Renewable Energy Development and Conservation in Saskatchewan by cio18038

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									    Renewable Energy Development and
       Conservation in Saskatchewan




 Given our wealth of renewable energy resources, it is the vision of my government
 that by the third decade of this century, the children of our Centennial will live
 in a province where one-third of their energy needs are met by renewable
 energy sources, and Saskatchewan will lead the country in energy conservation
 practices.

                                       - Speech from the Throne, November 2005




A First Report on Making Saskatchewan a Canadian Leader in
 Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Development



                                   Presented to
                               Premier Lorne Calvert
                                  December 2006




                                        By
                     Peter Prebble, MLA, Saskatoon Greystone
   Legislative Secretary for Renewable Energy Development and Conservation
Letter of Transmittal



To the Honourable Lorne Calvert
Premier of Saskatchewan

I am pleased to submit to you my first set of recommendations
on renewable energy development and conservation in
Saskatchewan.

Our government has set out a vision that, by the third decade
of this century, one-third of our energy needs will be met by renewable energy sources
and Saskatchewan will lead the country in energy conservation practices.

Saskatchewan has already taken strong actions on wind power, ethanol production (and an
ethanol mandate), CO2 sequestration, adoption of high energy efficiency standards for public
buildings and our Energy Share residential energy conservation program.

In this report, I propose additional policy changes that would make Saskatchewan a national
leader in the field of energy conservation and renewable energy. My recommendations
represent policy components that can be used to build on our strong beginnings to achieve
the goals you have set.

In making these recommendations, I received help and advice from a great many people
within the private and non-profit sectors of our province, as well as within government. I
was also fortunate to consult extensively with energy departments, climate change bureaus,
universities and power utilities in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, Oregon and California.

This first report focuses on the electricity sector and the buildings sector. A subsequent,
second report to you will address transportation issues and opportunities, including
ethanol and biodiesel. My second report will also examine small-scale hydro and biomass
development in forest fringe communities and Northern Saskatchewan.

I want to thank you very much for the opportunity to work on this assignment that is so
critical to the future of our province.




Peter Prebble, MLA
Saskatoon Greystone
Table of Contents

Executive Summary                                                          1

Recommendations                                                            4

Terms of Reference                                                         10

Acknowledgements                                                           11

Introduction                                                               12

Making the Transition to Conservation and Renewable
Energy in the Electrical Sector                                            15
      A Renewable Energy and Conservation Portfolio Standard               15
      Major Investment in Demand Side Management                           19
      An Important Role for Large Scale Wind Power                         25
      Encourage Net Metering                                               27
      Other Measures to Advance Renewable Electricity Use                  29

Financial Incentives to Promote Conservation and Renewable Energy          31
      Business Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tax Credit           32
      Residential and Homeowner Incentives                                 36
      Municipal and Non-Profit Grant Program                               37
      Low Interest Loan Program for Larger Projects                        37

Advancing Conservation and Renewables in the
Commercial and Institutional Buildings Sector                              40
     Energy Efficiency Building Code for New Commercial Buildings          40
     Promotion of Net Zero Energy Buildings                                42
     Promotion of Solar Energy                                             43
     Other Measures to Promote Energy Efficiency in the Buildings Sector   44

Policy Measures to Promote Conservation and Renewable Energy               47
       The Office of Energy Conservation                                   47
       Mechanism to ensure steady, stable, multi-year funding              48
       Training and Education                                              50
       Planning for a New Farm Energy Audit Program                        50
       Other Measures to Advance Conservation and Renewables               51
       The Need to Accelerate Implementation of these Recommendations      58

Contributions and Contacts                                                 61
Executive Summary

In May 2006 I was asked by the Premier to undertake an assignment as Legislative Secretary
for Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Development. Saskatchewan seeks to
become a North American leader in safe renewable energy sources and conservation, with
a vision set out in the 2005 Speech from the Throne. My task then is to provide government
with a blueprint for achieving this vision.

The recommendations contained in this first report build on Saskatchewan’s current
strengths in the areas of wind power, ethanol production (and an ethanol mandate), CO2
sequestration, adoption of high energy efficiency standards for public buildings and its
Energy Share residential energy conservation program. In addition, the recommendations
propose major policy changes that would make Saskatchewan a national leader in the field of
energy conservation and set the stage for significant advancements in the development and
adoption of renewable energy.

Summary of Priority Recommendations

This first report focuses primarily on the electricity sector and the buildings sector. The
recommendations fall within four core areas: transition to renewable energy in the electrical
sector; incentives to promote conservation and renewable energy; advancing conservation
and renewables in the buildings sector; and, policy measures to promote conservation and
renewable energy.

The summary below highlights the priority recommendations.

Making the Transition to Conservation and Renewable Energy in the
Electrical Sector

   •   Introduce legislation to establish a Renewable Energy and Conservation Portfolio
       Standard for electricity production in Saskatchewan. The Portfolio Standard would
       require that a minimum of 50 per cent of Saskatchewan’s electricity will come from
       renewable energy sources and electricity conservation by 2025.
   •   Undertake a major investment in Demand Side Management targeting electricity
       savings of 300 megawatts by 2025.
   •   Make large scale wind power an important part of future electrical generation with a
       target of 500 megawatts of wind power by 2015.
   •   Encourage net metering for small scale producers of green, low impact electricity with
       a rate structure that enables customers to sell low impact renewable electricity to the
       grid at the retail price.




