if an arrest has 
been made; if so, a drop‐off time for the reward will be arranged within a week’s time. 
Generally, these drop‐offs take place at banks. The caller does not give their number but instead 
again uses their initial reference number. For Northern communities, envelopes can be held for 
as long as necessary until the caller is able to come and retrieve it. All possible measures are 
taken to ensure that the identity of callers is kept anonymous. 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 82


   Meeting 3
   Discussion Question:
   “What are the challenges faced by police services that prevent them from reducing prescription drug
   abuse?”

Expanding on ideas from the previous session, participants had one task to complete before 
they moved ahead with their work. Facilitators asked participants about the topic of “forfeiture 
of funds / proceeds from drug‐related offences to band council or into programs.”  

Josias Fiddler focused on the use of restorative justice and on ways to recover the proceeds 
from drug sales. Paul Johnup stated that government often claims funds when federally funded 
programs are successful. The Justice of the Peace (JP) court system should be reinstated in 
communities, participants said. The group decided that a reinvestment strategy against 
prescription drug abuse is necessary.  

As a result of the conversation, “Return of JP Court System” was added as a strategic direction 
to the chart produced during the previous session. “Forfeiture of funds / proceeds from drug‐
related offences to band council or into programs” was also added under this new subheading. 

The group identified six strategic directions toward reducing prescription drug abuse. 
Facilitators Marty Singleton and Kevin Berube introduced the discussion question, and 
instructed the three groups to have one scribe per group and to brainstorm answers. The groups 
were also told to write their ideas on cards to be put up at the front of the room in the same 
manner as the first session. Groups decided to organize their goals under strategic direction 
headings. 

The participants formed three groups to brainstorm goals and organized their ideas under 
headings. The work produced during the session included six strategic goals for reducing 
prescription drug abuse: 

       More training and development for police services
       Improved, supported investigative techniques
       Stronger quality control to reduce / limit drugs in community 
       Empowerment
       Harmonization of jurisdiction (First Nation law and government law)
       Socioeconomic improvements
First, the groups discussed the flow of drugs from urban centres into their communities and 
from community to community. They asked how are drugs getting there, and who is selling 
them. The discussion concentrated on the challenge of reducing the transport of prescription 
drugs.  


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 83


From a police standpoint, participants said stronger security measures to detect drugs would 
reduce the trafficking of prescription drugs by means of air travel. In regard to relationships in 
small communities, Norm Weiss said, “Everything is intertwined here.” 

Berube asked participants, “Are users getting drugs from nursing stations?” Participants 
discussed the potential solution of work with doctors to reduce drug prescriptions. Weiss said 
that the doctors may prescribe a large and legitimate quantity of drugs for someone who 
genuinely needs them because of geography, but he raised the question of where it goes from 
there.  

The group identified the problems of accessing medical care in remote locations. It is often easy 
for patients to receive large quantities of prescription drugs at the nursing stations, because 
getting drugs into communities by shipping can take too long. Billy Joe Strang said shipping 
drugs to his community may “take up to five or six weeks.” 

In response to some of the problems identified with limiting drugs in the community, Berube 
asked, “How about getting nursing stations to give patients a supply of their required 
prescription drugs for one week?” A participant said, “Police know who the bad guys are.”  

The participants also talked about poverty. Another participant said, “People who sell drugs are 
not criminals; they live in poverty and sell pills to feed their babies.” Berube said that “poverty 
can make good people do bad things,” especially when a bottle of prescription drugs can be 
worth up to $10,000. 

The participants focused on having more control over the quantity of drugs in their 
communities. Barb Friesen stated that in Sioux Lookout, pharmacists will ask customers their 
name before giving over‐the‐counter drugs such as Tylenol 1. It is extremely difficult to get a 
prescription such as Tylenol 2 or Tylenol 3 with codeine filled by a person for whom the drug 
was not prescribed. Josias Fiddler mentioned that sometimes people steal from patients, 
particularly Elders. The theft of prescription drugs by nurses and other health care professionals 
who are close to the supply is another challenge in many communities.  

Louis Napish said that “every pill in every community has a story.” Participants agreed that 
there is a need to develop quality control rules to limit drugs. 

Next, participants discussed the low number of police officers in their communities. Chief 
Adam Fiddler highlighted the lack of resources. He said, “When we qualify for five officers, we 
might get one, and that officer will work for 24 hours a day.” The low numbers of police officers 
and the lack of training opportunities for professional development are two of the main reasons 
for the police presence not being as strong in the communities as most of the participants would 
like. 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 84


 Participants identified goals such as more training, improved intelligence, increased 
understanding of community issues, and additional funding to improve police services. They 
also highlighted the importance of sharing information with police officers, including the 
complete history of their communities, past and present struggles, and areas of success. In this 
way, police officers and community members can build more effective and trusting 
relationships. 

By the end of the session, the participants had their six strategic directions and goals under each 
direction. Their work finally resulted in a chart that is summarized below: 
Towards Improvements in Training and Development for Police Services

       Lack of resources and training to be able to recognize prescription drugs in their many 
        forms and equipment to detect contraband 
       Specialized training, improved intelligence, and understanding of community dynamics 
       Police have a lack of information  
       Funding (manpower, buildings, housing, training) 
       Inadequate funding means low morale for officers and no time for community policing 
Towards Improved, Supported Investigative Techniques
       Challenge in identifying the source of drugs (selling locally) 
       Challenge in identifying the supply chain (how is it getting in?) 
       Enlivenment of trust with police 
Towards Stronger Quality Control to Reduce / Limit Prescription Drugs in Community to Reduce
Prescription Drug Abuse
       Work with doctors to limit the amount of narcotics in the community (doctors are 
        overprescribing) 
Towards Empowerment
       Lack of motivation to have personnel to do their duty to the community 
       Political / parental issues preventing police to do their job 
       Lack of participation in community networks to deal with issues 
Towards Harmonization of Jurisdiction (First Nations Law–Government Law).
       Federal and provincial law does not work—not applicable to issues on communities 

       Police services do not recognize traditional law 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 85


       “Hands tied” due to jurisdiction issues as well Charter of Rights 

       How to enforce prescription drugs or other drugs that are brought into First Nations 
        jurisdiction 

Towards Improving Socioeconomics to Reduce Prescription Drug Abuse
       Poverty issues—people sell their prescription drugs out of desperation (for example, 
        they are on welfare, unemployment, Ontario Disability Support Program) 


   Breakout Group 5:
   The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face
   FACILITATORS
   James Cutfeet
   Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
   Frankie Misner
   First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
   Larry Jourdain
   Nishnawbe-Aski Legal Services

   Meeting 1
   Discussion Question:
   “What is your vision of the role your community leaders need to promote with respect to creating a
   community that is free from prescription drug abuse?”

As participants gathered, lead facilitator James Cutfeet encouraged participants to sit at tables 
with members of different communities, to increase sharing. Facilitators Frankie Misner and 
Larry Jourdain introduced themselves.  

Cutfeet said that throughout the breakout sessions, participants would follow the same basic 
process. First, each person would be encouraged to consider a question as an individual. Then 
each table of participants would discuss the question. A recorder at the table would write the 
top three ideas on index cards and post them on the wall.  

Chief James Mamakwa, Kingfisher Lake First Nation, reported from one table. He said 
communities need to develop policies in regard to zero tolerance and drug dealing; these 
policies would involve resource workers, the community, and leaders. The next idea was to 
promote spirituality, and this spirituality should include the Christian church, traditional 
spirituality, and cultural aspects of spirituality.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 86

Chief Connie Gray‐McKay, Mishkeegogamang First Nation, said that part of their table’s 
discussion had included stories of the role faith played during their childhood, and spirituality 
became an important theme. Their final idea was that leaders should be role models for the rest 
of the community. Leaders should promote healthy lifestyles physically, mentally, emotionally, 
and spiritually. 

Chief Arthur Moore, Constance Lake First Nation, reported for his table. He said their ideas 
included being proactive and involving all the available resources in the community. Their next 
idea was to build on the skills of the leaders, concentrating on communication to create linkages 
with various groups: Elders, youth, adults, and staff in health, education, and social 
development agencies. Their final idea was to identify resources and create facilities such as 
treatment centres.  

The reporter from the third table said that their ideas included the need for leaders to 
understand the root causes of abuse and addictions. Also, leaders need to support community 
initiatives. He said that many communities have programs in place, but infighting and jealousy 
prevent the leadership from supporting the programs as strongly as it could. He also said that 
they thought it was necessary to develop a community‐based strategy, with extensive 
community involvement, for the most impact.  

The recorder from the fourth table said that they saw a need for increased communication. He 
said that communication is necessary as a means of educating and of creating awareness about 
the problems of prescription drug abuse, as well as general community matters. He cited the 
role of spirituality as a strong base for community healing and a healthy community. He also 
said freedom of choice in spirituality, whether to follow traditional spirituality or Christianity, 
was important. Their last idea was that leaders of the community must be role models: drug‐ 
and alcohol‐free. 

The recorder at the final table said that leaders need to serve as role models. In that capacity, 
they should lead a positive lifestyle and develop positive relations with the community. She 
also said that the communities need education. Frontline workers need training in handling 
issues of prescription drug abuse, and workers need to learn to develop trust with their clients. 
Their final idea was to create bylaws to address drug dealers and to develop support systems 
for informants.  

Cutfeet and Misner listed common themes that had emerged: the need for leadership, the value 
of role models, the importance of spirituality, the need for new bylaws, the importance of 
education, the value of communication, the need to build awareness, the need to take full 
advantages of resources, and the need for capacity‐building / engagement.  

These themes were grouped under the following five headings: policies, spirituality, leadership, 
resources, and education.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 87


Participants reviewed a poster listing these headings and the supporting cards. Misner asked 
participants to work with others at their table to select their top three themes from the list. She 
said that while the other issues identified would also be considered, the facilitators needed to 
know the top priorities. 

The recorder from the first table listed resources, together with education and policies, as top 
priority. Second was leadership. Spirituality was their third priority.  

The recorder from the second table said that their top priority was policies, because “to have 
effective leadership, you need policies in place.” Their second priority was leadership, because 
leaders must understand what the needs of the community are and why the community wants 
those policies. Their third priority was resources. He said that their community needs resources 
to educate people on the importance of prescription drugs: “Using drugs to control illness is a 
benefit, but when drugs are abused, it affects the community.” 

The reporter from the third table said that their first priority was resources, so that the 
community can understand the best strategies. Education was their second priority. The 
reporter also said that elements of leadership, specifically community ownership were 
important. 

The reporter from the fourth table said that leadership was their top priority. Their second 
priority was development of policies, including bylaws and community‐wide laws on zero 
tolerance. The reporter said that they chose spirituality, “acknowledging the Creator and 
developing a sense of self,” as their third priority.  

The reporter from the final table said that their top priority was leadership. Community 
members, he said, must “respect the office.” Leaders should concentrate on the community’s 
issues as opposed to issues outside the community. The second priority for the table was 
communication, to promote awareness of drug abuse. The third priority was funding and 
resources. 

Cutfeet and Jourdain said that the top priorities were resources, leadership, and spirituality, but 
the other identified issues would also be included in the reports. 

   Meeting 2
   Discussion Question:
   “What are the challenges related to the role of community leaders with respect to reducing prescription
   drug abuse?”

During the break, Cutfeet and Misner organized the morning’s suggestions into five themes: 
policies, spirituality, leadership, resources, and education. They then welcomed the participants 
back, and introduced the next question for consideration. 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 88


Each table was asked to come up with three suggestions or ideas in response to the discussion 
question. Cutfeet encouraged participants to consider the whole range of community leaders 
when thinking about the question.  

“A leader could be a spiritual person, a leader could be in education, could be the chief and 
council, they could be an Elder or a youth. Think broadly as you consider this question,” he 
said. 

The suggestions were written on cards and arranged by theme. Here is what was presented:  
   Federal policies and legal system

Suggestion card #1:  

       Challenge of cooperation from legal community—i.e., lawyers, police, “Bon Cop vs. Bad 
        Cop” 
       Issues of trust 
       Use union as excuse not to do search 
       Use Charter of Rights 
Suggestion card #2:  

       Police forces to be able to lay charges and get convictions in court 
       Police need to be able to take directions from First Nations leadership 
Suggestion card #3:  

       Airlines should be made mandatory to enforce security measures—e.g., X‐ray of 
        baggage 
Suggestion card #4:  

       To develop bylaws 
       Work with legal sources to access search warrants when a tip is received  
       To be able to lay charges 
       Community aware of drug trafficking 
   Challenges within families

Suggestion card #1:  

       Parental / grandparent interference 
       When their child / children go to court, they want to support them 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 89


Suggestion card #2:  

       Lack of cultural understanding such as the sharing concept of families 
   Lack of communications / knowledge information infrastructure

Suggestion card #1:  

       Intoxicant bylaw be adjusted to reflect people’s needs, OR replace with new community 
        law  
   Community ownership

Suggestion card #1:  

       Community must take ownership 
       Answer lies in the community 
Suggestion card #2:  

       Lack of “full” community support or involvement in community strategy  
       Backlash 
   Lack of respect / repercussions and backlash

Suggestion card #1:  

       Lack of respect for leadership / Elders 
       Concern of political repercussions 
Suggestion card #2:  

       Gangs / dealers 
       Community fear 
       Lack of police / legal support 
       Fear of change (retaliation) 
       Accepting ourselves for who we are 
       Teachings, values, culture 
   Funding resources for programs

Suggestion card #1:  

       Funding / resources for counselling, for prevention and aftercare 
Suggestion card #2:  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 90


       Lack of training on prevention and promotion. It also includes training for skills 
       Workplace: frontline workers need information on how to best tackle problem 
Suggestion card #3:  

       Lack of resources 
       $ funding 
       Infrastructure 
       Human resources 
       Policing / enforcement 
       Lack of bylaws 
Following the reading of all the suggestions, a general discussion began. Participants first raised 
the need for adequate legislation, programs, and funding to address the problems faced in First 
Nation communities.  

Chief Arthur Moore, Constance Lake First Nation, spoke about the need to have laws, 
regulations, and policies at the federal and provincial level. He also stressed that these 
programs must include proper funding. 

Chief Connie Gray‐McKay, Mishkeegogamang First Nation, said good communications were 
key to dealing with the problem. She said some people still have strong resistance to dealing 
with prescription drug abuse. Public education through TV, radio, and newspapers is essential. 
“One of the biggest things I see here is the resistance to change—we’re not wanting to change. 
So we need to promote the ideas as much as we can, as often as we can, in all media possible.” 

A general discussion about the need for effective laws, policies, and regulations ensued. Cutfeet 
said that getting new federal or provincial laws enacted can take a long time, but there are 
plenty of actions First Nation communities can take right away. 

Dean Cromarty, Wunnumin Lake First Nation, picked up this theme. “If we wait for them 
[federal or provincial governments] to introduce a new law, it will take forever. We need to look 
at what we can do on our own.” Cromarty talked about how traditional First Nation justice is 
based on family and community coming together. “We don’t need the permission of the federal 
government to talk within our own community. We should act based on our own traditions, not 
based on federal or provincial laws.” 

Chris Moonias, Neskantaga First Nation, said inadequate legislation sometimes means that 
police are unable to stop the flow of prescription drugs into their communities. He suggested 
First Nation communities need to work for new laws, but also take action on their own to deal 
with the problems. 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 91


Moore agreed that federal and provincial policies can sometimes get in the way, but that should 
not stop First Nation communities from taking action. “Let’s not allow these policies and 
legislation to control us. There are ways we can work around them.” 

