Business Development - Career Profiles

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					                                         Business Development – Career Profiles

Career Field:                            Business Development / Operations
Functional Area:                         Business Process Analysis
Area Description:                        Develop business models and perform analyses of operational and financial metrics.
                                         Analyze existing business processes and identify areas for improvement in efficiency,
                                         effectiveness, or risk reduction.
                                         Develop, communicate & evangelize new processes or improvements to existing processes.

Typical Employers                        Mid-size to large corporations

Common Job Titles                        •   Business Analyst

Typical Job Description                  •   Investigate operational and business needs, with a focus on analyzing and modeling
                                             processes.
                                         •   Analyze in detail business process issues and problems.
                                         •   Develop solutions; including complex business and systems process analysis.
                                         •   Develop project proposals.

Qualifications:                          •   Possess broad knowledge and experience in leveraging IT solutions and business process
                                             improvements.
                                         •   Strong entrepreneurial and collaborative/teamwork skills.
                                         •   Innovative in the areas of process analysis and solution design.
                                         •   Solid knowledge of project management methodology.
                                         •   Sound diagnostic and creative problem-solving skills.
                                         •   Ability to apply structured root cause analysis, cost/benefit analysis, process
                                             mapping/simulation, data modeling, problem identification and interpretation, process
                                             change management and performance measures.
                                         •   Potentially: MBA and related certifications (such as Six Sigma)

What do career changers need to do?      Leverage Finance, Business Performance, or Strategy Backgrounds.
                                         Communicate prior experience that shows solid evidence of relevant transferable skills.




Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                           1                                                       January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                         Business Development – Career Profiles


Career Field:                            Business Development
Functional Area:                         Sales
Area Description:                        At some companies, business development might be better described as business-to-business
                                         sales. In many cases, the business development team and the sales team are one and the same.

                                         Cold calling or prospecting for potential clients, members, or partners is often a task that falls to
                                         entry-level biz dev employees. These employees often have to hone their own sales pitch to
                                         convince other companies that a partnership would add value to their businesses.

                                         As in traditional sales jobs, there's often an account-management aspect to business
                                         development—coordinating a variety of partner relationships and deal types, each at a different
                                         stage.

Typical Employers                        All industries/sectors

Common Job Titles                        •   Business Development Manager

Typical Job Description                  Typically, a Business Development/Sales Account Manager or Executive will

                                         •   Sell goods and/or services, often to corporate management. (B2B)
                                         •   Generate leads and sales appointments through cold-calling and existing client relationships.
                                         •   Develop and implement effective sales and marketing strategies.
                                         •   Follow up with customers to ensure satisfaction, repeat business and referrals.
                                         •   Prospect and build long-term relationships

Qualifications:                          •   Prior Sales and/or Subject Matter Experience - # of years depends of level of responsibility.
                                         •   Strong communication and computer skills.
                                         •   Successful track record of selling to business accounts of appropriate size.
                                         •   Ability to communicate with all levels of management.
                                         •   Outstanding communication skills.
                                         •   Professional presentation skills.
                                         •   Strong organizational skills.
                                         •   Potentially, niche expertise in selling.
                                         •   Excellent interpersonal skills.

Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                            2                                                          January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                         Business Development – Career Profiles

What do career changers need to do?      Seek sales or similar experience; build skills to convince prospective employer of consultative
                                         sales, communication, persuasive, and interpersonal skills.

                                         Seek internships to build up experience in this area. In interviews, be ready to demonstrate your
                                         knowledge of the company's business and show that you're familiar with its competitive
                                         landscape. Be sure to play up any experience you have in closing deals or managing
                                         relationships. And remember that recruiters will be seeking a keen eye for detail, solid
                                         communication skills, and analytical ability.




Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                           3                                                        January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                         Business Development – Career Profiles


Career Field:                            Business Development
Functional Area:                         Alliances
Area Description:                        Business Development VP’s and managers who are focused on building alliances identify,
                                         secure, and manage partnerships with outside companies and internal constituents whose
                                         contributions will facilitate growth in sales and market share. The work involves initiating the
                                         partnership relationship (including convincing 3rd parties and internal stake holders to buy into
                                         the idea), negotiating and drafting partnership contracts, and working with other teams in one’s
                                         own company (e.g., product management, marketing, and operations) to make sure that the terms
                                         of the partnership are met.

Typical Employers                        Business development jobs can be found in all industries—at everything from tech start-ups to
                                         huge pharmaceutical companies. What the work entails depends on how established a company is
                                         and on its business model.

Common Job Titles                        •   VP of Business Development
                                         •   Business Development Manager

Typical Job Description                  Identify, secure, and manage partnerships with outside companies and internal constituents
                                         whose contributions will further the product's vision.