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    Financial Assistance to Promote Conservation and Renewable Energy

      •   Introduce a Business Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tax Credit to help offset
          some of the costs incurred by businesses or co-operatives that install renewable
          energy systems and invest in conservation measures.
      •   Strengthen and expand the Saskatchewan Energy Share residential conservation
          program.
      •   Establish a Renewable Energy Grant Program to assist homeowners and landlords with
          the installation of safe, renewable energy technology in new and existing homes.
      •   Introduce a New Home Grant Program to assist homeowners with the incremental
          costs of constructing R-2000 and Energy Star Homes.
      •   Provide financial incentives to assist municipalities and non-profit organizations to
          upgrade energy efficiency and install renewable energy systems in existing buildings,
          build new buildings to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) energy
          efficiency standards, incorporate renewable energy systems in new buildings, and
          build net zero energy buildings.
      •   Establish a Low Interest Energy Loan Program for larger conservation and renewable
          energy projects. The program would be available to individuals, businesses, co-
          operatives, farms, school divisions, municipalities, First Nations and non-profit
          organizations.

    Advancing Conservation and Renewables in the Commercial and
    Institutional Buildings Sector

      •   Implement a common sense energy efficiency building code standard for new
          commercial buildings.
      •   Promote the construction of net zero energy buildings with particular emphasis on
          commercial and institutional buildings.
      •   Promote the adoption of solar energy with the introduction of solar rights legislation
          and undertake extensive consultation with municipalities to encourage proper
          orientation of new homes to facilitate solar access.




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Policy Measures to Promote Conservation and Renewable Energy
Development

   •   Expand the role of the Office of Energy Conservation with a mandate to make
       Saskatchewan a North American leader in energy conservation and renewable energy
       development.
   •   Establish an Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Fund to ensure a stable,
       multi-year public funding base for conservation and renewable energy initiatives and
       investments.

These recommendations represent policy components that can be used to build on
strong beginnings to make Saskatchewan a North American leader in energy conservation
and to achieve the target set by the government for renewable energy development in
Saskatchewan – 33 per cent renewable energy by the third decade of this century.




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    Recommendations

    Making the Transition to Conservation and Renewable Energy in the
    Electrical Sector

    1.   Introduce legislation to establish a Renewable Energy and Conservation Portfolio
         Standard for electricity production in Saskatchewan. The Portfolio Standard would
         require that a minimum of 50 per cent of Saskatchewan’s electricity will come from
         renewable energy sources and electricity conservation by 2025.

    2.   Undertake a major investment in Demand Side Management (DSM) targeting
         electricity savings of 300 megawatts by 2025.

         Achieving this level of electricity savings will require SaskPower to increase DSM
         spending to at least $30 million by 2009. Demand side management must be viewed
         as a supply side option and all related expenditures should be treated as capital costs
         rather than operating expenses.

         Based on the experience of other utilities, a cost effective DSM program could include
         the following components:
         • Major, sustained advertising campaign aimed at saving electricity;
         • Mass distribution of compact fluorescent light bulbs;
         • Incentives for other wise lighting initiatives;
         • Incentives to encourage energy efficiency on farms and in businesses;
         • Incentives to encourage municipalities to save electricity in municipal facilities, ice
            rinks, traffic lights and street lighting;
         • Energy performance contracting services for municipal, farm and small business
            customers;
         • Installation of advanced metering;
         • Special audit and consulting services for large industrial customers;
         • Engaging outside expertise to assess opportunities for DSM and conservation
            investments;
         • High performance building program for large electricity intense facilities;
         • Energy Efficiency Leaders in the Workplace Program.

    3.   Make large scale wind an important part of future electrical generation with a target of
         500 megawatts of wind power by 2015.

         Medium term planning should focus on overcoming wind power integration
         challenges and SaskPower should establish a wind power integration unit that would
         enable Saskatchewan to become a world leader in wind power development and
         integration.




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4.   Encourage net metering for small scale producers of green, low impact electricity
     with a rate structure that enables customers to sell low impact renewable energy to
     the grid at the retail price. Until such time as a two way single meter is approved for
     use by Measurement Canada, SaskPower should install a second meter at no cost for
     customers who install small scale, zero emission, green electricity generation systems.

5.   Contract with environmental organizations and other non-profit organizations to
     market green power and promote public education and awareness.

6.   Expand the Environmentally Preferred Power program targeting another 200
     megawatts of environmentally preferred power over the next six years.



Financial Incentives to Promote Conservation and Renewable Energy

1.   Introduce a Business Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tax Credit to help offset
     some of the costs incurred by businesses or co-operatives that install renewable
     energy systems and invest in conservation measures.

2.   Strengthen and expand the Saskatchewan Energy Share residential conservation
     program.
     • Expand the program to include electrical energy and domestic hot water
        conservation measures.
     • Increase the maximum grant available and enable residents to access the program
        for a second round of eligible improvements.
     • Broaden the eligibility to include renters for a prescribed list of highly cost effective
        expenditures including the purchase by the tenant of energy efficient lighting,
        Energy Star appliances, low flow showerheads and hot water heater blankets.
     • Distribute through the EnerGuide audit process free conservation kits including
        very low cost conservation products such as compact fluorescent lights.
     • Re-establish the low interest loan program to help finance the purchase of high
        efficiency furnaces.
     • Ensure measurability of program outcomes and results.