Gray‐McKay reinforced Moore’s comments by saying that “the answer lies in the community.”  
She said a return to traditional teachings is needed to deal with this problem. 

Teri Fiddler, Sandy Lake First Nation, said the key to solving the problem of prescription drug 
abuse is to establish community‐based treatment centres. Drugs will keep flowing into First 
Nation communities as long as people are addicted, and right now, the only treatment centres 
are in distant urban centres.  

Fiddler shared her personal story of helping her daughter deal with prescription drug 
addiction. “I tried to help her while she was going through the withdrawal. We would both end 
up on the floor. I would hold her and we would both be crying. She would be saying, ‘My blood 
hurts.’”  

Although youth often fall victim to addiction, Cutfeet said his son, who is a medical student at 
the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, recently helped him quit smoking. “He started telling 
me about what it was doing to me, so I went cold‐turkey. So your youth, your children—they 
have this powerful sense that can assist in the resolution of these problems.” 

Moonias said that people are often too judgmental about those who are addicted. Either that, or 
they say nothing, because talking about someone’s addiction is awkward. “The people who are 
addicted have a challenge. We need to accept them as individuals and help them deal with it.” 

The session concluded with Cutfeet commenting that the Canadian system is more about the 
individual, whereas First Nation communities are more of a collective. He said that from the 
comments made, First Nation communities clearly must come together to solve this problem of 
prescription drug abuse. 

At the end of the session, facilitators Cutfeet and Misner again organized the individual 
suggestions into six themes. Participants were asked to vote (by a show of hands) on the top 
three: 
   Theme priorities and number of votes received

       (#1 priority) Community ownership: 16 
       (#2 priority) Funding resources for programs: 12 
       (#3 priority) Lack of communications / knowledge information infrastructure: 7 
       Lack of respect / repercussions and backlash: 5 
       Challenges within families: 4 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 92


       Federal policies and legal system: 0 

   Meeting 3
   Discussion Question, written in two parts:
   A: “What are some actions that can be taken to change and improve the role of community leaders?
   What should be done first?” Please state your top three priority actions.
   B: “How can the community stakeholders support their leaders to reduce the challenges?” (Please keep
   in mind all of your community members—community leaders, men / women, children / youth, Elders,
   single mothers, families, First Nation workforce, etc.)

Cutfeet said that the leaders in the community are important. However, “they aren’t the only 
ones responsible for the issue of prescription drug abuse: everyone is.” In Part B, he said, 
participants should list specifically what they could do in their own organizations, “whether 
you’re an educational leader, a spiritual leader, or an administrator,” to support the leadership 
in improving the community. He requested that participants note which of the other 
community stakeholders should be involved as they list actions. 

After giving groups time to discuss, write, and post their ideas, Cutfeet and Misner read the 
posted ideas.  

The first table suggested forming a group or task force from the resource people, to support the 
leadership. This group would provide visible and active support in their field of work. Their 
second idea was for a community, when developing new policies, to get legal advice on how 
effective the proposed policy will be within the Indian Act guidelines. The community should 
also support the chief and council, when they are enforcing bylaws, to have strong leadership, 
to be more vocal, to work together as a team, to maintain traditional values, and to support each 
other.  

Bernie Quequish, Weagamow Lake 87 Reserve, gave an example. She said that an Elder in 
North Caribou Lake started a committee to work on community issues. However, the leaders 
do not support the committee, so the committee cannot make progress and is stuck. “Most of 
our leaders don’t agree with us, and it’s hard for our community to stand with us,” she said. “If 
our leaders stood with us, our community would support us.”  

Cutfeet said that forming the task force of resource people is key for moving on the issues. 
“Look at people in the health, education, and policing fields,” he said. Leaders need to come to 
terms with the fact that using their resources is the way to get more external political support.  

The first idea from the second table was to involve the whole community in all aspects of the 
issue and to recognize the positives. The participants suggested obtaining a strong community 
mandate to enforce community laws—the BCRs. They said it was important to develop 
strategies and protocols around awareness, counselling, and debriefing, and to support simple 
tasks, such as using money to feed the community’s children. 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 93


The participants at the third table said that leaders must be transparent and informative to their 
members. Leaders should get people together and brainstorm to plan and find resources. 
Leaders should be honest and make sure they have the skills to lead, and if they do not, step 
out. Leaders should study the problem and find resource people to help them, hold community 
meetings, dialogue with caregivers, attend project meetings, and participate with the managers 
of each program.  

Cutfeet said it sounded as if participants at this table believed it was very important for 
leadership and resource people in the community to have a collegial relationship.  

In response to part B of the question, participants at the third table said that the community 
needed to support and be part of the solution, and be consistent in communication. Resource 
people from all areas of expertise can support leaders by giving facts, information, and 
knowledge in the form of briefing notes, so that leaders can be effective in representing them. 
People can also support leaders by making specific recommendations on solutions.  

Chief Arthur Moore, Constance Lake First Nation, added that they believed in the old slogan, 
“Just do it!” Acknowledging that a problem exists leads to solutions. He said it is important for 
community leaders and resource people to teach people to not be dependent, and to turn 
responsibility for solutions over to the people. He also said that communities need to be creative 
when dealing with policies: “to a certain degree, we can bend policies to make things happen, 
but stay focused on the mandate.” Achieving results is of utmost importance. 

The participants at the fourth table suggested calling a general membership meeting to set up a 
support system for the chief and council. An Elders council or youth council would be able to 
give specialized support. Also, they suggested forming a committee to oversee the chief and 
council, to ensure that they follow their oath of office. The leadership must be accountable; all 
band employees must be drug‐free. The participants said that membership must agree to zero 
tolerance for drugs and drug dealers.  

The group also emphasized the importance of “tough love” ‐ parents should be encouraged not 
to interfere or rescue their children during rough times, such as when a child is going to court, 
and the band must be clear about upholding the law. The group also said that the chief and 
council must access funding and resources to open methadone clinics to help addicts. 

The group at the fifth table suggested a leadership retreat at which the leaders would set 
priorities, participate in visioning exercises, and establish roles and responsibilities. The goal 
would be team building and conflict resolution, and the focus would not be on political issues, 
but on social issues. The group also said that accountability was important: community 
members should be clean and sober, have healthy lifestyles, and be stable. Participants also said 
that community members should vocally support their leadership’s decisions. 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 94

In the fifth table’s answer to part B, Chief Connie Gray‐McKay, Mishkeegogamang First 
Nation, said the leadership needed to communicate with the community repeatedly, and in a 
variety of media, on issues, programs, and progress. She said newspapers, radio programs, 
home visits, and round‐table meetings were all options. Communities must accept and take 
ownership of the change that their communities need to make. She said maintaining an open 
mind about spiritual beliefs, accepting both Christianity and traditional beliefs, would be 
important to build community support. 

Cutfeet told participants that answering this question had started the process of identifying 
solutions to the problems. The next day, participants would be putting these solutions into 
specific goals, assigning roles for specific people who will carry out the actions.  

Discussion moved to identifying common links. Resources / community building was listed. 
Other themes mentioned were supporting leadership through task forces, communication, and 
for the community to become more visible and active in finding solutions. 

Chief Moore said that leaders need community members to support them, and also to help push 
their leadership to address an issue. He said, “Rather than retreating back and saying we’ll talk 
about it at the next meeting, sometimes you have to push the issue and deal with it.” 

Chief Allan Towegishig, Long Lake 58 First Nation, said that part of being visible in a 
community includes recognizing positives. He described a “dry dance” in his community a few 
years ago, in which they recognized all the people who had been sober for a year, five years, 10 
years, and more.  

Misner suggested summarizing the topic as “be creative, be strong.” She said it encompassed 
the ideas of making creative decisions and standing by them, with tough love. 

On the topic of celebrating strengths, Chris Moonias, Neskantaga First Nation, said that most 
often, groups are told what is wrong with them. He said that Aboriginal people hear, “‘you’re 
not good enough for this, or that. You can’t do this, or that.’ We try to change the attitude.” He 
said his community points out what people can do, based on their skills, encouraging everyone 
to use what they have. He said that people do not need to hear every day what their problems 
are; they need to be encouraged to bring out their strengths. Leaders must be able to accept, 
without jealousy, people who are willing to step up. Leaders should enable those people to 
work. 

Misner described participating in an exercise in which a community mapped its strengths. 
Everyone in the community, including the children, were involved. She said the group covered 
a table with a piece of paper, and everyone wrote down what they could and would do to make 
their goal happen. She suggested this exercise might be valuable for communities. 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 95


Cutfeet said that it would be important to capture, under “provide recommendations,” the need 
for recommended actions that leaders can take. The resource people in the community, as they 
perform their tasks, need to inform council of their challenges and of recommended solutions. 

Tensions among community members and leaders were discussed. Anna McKay said that she 
organizes activities for young people, “but then an Elder comes and says I shouldn’t do so 
much activity planning.” She said it was difficult to balance those kinds of conflicting 
perspectives in the community, and some of the direction should come from the community’s 
leaders. 

Cutfeet said that better communication of the reasons behind a particular program might help 
improve community relationships. The young people may need programming to have fun and 
relieve stress—and if the parents understand that the program is part of creating and living in a 
healthy environment, they can support it.  

John Kamenawatamin, Koocheching First Nation, suggested looking to municipalities to see 
how they structure their boards to support the community. From the years he lived in Thunder 
Bay, he knows that the organizations that manage sports and recreation programs, for example, 
are driven by volunteers. The municipality leadership has an annual strategic community plan 
to state how the leadership will deliver programs to the members. He said that in Aboriginal 
communities, “there’s disengagement, a generational gap between our youth, our leaders and 
Elders, and adults.” He suggested creating programs and services in which parents, guardians, 
and leaders work with youth in the community to re‐engage the children and youth. 

Daisy Kabestra, the health director from Fort Severn, raised a question. She said she noticed in 
her nearly 20 years of work as a health director, the turnover in health‐related positions is high. 
One big issue in communities is that mental health workers are not adequately trained in 
providing family counselling, and therefore families do not trust the workers and do not seek 
their help. She said that although agencies respond when a mental health situation escalates, 
they are not proactive in addressing the core problem, which is that workers on the front line do 
not have the necessary skills. The investment in building the capacity of the workers in the 
community is not a priority, she said, the way it was for diabetes education. She asked, “When 
will we provide that training for our frontline workers in our communities?” 

Cutfeet said that building capacity was included in one of the common themes they had 
identified and that Kabestra had provided a good example. He said that long‐term and big 
issues would likely need to be handled in the political arena and addressed with government 
agencies. However, the rest of the session, the next day, would focus on creating an action plan. 

Seven common themes were developed from this session:  

       Provide recommendations to leadership 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 96


       Build resources / community relationships 
       Support leadership 
       Communicate why things are being done 
       Celebrate strengths 
       Be strong, be creative 
       Take ownership: be involved 
Participants voted on the three themes they thought were the most important. The themes that 
garnered the most votes were the final three: celebrate strengths; be strong, be creative; and take 
ownership: be involved. 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 97




   Plenary Discussion for Planning Committee 1

Emcee Wally McKay welcomed the group. He said that the facilitators of the five breakout 
sessions had condensed their discussions into 15‐ to 20‐minute presentations. 

   Breakout Group 1:
   The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages
   PRESENTERS
   Frank McNulty
   Francine Pellerin
Frank McNulty repeated the first discussion question posed to breakout group 1 participants: 
“What is your vision for creating a community that is free from prescription drug abuse?” 

McNulty said the community needs to work together to develop strategies, treatment, and 
legislation. To get the community involved requires developing cultural programs and 
activities, raising awareness and providing education, developing the community’s economics, 
encouraging people’s sense of self, and nurturing their spiritual development. What need to be 
promoted are community connectedness, community values, and community spirit; spirituality 
supports community connectedness. During the session, McNulty said, an Elder shared a story 
on unclear family devotions, which led to discussion on both Christian teachings and traditional 
teachings.  

The community can develop solutions, and the community and individuals living within the 
community can become drug‐free. However, “it’s hard to stay on that path” to sobriety, said 
McNulty. There is a need for healing and support both for and from families. Support should 
come from the leadership, the community as a whole, Elders, parents, and others.  

Francine Pellerin restated the second discussion question for breakout group 1: “What are the 
challenges of prescription drug use as it applies to all ages within your community?” 

Pellerin said that prescription drug abuse affects everyone in the community. For example, 
community members can face issues with security threats, smuggling, illegal drug sales, 
domestic violence, Elder abuse, and lack of treatment options for addicted persons. Other 
problems within communities may unintentionally promote drug abuse: peer pressure, 
boredom, lack of organized activities, unemployment, and poor nutrition. Other issues and 
challenges include the concern of Elders having to take responsibility for their grandchildren.  

The final question discussed was “What actions could be taken to reduce drug abuse or misuse?” 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 98


In reducing prescription drug abuse and misuse, the focus needs to be on the strength and 
ability of the community. Without the community taking action, “the leadership wouldn’t be 
able to enact these issues like community‐driven policies.” Working together as a community is 
the key to success.  

Pellerin said most of the items discussed stemmed from the community. The community has to 
be moving toward a clear goal. The community and the leadership should lobby for funding 
and resources, using creative problem‐solving methods to do so.  

   Breakout Group 2:
   Current Support Systems (Health and Others)
   PRESENTERS
   Lynda Roberts
   Raija Vic
Lynda Roberts introduced breakout session 2, noting that the original title of the workshop, 
“Health Care Panel,” had been changed, to give a broader community perspective. In the first 
part of the session, the participants’ discussion was in response to the following questions: 
“What do you see as the answers to effectively address prescription drugs abuse in your community? 
What supports are needed?”  

Roberts reported that the community needs to be engaged and focused on goals. Goals can vary 
from increasing awareness through education, to developing programs that reinforce parenting 
skills, self‐esteem, and resiliency, and that draw on traditional teachings. The community can 
encourage youth, to ensure they have pride and a sense of identity. The community can 
establish specific prevention activities including peer counselling, sharing circles, and better 
aftercare and support.  

The community needs to take responsibility at the community level. As Roberts said, “All the 
answers are within the community and within ourselves.” The community needs to care, even if 
someone does not fully understand or know specifically how to help.  

Raija Vic presented the next discussion question: “What are some of the challenges related to health 
care services that prevent addressing the challenge of prescription drug abuse?” 

Vic said there is a lack of “holistic programs,” and the community needs to rediscover its 
strengths and values, and “ensure survival for its own livelihood.” Despite the lack of 
resources, leadership, education, and awareness, the community must focus on having a 
positive mindset.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 99


The community needs to acknowledge the drug problem, even though people may have been 
ignoring the issues for personal reasons. Two particular challenges discussed were the drug 
dealers’ legal rights and the repercussions that individuals can face if they expose the dealers. 
For example, these individuals may experience backlash such as being a victim of violence. This 
is a serious concern that the community needs to address.  

Language barriers for Elders also pose a problem, especially as not enough people are available 
to translate. As a result, Elders may not understand their illness, or they may not know how to 
take prescription drugs safely.  

   Breakout Group 3:
   Community Responsibility and Ownership
   PRESENTERS
   Cristine Rego
   Karen O’Gorman
The first question that breakout session 3 participants addressed was “What is your vision for 
community responsibility and ownership as it relates to reducing the challenges with prescription drug 
abuse?” Cristine Rego also asked a related question: “What do you see your community doing?” 

Rego said there is a critical process when forming an action plan. The plan should help the 
community move ahead, address and eliminate the community’s problems, and make for a 
healthy community.  

The session participants created a vision statement: “The community acknowledges, as a whole, 
that there is the problem of prescription drug abuse and agrees to work together towards 
strengthening our families through supportive programming, advocacy, training, and 
education.” 