                                         Draft contracts and negotiate terms.

                                         Work with other teams in a company (e.g., product management, marketing, and operations) to
                                         oversee the successful meeting of the terms of the partnership.

Qualifications:                          •   Intuitive marketing ability.
                                         •   Savvy business skills.
                                         •   Prolific track record of building creative and productive partnerships.
                                         •   Passion for growing the business.
                                         •   Customer focus for solution selling.
                                         •   Relationship and team building skills.
                                         •   Ability to drive to results.
                                         •   Knowledge of competitive product offerings and technologies.
                                         •   Understanding of company strategy and development/product directions.


Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                           4                                                       January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                         Business Development – Career Profiles

                                         •   Previous experience in managing executive level business partnerships.
                                         •   Good technical selling background and prior experience in creating or supporting alliance
                                             agreements.
                                         •   Skills in relationship identification, account management, and client development.
                                         •   Understanding of the legal framework of deals and comfort in deal negotiation.
                                         •   Experience/skills in contract preparation and analysis.
                                         •   For tech companies, potentially an undergraduate degree in engineering.
                                         •   For tech companies, understanding of how technology connects to the overall business goals
                                             of the company.
                                         •   For tech companies, able to address engineers' objections and communicate business
                                             development objectives to them.

What do career changers need to do?      The best way to get into business development is by first gaining experience in finance,
                                         consulting, or corporate sales. The minimum degree requirement for an entry-level position in
                                         business development is a BA or BS. For more senior positions, an MBA is often preferred,
                                         along with 5 or more years of previous business development or sales experience.

                                         Those with an aptitude for landing and structuring deals—lawyers, for instance, or investment
                                         bankers—have the best shot at landing these jobs.

                                         Business development positions at high-tech companies may require a technical background, or
                                         sales experience in a related field.

                                         Networking with friends or alumni will give you an advantage getting your foot in the door. If
                                         you're asked in for an interview, be ready to demonstrate your knowledge of the company's
                                         business and show that you're familiar with its competitive landscape. Be sure to play up any
                                         experience you have in closing deals or managing relationships. Recruiters will also be seeking a
                                         keen eye for detail, solid communication skills, and analytical ability.




Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                           5                                                       January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                         Business Development – Career Profiles


Career Field:                            Business Development
Functional Area:                         Strategic Planning
Area Description:                        Strategic Business Development professionals constantly ask: "What ten things will have the
                                         biggest positive impact on my company's business, and how can we make them happen?" Their
                                         objective is to expand the market reach or revenue of their companies in ways that make the most
                                         of their companies' resources and capabilities.

                                         During an assignment, or project, a strategic planner might compare his or her own company's
                                         manufacturing process to that of an industry leader; evaluate the size of a new market, its
                                         potential profitability, and barriers to entering that market; or consider whether it makes more
                                         sense for the company to have its own means of transportation or to "outsource" that function.

                                         Strategic planning jobs are found mostly at large, established companies seeking to expand and
                                         diversify their business. Just like management consultants, strategic planners spend a lot of time
                                         thinking about top-level strategy issues such as what new business activities their company
                                         should pursue, how it should position itself and market those activities, and in which
                                         technologies it should invest. At some companies, strategic planning may be carried out by the
                                         corporate finance department. In such cases, biz dev jobs may resemble investment banking
                                         functions such as mergers and acquisitions. If the acquisition takes place, strategic planning may
                                         help integrate the two companies. Strategic planning may also involve institutional investment—
                                         that is, parceling out the company's money to fund outside start-ups.

                                         Some strategic planners work as internal consultants within their companies. They may work on
                                         temporary assignments within a business unit while that unit is planning or evaluating new
                                         projects. Or they may have a long-term position within a central strategic planning unit of a large
                                         corporation, where they evaluate the strategy of the corporation as a whole. Either type of work
                                         can eventually lead to general management roles within a company.


Typical Employers                        Large corporations


Common Job Titles                        •   VP of Business Development




Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                           6                                                         January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                         Business Development – Career Profiles

Typical Job Description                  Example from Microsoft: Identifying technologies and products in the ecosystem that will
                                         delight our customers; evaluating the strategic fit of identified technology with Platforms
                                         products; driving build-license-buy analysis and facilitating the development of business cases, if
                                         appropriate, for such technologies and for addressing the market opportunities they represent;
                                         developing strategies for putting together licensing or acquisition deals with third parties who
                                         will bring such technologies or products into Microsoft; negotiating and executing all key
                                         licensing deals, intellectual property issues and evaluation of technologies being acquired; and
                                         managing relationships.