3.   Establish a Renewable Energy Grant Program to assist homeowners and landlords with
     the installation of safe, renewable energy technology in new and existing homes.

4.   Introduce a New Home Grant Program to assist homeowners with the incremental
     costs of constructing R-2000 and Energy Star Homes. The target should be to construct
     50 per cent of new homes to meet either R-2000 or Energy Star standards by 2010.




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    5.   Provide financial incentives to assist municipalities and non-profit organizations to
         upgrade energy efficiency and install renewable energy systems in existing buildings,
         build new facilities to LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)
         standards, install renewable energy systems in new buildings, and build net zero
         energy buildings.

    6.   Establish a Low Interest Energy Loan Program for larger conservation and renewable
         energy projects. The low interest loan program would be available to individuals,
         businesses, co-operatives, farms, school divisions, municipalities, First Nations and non-
         profit organizations for projects ranging from $10,000 to $2 million.

         The Program would have two components:
         • Revolving Energy Conservation Fund for conservation and energy efficiency
           projects that could be repaid within 8 years through energy savings.
         • Renewable Energy Innovation Fund geared to assist with the construction of
           renewable energy projects where energy savings alone are not expected to enable
           full repayment of the loan in the medium term.



    Advancing Conservation and Renewables in the Commercial and
    Institutional Buildings Sector

    1.   Implement a common sense energy efficiency building code standard for new
         commercial buildings.

         Adopt the Model National Energy Code for Buildings as a regulation and prepare
         a separate amendment (in co-operation with Manitoba) with higher energy
         performance requirements.

         Provide required training for municipal building inspectors on new building
         code provisions and financial assistance to municipalities to ensure appropriate
         enforcement.

    2.   Promote the construction of net zero energy buildings in all sectors, with particular
         emphasis on commercial and institutional buildings.
         • Provide financial assistance to cover a portion of the incremental costs of building
            net zero energy buildings for businesses, homeowners, farms, municipalities or First
            Nations.
         • Work with private sector building owners to demonstrate net zero energy buildings
            in different commercial settings.




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     • Work with municipalities to construct several high profile net zero energy
       community facilities.
     • Saskatchewan Property Management and the Crown sector should plan to
       construct at least one net zero energy building each over the next two years.

3.   Promote the adoption of solar energy with the introduction of solar rights legislation
     to protect the rights of residents who have installed solar systems on their property.

4.   Undertake extensive consultations with municipalities to encourage proper
     orientation of new homes to facilitate solar access and prepare a model municipal
     bylaw that can be adopted by municipalities to guide the layout of subdivisions,
     streets and buildings to protect solar rights.

5.   Encourage builders to design homes that are ‘solar ready’ even if they do not
     immediately deploy solar technology.

6.   Consult with school divisions, health districts, universities, and others with a view to
     updating the energy efficiency policy and standards for public buildings with the
     objective of building new public facilities to a Leadership Energy & Environmental
     Design (LEED) standard. Consideration should be given to a LEED Silver designation for
     all newly constructed provincially funded buildings.

7.   Work to promote and encourage building construction to levels that achieve
     Commercial Building Incentive Program standards and R-2000 standards.

8.   All new buildings constructed to the Commercial Building Incentive Program
     Standards or better should be commissioned to make certain the buildings operate at
     the designed efficiency levels.


Policy Measures to Promote Conservation and Renewable Energy

1.   Expand the role of the Office of Energy Conservation with a mandate to include
     responsibility for making Saskatchewan a North American leader in energy
     conservation and renewable energy development.

2.   Establish an Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Fund to ensure a stable,
     multi-year public funding base for conservation and renewable energy initiatives and
     investments.




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    3.    Work with SIAST, the regional colleges and our other educational partners and
          institutions to provide training and education in all areas of energy efficiency including
          residential and commercial retrofitting, training for building inspectors to ensure
          appropriate enforcement of new building codes and standards, training for solar and
          wind installations, for biomass applications and other renewable energy technologies.

    4.    Begin preparation and consultations on a farm energy audit program. Such a
          program would involve a full audit of farm energy use, the potential for cost effective
          conservation investments and a comprehensive assessment of the opportunities for
          renewable energy development on the farm.

    5.    Establish a Premier’s Awards Program for outstanding leadership in conservation and
          renewable energy development.

    6.    Expand the role for Saskatchewan Property Management as a bulk buyer of energy
          efficient and renewable energy products to save money for municipalities and non-
          profit organizations.

    7.    Assign a staff person to work with municipalities on applications for the Canadian
          Federation of Municipalities Green Municipal Fund and other federal programs
          that provide financial assistance in advancing conservation, renewable energy and
          environmental sustainability.

    8.    Participate with other provinces in working groups to revise building codes and
          standards.

    9.    Undertake an Energy Resource Planning Framework Study to provide a detailed
          renewable energy resource inventory and an analysis of how the resource locations
          compare to the points of energy consumption.

    10.   Carefully document and maintain all records related to the actions and initiatives
          taken to reduce green house gas emissions, save energy and introduce renewable
          energy. These records will be extremely useful in future negotiations with the federal
          government.