The final question in breakout session 2 had two parts: “What are the challenges or what stops the 
communities from taking responsibility and ownership as it applies to all ages within the community?” 
and “If the focus is to decrease prescription drug abuse in communities, what are some of the things that 
can be done to increase community ownership?” 

The community needs to acknowledge the problem and not deny that it exists. A breakdown in 
communication and misinformation affect the community in negative and unhealthy ways. 
Rego said the community has to “embrace the bad with the good” before it can move forward 
toward its goal. The community runs the risk of pressuring the leadership in an unhealthy way; 
therefore, the community needs to provide support for all of its members.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 100


There may be a loss of identity for the community as a whole and for community members 
individually. Groups within the community may work against each other in an unhealthy 
manner. Social situations such as lack of jobs, poverty, limited education, poor housing, and 
general apathy can hinder the community’s progress.  

Community members may be afraid to report drug dealers in case the leaders themselves are 
involved in the drug community. A safe environment needs to be created that ensures 
individuals can come forward without fear. Another possible challenge is a community’s loss of 
identity. To rebuild its identity, the community would need to create activities such as reviving 
its language and culture, and organizing family days, community gatherings, and feasts. These 
activities help in building bonds and can create positive energy.  

Strong leadership will create positive role models. Positive role models will translate to the 
younger community members.  

Awareness marches are one way to raise a community’s awareness of prescription drug abuse. 
Another way is to introduce or expand education programs on the problem. What may also be 
needed to build more support in the community is education on the roles and responsibility of 
the leadership. The community needs to develop awareness of the issues and a willingness to 
act, and to then ensure that a process is in place to maintain the momentum.  

The leadership and community need to support and encourage frontline workers. To the extent 
that resources permit, community plans should be community‐appropriate. The chief and 
council can develop protocols and processes for effectively and non‐judgmentally 
implementing these plans.  

Using outside resources, the community can create beneficial programs such as Neighbourhood 
Watch, peacekeeping, delivery options, and incentives as a start. Keeping the goals small and 
easily obtainable will empower the community in their activities. Other programs can 
strengthen the community by developing its team‐building skills and also individuals 
members’ coping skills and self‐esteem.  

To build a healthy community that can respond to the issues, the community has to 
acknowledge the problem, be honest, and be strong.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 101


   Breakout Group 4:
   The Law and Security
   PRESENTERS
   Marty Singleton
   Kevin Berube
The first day of discussions in breakout session 4 dealt with three questions:  

       “What is your vision for supporting police services to help create a community that is free from 
        prescription drugs?” 
       “What are the challenges faced by police services that prevent them from reducing prescription 
        drug abuse?”  
       “What are some of the things that can be done to reduce policing challenges in your 
        community?” 
Marty Singleton said that in their discussions, participants had emphasized four aspects: 
community networking, recognition of legal functions and jurisdictions, reinvestment in 
strategies, and education. Reducing the challenges can be done by improving training and 
development for police services, especially in investigative techniques; enhancing support for 
the police; implementing stronger quality control to reduce drugs in the community; and 
recognizing, respecting, and improving the community’s economics.  

To reach these goals, Singleton outlined the group’s suggestions. In essence, communities need 
to develop strong screening and security procedures, and also key services (funding, 
peacekeepers). Singleton also said that communities should “take the reserve dogs and train 
them to be sniffers,” an idea that the session participants had found amusing.  

An innovative approach to making a community drug‐free is to develop stronger networking.  

Kevin Berube said that breakout session 4 had a number of recurring themes: little recognition 
of First Nations’ loss, poor communication within the community, and inadequate resources. 
These problems hinder a community’s progress.  

Addressing the problems requires better training and support for police services, advocacy for 
additional support and resources for police services, and a commitment or recommitment from 
community members to trust their police. Community policing is a community function, and 
community members need to take back their community. “We don’t need to wait for the police 
to police our communities,” said Berube. 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 102


   Breakout Group 5:
   The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face
   PRESENTERS
   James Cutfeet
   Frankie Misner
   Larry Jourdain
Larry Jourdain presented breakout session 5’s first question: “What is your vision of the role your 
community leaders need to promote with respect to creating a community that is free from prescription 
drug abuse?” 

Jourdain said the top five categories of ideas that participants identified were leadership, 
spirituality, policies, education, and resources.  

Leaders have an active role in supporting any community initiative. Leaders occupy a “pivotal 
position in the community” and need to act as role models. They need to have positive 
relationships with all segments of community, and by the way they live and behave, to 
demonstrate a healthy lifestyle and strong spiritual values. “They are the heart of the 
community,” Jourdain said. 

The community needs to recognize that individuals within the community, or other 
communities, may have different faiths. Belief systems do not need to compete, and different 
faiths should not limit a community’s networking or progress. “Spirituality is the base on which 
the community is built,” Jourdain said.  

The session participants agreed that communities need to adopt a zero tolerance policy in 
regard to drug abuse, prescription and otherwise. This policy should apply to all community 
members, even the leaders. To help its members adhere to such a policy, the community needs 
to ensure that adequate support systems are in place. 

Frankie Misner restated breakout session 5’s next discussion question: “What are the challenges 
related to the role of community leaders with respect to reducing prescription drug abuse?” 

Misner said the community must take ownership of the problem and acknowledge the many 
challenges. The biggest of the challenges is overcoming the lack of resources. Funding resources 
for programs are limited, as are resources for staffing, training, and communication.  

There are also challenges within families, with some families finding it difficult to make good 
choices and decisions. Regarding federal policies and the legal system, Misner said, there is a 
“necessity to reshape the box and look at new ways of addressing these issues.” 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 103

James Cutfeet posed a final question in two parts: “What are some actions that can be taken to 
change and improve the role of community leaders?” and “How can the community stakeholders support 
their leaders to reduce the challenges?” 

In wrapping up their first day’s discussions, breakout group 5 participants recommended that 
communities take the following actions: 

       Be strong, take ownership of their problems, and address the challenges creatively.  
       Recognize their own strengths and focus on positivity.  
       Support the leadership, and form groups to promote leadership support.  
       Encourage better communication by educating community members.  
Wally McKay thanked the presenters. He said that the day had been a useful team‐building 
exercise, as the participants were from a range of backgrounds. McKay also said that 
developing a five‐year plan for well‐being is a valuable process; “it’s amazing the results that 
are produced.”  

The plenary discussion concluded with a drum song, and an Elder led the closing prayer.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 104




   Day 3

   Breakout Group 1:
   The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages
   FACILITATORS
   Frank McNulty
   First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
   Francine Pellerin
   Matawa

   Meeting 4

The group met and discussed the ideas formed from the previous Breakout Session. Each group 
read the notes on the index cards taped to the walls, to recall the ideas previously generated. 
Frank McNulty said the plan was for the small group at each table to take ideas from 
yesterday’s meeting and formulate them into goals. After that, the small groups were to turn 
each of the goals into a strategy by including a time frame and assigning a group or individual 
to help enact the strategy.  

McNulty said that the notes from this breakout session would be presented at the plenary 
discussion in the afternoon. At the conclusion of the conference, people can take the notes back 
to their community and attempt to enact some of the recommended strategies.  

As before, McNulty assigned each table a category listed on the wall during yesterday’s 
discussion. The categories were adolescents, children, youth, adults, community, leadership, 
and family. However, for the requirements of today’s discussion, the categories were grouped 
as follows: children / adolescents; youth / adults; Elders; families; leadership; and the 
community as a whole. For their assigned category, the groups were asked to list the actions in 
order of importance and to highlight the top three to four priority actions in their assigned 
category. These actions will be ones that are feasible for communities to consider implementing.  

Each group removed the relevant index cards for their assigned category from the wall and 
discussed the points. McNulty said that after the break, each table would present the goals, 
strategies, and actions that they had outlined in their discussion to the larger breakout group.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 105


   Meeting 5
   Addressing problems and determining what changes need to be made to conquer prescription drug
   abuse

Participants were asked to prioritize three goals within the broad categories discussed in their 
previous breakout sessions, namely, youth and adults; leadership; community; children and 
adolescents; families; and Elders. Each group filled out a worksheet that represented a draft 
work plan with activities to be implemented by chiefs and councils. Work sheets had columns 
for goals, tactics / strategies or specific activities, dates (timelines for the suggested activities), 
and names of who would be responsible for implementation. 

   Youth and adults

Theresa Brown, Kasabonika Lake Council, presented the work plan that her small group 
developed.  
   Goal #1: A First Nation education program through a DVD or PowerPoint presentation should be created
   to educate youth and adults about prescription drug abuse in our communities

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
A First Nation organization (e.g., Assembly of First Nations) or Health Canada, with a mandate 
from First Nation communities and using the information flowing from this conference, should 
create an educational DVD / PowerPoint presentation / poster to be used in our communities 
and schools. The educational program should represent “us as First Nations,” said Brown, who 
added that some materials already exist, but they are not First Nation‐specific. The group said 
that the issue of confidentiality, and how to ensure it, should be stressed in any educational 
program.  

        Timeline and who is responsible:  
The group said that such an educational program would take six months to create and should 
be an ongoing activity. In terms of who should be part of the program, adults and youth should 
be telling their stories, and that stories should be brought to different communities. Stories 
should stress successes in getting off drugs and describe how. A First Nation or government 
organization should be identified to create the DVD / PowerPoint / poster.  
   Goal #2: Every community could create a chief council for youth, to seek input / solutions from the
   community on the problem

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
The group suggested creating information on the organization and roles of the chief and 
council, and having an election process for and by youth. Once elected, a youth council would 
identify the issues and create a plan of action, which would be enacted by youth under 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 106


advisement from the chief, the council, and Elders. At the end of this process, the community 
would have its own chief’s conference. 

        Timeline and who is responsible:  
These activities could start within one month to one year from now, and those responsible 
include the current chief and council from each community, Elders as advisors, and youth.  
   Goal #3: Each community should have community question boxes, which provide a window of
   opportunity for people who are ready to get off drugs but do not know where to turn

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
Question boxes should be put up throughout community (e.g., band office, schools, health 
office, community store, post office, airport waiting room). The questions / concerns could be 
addressed on radio shows and flyers in the community and could be used to focus future chiefs’ 
conferences. 

        Timeline and who is responsible:  
Health staff, frontline and youth workers, church congregations, and teachers should be 
involved in implementing this ongoing strategy.  

   Leadership

Clovis Meekis, Sandy Lake First Nation, said that the group believed strongly that leadership 
should involve community discussion and input.  
   Goal #1: To eliminate prescription drug abuse in the community

This goal could be enacted immediately by the chief and council holding general community 
meetings, to gain community support and to emphasize that the community needs to work 
together as a whole.  
   Goal #2: To develop policies, guidelines, and resolutions that address steps to combat prescription drug
   abuse in First Nation communities

This goal could be achieved through band council meetings, announcements, and advertising of 
measures to be taken to deal with the issue. The group said that the chief and council could 
implement these measures immediately.  
   Goal #3: To implement the policies, guidelines, and resolutions as directed by the chief and council

Implementation by the chief and council, and by community resource workers including 
NNADAP, nurses, health directors, NAPS, and community security workers, should be 
immediate and ongoing.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 107

   Community

Beverly Taylor, Constance Lake First Nation, said that “when we get back to our communities, 
we should get their input into the work plan.”  
   Goal #1: To provide education and to raise awareness

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
       Tribal council to train a team from each community to provide drug awareness 
        programs 
       Implement mandatory substance abuse curriculum in school  
       Life skills programs 
       Advertisements, commercials, documentaries 
       Wawatay News 
       Drama 
        Timeline and who is responsible:  
Many of these activities should be ongoing but could start with the April 2009 to April 2010 
period. Frontline workers, Ontario Works, tribal council, health centre staff, and band staff 
should be involved.  
   Goal #2: To provide mental health programs

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
       Healing the inner child 
       Counselling 
       Support system 
       Treatment services 
       Sober walk and rallies held several times a year 
       Developing capable people 
       Respect community property 
        Timeline and who is responsible:  
As with Goal #1, the activities should be ongoing. Education staff, chief and council, community 
members and health staff are implicated.  
   Goal #3: To provide education awareness through community activities

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 108


The group proposed more community activities such as camping, hunting, and fishing trips, as 
well as a focus on culture, spirituality, “our history,” and traditional activities including Elders. 
They also wanted to see Crime Stoppers programs and school programs.  

Timeline and who is responsible:  

The community activities should be ongoing, and band staff, NAPS, and all community 
members should be involved.  

   Children and adolescents

Chief Celia Echum of the Ginoogaming First Nation said that “it takes a whole community to 
raise a child,” and presented the group’s work plan.  
   Goal #1: To promote healthy eating

The group suggested that the goal could be achieved through a breakfast / lunch program 
during the winter months (November to March) and on‐reserve food banks. Community health 
directors and program workers from HBHC, BF, council, and CWW should be involved.  
   Goal #2: To encourage parental involvement and to strengthen family structure

Ongoing, everyday activities should include cultural ones, such as feasts, gatherings, and story 
times, where adult / family member accompaniment is required. Parents could be “lured” to 
activities with door prizes, gift certificates, food, clothing giveaways, and furniture for young 
families. These activities should be promoted by the chief and council, and by the community as 
a whole.  
   Goal #3: To provide a safe environment for our children

Communities should hold safety workshops (e.g. first aid, bicycle, fire escape plan) while the 
band office should provide a first aid kit for each home. A safe house (e.g., Kookum’s House) is 
needed for kids, as is a Neighbourhood Watch program and emergency contact information for 
each family (somewhere on their clothing). These activities need to be ongoing and carried out 
by the health director, school staff, housing managers, and fire prevention workers.  
   Goal #4: To provide recreational facilities / activities to get away from boredom

Participants suggested a number of ongoing tactics including daycare and recreation facilities 
having fences and safe zones, and only dry events being held. The chief and council, as well as 
economic development officers, should be involved.  

The group also added a goal to secure funding that should be ongoing.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 109

   Families

Judy Desmoulin, Longlac #58 health director, presented the group’s work plan.  
   Goal #1: To have the majority of families participate and become involved in organized community
   events / activities

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
       Open lines of communication (e.g., radio, newsletters, advertisements, announcements, 
        invitations) 
       Provide incentives at the organized events / activities (e.g., feasts and draws) 
       Publicly acknowledge participants so that they will come out again  
       Provide daycare  
        Timeline and who is responsible:  
These activities could happen immediately and should be ongoing. The chief and council, band 
staff, and frontline resource workers should all be involved.  
   Goal #2: To have the majority of families support and become involved in their local educational
   programs / system

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
       Demand that mandatory curriculum with cultural content be incorporated 
       Demand the mandatory participation of staff / administrators in cultural / traditional 
        gatherings 
       Improve their own children’s attendance at school (if families do not encourage their 
        children, their chances of succeeding are diminished)  
       Participate in adult educational programs that interest them 
        Timeline and who is responsible:  
These initiatives could start immediately and should be ongoing. The group also suggested that 
meetings should be scheduled according to tasks specified from the initial gathering. The chief 
and council, band staff, local education boards / staff, and all frontline workers should be 
involved. 
   Goal #3: To have a majority of families engage in family healing

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
       Provide support, resources, and information to families who want to engage in family 
        healing sessions 
       Provide opportunities for spiritual knowledge and growth for families  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 110


       Provide parenting programs so families can learn to protect their children and prevent 
        substance abuse  
        Timeline and who is responsible:  
It was suggested that a work plan and a corresponding budget to achieve this goal be 
developed immediately, with ongoing efforts to secure additional funding. These activities 
should be carried out by the chief and council, band staff, and community spiritual advisors.  