Qualifications:                          •   Highly developed analytical skills
                                         •   Broad understanding of industry,
                                         •   Potentially: Working knowledge of intellectual property (IP) issues and tradeoff points with
                                             respect to negotiating deals involving IP,
                                         •   Capacity for strategic thought leadership,
                                         •   Ability to solve highly unstructured business problems,
                                         •   High levels of energy and drive to get things done on time,
                                         •   Solid relationship and communication skills in working with senior executives and other
                                             groups such as Legal & Corporate Affairs, Corporate Development, Venture Integration and
                                             Finance.
                                         •   Often: at least 2 years experience in investment banking or consulting
                                         •   For more senior positions, 10+ years of post-college experience in areas directly relevant to
                                             responsibilities.
                                         •   MBA or JD

What do career changers need to do?      Strategic-planning or corporate-development positions often require a minimum of 2 years'
                                         experience in investment banking or consulting.

                                         People who have lots of experience negotiating and who have built up a good Rolodex are in
                                         high demand.

                                         Industry Experience is often critical.

                                         As with purely alliance-focused business development jobs, networking with friends or alumni
                                         will give you an advantage getting your foot in the door. If you're asked in for an interview, be
                                         ready to demonstrate your knowledge of the company's business and show that you're familiar
                                         with its competitive landscape. Be sure to play up any experience you have in closing deals or

Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                            7                                                        January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                           Business Development – Career Profiles

                                           managing relationships. And remember that recruiters will be seeking a keen eye for detail, solid
                                           communication skills, and analytical ability.

                                           High Tech: Networking is huge in this industry. Check out the Technology Business
                                           Development Forum, which meets once a month; there are 50 to 60 business development
                                           representatives at the meetings. Make calls to small growing Internet companies. After a
                                           company gets its first or second round of funding, it may hire business development executives to
                                           make deals. Keep your eye out for companies that have recently gotten funding.


RESOURCES:

Guides

CareerLeader® Strategic Planning and Business Development – available through CareerNet

Associations

Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (A.S.A.P) – http://www.strategic-alliances.org/ - a professional organization promoting
best practices and networking events for alliance professionals. Their monthly meeting events have included speakers from Oracle, IBM,
VeriSign, FedEx, Gartner, and others who discuss a wide array of alliance and partnership topics and are well attended by Bay Area
companies.

A.S.A.P.'s membership is comprised of Alliance, Marketing, Sales, Strategy, and other managers from top companies including:

Accenture                                      Hewlett-Packard Company/Compaq                       The Dow Chemical Company
Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals           Oracle                                               The Warren Company
Cisco Systems                                  Siebel Systems, Inc.                                 Unisys Corporation
Eli Lilly & Company                            Siemens
GlaxoSmithKline                                Starbucks, Inc.

Web Sites



Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                             8                                                       January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center
                                          Business Development – Career Profiles

Free Management Library Strategic Planning Basics - http://www.mapnp.org/library/plan_dec/str_plan/basics.htm - basic descrition
of strategic planning, including key terms. Includes link to page with Recommended Approach to Understanding Strategic Planning,
Benefits of Strategic Planning, When Should Strategic Planning Be Done, and Various Overviews (basics, key terms, special topics,
samples, various models, skills to have, etc.)

Wetfeet – Career Overviews – Business Development - http://www.wetfeet.com/asp/careerprofiles_overview.asp?careerpk=7

Yale School of Management – Career Roadmap – Strategic Planning & Business Development -
http://www.som.yale.edu/careers/cdp/research/roadstrategic.asp

Periodicals

Forbes
Fortune
Wired
Business 2.0
Inc.

Coursework at Haas

MBA 224A Managerial Accounting                                       MBA 267 Sales
MBA 247A Supply Chain Management                                     MBA 268A Global Marketing Strategy
MBA 247A Service Strategy                                            MBA 290M High-tech Product Design and Rapid Manufacturing
MBA 252 Negotiations & Conflict Resolution                           MBA 290N Managing the New Product Development Process
MBA 260 Consumer Behavior                                            MBA 295A Entrepreneurship
MBA 261 Marketing Research                                           MBA 298A International Business Development for MBAs
MBA 262 Brand Management and Strategy                                MBA 299B Global Strategy and Multinational Enterprise
MBA 263 Internet Strategy                                            MBA 299E Competitive and Corporate Strategy
MBA 264 High Technology Marketing Management                         MBA 299M Strategic Market Planning
MBA 267 Pricing                                                      MBA 299T Strategic Planning: Perspectives & Decisions

Recruiters
MRI – Management Recruiters International (www.mrinetwork.com)
Spherion (www.spherion.com)

Prepared by Peter Jacobs                                         9                                               January 2005
For UC Berkeley Haas MBA Career Center