    11.   Launch several high profile, practical demonstration projects that advance renewable
          energy development and conservation measures. Projects should be geared to proving
          and widely applying conservation and renewable energy applications. Examples of
          potential projects for consideration include:




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      • Construction of several net zero energy homes
      • Major energy conservation retrofit program on a First Nation reserve
      • Construction of renewable energy subdivisions in Saskatoon, Regina, Prince Albert
        and Moose Jaw
      • Installation of smart meters in a smaller Saskatchewan city
      • Development of a district heating system in a commercial urban setting
      • Demonstration wind/hydrogen project in Saskatoon and Regina at or near the
        SOCO Research Parks
      • Development of a commercial ethanol production facility using wood residue
      • Demonstration project using wood waste to generate electricity
      • Construction of a northern biomass project that generates waste heat and uses the
        waste heat for district heating
      • Demonstration project using plug-in hybrid vehicles combined with small scale
        wind and solar photovoltaic systems

12.   Accelerate the implementation of the recommendations in light of the urgency
      associated with the consequences of climate change.




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     Terms of Reference

     Peter Prebble, MLA for Saskatoon Greystone, was appointed Legislative Secretary to the
     Premier for Renewable Energy and Conservation on May 26, 2006. The terms of reference for
     his assignment are as follows:

     Saskatchewan seeks to become a North American leader in safe renewable energy sources
     and conservation. In the 2005 Speech from the Throne government laid out its vision with the
     following statement:

            Given our wealth of renewable energy sources, it is the vision of my
            government that by the third decade of this century, the children of our
            Centennial will live in a province where one-third of their energy needs are
            met by renewable energy sources, and Saskatchewan will lead the country in
            energy conservation practices.

     The Legislative Secretary for Renewable Energy and Conservation will provide government
     and the province with a blueprint for achieving this vision.

     The mandate is to:
     • work with relevant government and crown agencies, Saskatchewan community agencies,
       industry stakeholders and researchers to develop a short, medium and long term plan;
     • build on the successes in energy conservation, wind power and Environmentally Preferred
       Power that we have already initiated, and examine how our existing initiatives can be
       further enhanced and expanded;
     • examine potential new renewable energy initiatives, including the development of solar
       and the potential role of green technologies;
     • examine the potential to establish targets for the use of renewable energy;
     • examine successful conservation and safe renewable energy policies and practices existing
       in other parts of Canada, in the United States and in Europe with a view to determining
       which ones can be successfully applied in Saskatchewan; and
     • examine the potential to realize energy savings through the improvement of the energy
       codes that govern building construction and the application of new efficiency measures in
       the commercial and industrial sectors.

     The Legislative Secretary will present a first report with short-term recommendations to the
     Premier this fall. A final report, which will include recommendations for the medium and long
     term, will be presented by June of 2007.




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Acknowledgements

I am thankful for the opportunity to work on this assignment.

In undertaking this work, I have been privileged to have the assistance of Kathie
Maher-Wolbaum who has joined me in a great many of the meetings I have attended and
has offered extensive advice in the preparation of this report. Kevin Wishlow in Crown
Investments Corporation and my constituency assistant Puck Janes have helped me a great
deal in organizing meetings with individuals and groups. Puck Janes has also assisted me in
the editing of this report.

I also want to acknowledge the significant help and advice I have received from a great many
people within our government and within the private and non-profit sectors of our province.

I was also fortunate to have the opportunity to consult extensively with staff in energy
departments, climate change bureaus, universities or power utilities in Ontario, Manitoba,
Alberta, Oregon and California. Their perspectives were extremely helpful in preparing my
recommendations.




                                                                                               11
     Introduction

     The Saskatchewan government has set out a vision that, by the third decade of this
     century, one-third of our energy needs will be met by renewable energy sources and
     Saskatchewan will lead the country in energy conservation practices.

     Saskatchewan has already taken strong actions on wind power, home heating conservation
     programs, and excellence in the energy efficiency standards that are set for all new public
     buildings paid for 30 per cent or more by the Province.

     Saskatchewan currently has the highest level of wind power per capita in Canada.
     Saskatchewan has maintained its EnerGuide for Homes conservation grant program and its
     low income homeowner energy conservation program despite major funding cuts by the
     federal government. Saskatchewan has set an energy efficiency standard for new public
     buildings that exceeds the Model National Energy Code by 25 per cent.

     This report proposes policy components that can be used to build on Saskatchewan’s strong
     beginnings. I am pleased to submit my first set of recommendations on how best to make
     Saskatchewan a North American leader in energy conservation and on how best to achieve
     the target set by the government for renewable energy development in Saskatchewan – 33
     per cent renewable energy by the third decade of this century.

     In making these recommendations, I have examined several of the leading jurisdictions in
     North America that have already made major advances in the fields of energy conservation
     and renewable energy development. I looked at the major policy components these
     jurisdictions had in common that allowed them to advance in all sectors of their economy.

     The key policy components include:
         • a clear mandate put in law by the Legislature,
         • incentive programs that stimulate investment in conservation and renewable energy
            in all sectors of the economy,
         • leadership by example within provincial and state government departments,
         • the implementation of building codes at a provincial or state level,
         • the implementation of appliance and equipment standards (mostly done by large
            states and national governments),
         • public education through demonstration projects and the provision of good quality
            information,
         • the introduction of net metering which allows individuals and businesses to
            contribute renewable energy electrical solutions,
         • a large and steady flow of investment in conservation and renewable energy each year
            at a public sector level,
         • a university and technical school community that incorporate education and training
            in conservation and renewable energy into their curriculum, and
         • good research and development programs in the public sector.