Desmoulin related that her community put out a call for 10 families interested in strengthening 
their family. “Within 24 hours, we had 14 families signed up.” The initiative consisted of 
workshops on lateral violence, parenting, literacy, and numeracy. They have developed work 
plans for action, as well as budgets. So far, 18 families have been involved in the program, but 
“we can’t meet the demand.” The additional families who want to make changes have no place 
to go, no immediate resources, and no professional counselling as they go deeper into their 
trauma. There is nowhere to send them. “It all starts by consulting the community.”  

   Elders

Annabelle Mendowegon, Aroland First Nation, shared with the group the results of the 
discussions at her table.  
   Goal #1: To educate Elders about prescription drug abuse

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
The goal could be achieved through radio shows with open call‐in lines, Elders’ feasts with 
presenters (must provide transportation as well), and the distribution of awareness‐raising and 
promotional materials. Elders also need education on the proper use of medication (e.g., need 
translation). 

        Timeline and who is responsible:  
These activities could start immediately and should be ongoing. Mental health workers, police, 
nurses, CHR, pharmacists, past abusers (who share personal stories of recovery; what to look 
out for), youth councils, and NNADAP would be responsible. 
   Goal #2: To enable Elders to share their knowledge, wisdom, stories, and traditional knowledge to youth
   and community

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
The goal could be addressed with cultural days at schools, with stations for students to rotate 
through and participate in hands‐on traditional activities (e.g., traditional vs. western), Elders 
teaching the Aboriginal language, and an Elders’ drop‐in centre with kitchen (with traditional 
food) where stories can be shared and traditional games can be played. There should also be 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 111


traditional knowledge and information sessions in schools and clinics (e.g., using traditional 
medicine to treat diabetes). Elders’ camps for families and youth would be an excellent avenue 
for families to learn traditional activities. No technology would be allowed in the camps.  

        Timeline and who is responsible:  
These activities could start immediately, would be ongoing, and should be organized by Elders, 
students / youth, teachers, nurses, and health care workers.  
   Goal #3: To ensure a safe living environment for Elders

        Tactics / strategies / specific activities:  
Mental health workers could conduct one‐on‐one home visits, and radio shows could provide 
contact information.  

        Timeline and who is responsible:  
These activities should start immediately, be ongoing, and be organized by health care staff, 
mental health workers, and Elders. 

   Discussion

Facilitators asked participants which three of the categories identified were priorities. After 
some discussion, participants agreed that everyone is part of the community and nothing 
functions without the support of the whole community. While community leadership is 
important to push and implement initiatives, leadership and the community go hand in hand.  

Desmoulin said that one of the common threads in the discussions so far is the lack of 
communication. A key message that has been reiterated several times is that “we need more 
dialogue between communities and leadership.” This point could go under the category of 
community. She added that it is also important to “draw people out to be involved, and that the 
leadership needs to stimulate this.”  

Jerry Sawanas, translator, agreed that communication is important. “People need to know what 
is expected of them and what they can do.” He related the overwhelming response to the 
communication efforts of an organization for the homeless in Sioux Lookout. “We need to use 
communication tools as part of our arsenal.” Those who need help must know where to go and 
how to access resources. Communication is not just one‐way, however; one has to listen as well.  

“I am impressed with the teamwork and the spirit that is here,” said Lucas Tait, SLFNHA board 
member, adding that the communication between people over the past few days of the meeting 
must continue and will be key to stopping the problem.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 112


Tait shared with participants the story of his uncle, a community Elder, who had been losing 
sleep because of his grandchildren. One early morning, his uncle woke up to find one of them 
outside with a gun and likely on drugs and medication. His uncle told Tait that he could not 
rest anymore, wondering if someone might be seriously hurt the next morning.  

Stories like this “really hurt me and weaken my spirit and trust. I hope someone will help.” If 
everyone works together, the problem can be confronted. When people come together, support 
each other, and show compassion for youth and children, when churches unite to overcome 
differences in faith and beliefs, and when the leadership from all areas work together, then there 
will be progress.  

“I want to encourage you to work relentlessly, no matter how hard it seems, and to trust God 
that He will bring us through this so we can have peace and freedom in our villages.”  Tait 
thanked participants for their participation in the meeting and their hard work, and sent them 
back to their communities with hope and the knowledge “that God knows who you are.” 


   Breakout Group 2:
   Current Support Systems (Health and Others)
   FACILITATORS
   Lynda Roberts
   First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
   Raija Vic
   Ka-Na-Chi-Hih Specialized Solvent Abuse Treatment Centre

   Meeting 4

For this session, the facilitators said that the participants were to take the ideas developed 
during yesterday’s discussion and group them into specific, common themes, to formulate an 
action plan. Lynda Roberts commented on how it was interesting to see the participants’ 
different thought patterns when grouping the ideas together.  

The small groups took some time to categorize the ideas, adding some more ideas in the 
process, and in the end agreed on the following groupings. 

   Linkages, networking, and dialogue

       Dialogue among all members of the community, to determine different ways to work 
        through challenges, and identify how to best work together to address prescription drug 
        abuse  


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 113


       Both levels of government should be involved in planning process of First Nations and 
        to better meet needs, treatment centres  
       Develop linkages with other communities / organizations through the use of today’s 
        technology, via K‐Net, videoconferences  
       Physicians and pharmacists need to be involved in helping people who are addicted and 
        in the overall process for reducing prescription drug abuse  
       Write proposal to drug companies requesting funding to carry out the necessary 
        education / training sessions for our people 
       Identify how to best work together to address prescription drug abuse 

   Prevention / promotion and prevention / education

       Restore teachings, parenting, the role and rights of women, because the residential 
        school system, churches, and the child welfare system have caused damage to the social 
        and family structures 
       Education, skills training, client, staff, community, life skills at all levels, individual, 
        family, school, community, Elders  
       Peer groups, role model program, technology, networking, websites, training  
       Create a strategy for education and training re prescription drug abuse and treatment  
       Target educational awareness programs and materials to appropriate age and audience  
       Community engagement, forums, advertising, email, Facebook 
       Immediate coordination of community programs related to health and well‐being  
       Focus groups—i.e., with Elders, men, women, youth, parents—to get their input and to 
        identify areas they would like to address  

   Protocols / policies, accountability, and professional development

       Proper orientation for health care professionals entering our First Nations, to ensure 
        there is an understanding of issues and no abuse on dispensing nurses  
       Protocols for nursing and physicians. Some nurses have too much control over referrals 
        and have too much say on who can / can’t be seen by physicians 
       Examine safer transfer of prescription drugs into communities  
       First Nation leadership, frontline workers, NAPS, education, band office staff, Elders, 
        and natural helpers should meet regularly, to ensure work on this issue is ongoing and 
        that there is follow‐up on areas that need to be worked on  
       Need proper policies and procedures to be followed by all workers in community 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 114

   Treatment development, and healing and wellness

       Look at and develop community‐based treatment models, sharing circles versus AA 
        groups  
       Need shorter waiting lists for clients who want to seek treatment; First Nation youth get 
        tired of waiting for treatment, and some end up committing suicide 
       NNADAP—detox—NNADAP workers do not have the medical training for detox  
       Break stigmas associated with drugs, and recognize and treat it as an illness 
       NNADAP model—is the NNADAP model culturally appropriate? The current model 
        requires people to seek out help and to not intervene, and this is not in accordance with 
        our culture 
       There needs to be accountability from the workers, i.e., NNADAP and mental health 
        workers, to make sure they are actually doing their job  
       Retreats for health care providers (healing and wellness) 
       Research outcomes 

   Discussion

Following the grouping of ideas into the specific categories, Roberts asked why the participants 
had grouped the ideas the way they did. One small group said they had examined the ideas 
from the perspective of communication. They had also noticed a number of ideas on the duties 
and activities of First Nation staff and personnel that are already achievable, while another 
group of ideas were priorities and strategies that still need to be implemented. As a result, part 
of the categorization approach they used reflects what is achievable now versus what can 
happen in the future.  

Roberts also asked the participants to develop headings for these groupings. The group as a 
whole then discussed where the ideas belonged and what the categories should be. One 
participant said the point about the residential school system and the resulting syndrome 
should fall under healing and wellness, instead of prevention. She said that it is something that 
has already happened and cannot be prevented anymore, and the move is now toward healing. 
This led to a debate around education and healing, and where these categories fit into the larger 
picture. Dr. Hynnes said that education is one of the major arms of prevention—that education 
is a form of prevention. “It’s mostly community education, which is different from professional 
education,” he said. The group asked if the category should be called “healing, wellness, and 
prevention,” or perhaps “prevention / promotion” because they are promoting education.  

A question was raised if the category of “healing and wellness” was too broad. Dr. Hynnes said 
that all the ideas on the wall could fit under the heading of healing and wellness. He also 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 115


commented on the importance of terminology and said that when it comes to justification for 
funding, the phrasing counts. When funding is sought from governments, it is more beneficial if 
it can be phrased in a way that they can understand and then feel justified in providing the 
funding. 

Roberts decided to include both the healing and wellness and the prevention / promotion 
categories, saying that “different words mean different things to different people. For our 
purpose, I don’t think it’s all that important what we call it. It’s just there are commonalities 
among all the things we are talking about.” 

Roberts asked the participants to select their top three priorities from among the categories of 
ideas posted on the wall. One small group said that their top priority is treatment, because of 
the current shortage of available treatment options—a common concern of many participants. 

Another small group considered prevention to be the most important. Roberts said that she has 
heard about many communities wanting to do prevention work continually. This desire 
sometimes creates a complication, with communities feeling caught between doing proactive 
work and dealing with the reality of the situation in the specific community. Dr. Hynnes said 
that primary prevention, secondary prevention, and the consequences surrounding abuse all 
need to be looked at. 

In discussing the groupings of the points on the wall, one small group said that the heading of 
healing and wellness should be put with the heading “treatment development,” while the 
category “professional development” should go with “protocols / policies, linkages, and 
networking,” and “dialogue” needed to go with “education,” because research is important in 
providing education. Roberts said that ideas in research and evaluation are often missed, which 
she thinks is unfortunate, as they are vital when seeking funding.  

The participants also thought that a treatment development model is needed for individual 
communities. They returned to the problem of long waiting lists and the lack of treatment plans 
for communities. A community treatment model needs to be developed and put in place. 

A participant from Muskrat Dam asked why there are so few treatment centres in the area. 
Roberts said that the population has grown substantially, along with the need for treatment, 
and the treatment centre data do not always show that increase. In many cases, the treatment 
centres are not full, and there is a disconnect between the community and the treatment centre. 
Communities have frustrations when it comes to getting people to centres, and centres say there 
is a gap between treatment and detox. Some of the detox issues are also beyond the centres. 
Roberts then said that over the next few years, there will be changes in treatment, and a lot of 
the ideas on treatment development will be discussed at the NNADAP assessment.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 116


Dr. Hynnes said that the broader literature in addictions treatment has changed radically over 
the past two decades. NNADAP centres set up 25 years ago are still using the older treatment 
methods; meanwhile, the situation has changed significantly.  

The session ended with the participants happy with the categorization of their ideas under the 
relevant headings, as well as the top three priorities of treatment, prevention, and education 
they had selected. 

   Meeting 5
   Developing an action plan to combat the problem of prescription drug abuse

For this session, the facilitators divided the participants into three groups. Each group was to 
take an hour to draft an action plan to combat the problem of prescription drug abuse.  

       Group 1 was assigned Strategic Direction: Prevention / Promotion and Prevention / 
        Education, and Linkages, Networking, and Dialogue.  
       Group 2 worked on Strategic Direction: Protocols / Policies, and Accountability and 
        Professional Development.  
       Group 3 worked on an action plan for Treatment Development, and Healing and 
        Wellness.  
At the end of the hour, each group presented its plan to the room, outlining goals, actions to be 
taken, a time frame in which to carry out the proposed actions, and the people responsible to 
carry out the actions. 

   Strategic direction:
   Prevention / promotion and prevention / education and linkages, networking, and
   dialogue

   Goal #1: To reduce the incidence and prevalence of prescription drug abuse

        Actions: 
       Community forums 
       Information sessions 
       Public service announcements 
       Newsletters 
       Sharing circles for families affected by prescription drug abuse 
       Develop a life skills program that targets individuals, families, school, community, and 
        Elders (whole person orientation) 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 117

        Time frame: 1 year 
        Who: Forum—NNADAP, leadership; health director (to direct appropriate health staff) 
   Goal #2: To network at community, tribal, provincial, and federal levels in order to address the issue of
   prescription drug abuse within First Nations communities

        Actions: 
       Establish a health care panel at the community level (including justice) 
       Negotiate with Non Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program for alternatives 
       Develop research proposals for models of treatment 
       Develop a website 
        Time frame: 2 years 
        Who: Tribal councils, physicians, and FNIHB; website by SLFNHA 

   Strategic direction:
   Protocols / policies, and accountability and professional development

   Goal #1: To provide and develop proper orientation for health care professionals coming into First
   Nations communities

        Action: 
       Examine existing orientation packages (FNIHB, NOSM, physician groups) to ensure 
        culturally appropriate practices. 
        Time frame: ASAP, by February 2010 
        Who: Chiefs; SLFNHA; tribal councils; health officials; physician groups; Elders; nurses; FNIHB 
        frontline workers 
   Goal #2: To establish protocols for physicians and nurses providing health care services in First Nations
   communities

        Action: Develop a code of ethics to ensure access to health care. 
        Time frame: August 2009 
        Who: Chiefs; SLFNHA; tribal councils; health officials; physician groups; Elders; nurses; FNIHB 
        frontline workers 
   Goal #3: To have more physicians and specialists available to ensure adequate health care in
   communities

        Actions: 
       Recruit health professionals to meet identified needs of communities. 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 118


       Encourage children and youth to pursue health careers 
        Time frame: By February 2011 
        Who: Chiefs; SLFNHA; tribal councils; health officials; physician groups; Elders; nurses; FNIHB 
        frontline workers 
   Goal #4: To establish a narcotic administration policy

        Action: Develop a narcotic administration policy. 
        Time frame: By February 2010 
        Who: Chiefs; SLFNHA: tribal councils; health directors; frontline workers; physician groups; 
        Elders; pharmacists; FNIHB; NIHB Program  
   Goal #5: To create a secure transportation policy and procedures for prescription medicines, especially
   narcotics

        Action: Develop policy and procedures for secure transportation of narcotics. 
        Time frame: By February 2010 
        Who: Chiefs; Wasaya Airways; pharmacies; NAPS; health directors; tribal councils; physician 
        groups; Elders; FNIHB 
   Goal #6: To increase accountability of community workers involved in health-related programs

        Actions: 
       Review and update policies, procedures, and job descriptions 
       Training and orientation of staff 
        Time frame: By August 2009 
        Who: Chiefs; SLFNHA; tribal councils; health officials; frontline workers; Elders 

   Strategic direction:
   Treatment development, and healing and wellness

   Goal #1: To develop an appropriate treatment model to deal specifically with drug abuse

        Actions: 
       Develop models with community staff 
       Awareness development 
       Training needs 
       Accountability policies 
       Implement models of action 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 119

        Time frame: 1 year 
        Who: Nurses and hospitals; broader community; community health staff 
   Goal #2: To develop pre-treatment plans for treatment entry

        Actions: 
       Develop protocols for pre‐treatment, i.e., detoxification. 
       Consult with nurses, addictions specialists, and doctors for treatment direction. 
        Time frame: 1 year 
        Who: Nurses and hospitals; broader community; community health staff 
   Goal #3: To develop training / education strategies for frontlines workers, e.g., NNADAP health staff and
   nurses

        Actions: 
       Develop meetings and workshops 
       Education sessions / professional development 
        Time frame: Regular meetings 
        Who: Nurses and hospitals; broader community; community health staff 
   Goal #4: To develop political avenues and needs assessment for treatments that are lacking and that
   need to be addressed politically

        Action: Write letters to NAN and politicians on shortages and gaps in treatment options. 
        Time frame: Ongoing 
        Who: Health directors; staff; political leadership 
   Goal #5: To develop further networking opportunities

        Action: Hold regional meetings with NAN, health directors, staff, Elders, and community. 
        Time frame: Regular meetings 
        Who: Health directors; staff; political leadership 
   Goal #6: To develop a prevention program

        Actions: 
       Promotion posters 
       Workshops 
       Radio 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 120


       Classroom visits 
       Pamphlets  
        Time frame: Ongoing 
        Who: Health directors; staff; political leadership 
   Goal #6: To establish a community model treatment plan

        Actions: 
       One‐to‐one counselling 
       Family inclusiveness counselling 
       Sharing circles 
       Find supports for care 
        Time frame: Long‐term 
        Who: NNADAP; Mental Health and Wellness (MHW) 
   Goal #7: To develop an aftercare plan

        Actions: 
       Use other resources 
       Obtain chief and council approval 
        Time frame: Long‐term 
        Who: Pastors and church leaders; MHW; NNADAP; nurses; chiefs and councils; extended 
        family 
   Goal #8: To develop a specific treatment plan for prescription drug abuse

        Actions: 
       One‐to‐one counselling 
       Family therapy 
       Involve detox workers for professional safety 
        Time frame: Long‐term 
        Who: Counsellors; detox workers; extended family; Elders; church leaders 
In addition, Group 3 drew a diagram for continuation of health and support that placed the 
person with addictions and the community at the centre. The next surrounding circle included 
NNADAP and MHW staff, resource people such as the police and teachers, chiefs and council, 
and nurses and doctors. The final circle indicated that with no or minimal supports, most clients 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 121


relapse. Therefore, for continued recovery, they need the support systems of close and extended 
family, mental health workers, NNADAP staff, church leaders, and council. Aftercare is a must 
for success. 