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As the work becomes more advanced, jurisdictions also find it very useful to develop a
comprehensive inventory of their renewable energy resources and of how those resources
match up with their energy demands.

The implementation of these policy components is essential in order to achieve the goals the
Saskatchewan government has set. This report lays out a set of actions for getting most of
these policy components in place.

There are a few other introductory comments that I would like to make that reflect a broad
range of discussions I have been privileged to have.

First, it is important to recognize the areas where Saskatchewan has displayed strong
leadership. In my discussions with officials in other jurisdictions, there was consistent interest
in Saskatchewan actions on wind power, ethanol production (and an ethanol mandate), CO2
sequestration, adoption of high energy efficiency standards for public buildings and our
Energy Share residential energy conservation program. There was also a positive response to
the targets that have been set for renewable energy; these targets were seen as an important
sign of leadership and were also judged to be realistic.

Second, there are wide differences in the current levels of renewable energy penetration by
sector. Twenty-nine per cent of Saskatchewan’s electrical capacity comes from renewable
energy, primarily large scale hydro and wind power. In contrast, in the Saskatchewan buildings
sector and transportation sector renewable energy accounts for 2 per cent of energy use. To
reach an overall target of 33 per cent renewable energy by the third decade of this century,
the electrical sector will need to achieve well in excess of one third renewable energy. The
buildings and transportation sectors will be unlikely to reach the one third target, but will
need to reach at least 25 per cent.

Third, as new information emerges on the very serious consequences of climate change,
the urgency of moving forward with a major conservation and renewable energy agenda
becomes even greater. Moreover, making the right renewable energy choices – those which
will have the most impact in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions – will be very
important.

Fourth, our emphasis on both energy conservation and renewable energy is the right mix.
If we were to achieve 33 per cent renewable energy by 2025, but demand for energy had
risen by 50 per cent, the burden of energy costs to our economy would be very high and we
would be even further behind in battling greenhouse gas emissions. Conservation is thus an
imperative. On the other hand, reducing energy demand alone will not take us far enough
down the road to actually fix our greenhouse gas emissions problem; it is essential that we
deploy renewable energy sources to achieve that goal. A combined policy approach can




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     also generate the greatest economic benefits. Energy efficiency has the greatest potential
     to generate savings and create jobs in the next decade, while after that renewable energy
     sources and conservation should be of equal potential.

     Fifth, there are many important benefits to Saskatchewan by emphasizing the development
     of conservation and renewable energy. These investments create more jobs per million dollars
     of investment than do conventional sources of energy. These investments are much more
     environmentally sustainable than the current use of fossil fuels. Investments in renewable
     energy hold great potential for economic renewal in rural Saskatchewan, where we are
     blessed with a wide array of renewable energy resources.

     Finally, our natural gas and recoverable oil reserves have a limited lifetime and are likely to
     become much more expensive over the next decade. This is the case whether one observes
     from a Saskatchewan perspective or from the perspective of the integrated North American
     energy market that we are part of. Energy security will thus become a more and more
     important issue. In this context, it is wise to accelerate the development of renewable energy
     sources so that they are readily available to the next generation of Saskatchewan residents at
     prices that are affordable.

     This first report focuses on the electricity sector and the buildings sector. My second report
     will address transportation issues. Two of the major opportunities in the transport sector are
     ethanol and biodiesel. The Minister of Regional Economic and Co-operative Development and
     the Minister of Agriculture and Food are working hard to make substantial progress in both
     of these areas. The Saskatchewan ethanol strategy is moving forward well and the Biodiesel
     Development Task Force completed its final report in June 2006. My second report will also
     examine in much more detail the potential for small scale hydro and biomass development in
     forest fringe communities and in Northern Saskatchewan.

     With that, I am pleased to submit my first set of recommendations on how best to make
     Saskatchewan a North American leader in energy conservation and to achieve the target set
     by the government for renewable energy development in Saskatchewan.




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Making The Transition To Conservation and
Renewable Energy In The Electrical Sector
A RENEWABLE ENERGY AND CONSERVATION PORTFOLIO STANDARD – High
Priority

Saskatchewan has declared that by the third decade of this century, 33 per cent of all its
energy needs will be met through renewable sources of energy.

In contrast to other sectors, the electrical sector is already close to the 33 per cent figure –
sitting at 29 per cent right now. Of that 29 per cent, approximately one quarter of the capacity
is wind power and three quarters of the capacity is hydro. There are excellent opportunities
for expanding the use of renewable energy in the electrical generation sector using existing
technologies. There are also outstanding, low cost opportunities for electrical conservation
using existing technologies.

In the electrical sector, it is practical to think in terms of achieving over 40 per cent renewable
energy by 2025. This will help compensate for the buildings sector and transportation sector,
where renewable energy is currently in the range of 2 per cent and where renewable energy
systems are unlikely to exceed 25 per cent of total energy consumption by 2025.

To accelerate the development of green electricity, the Government of Saskatchewan
should follow the lead of many U.S. legislatures and establish a Renewable Energy Portfolio
Standard. The purpose of a Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard is to put in place a legislated
requirement for the use of renewable energy in all future power production planning.