   Breakout Group 3:
   Community Responsibility and Ownership
   FACILITATORS
   Cristine Rego
   Consultant
   Karen O’Gorman
   Consultant

   Meeting 4
   Discussion Question:
   Referring to the top three priorities (strategic actions), use the goal sheet to begin examining what
   specific steps should be taken to begin working on your three top initiatives. (Facilitators handed out the
   sheets.) Please record your thoughts and be prepared to hand them in for reading.

Cristine Rego opened the session by congratulating participants for their hard work and efforts 
on the previous day. She said that the vision statement that the group had developed had 
already been entered into the chiefs’ final “declaration.” 

The group was given a two‐page chart of the responses from the previous day’s session. This 
chart grouped the challenges preventing community responsibility and ownership into four 
major themes: Unhealthy Processes, Loss of Identity, Denial, and Fear.  

The participants were then told that the facilitators had examined all of the solutions presented 
in the previous session and grouped them under four categories: Education, Programs, Process, 
and Identity Building. The group was then instructed to select their three top priorities within 
each category. They were asked to further develop that priority by outlining the action required 
to implement it. The results of this exercise would ultimately be incorporated into the larger 
work plan.  

Rego described how the name of each category / column was selected and said that the 
participants could change any category heading if they thought it was inaccurate or 
inappropriate. To illustrate this process, she selected specific statements and the group reached 
a consensus on whether to leave the statement under the category that the facilitators had 
selected or move it to another category.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 122


The following is a summary of the statements that were selected and the group’s decision 
regarding the appropriate column under which to place them:  

   For the statement “drug‐free community through education and commitment,” the group 
    selected the column “Process.”  
   For the statement “education, community, and curriculum in schools,” the group selected 
    the column “Education.”  
   For the statement “visuals, facts, and guest speakers,” the group selected the column 
    “Education.”  
   For the statement “community‐driven processes to understand and admit the issues,” the 
    group selected the column “Process.”  
   For the statement “understanding the behaviours and the underlying issues that are 
    impacting that behaviour,” the group, after some discussion, settled on the column 
    “Education.” There was some discussion among participants who initially thought that the 
    statement belonged under “Programs,” as well as some who thought that it belonged under 
    “Identity Building.”  
   For the statement “march or rally to promote non‐tolerance of substance abuse,” the group 
    selected the column “Education.”  
There was some sporadic discussion in the larger group as participants engaged in this process. 
While the group debated the appropriate column for the statement regarding understanding 
issues that impact behaviour, Donna Roundhead stressed the importance of educating people 
on the issues. “You need to understand the root causes and then develop the processes to deal 
with them—dealing with grief, for example,” she said. 

The group also discussed how a march or rally in the community could be significant in 
expressing the community’s ownership of the prescription drug abuse issue. Pam Pitchenese 
echoed Chief Esther Pitchenese’s suggestion of this activity by stating that “it’s intended to 
raise awareness of where the community stands.”  

At the completion of this segment of the exercise, Rego instructed participants to select a 
specific goal and develop a strategy for the activity or activities that would need to be put into 
place to achieve that goal. As an illustration, she told participants that if their goal was 
education regarding underlying causes of behaviour, the activity to implement that might be 
hiring an expert in the field to educate people.  

Participants worked quietly in their groups for the remaining 30 minutes of the session. Because 
of the shortage of time before participants had to proceed to the next session, only two groups 
were able to report back on the result of their discussion.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 123

   Group 1

Goal: To develop a sense of understanding and knowledge within the whole community, to 
understand the issues regarding prescription drug abuse 

Activity: To provide training to frontline workers, crisis workers, counsellors, Elders, law 
enforcement, and school staff; to develop appropriate programs and make sure they are 
maintained through regular follow‐up and evaluation  
   Group 2

Goal: To create dialogue and sharing between all families in the community  

The group ran out of time at this point, and Rego said the remaining small groups would 
continue the process of reporting back on their identified goals and activities at the next 
breakout session.  

   Meeting 5
   Work plan development

For the first part of this session, the participants worked in small groups to prepare a work plan 
for the eventual elimination of prescription drug abuse. This work plan was to be applicable for 
all First Nation communities.  

To complete the work plan, the participants referred to the solutions for the challenges that 
were posted on cards at the front of the room under the four categories of Education, Programs, 
Process, and Identity Building. The goal was to come up with one goal and one action for each 
of the four categories. If they did not manage to finish all four categories in the available time, 
said Rego, they should present what they had worked on, since the feedback from all the 
groups would be combined into one overall work plan at the end of the session. 

Once the small group discussions ended, one person from each table presented what that 
group’s members had been able to complete of their work plan. 
   Group 1

The group members “looked at it from a different view,” said presenter Pam Pitchenese. They 
started off with the categories as goals and then decided to make the goals more specific. Under 
the Education category, the group thought a goal could be “teaching the community of the 
effects of abusing drugs,” and to do this they would use visual aids, such as posters. For help, 
they would “seek information from other First Nations,” as well as use other resources in their 
region.  




             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 124


Actions to achieve this educational goal need to be under way by March or April 2009. The 
work entails producing the visual aids and getting them out to every community. Frontline 
workers will oversee the distribution of the visual aids. Some basic training for staff is needed, 
and it can be offered by outside resource people, or preferably, other community members. 
Having a pharmacist or nurse to help out will be useful, especially in explaining the short‐ and 
long‐term effects of prescription drug abuse.  

The group then looked at the Process category. Pitchenese said that they agreed that addressing 
the grassroots issues and the needs in the community is paramount. In order to do this 
effectively, suggested the group, the community has to identify which needs to address first. 
This assessment needs to occur “before planning any programs,” Pitchenese said. “It would be 
like an engagement process and developing a needs assessment.” It encompasses identifying 
and mapping a community’s strengths and internal resources—for example, the traditional, 
cultural, and professional skills already in the community. Also, part of this will include 
quarterly meetings for the leadership. Useful tools are newsletters and the “moccasin 
telegraph.”  

Pitchenese said that “in order to move on, we have to do this. The people who can help will be 
the health portfolio and the council, heath directors, volunteers from community—and we must 
engage all staff and the community.”  

Identity Building was the final category that the group considered. The need is for the “Elders 
to speak about the community, what they have gone through personally, what they have been 
through as a community.” Pitchenese added that “this is an important part of the process, but 
finding a community identity involves education as well.” The process will be “a basic 
education on the effects of drugs and an engagement process to identify needs. Then that way 
we can develop a partial identity and programs, as we cannot do programs until we’ve done the 
engagement process.” 
   Group 2

Presenter Shirley Kielly said “the goal is to develop a sense of understanding and knowledge 
in regards to education.” The responsibility for education must be widespread throughout the 
community, not just rest with the leaders. Tactics include “hiring and doing training with 
frontline workers, crisis counsellors, and school counsellors,” and inviting guest speakers to 
participate in this training. Communities need a well‐developed awareness and consistent role 
models. The people to help in this process are the Elders and law enforcement personnel. 
Health care professionals and frontline workers in the community with the skills also have a 
role to play.  

The second category for the group was Process; their goal was to develop a community plan 
that addresses prescription drug abuse from the community’s perspective. “We need to support 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 125


and encourage members” in carrying out the plan. As needed, communities can engage outside 
resources such as the OPP, and “use local resources such as Aboriginal speakers, community 
volunteers, trained facilitators, and health directors.” 

Moving to the next category of Programs, Kielly said that “programs are needed in order to 
empower frontline workers, the chief and council, and community members to have a drug‐free 
community.” Specifically, programs are needed to teach parenting skills, along with 
“educational programs, GED school programs, welding and hunting programs, and programs 
that engage traditional leaders in the community to share skills, as well as cultural / traditional 
programs.” 

In discussing Identity Building, the final category, the group highlighted the revival of 
traditional language and culture as being of the greatest importance. Communities must 
therefore “use Elders and community members to teach.” 
   Group 3

This group focused on Identity Building, especially on the need to revive language and culture. 
Presenter Jeff Neekan said that they must “go into schools, merging programs from JK to 
Grade 3,” and relearn the language, because it “sets us apart from everybody else.”  

Also important in the identity of every community is “knowing the land” through land‐based 
activities. It is valuable to learn “where you are, demographics, and what each thing is called in 
your own language.” Neekan said that “age‐appropriate gatherings” give community members 
the opportunity to be more “involved in knowing each other and their own age‐group.”  

The group also viewed radio programming in Aboriginal languages as a useful tool in 
promoting identity. The people responsible for the initiative on identity building are members 
of the community who are knowledgeable about their culture; an education director can 
oversee the process. 

The group’s second goal was to “create awareness and maintain awareness.” They saw this 
being done through “community meetings, and frequent updates through posters. People 
involved will include “the community health representative, and all social / health staff can do 
the programming.” 

For the Process category, the group recommended “grassroots efforts, and community forums 
to promote pride and self‐esteem.” Neekan said there is a need to establish youth groups and 
Elder Committees, as well as to role‐model initiatives.  
   Group 4

Education requires “dialogue and sharing between all the leaders and families in the 
community,” said presenter Don Sofea. Tactics to achieve this goal include gaining trust and 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                   PAGE 126


building links between frontline workers and leaders. Leaders can increase their visibility by 
making “community home visits to families”; classroom visits are a useful tool as well. Leaders 
and frontline workers need to maintain a consistent dialogue. Monthly meetings are needed 
between the leaders and frontline workers so that they can stay current, plus the home visits 
and class visits should happen at least monthly. People involved will be the “chief, council, and 
frontline workers.” 

The group’s second goal concerned prescription drug awareness intervention and prevention. 
“We must use the community and council to teach traditional ways,” said Sofea. For example, 
the community can offer land‐based programs to target groups—such as youth—who can 
benefit from spending time on the land. “To teach a young person survival skills, teach them 
how to do it by listening to an Elder” first; then “give the youth one match, one rainy day,” and 
see if that individual is able to create a fire for him / herself.  

The group also discussed the important topic of aftercare. Participants suggested looking for the 
input of recovered addicts and setting up sharing circles. These approaches will aid in 
confidentiality. 
   Group 4

This group’s goal, said presenter Lorraine Crane, was to “develop protocols and processes from 
the community prospective.” The suggested tactics are “radio programming, community 
meetings, focus group meetings, workshops, professionals such as nurses, and doctors—if they 
have time.” The people involved will be the “council, health director, Elders, and other 
community members.” 

   Discussion

Pitchenese said, “Every community should know the process or [experience] the process of 
making the work plans . . . get the training done for the communities, then identify how you are 
to work at a problem by using this type of process.”  

Rego spoke about the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health (CAMH): “The community can 
ask us to come in, and we can walk you through it, and it’s free,” she said. Pitchenese suggested 
including CAMH in the work plan. Rego added, “The idea is that it is time to take ownership of 
our own problems.”  

The participants agreed that the three priority categories to be reported on in the final session 
are Identity Building, Education, and Programs. The Process category should be removed, 
because as Donna Roundhead suggested, “The process is going to be done anyway.” The 
wording for the educational goal can be “to develop an understanding and create an awareness 
of the prescription drug problem within the community,” said Rego. 


             SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 127


Pitchenese said, “You can’t develop programs if you don’t know what the needs are.” Rego 
responded, “We need to keep in mind to bring it back to prescription drug abuse; [we] have to 
bring it back to the original forum goal.” She said that the communities “can do a needs 
assessment, but make it more specific on prescription drug abuse—that fine‐tuned.”  

Roundhead commented: “Early identification of problems needs to be done and dealt with . . . 
quit waiting until the situation is out of control. We are reacting all the time. What gets us 
reacting is crisis; we need to move away from that and do prevention programs.” 

Lorraine Crane spoke of the people from her community who had attended the conference: 
“We came as a few representatives . . . our nurse and health director is here. . . . But I think one 
of our Elders should have been with us, because they have the knowledge.”  

Rego assured participants that after the conference, there will be “opportunities to give that 
feedback to the planning committee.” Solomon Mamakwa said that “this process needs to not 
be taken personally and to be supported. Although it may occur differently, we need to get 
away from blame.”  

The final session ended with the session participants unable to capture all of the goals and 
solutions in a concise few statements because of the lack of time. Therefore, they asked the 
facilitators to do this for them, with Jeff Neekan presenting the resulting document at the 
plenary discussion later that day. Rego would have the official version of the final draft, and if it 
was not previously provided to the conference planning committee, would make it available to 
them upon request.  


   Breakout Group 4:
   The Law and Security
   FACILITATORS
   Marty Singleton
   OPP Sergeant;
   North West Region Aboriginal Relations Team Coordinator;
   Eagle Lake First Nation
   Kevin Berube
   Director of Treatment Services
   Nodin Child and Family Intervention Services

   Meeting 4

At the beginning of the session, a complaint was jokingly raised: training the reserve dogs had 
not been included in the previous day’s summary of their discussions. 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 128


The group had formulated five directives based on question three of the February 11 Law and 
Security breakout sessions. Each directive is a strategic plan or goal for communities and 
individuals to assist police and combat problems with prescription drugs. Marty Singleton and 
Kevin Berube began the session by reposting them for the group to review: 

       Strong Screening and Security 
       Developing Our Policing Services 
       Innovative Approaches 
       Community Declarations to Be Drug‐Free and Promote First Nations Beliefs 
       Stronger Networking within the Community 
Singleton and Berube led the group through a brief vote to create a new directive order based 
on priorities. Due to time constraints, only a top three list was chosen. The revised list read as 
follows, in order of importance:  

       Stronger Networking within the Community 
       Community Declarations to Be Drug‐Free and Promote First Nations Beliefs 
       Developing Our Policing Services 
A participant jokingly suggested that training the reserve dogs should be the number one 
priority. During the vote, Norm Weiss of Wasaya Airways said that he “didn’t feel [he] should 
have a vote as [he] is not Aboriginal and doesn’t live on a reserve.”  

After the vote, the three teams began brainstorming ideas, working with one of the assigned 
headings. Berube stressed to them that they were trying to decide how they could implement 
the ideas that had been developed under the headings from the previous day. 

During the small group discussions, some participants moved onto a tangent and began talking 
about a recent news item from The Chronicle Journal. As it was relevant to the topic at hand, 
Singleton explained to the group what had occurred: the offender “was pulled over during the 
RIDE program, and she had been drinking, had open liquor, which allowed them to go into the 
vehicle, and they searched it and found drugs.” She received a six‐month conditional sentence. 

A participant asked, “What does her sentence mean?” Singleton responded, “There probably is 
probation, but she may also be under house arrest . . . if she has a problem with alcohol they 
may have conditions where she cannot be in a bar . . . however, if she breaks any of those 
conditions she will go straight to jail. There’s no court appearance, you just go straight to jail.” 
He continued, “Just for your information too . . . these individuals are smart, they know the law 
. . . she told the officers that she was going to hide the pills underneath her breasts.” Berube said 
that it was a “relatively light sentence for something that was so serious,” and several 
participants agreed with this opinion. 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 129


Discussions were ongoing throughout the time allotted. Singleton and Berube told the group 
that they would resume work on this project in the following session. 

   Meeting 5

The facilitators asked, “While we may not have everything in place, how can we reach our 
goals?” Two groups contributed to the discussion, and one group brainstormed amongst 
themselves. 

The facilitators asked the participants to answer the question “What are some things that can be 
done to reduce the policing challenges in your community?” The group created the following 
chart at the front of the room, with one strategic direction and four goals: 
   Towards Innovative Approaches to Reduce Prescription Drug Abuse

       Community health programs to reduce prescription drug abuse by providing alternative 
        drugs—for example, clonidine treatment 
       Amnesty program before consequences 
       Random drug testing 
       Awareness walk 
The participants highlighted the reality that most of their communities have small populations. 
When police receive drug intelligence, it is important to ensure that tips are kept anonymous. It 
is easy for police to identify the pushers, but tackling them is difficult. The participants also 
stressed the importance of restoring harmony by incorporating the restorative justice system. 

In addition, the participants discussed organizing community‐wide prescription drug 
awareness walks. Awareness walks are achievable and inexpensive, and require no funding. 
Participants enthusiastically embraced the idea of awareness walks and said that “it could be 
done tomorrow.”  

One participant suggested that walks could be done for three months and then amnesty 
programs could be commenced. Amnesty programs could include not only prescription drugs 
but all drugs. The participants thought that amnesty programs are positive and want to gather 
more information about their legal requirements. Amnesty programs have been initiated in 
Canada and the United States. 

Another tactic to achieve the goal of amnesty is to look at awareness walks as a way to turn in 
drugs. A participant said, “We know who the drug dealers are, and we could run a program of 
awareness first so that drug dealers and abusers can get the message that their behaviour is 
unacceptable and that there will be consequences. Drug dealers would fear the community 
much more than they would fear the police. This would be a chance for drug dealers to give in 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 130


all drugs and gain the respect of the community. The community is a tool to come down on 
drug dealers rather than the courts.”  

Norm Weiss added, “This also helps people turn a new page in their life.” The participants 
agreed that amnesty before consequences programs offer an incentive to change without harsh 
legal outcomes. The impacts of poverty were also noted; the socioeconomic factors in 
impoverished communities are major challenges. 

Community health and treatment programs for methadone and clonidine involve a weaning 
process. Participants noted that it often takes four months of using alternative drugs to get 
people off prescription drugs. Community health programs and the two pharmacies in Sioux 
Lookout have examined privacy issues. For example, the pharmacists can identify “people at 
risk” of prescription drug abuse and report them to the police, nurses, and health practitioners. 

The idea of having a community health fair or awareness gathering to spread the anti‐drug 
message is another tactic. John Domm said it is important to deal with “reaction and 
prevention.” A community‐based event has the potential to prevent prescription drug abuse in 
the first place. Police could attend health fairs to help bring more awareness to community 
members. Weiss said that “recruiting survivors of drug abuse from within a community to 
share their stories” is another avenue to prevent prescription drug abuse. When people who 
legitimately need drugs know about the potential danger of unsafe storage, they choose not to 
store large quantities of pills at home. 

The participants supported health programs that offer prevention and identified the problem of 
doctors over‐prescribing drugs. A participant said, “It is one thing to find an alternative to those 
who are hooked on this, but doctors play a role in prescribing this medicine and getting people 
hooked.” Doctors need to look at alternatives when responding to patients’ needs. Once again, 
the idea of prevention was explored as a way of helping communities. 

Berube said, “There are incentives for doctors by pharmaceutical companies, and doctors often 
get paid to promote a certain type of drug.” Zacharius Tait said, “We should have those 
pharmaceutical companies come to our communities so that they can see the effects.” Domm 
suggested that perhaps pharmaceutical companies could fund a clinic or treatment program. 
Many participants commented that clinic programs should include support for the patient, the 
family members, and the entire community. 

Participants suggested initiating an incentive plan to encourage people to stop abusing 
prescription drugs. For example, communities might see a reduction in prescription drug abuse 
if abusers could receive $5,000 if they were to become drug‐free. Another idea is to ask 
businesses to donate items that could be awarded to those who are now drug‐free; many 
businesses are involved with First Nations, and it would be easy to get air tickets from Wasaya 
Airways, spa gift certificates, hotel vouchers from the Valhalla Inn, and other prizes. A 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 131


participant said community program workers could make “healthy living packages” for 
recovered drug users. 

The participants agreed that although it is difficult to promote healthy lifestyles, it is important 
to motivate people to live healthily. A participant said, “Statistics suggest that the most effective 
target group is youth from a health perspective and that youth are most at risk of becoming 
addicted.” Weiss said, “Community members need to speak out and reach out to the youth.” 
This idea also fits with traditions such as storytelling. Another participant said that “social 
development is a key element of reducing prescription drug abuse.” Weiss added, “A proven 
method of helping people is looking inside of yourself and sharing how drugs impacted your 
life. . . . Tell your stories.” 

Berube offered the idea of giving job opportunities as a part of an incentive program. A 
participant said, “The casino fund could be given to a training program for those who want to 
upgrade their employable skills.”  

Domm said that structured programs that promote voluntarism and reconnection with the 
community could be another option. A participant said, “The heart of the question is what 
motivates an addict to reform. If dealers are used to making a certain amount of money each 
month, how can we replace their expected income? The sole and only purpose of drug dealing 
seems to be financial gain.”  

Another participant said that when students from his community go to Thunder Bay to attend 
high school, they often get involved with or exposed to the “big fish,” who use the students to 
make more money, expanding the supply of drugs in the region. A participant asked, “What 
would be a financial incentive for these ‘big fish’? They may be permanent players in this 
problem.” 

During the breakout session discussions, OPP Superintendent Ron Van Straalen, Regional 
Commander, entered the room and was introduced by Singleton. Van Straalen wanted to wish 
the group all the best in combating prescription drug abuse and shared his commitment to their 
efforts. He said, “It is in your best interests and our best interests to reduce the incidence of 
prescription drug abuse.” 

An additional approach to reduce prescription drug abuse is to integrate cultural and faith‐
based programming. A participant said that “quick fixes and putting all your eggs in one basket 
should be avoided when it comes to combating drug abuse.” Participants stressed that lifelong 
support treatment is important.  

A participant said, “Do not just send a recovered addict home; deal with the whole community 
and provide ongoing support after addiction.” The participants also agreed that it is important 
to raise awareness of prescription drug abuse at the community level. A participant suggested 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 132


holding a wilderness camp for six months so that prescription drug abusers could learn about 
healthy lifestyles. 

The participants explored the option of imposing random drug testing in their communities. 
Billy Joe Strang said that “random drug testing would not be endorsed by Health Canada.” 
Participants considered the ramifications for people who refuse to get tested; they may be 
refused entry into their communities.  

“Drug testing is draconian,” said Domm. Ultimately, the participants agreed that random drug 
testing is too tough to implement, unconstitutional, and too personal, and is also unreliable, as 
drugs such as marijuana only last in the bloodstream for a short period. Overall, random drug 
testing may only be applicable in some cases and will not be helpful in most communities. 

From a networking perspective, a participant said to “make connections with other 
organizations across Canada” in order to reduce prescription drug abuse. Domm said, “This is 
not a local problem and it impacts many people.” Participants underscored that community 
members need to know the signs of drug abuse.  

Other awareness initiatives may include a national campaign against prescription drug abuse. 
Participants brainstormed that Health Canada, electronic media outlets, the Aboriginal Peoples 
Television Network (APTN), Nishnawbe Aski Nation, and K‐Net could be involved. Local 
organizations could take the lead by working to make prescription drug abuse unattractive and 
provide education on how it impacts communities. Another idea is to publish drug dealers’ 
pictures in the newspaper, to use the power of social stigma against drug dealers.  

The group decided to present their plan to the larger group during the afternoon. 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 133


   Breakout Group 5:
   The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face
   FACILITATORS
   Barbara Bowes
   President, Legacy Bowes Group
   Frankie Misner
   First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
   Larry Jourdain
   Nishnawbe-Aski Legal Services

   Meeting 4

Barbara Bowes started the session. She said that James Cutfeet had been called away to 
participate in another activity and she would lead facilitation, along with Frankie Misner and 
Larry Jourdain.  

Cards listing the themes generated in the previous session were posted around the room. The 
cards included all those themes identified in the afternoon session on Wednesday, not only the 
cards from the themes determined to be priorities. The themes and supporting points are as 
follows: 
   1. Community ownership

       Ownership 
       Participate / involvement 
            Accept change 
            Ownership 
       Lots of communication 
            Various media 
       Accountability 
            Set an example 
            Sober / clean 
            Healthy lifestyle 
            Skills 
       Involve the whole community in all aspects 
            Recognize positions 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 134


       Obtain strong community mandate to enforce community law (BCR) 
   2. Celebration of strengths

       Openness to both Christian and traditional beliefs 
   3. Increased communication

       Provide support by giving facts, information, knowledge, statistics so the leaders will be 
        effective (briefing notes) 
       Call a general meeting of membership to  
            Set up support system for council and chiefs (e.g., Elders council, youth council) 
            Give full mandate to council and chiefs to address drug abuse, e.g., BCR 
       Improve communication: attend project meetings with leaders and managers of each 
        program 
       Provide correspondence 
       Accept parental responsibility and turn it back to the people to be responsible: teach not 
        to be dependent 
   4. More support of leadership

       Stand and support leadership 
            Form a general task force of the resource people to support the leadership 
       Voice: take a stand, be repetitive on the same topic, be strong / firm, support freedom of 
        choice 
       To have strong leadership 
       To be more vocal 
       To work together / teamwork 
       To keep traditional / go back to the time it was before 
            To speak with and support each other 
            To agree to our leaders only if all people agree 
       Get people together and brainstorm 
       Skill to lead 
       Leaders have to be transparent and informative to members 
       Traditions 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 135

   5. Effective recommendations

       When you are developing new policies for the community, get legal advice as to how 
        effective it would be within the Indian Act guidelines. 
       Support the chief and council when they are enforcing bylaws 
       Provide visible and active support in their field of work 
       Leadership retreat 
            Set priorities 
            Visioning  
            Establish roles and responsibilities 
       Develop strategies and protocols 
            Awareness 
            Counselling / debriefing 
            Help families use money for food for kids 
       Chief & council must access funding and resources (treatment centres) to open 
        methadone clinics to help addicts to kick their habits.  They can’t quit cold turkey 
       Form committee to oversee the chief and council to 
            Follow the oath of office 
            Be accountable: all band employees must be drug‐free; membership must agree to 
             zero tolerance to drugs and dealers 
       Provide recommendations 
       Just do it! 
   6. Increased strength / creativity

       Be strong, be creative 
       Be creative when dealing with policies. To a certain degree, we could bend policies to 
        make things happen and stay focused to the mandate. Need ultimate results 
       Support 
            Be part of the solution 
            Communication: consistent 
            Ongoing dialogue with caregivers 
       “Tough love” 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 136


            Community members must support chief and council  
            Some actions initiated require no parental interference 
            Show no compassion during tough times: court, when they need money 
Bowes said that the task for the morning’s sessions was to create a work plan. She asked 
participants to review the posted topics to be sure they were still priorities, and then select the 
topic they wanted to work with. These topics would be strategic areas. Participants would 
develop a work plan, with specific goals mapped to each strategic area. 

Participants grouped themselves according to the strategic direction they were interested in. In 
their groups, participants discussed each of the supporting points to see whether they were still 
good ideas. Participants then developed a work plan using the materials provided. For each 
strategic area, they listed goals, and for each goal, they listed tactics and date, and specified who 
would be responsible for carrying it out. 

   Meeting 5

The session continued with individual groups focusing on one of four target areas: 

       Toward: increased communications 
       Toward: increased strength and creativity 
       Toward: supportive leadership 
       Toward: increased community ownership 
A fifth target area—Toward: effective recommendations—was identified, but not worked on. 

The objective for each small group was to come up with a work plan that included specific 
goals, tactics, timelines, and people who should be involved. A designated speaker from each of 
the four working groups presented the results near the end of the session. 

   Toward: Increased communications

   PRESENTER
   Dean Cromarty
   Wunnumin Lake First Nation
   Goal #1: Leadership stability and continuity

To achieve this goal, Cromarty’s group thought they should develop community election codes, 
in consultation with the people. A designated Election Code Committee could be struck within 
each community. Cromarty said the committee should be selected by the community, and not 
by the current leadership. 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 137

   Goal #2: Leadership transparency and accountability

Leaders should hold regular (monthly, quarterly, annual) meetings and assemblies. This would 
improve communications between the chief and council and the people. Cromarty said 
community members could show support of the leadership by attending these meetings. 
   Goal #3: Leadership accessibility

Cromarty said his group made the point that people need to have access to their chief and 
council members, so they can discuss issues with them. Leaders need to be accessible to 
community members.  
   Goal #4: Establish better community working relationships

Sometimes there is a need to improve working relationships between the chief and council 
members themselves, or between council and staff, said Cromarty. “We recommend we create a 
Council Advisory Group. It would be made up of council members, Elders, youth, women, etc.”  
   Goal #5: Leadership must share information with the people

Leaders must do a better job of sharing information with the community at large. Cromarty’s 
group recommended several actions: 

       Holding community meetings 
       Distributing meeting reports 
       Going on TV and radio, and sending out newsletters 
       Conducting home visits with people 
       Participating in community workshops 
   Goal #6: Treat everyone equally

Cromarty said sometimes people do not support council decisions and actions, because they 
perceive that not everyone is treated equally. “For instance, at the airport, sometimes some 
people don’t get searched because they are prominent members of council. That really doesn’t 
sit well with everyone. If the chief and council want the support of the people, they have to treat 
everyone the same.” 
   Goal #7: Intercommunity relations

The group said better communications are needed both within each community, as well as 
between different communities. Cromarty’s group recommended establishing a Nishnawbe 
Aski Nation (NAN) protocol for information sharing among communities around the issues of 
drugs and alcohol abuse.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 138

   Toward: Increased strength and creativity

   PRESENTER
   Chief Celia Echum
   Ginoogaming First Nation
   Goal #1: Community mandate

Chief Celia Echum said her group thought the key was for communities to take ownership of 
the prescription drug abuse problem. “We know that in our communities, there are people who 
are saying there is no problem. Those are the people who have to come together to reach a 
consensus that there is a problem.” 