In the same way that our Government has established a legislated mandate for ethanol,
I recommend we consider a legislated mandate for renewable electricity and electricity
conservation. To give SaskPower additional flexibility in meeting its Renewable Portfolio
Standard requirements, I recommend that electricity conservation be added to the concept
of a Renewable Portfolio Standard because conservation is low cost, its greenhouse gas
emissions are zero and its environmental performance is excellent. In effect, our government
should mandate a Renewable Energy and Conservation Portfolio Standard for electrical
generation in our province.

SaskPower is forecasting a demand of 4000 megawatts by 2024 – up approximately 700
megawatts from current demand peaks. SaskPower is also forecasting that over 1,000
megawatts of existing fossil fuel generating capacity will need to be retired and replaced, or
upgraded with a major capital investment by 2024.

When setting a Renewable Energy and Conservation Portfolio Standard, it is useful to look in
broad terms at the potential for developing renewable sources of electricity and using them
to either replace retiring fossil fuel plants or to meet load growth. It is also useful to look at




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     the cost effective potential of using energy conservation to reduce the need for building
     additional generating capacity. A brief synopsis of our opportunities is explained below.

     One of our best renewable sources of energy is hydro. Twenty-four per cent of SaskPower’s
     current generating capacity is from large scale hydro. In southern Saskatchewan SaskPower
     could expand its large scale hydro capacity by at least another 200 megawatts. One example
     of a project proposal that has been put forward along the North Saskatchewan River is the
     proposed Tri-Nations Hydro Project. It proposes to generate between 200 megawatts and 250
     megawatts of electricity.

     Saskatchewan’s potential to generate electricity from wind, small scale low impact hydro,
     solar, biomass and other environmentally sustainable renewable resources is enormous.
     172 megawatts of wind power capacity have already been developed and there are a large
     number of other excellent wind power sites in Saskatchewan. The limitation with wind power
     is its integration into the grid system. Given the progress already achieved on this front by
     many other jurisdictions, it is realistic to think in terms of at least another 300 megawatts of
     wind power on our Saskatchewan grid by 2015. Higher targets may be achieved by 2025.

     There is potential for several smaller scale hydro projects with low environmental impacts in
     Northern Saskatchewan. These would be developed working in partnership with First Nations
     and Métis communities and could easily exceed 125 megawatts by 2025. The Elizabeth Falls
     Hydro Project at approximately 40 megawatts is one example of a smaller scale hydro project
     on which a great deal of planning work has already been done.

     Other renewable energy sources have potential, but on a smaller scale. There are practical
     opportunities for 75 megawatts of electrical generation from biomass in forest fringe and
     northern communities. Fifteen megawatts of electrical generation using heat recovery is
     being contracted for along the Alliance Pipeline and there is potential for doing several
     more heat recovery projects. Saskatoon and Regina have excellent potential for small scale
     landfill gas projects that between the two cities could generate in the range of 10 megawatts
     of electricity. Small wind power systems on acreages and farms are already being installed
     and their adoption will become more widespread in the coming decade. Solar photovoltaic
     systems are steadily dropping in price and are likely to see widespread application within ten
     years. Small wind power and solar photovoltaic systems will contribute several megawatts of
     electrical production by 2025.

     The greatest economic opportunity of all lies in introducing new electricity conservation
     measures. Between now and 2025 there is potential for at least 200 megawatts of electrical
     energy conservation in Saskatchewan over and above the 100 megawatts currently assumed
     by SaskPower. This conservation potential alone is the equivalent of creating a new medium-
     sized electrical generating station at a price tag far below the cost of building new generating
     capacity.



16
With all of the above mentioned sources combined, there is every reason to think of hitting a
portfolio standard of at least 1,000 new megawatts of electricity from renewable energy and
demand side management by 2025.

I thus recommend that legislation be introduced in the Saskatchewan Legislature that
establishes a Renewable Energy and Conservation Portfolio Standard for electricity
production in Saskatchewan. The Portfolio Standard should require that by 2025 a
minimum of 50 per cent of Saskatchewan’s electricity will come from renewable energy
sources and from electricity conservation measures that are implemented between now
and 2025.

Renewable energy sources that are counted as part of the portfolio standard would include
existing hydro, wind power and gas compression heat recovery production and all new
renewable energy production that is brought on line between now and 2025. Electricity
savings that are counted as part of the portfolio standard should be achieved through
conservation initiatives taken between now and 2025 that reduce the need for new
generation capacity.

Renewable Portfolio Standards are widely adopted in the United States.1 Some U.S. states
specify targets for certain categories of renewable energy, most often all categories other than
large scale hydro.

New Jersey, for example, has set a Renewable Portfolio Standard of 22.5 per cent by 2021 of
which 2.5 per cent may come from small scale hydro (up to a maximum of 30 megawatts) and
2.12 per cent must come from solar electricity.

California has enacted a Renewable Portfolio Standard requiring 20 per cent renewable
electricity by 2017. The California Energy Commission has gone further and set a goal of 33
per cent by 2020. The California definition of renewable energy includes small hydropower
of 30 megawatts or less. Large scale hydro is excluded. Technologies such as wind, solar,
geothermal, biomass, fuel cells using renewable fuels, digester gas, landfill gas and ocean
wave are all included. Municipal solid waste is included in California law only if the municipal
waste is converted to a clean burning fuel using a non-combustion thermal process.

The Oregon Governor is bringing forward legislation next year to require that 25 per cent of
the state’s electricity will come from renewable energy by 2025, using a similar definition of
renewable energy.