Echum’s group said the community must be empowered to take action. She suggested that 
chiefs and councils should use traditional forms of justice, such as banishment, while awaiting 
decisions from provincial or federal law courts. 
   Goal #2: Communication and education

Echum identified a need for an open dialogue on the effects of prescription drugs and 
painkillers. People need to understand the dangers of abusing these powerful drugs. They also 
need to understand when it is appropriate to use them. Health professionals also need to be 
more involved in this education process. 

Echum’s group said communities must have access to better counselling services. There also 
needs to be a stronger focus on trust and honesty. “This has to be put in place to become a 
healthy community,” said Echum. “If you as a leader go on preaching that ‘you shouldn’t do 
this’, you have to do what you preach. Do not go around and say ‘don’t do drugs,’ and then 
turn around and do drugs yourself. You can’t do the opposite of what you say. You have to be a 
role model.” 
   Goal #3: Focus on heritage

Aboriginal communities need to return to their traditional ways, said Echum. There needs to be 
a revival of traditional methods of solving problems. “A lot of us don’t follow what we grew up 
with—Christianity and some of our traditional teachings. My father never hit us when we were 
growing up. He disciplined us with legends. He used legends to teach, and I think that should 
be brought back.” 

The group identified the need for positive role models, the promotion of healthy lifestyles, and 
a return to a more traditional way of life. She said a lot of Aboriginal people have lost 
connection to where they came from. “Going out in the bush, living off the land, hunting and 
trapping, fishing. We can’t teach these things to our kids if we don’t know them ourselves.” 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 139


The pain of drug abuse is a symptom of the greater pain of being trapped on the reserves, said 
Echum. The land allotted to Aboriginal people is like “leftover land,” with few resources and 
limited possibilities. She said her people have to fight to benefit from the resources that should 
be rightfully theirs, and this is part of the root cause of the current prescription drug abuse 
problem. 

   Toward: Supportive leadership

   PRESENTER
   Cecilia Begg
   Council Member
   Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation
   Goal #1: Form a group or task force of the resource people to support the leadership

Cecilia Begg’s group dealt with how to support the community’s leaders so they can take the 
necessary actions. They suggested getting key people together to form a task force that can 
brainstorm about issues. They also thought this group could help develop leadership ability 
among the people and promote traditional / spiritual skills. 
   Goal #2: Stand and support leadership on decisions

The group said it is important for members of the community to take a stand and voice their 
support for the leadership. “We must learn to speak up and support each other, and work 
together to build teamwork,” said Begg.  

   Toward: Increased community ownership

   PRESENTER
   Chief Arthur Moore
   Constance Lake First Nation
   Goal #1: Take ownership by instituting our own governance on justice, tradition, social cultural
   teachings, and restorative justice

Chief Arthur Moore’s group said their communities needed to look to traditional ways of 
justice and cultural teachings. They said a number of initiatives are already under way in 
various communities, tribal councils, and provincial / territorial organizations (PTOs). These 
should be supported and “fast‐tracked.” But there is also a need to take matters step by step, 
and to actually follow through with plans. “Many times we talk and talk and talk, but where’s 
the action? We need to do something to implement these plans.” 

Moore said it is easy to get overwhelmed with the immensity of the problem, so it is important 
for the chief and council to remain focused. Sometimes, this means delegating certain tasks to 
others and then encouraging them to follow through. 

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 140

   Goal #2: Deal with past issues openly so we can move forward

“We need to break away from the bondage of the ‘residential school syndrome.’ And we need 
to deal with abuse within families such as incest and the need for closure,” Moore said.  

Moore’s group said the devastation of residential schools is still being felt. Communities need 
support from health care professionals like psychiatrists. He said communities need to realize 
that money is not healing. To move forward, they must learn to deal with “the demons” of the 
past. 
   Goal #3: To participate and get involved with the community and programs

Moore said that Aboriginal people need to reach out to different sectors and to become involved 
in education, social development, and recreation.  

He told the story about how his five‐year‐old son had come home from school one day with the 
drawing of four Aboriginal heads on a pole.  

“At the bottom it said ‘savages.’ I asked him why he wrote that, and he said he learned it in 
school. I was surprised, so rather than let it go, I went to see the principal. I told him, ‘That’s got 
to stop.’” This interaction led to a change in the school’s curriculum.  

Moore’s group recommended that community leaders involve themselves more in changing the 
mindset of educators and others. Stronger emphasis on Aboriginal values, culture, and 
spirituality is needed. 
   Goal #4: Inventory skills and identify gaps to expand these skills

The group said bands should conduct a survey to evaluate what skills already exist within their 
current staff. Strengths and weaknesses should be identified, and upgrading training should be 
implemented. 
   Goal #5: Role modelling

Moore said his group wanted to see more positive role models for the communities. They 
recommended bringing in Aboriginal speakers who had successfully overcome drug addiction.  

“We also need to teach the younger generation how to show positive affections—to say I love 
you,” he said. “We have to teach ourselves to be open in our expressions and show affection.” 
   Goal #6: Obtain strong community mandate

BCRs need to be enforced within the community, said Moore, through community 
consultations, one‐on‐one meetings, group discussions, and media campaigns. Leaders should 
use referendums and declarations, and they should get out and talk to people directly.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 141


“In my community, when my council decides to do something, we all agree to visit a certain 
number of homes so we can talk to the people about the issue,” he said. “We knock on their 
doors, give them a pamphlet and talk to them, rather than just dropping it into their mailbox. I 
think it’s important that we have that dialogue one on one—it’s more meaningful.” 
   Goal #7: Start recognizing positive activities and people

Communities should recognize people who are doing positive things through awards and 
incentives, said Moore. Holding special feasts or gatherings to recognize these people would 
help encourage positive behaviour. 
   Goal #8: Be more transparent and accountable

Community leaders, such as the chief and council, need to be role models, said Moore’s group. 
This means being sober, having a healthy lifestyle, and being open and available to community 
members. 

Moore told how he had befriended a neighbourhood boy who was without a father. On one trip 
into town with the youth, they stopped for lunch. “You know how kids are nowadays; they 
wear hoods that conceal their face. So I asked him, ‘Why are you doing that?’ He didn’t say a 
word, so I pulled it off and said, ‘You know, you’re handsome.’ He looked at me and started 
smiling and nodded.” 

Moore said leaders have to learn to reach out to the youth. Leaders must have meaningful 
dialogue with all people in their community. 
   Goal #9: Keep youth active in the area of recreation and workshops

Communities need to provide workshops for their youth, to foster positive interactions with 
leaders. Youth also need good recreation opportunities.  

Moore said it is important to promote sports like hockey, basketball, and volleyball, and to 
build the necessary facilities. He acknowledged that facilities such as arenas are expensive, 
especially to maintain and operate, but communities could look at negotiating funding 
arrangements with mining companies that want to operate in their areas.  
   Goal #10: Promote cultural activities

“We forget about our past, our way of doing things, legends, storytelling. I think we should 
bring that back and start exercising those kinds of traditions,” said Moore. 

Communities can be fortified and protected from problems like prescription drug abuse by 
returning to traditional spiritual teachings, he said. He gave an example from his own 
community where a half‐day per week is now spent teaching kids how to snare rabbits, travel 
in the bush, and listen to a traditional legend read by an Elder. 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 142

   Goal #11: Promote positive lifestyles

Communities need to engage existing groups, such as churches, that promote positive lifestyle 
choices. Leaders also need to engage various demographics within the community, and target 
them appropriately.  

Moore told the story about how they would hold general meetings, and the youth would “sit on 
their hands” while the Elders did all the talking. So Moore said they started holding meetings 
just for the youth. That got the young people engaged and interested. 




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 143




   Plenary Discussion for Planning Committee 2

Emcee Wally McKay introduced the final plenary, in which summaries of the second day of the 
Breakout Session discussions were presented.  

   Breakout Group 1:
   The Abuse of Prescription Drugs Affecting All Ages
   PRESENTER
   Judy Desmoulin
A group member began the presentation by saying that their group’s primary idea was that 
“changes need to be made,” specifically in the areas of community, education, and awareness. 
Within the community, the chiefs need to ensure that everyone receives more education on the 
issues of prescription drug abuse. The education system should implement mandatory drug 
awareness training. “For a healthy community, we have to start dealing with the issues,” she 
said. One way is for the community to provide programs, workshops, and services. For 
example, the community can implement and run life skills programs. Other possible programs 
are those addressing mental health, such as the “Healing the Inner Child” program.  

Presenter Judy Desmoulin said that a strong message to the leadership is that communities 
need more lines of communication. Community members have ideas, solutions, and 
suggestions for problems. Leaders should feel comfortable talking with community members 
about their ideas, and should provide forums for them to do so. To stimulate community 
involvement and activity, the chiefs and councils can visit residents in their homes. If chiefs and 
council members cannot do this, other suggestions are to have other band members visit; do 
outreach to the community through the community radio station (if one is available); and send 
messages home with students from school. It is possible to reach practically every home. 

Desmoulin provided the example of the “Family Strategy Plan” from her own community, 
Longlac #58. Her community made an open call for 10 families to come forward and participate 
in a program. The program’s goal was to teach each family to become a healthier and stronger 
unit. Within 24 hours of making the open call, 14 families had responded from the community 
of approximately 100 families, indicating the community wanted positive change. The program 
offered programs in lateral violence, parenting, literacy, and numeracy. However, the limited 
funds meant they could only service 14 to 18 families. 

Often, many communities do not have immediate places to send people at risk. Desmoulin 
described the situation in her community, where if an individual is at high risk for suicide, that 
person is unable to go for immediate help. The counselling services are full, and have an 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 144


average waiting list of three months. She said leaders should lobby for more resources to 
change the problem. The leaders and the community must use the resources wisely; careful 
planning must happen before resources are used.  

Desmoulin said chiefs and councils should adopt policies, guidelines, and resolutions to 
address the issues in the community. The leadership should stand behind these policies and 
ensure they are followed through. Infrastructure can also help the communities. Suggestions for 
new infrastructure to benefit the community included recreational facilities, youth centres, and 
Elder centres. Leadership needs to do extensive lobbying and resource searching to be able to 
implement these facilities within the community.  

   Breakout Group 2:
   Current Support Systems (Health and Others)

The presenter, a session participant, said that within the community, prevention, promotion, 
and education are all needed as treatment approaches in tackling prescription drug abuse.  

Communication and education are important for treatment. The community staff, the medical 
staff including nurses and doctors, and individual community members must educate 
themselves on the various drugs and the different treatment methods. The community can 
develop protocols, policies, and accountability, and learn what treatments are available. The 
community should examine and study the treatments, and then activate those treatments that 
seem most relevant to their situation.  

The concepts of healing and wellness need promoting within the community and including in 
any treatment development plan. Treatment development is a broad area that mostly addresses 
treatments that are available and accessible for individual clients and community members. 

The presenter outlined some preliminary goals for communities to consider: 

       Reduce the incidence and prevalence of prescription drug abuse in communities. 
       Network at the community, tribal, and federal levels to address the problem in First 
        Nation communities.  
       Have more medical professionals to visit First Nation Communities. 
       Establish a narcotics policy. 
       Increase the accountability of workers. 
       Develop appropriate treatment models. 
       Develop appropriate pre‐treatment and treatment plans.  
       Conduct a community needs assessment 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 145


       Develop a prevention program to discourage people from taking their first drug. 
       Create a detox facility. “There is a shortage of them in the region.” 
       Expand on the education program within the community.  
       Research prescription drug abuse, and ways to address the problem in the community.  

   Breakout Group 3:
   Community Responsibility and Ownership
   PRESENTER
   Jeff Neekan
Identity building was the top priority for this group. Presenter Jeff Neekan said that reviving 
language and culture is vital. Suggested approaches are to offer land‐based activities; identify 
Elders and individuals able to teach Aboriginal culture and skills; ask Elders to speak about the 
community and its history; provide support groups for the community; and in the schools, 
provide language immersion from junior kindergarten to grade 3.  

Neekan said that reviving language and culture is possible to start in small steps. For example, 
by July 2009, the Elders can start teaching the community about its history and what it has gone 
through. Teaching the community about its past can be done with the help of volunteers from 
the community and community staff with cultural knowledge. 

The second priority the group discussed was education for the community on the effects of 
using drugs. A community should seek information from other First Nation communities that 
are doing this type of education. Involving pharmacists, nurses, and other health care 
professionals in this education is recommended—though they will need training first. An 
education program for the community on the negative effects of drugs can ideally be created by 
the fall of 2009.  

Educating the community will also increase understanding and awareness of the serious issues 
underlying prescription drug abuse. Community programs can help address these underlying 
issues.  Programs can be tailored to teach parenting skills, trade skills such as carpentry and 
welding, cultural awareness, and traditional skills such as hunting and fishing. 

The group also suggested a number of strategies to improve communication within the 
community on the issues with prescription drugs: (1) create a dialogue between community 
members; (2) have leaders accessible to the community by having them visit homes; (3) ensure a 
dialogue between leaders and frontline workers; and (4) create posters, hold community 
meetings, and give regular updates. Ideally, the initial steps in this plan, such as monthly 
meetings, can be enacted immediately. The chief, the council, and the staff of social programs 
can help to enact this.  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 146


   Breakout Group 4:
   The Law and Security
   PRESENTERS
   Jackie George
   Zacharius Tait
The group developed and prioritized four strategic directions: 

       Community networking 
       Community declaration, to address the prescription drug abuse issue 
       Development of police services within the community, to reduce prescription drug 
        abuse 
       Development of innovative approaches to reducing prescription drug abuse 
Developing innovative approaches to the reduction of prescription drug abuse is a broad topic, 
but one goal is to create community health programs. Health services and health authorities can 
provide community information sessions on healthy alternatives; offering alternatives to highly 
addictive drugs will decrease prescription drug abuse. In addition, some drugs have similar 
effects but are less addictive. One suggestion is to set up a system for dispensing drugs through 
nursing stations. Patients can come on a weekly basis to pick up their prescription, enabling 
health care workers to monitor drug intake and effectiveness. This approach would also allow 
health care workers to interact more with community members.  

Another innovative approach is to implement awareness initiatives, such as walks to raise 
awareness of prescription drug abuse. Such initiatives can happen with “operational dollars” 
and a group of community volunteers. One participant related his experience with an 
awareness walk in his community. A group of about 150 community members walked around 
the community and stood silently in front of each drug dealer’s house. The strategy was 
effective, because it told the dealers that community members know who they are and disagree 
with their actions.  

Also worth considering is the creation of an amnesty program that promotes dropping charges 
if an individual brings in a contraband substance by a certain date. After that specified date, the 
law will be upheld and charges will be laid. An amnesty program gives people the opportunity 
to begin the process of quitting. It also demonstrates that the community leaders are working 
toward the community being drug‐free. Incentive programs can also help to reduce prescription 
drug abuse. For example, businesses can offer promotion packages and employment 
opportunities; having another source of income might encourage dealers to stop dealing. 
Money earmarked for the community can also be redirected to drug treatment programs.  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 147


The chief and council, the community, and the police should organize awareness meetings with 
specific agendas. These meetings should be held quarterly and may incorporate health fairs. 
Police officers, community members, and government personnel, especially in health services 
can participate in organizing such meetings.  

Another goal is to link the police into the community better, to bridge the trust gap. Resource 
groups consisting of police officers, child welfare workers, youth crisis intervention workers, 
pastors, church workers, and the like can be established. These resource groups could meet 
monthly, and then report on their work to the community every quarter. The chief and council 
should be involved with this as well.  

To achieve the goal of developing services will require additional education, intervention, and 
rehabilitation, and the integration of traditional and other spiritual practices. External services 
such as hospitals, airlines, and other forms of transportation need to be better networked with 
the police and the local health services. Elders, the chief and council, and pastoral services can 
help enact a plan for developing services.  

Presenter Jackie George turned to the topic of developing resources for reducing prescription 
drug abuse. Proposed solutions include educating police officers about the local community so 
that they understand it better. Officers should receive training on local languages, and 
communities can make a commitment to teach officers about the local culture.  

For band constables and peacekeepers, a program should be established that would enforce 
band bylaws and resolutions. Networking with other police services will permit them to jointly 
lobby for additional needed funding. The community should also support auxiliary officers by 
providing equipment, training, and funding. To achieve funding and support, political leaders 
should work with the community. 

Presenter Zacharius Tait spoke about the notion of a community declaration on the need to 
reduce prescription drug abuse. Also needed are improving communication, promoting culture 
and language, creating an oath for police and First Nations on protecting the community, 
building the community’s trust of the police, working toward a treatment centre, and 
developing new technologies and innovative approaches.  

Trusting the police is key to providing better services. Communities need to feel safe when 
talking with the police. The police should make their presence known by driving or walking 
around the community, organizing ride‐alongs, and arranging school visits, for example. The 
police should also take an oath consisting of a generic allegiance statement that recognizes First 
Nations’ governance. The chief and council and the police should enact this oath immediately.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 148


A treatment centre can be built centrally, with Sioux Lookout as the suggested location. The 
available treatment centres have long wait‐lists, resulting in many people not receiving the 
needed help. A treatment centre will also create employment opportunities for the community.  

New technologies and innovative approaches include ways to deter prescription drug 
trafficking in communities. Methods include purchasing a passenger and luggage scanner 
(although this is costly); running a pilot project in Sioux Lookout or Thunder Bay; installing 
drug detection machines in municipal airports; and purchasing wand scanners for detecting 
prescription drugs and narcotics.  

Tait concluded, “With prescription drugs, we face tribulations.” Despite the difficulties, “we 
provide care and respect for those suffering. There’s hope for them.” 

   Breakout Group 5:
   The Role of Leaders and the Political Challenges They Face
   PRESENTER
   Larry Jourdain
Larry Jourdain explained that Chief Arthur Moore was originally scheduled to do this 
presentation, but was unable to attend. 

Jourdain said the most important aspect to remember is for “our communities to take 
ownership of our institutions,” particularly those of governance and social and cultural justice. 
A “step‐by‐step approach,” with smaller, more obtainable goals, will ultimately benefit the 
larger end goal.  

However difficult to do, the community needs to openly deal with past issues, so that the 
community can move forward. Jourdain drew a parallel with the Humpty Dumpty nursery 
rhyme: “If we discuss the issues openly, then we’re going to shatter—but you need to go 
through it” to see positive change.  

All community members and leaders are accountable for the prescription drug problem, as the 
responsibility does not lie with one side. All community members should act as role models of a 
healthy lifestyle and cooperative living. Leaders should leave a positive impression on the 
younger population in particular by being accessible and transparent.  

Increasing the strength and creativity of the community is a goal. Creating a community 
mandate with a declaration will help the community accept ownership of its problems. Before it 
can do this, the community needs education on the effects, implications, and prevalence of 
prescription drug abuse and misuse. This education should not be limited to one social or age 
group, because prescription drug abuse cuts across all ages and all levels in society.  


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 149


The community needs to support its leaders on their decisions on the health and safety of the 
community.  Establishing a resource group or “task force” of people with a range of skills and 
abilities who can advise the leaders will make for a stronger community.  The community also 
needs to be socially tolerant.  People of different faiths need to understand that toleration will 
contribute to the community’s strength and success. 

Wally McKay thanked the presenters and then summarized the past three days. The first day 
had presentations on how to address prescription drug abuse; the second day saw workshops 
on the start of work plans; and today resulted in strategies and actions that communities can 
implement. “It’s an empowering process,” he said. All the participants working together were 
able to create a plan for reducing prescription drug abuse and making their communities drug‐
free. The plenary concluded and the participants went for break.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 150




   Panel of Governance Representatives and Chiefs
   PANELISTS
   Chief Titus Tait
   Sachigo Lake
   Chief Sol Atlookan
   Eabametoong
   Chief Connie Gray-McKay
   Mishkeegogamang
   Chief Adam Fiddler
   Sandy Lake
   Chief Clifford Bull
   Lac Seul
   Chief Norman Brown
   Wapekeka
   Chief James Mamakwa
   Kingfisher Lake
The meeting was called to order by an Elder, who opened with a prayer and greeting in his 
language.  

Emcee Wally McKay welcomed everyone to the session and stated that the official Declaration 
of the chiefs, community members, and leaders had now been finalized and would be presented 
by Chief Adam Fiddler. McKay emphasized that the Declaration, to be known as Mamow Na‐Ta‐
Wii‐He‐Tih‐Sowin, was a collective document and was to be signed by every participant at the 
conference, to illustrate the solidarity of all of the Nations and communities with regard to 
meeting the challenges of prescription drug abuse.  

To assist with this signing, someone would circulate the document to all participants while 
Chief Fiddler gave his address. McKay congratulated the participants for their hard work, 
patience, willingness to examine all the issues related to prescription drug abuse, and ability to 
focus on solutions. 

Chief Fiddler began his presentation of Mamow Na‐Ta‐Wii‐He‐Tih‐Sowin with a brief address in 
his language. Before he read aloud the 18 points in the Declaration, he reflected on what had 
been accomplished over the three days of the conference.  

“People came prepared to talk about what could be some of the solutions that they could do 
now to create the change that they want for their children and their grandchildren,” Chief 
Fiddler said. He told the audience that people who had come to the conference had listened 


            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 151


carefully and thoughtfully to many discussions over the course of the three days. What will 
help them, he observed, is to be able to leave the conference with something concrete to bring 
back to their communities that will show them, “This is what we did.”  

The Declaration, or Call to Action as he also referred to it, will mobilize not just the leaders, but 
everyone in the community.  

The document was then read aloud clearly and carefully, from the preamble to the numbered 
items and commitments. Chief Fiddler stressed the inclusiveness of the document and said that 
he had discussed the Declaration with the other leaders and chiefs, and they had ensured that all 
comments from participants were incorporated in it. The chiefs were advised by the Elders, he 
said, to use their own language in capturing what they heard, and hence the title of the 
document.  

Chief Fiddler told the audience that the chiefs had met and agreed to work together on the issue 
of prescription drug abuse in their communities. He reminded participants that “the roots of 
this problem lie in our history and the government, as well as the residential schools 
experience.” The chiefs were then asked to sign the document while seated at the head table, 
and that process was filmed and recorded by technicians who were standing by.  

Chief Connie Gray‐McKay addressed the audience, initially in her own language, stating that 
she felt more comfortable speaking her own language. She presented an impassioned insight 
into the problem of drug abuse, which she said is destructive to communities and individuals at 
a very basic level.  

“What we are talking about is life,” she said, “and life is sacred. Our people’s lives are being 
destroyed.” She also spoke of the importance of forgiveness. “We talk about being able to 
forgive each other as Nations, and that needs to be done in order to move forward. This is being 
dragged into the younger generation.”  

She reminded the audience of the value of the old ways, and asked that the people who are 
returning to their communities to undertake this challenge make sure that they have people 
praying for them. 

Chief Gray‐McKay also talked about the role of compassion in dealing with this issue. “Today, 
we are talking about life and death,” she said. “You have to have compassion for the people. We 
need to teach the dealers about the old ways. You need to engage all the people.” She concluded 
by returning to the theme of destruction and darkness that the abuse of prescription drugs is 
creating in the communities.  

“I’ve had my eyes opened being here. I’ve noticed how many babies we are burying because 
our mothers and fathers are using. We are too busy fighting in our communities, and while we 
are fighting, the darkness is getting to our children.”  

            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 152

Chief James Mamakwa, who also addressed the audience in his own language, agreed that the 
users need the help of the leaders and the community, and he expressed his appreciation that 
the conference has brought the Nations together to work together to do that.  

The community must take ownership of the drug abuse issue and use the resources that it has 
in order to deal with the problem, Chief Sol Atlookan told the audience in his address. He 
shared some of the situations that his community has been dealing with, and said that in a 
meeting three weeks ago, the members acknowledged and took ownership of the problem.  

“A lot of the things that we identified were also said here,” he observed. “We can now work 
together to do something. I’m happy that the leaders and people had the guts to come forward 
and say there is a problem—our kids are dying.”  

Chief Atlookan provided a dramatic illustration of how serious the situation is in his 
community by telling the audience that during a meeting, the leaders were advised of an 
emergency situation in the community. He said that a young mother of four children who is a 
user had attempted suicide and was still in hospital at the time of the conference.  

“We need to call on both levels of government to help with dollars to run programs. That is 
their responsibility,” he emphasized.  

Chief Atlookan also noted the importance of bringing about change at the grassroots level. He 
said that in the past, there were many resolutions from chiefs, but how to implement them had 
always been a problem. “But now, everyone has one theme,” he said, “and that is to eradicate 
prescription drug abuse. So now we can work together.”  

Chief Atlookan also stressed the need to evaluate the existing government programs in the 
communities. “It sounds good to Canadians when the government announces millions of 
dollars for us,” he said. “But how much of that gets to the communities?” He recounted an 
incident in his community where a mother died in a tragic fire and the government failed to 
provide any intervention or debriefing to the frontline workers. “They had to fly out [of the 
community] for that,” he said. “And in the meantime, they are carrying the pain.” 

“Everyone has to do their part,” Chief Atlookan concluded. “And I stand here to make that 
commitment.” 

Chief Clifford Bull told the audience that he has a lot of youth in his community, and the 
leaders are finding that a lot of drugs are being brought in from urban centres and sold to them. 
“We want to find the drug lords,” he said. But the police in the community have told him that 
the youth will not “fess up,” and this is making it difficult to deal with the problem. He noted 
that unknown vehicles have been seen in the community and that the people are aware that 
drugs are being brought in. He told the audience that a peacekeeping force has been formed in 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 153


his community for the purpose of assisting the police in patrolling the community, and that 
they are in the process of trying to get a vehicle to begin that endeavour. 

Chief Bull also expressed his concern about the number of Aboriginal people who are 
languishing in jail across Canada. He stated that he believes in and promotes the use of the 
judicial system within the community.  

“Our ancestors’ system is conducive to healing and rehabilitation,” he pointed out. He shared 
his experience of visiting the community schools to develop a historic view of the community 
with the children. “I take the kids back to pre‐contact to show them what it was once like. We 
were healthy once, and that is the way it’s supposed to be.”  

Chief Bull stated that the youth need to be empowered, and one of the ways to do that is to 
show them photos of traditional activities and ceremonies. “They are lost because they don’t 
know where they come from,” he added.  

The support of the community and the willingness of people to help one another are also critical 
factors in combating this problem, Chief Bull observed. He said that when something happens 
to a member of the community, people need to converge on them.  

“But no one wants to go knock on doors. They’re afraid or not trained, so we need to empower 
our workers too.” The lack of resources and dollars is another factor, Chief Bull noted, and he 
told the audience that he would be meeting the local MPP (Member of Provincial Parliament) 
the following week to bring his proposal forward. 

Chief Bull concluded by stressing the importance of spirituality and shared a story about a 
fellow who came to a community workshop and drew a picture of a tree that was withering 
without leaves. That is the way that Chief Bull sees a lot of the communities, he said, and added 
that the communities need to replant those roots.  

“There is always hope,” he said. “I’m seeing a change over the past 30 years. The sober people 
are the majority.” 

Chief Fiddler expressed his pleasure with the outcome of the conference and in particular with 
its focus on solutions.  

“We can all give examples from our communities,” he said. “We know that it is ruining our 
lives, and I’m glad that we didn’t spend three days just talking about it. We focused on 
solutions.”  

Chief Fiddler told the audience that the discussions over the past two days had focused on three 
major areas. The first area was why the problem is occurring—what the root causes are. “Before 
this, we had booze and glue,” he noted. “Prescription drug abuse is just the latest.”  



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 154


The second area that was the focus of discussions, Chief Fiddler said, was how to help people 
who are affected by prescription drug abuse. He told the audience that he had a letter from one 
of his people who is addicted to “oxy” (OxyContin) and who was “crying out for help.”  

The third area that discussions focused on was looking at how to prevent drugs from coming 
into the community, Chief Fiddler said. He reiterated that he is hopeful, because “we are going 
somewhere now—we are getting something done.”  

Chief Fiddler concluded by reminding the audience that in order to be successful, the process 
has to come from within the community, and everyone shares the responsibility to take the 
solutions back to their community.  

“We work very hard, and sometimes we have to do tough things. We are not fighting the 
people—we are fighting what is happening,” he said. “Let’s think about life, because this is 
what it is all about.”  

   Discussion

The panel answered questions from the audience.  

Paul Johnup from Round Lake wondered if there was a plan to approach the pharmaceutical 
companies to see what roles they could play in dealing with the problem of prescription drug 
abuse. Chief Bull responded that the medical panel that attended the conference will be 
producing a report examining the roles of the medical professionals. For example, it will look at 
why doctors are prescribing these drugs, as well as what the role of the pharmacist is in how 
drugs are dispensed and transported. 

Johnup also commented that he believes that sending youth to jail will ultimately correct their 
behaviour, and pointed to his own situation and history to support his point. He told the 
audience that he had done jail time, and when a worker came to see him in jail, his life was 
turned around. He said that jail is like university, except that he learned many negative things 
while there. But he remains optimistic that people can change.  

“I am 20 years sober,” he said, to a round of applause from the audience.  

Johnup also stressed the importance of spirituality in dealing with the problem of prescription 
drug abuse, and suggested that the closing address should include prayers for all who are 
abusing, both young and old, including the people who are selling drugs.  

Chief Leslie Cameron spoke from the audience, stating that because he comes from a small 
community, he did not realize that the problem was so bad until he attended the conference. He 
shared with the audience that he is a born‐again Christian, and he asked that the people in the 



            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009
ANSWERING THE CALL FOR HELP:
REDUCING PRESCRIPTION ABUSE IN OUR COMMUNITIES                                                  PAGE 155


audience pray for each other, regardless of their personal beliefs. “That is our foundation and 
roots,” he said.  

Chief Celia Echum wondered if there was a way to get around doctor / patient confidentiality 
when dealing with prescription drug abuse issues. Chief Fiddler responded that the issue is 
difficult and one that is governed by provincial and federal rules and legislation on privacy. He 
told the audience that they have the ability and authority to make the changes that could work 
for the communities, and suggested that the government should be approached about these 
changes. He encouraged the communities to work with the government to make changes that 
will work for them.  

“We hear about the right of the individual,” he said. “But we are focused on the rights of the 
community.”  

Another questioner, John Fox, shared his journey with a severe addiction to “oxy,” and he 
described the severe pain of withdrawal and how it causes the user’s bones to hurt so badly that 
“you feel like you are dead.” He told the audience that he had also sold drugs for 20 years 
because of his anger at God after being abused by a pastor. He reflected that he survived 
because he “asked for help from the Creator,” and he encouraged users to learn from their 
experience and to seek something better.   

The conference concluded after a closing prayer from an Elder and the traditional drumming 
ceremony.  




            SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY • THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO • FEBRUARY 10–12, 2009

								
To top