1   At present over 20 U.S. states have Renewable Portfolio Standards.




                                                                                                   17
     The state of Montana requires that by 2015, 15 per cent of public utilities’ electricity sales will
     come from wind, solar, geothermal, existing hydro of 10 megawatts or less, landfill or farm-
     based methane gas, waste-water treatment gas, low emission biomass and fuel cells where
     hydrogen is produced with renewable fuels.

     The state of Nevada requires that 20 per cent of its electricity come from renewables by 2020
     with 5 per cent from solar energy. Nevada also allows electricity conservation to be included
     in its standard.

     Washington has recently adopted legislation setting a Renewable Portfolio Standard and, in
     this case there is a requirement for the utilities to pursue all available conservation that is cost
     effective, reliable and feasible.

     While the approach of these U.S. states is of interest with respect to the specificity of their
     Renewable Portfolio Standards, I am suggesting that our government leave SaskPower
     with flexibility in terms of how best to meet the proposed renewable portfolio standard in
     Saskatchewan. Hydro and conservation are both included in the proposed Saskatchewan
     standard and no specific legal requirements are proposed for any one category of renewable
     energy. Rather the intent is to focus on a broad range of low emission, renewable energy
     options plus electricity conservation.

     This proposed Saskatchewan legislation is intended to highlight a shift in the way SaskPower
     produces electricity and would form an important part of the foundation for its future
     planning process.

     The year 2025 is recommended for several reasons. First, it meets our Government’s
     commitment to achieve one third renewable energy by the third decade of this century.
     Second, it gives SaskPower adequate planning time to achieve the goal. Third, by 2025
     over 1000 megawatts of SaskPower’s current electrical generating capacity will either have
     to be retired or else upgraded by way of a very major capital investment. The SaskPower
     Supply Needs-Capacity exhibit identifies the timelines for retirement or major upgrade of
     SaskPower’s current generating facilities. This includes replacement of or a major capital
     retrofit of Queen Elizabeth units 2 and 3 and Boundary Dam units 1 through 6. Load growth of
     over 600 megawatts is also expected. Both the retirement of coal fired generating stations and
     load growth provide an excellent opportunity to introduce renewable energy systems.




18
EXHIBIT




A MAJOR INVESTMENT IN DEMAND SIDE MANAGEMENT TO REDUCE
ELECTRICAL CONSUMPTION IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER – High Priority

Saskatchewan’s most effective and least expensive opportunity to generate new zero
emission electricity is to invest in electricity conservation.

At present Saskatchewan Power Corporation estimates that electricity consumption in
Saskatchewan will grow at 50 megawatts per year. This is a very costly proposition because
it means over the next 20 years that not only will old existing generating stations need
to be retrofitted or replaced by new facilities, but that in addition a huge amount of extra
generating capacity will need to be built.




                                                                                               19
     The need for this enormous expenditure can be reduced somewhat by introducing an
     aggressive electricity conservation program. There are many examples of utilities in other
     parts of Canada and the United States that have successfully done this. These programs are
     referred to as ‘Demand Side Management’ and have succeeded in achieving annual energy
     savings of approximately 0.6 per cent per year.

     In a Saskatchewan context over the period 2006 to 2025 an aggressive demand side
     management program should be able to achieve energy savings of between 10 per cent and
     12 per cent.

     I recommend that SaskPower undertake a major investment in Demand Side
     Management targeting 300 megawatts of electricity savings by 2025. Achieving
     this level of electrical savings will require Demand Side Management spending of at
     least $30 million on an annual basis by 2009.2 This would triple current SaskPower
     projections with regard to the role of Demand Side Management by 2025.

     To ensure cost effective planning, all initial Demand Side Management proposals should come
     in at 3 cents per kilowatt hour or less, which is far below the cost of building new electrical
     generation. This will translate into a huge saving for taxpayers. It will reduce rate pressures and
     help keep SaskPower’s debt at more reasonable levels.

     In order for this policy change to work successfully, demand side management (i.e.
     energy conservation) must be viewed as a supply side option. It must be allowed to
     compete financially with all other electrical generation options. All expenditures on
     Demand Side Management including related staffing costs should be treated as a
     capital expense, not an operating expense. This is standard practice in both Manitoba
     and British Columbia.

     If Demand Side Management is allowed to compete in this way with all electrical generation
     options, it will come out ahead on a great many occasions, simply because conservation is
     certain to be the cheapest option. As an additional spin-off, this will be an extremely effective
     investment in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Not only is Demand Side Management a
     zero emission option, but it will substantially cut emissions.3

     What would a Demand Side Management (energy conservation) program in the electricity
     sector in Saskatchewan look like? I have provided some examples of successful programs
     that might be included in a utility DMS program below. There are huge savings to be had by
     relatively simple but decentralized measures.


     2    Manitoba Hydro spends $35 million per year on Demand Side Management initiatives in the electricity sector. SaskPower currently
         spends under $1 million per year on DSM.

     3   To prepare for the second phase of Demand Side Management a determination study should be undertaken in which a very detailed
         look is taken at DSM opportunities by customer sector. The estimated cost of this study is $600,000. It will be very useful in ensuring the
         best use of a Demand Side Management investment in Saskatchewan that should reach $30 million per year.
20
Ad Campaign Aimed at Saving Power

SaskPower should launch a major and sustained advertising campaign aimed at encouraging
workplaces, homes and farms to turn off lights, use the right appliance, buy energy efficient
appliances, install energy efficient lighting, get rid of old, highly inefficient appliances, etc. DSM
SaskPower staff have done significant planning work on what this campaign might look like.

Mass Distribution of Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

Large electricity savings can be achieved simply by replacing incandescent lighting
with compact fluorescent lighting. SaskPower should therefore focus on the widespread
distribution and installation of high efficiency compact fluorescent light bulbs and should
view this as a supply side strategy. SaskPower should distribute millions of high efficiency
compact fluorescents free of charge and make on site visits to residential and small
commercial customers to help customers install them in locations that get the most daily
use. In the case of small commercial businesses, the program should include the installation
of super T-8 fluorescent lighting. This campaign should be planned in conjunction with retail
outlets that distribute this merchandise.

Manitoba Hydro has achieved 30 per cent of their electricity reductions in homes through the
installation of compact fluorescent lighting.4

Incentive Programs for Other Wise Lighting Initiatives

SaskPower should provide financial incentives for public institutions and businesses to:
    • replace incandescent exit sign lamps with LED lamps;
    • upgrade halogen lamps to more efficient halogen infrared lamps;
    • replace metal halide lights with energy efficient, lower wattage metal halide lights;
    • install lighting controls, such as occupancy sensors and timers to turn lights on only
      when needed; and
    • upgrade municipal lighting systems to very high efficiency levels that orient light
      downwards instead of upwards to the sky.

B.C. Hydro offers most of these incentives right now through their Power Smart Program.




4   The Manitoba experience has been that both Manitoba Hydro and their customers have received financial savings through investments
    made with the encouragement of incentives under the Demand Side Management Program. The level of incentive from Manitoba
    Hydro depends on the savings for the Crown utility. Manitoba Hydro initiatives in the commercial and farm sector generally cost under
    2 cents per kilowatt hour. There have also been other benefits to farm and business owners. For example, dairy farmers report that the
    installation of more efficient lighting has improved milk production. Businesses report that employees get less headaches in buildings
    where energy efficient lighting has been installed.




                                                                                                                                             21
     Incentive Programs for Broader Investments in Electricity Efficiency on Farms and in
     Businesses

     As discussed in more detail in a later section on a proposed business energy tax credit, our
     Provincial Government should provide financial incentives to shorten the payback period for
     farms and businesses that make practical conservation investments including high efficiency
     lighting, the installation of high efficiency motors, the installation of energy efficient pumps,
     the installation of energy efficient elevators, the installation of variable frequency drives,
     the installation of more energy efficient irrigation systems, energy efficient retrofits to
     refrigeration facilities and the installation of advanced controls for HVAC systems. Investments
     should achieve energy reductions of 10 per cent or more.

     Targeted Incentive Program for Municipalities to Reduce Electrical Expenses in Ice Rinks,
     Municipal Facilities, Traffic Lights, and Street Lighting

     Incentive programs should be geared to encouraging municipalities to install LED lighting
     and other high efficiency lighting, upgrade the energy efficiency of refrigeration equipment,
     invest in new high efficiency motors and invest in Energy Star appliances, computers and
     equipment. In ice rinks financial help could be provided to install variable speed drives on
     brine pumps which pump coolant through the rink. Investments in advanced metering and
     energy control systems should be encouraged among large customers.

     Energy Performance Contracting Services for Municipal, Farm and Small Commercial
     Customers

     SaskPower has delivered first class energy performance contracting services to many of its
     larger customers including important institutional customers such as school divisions. This
     service focuses on identifying energy conservation investments that will pay for themselves
     through the electrical savings and also generate a small profit. This excellent service should
     be expanded and made available to small commercial customers, municipal customers and
     farms.

     Installation of Advanced Metering

     Installation of interval based metering allows a customer’s meter to be read in 15 minute
     blocks.5 This would allow the customer to understand more fully when electricity is being
     used and to curb consumption as needed. Incentives should also include help with the
     installation of top of the line energy control systems.


     5   The Government of Ontario is installing smart meters in every customer facility by 2010. The Government of Manitoba has embarked on
         a smart meter pilot project.




22
Special Audit and Consulting Service for Large Industrial Customers

Large industrial customers are now making up half the demand for electricity in
Saskatchewan. This sector needs to be considered a major priority for encouraging demand
side management.

SaskPower should establish a special service targeted at helping large industrial customers
save electricity, save money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.6 This service should begin
by focusing on the 40 largest customers which account for 33 per cent of SaskPower sales and
50 per cent of the kilowatt hours sold.

The conservation needs of large industrial customers are often very industry-specific and
are best addressed through industry experts. What is needed however, is for the DSM branch
of SaskPower to coordinate energy audits and to facilitate follow-up expert visits to each of
SaskPower’s large industrial customers. SaskPower should budget to cost share the audit costs
when the client adopts efficiency and conservation actions.7

SaskPower should also budget to cover part of the cost of engaging energy managers for
industrial clients in circumstances where the industrial client wants to partner with SaskPower
to launch significant energy reductions.8

SaskPower Would Benefit from Outside Expertise in Launching its Demand Side
Management Work, Especially on the Industrial Side

I recommend that our government seek out high profile organizations who could offer special
expertise in working with Saskatchewan’s industrial customers to reduce energy use.

A broader Demand Side Management analysis is also required to assess all the best
opportunities for demand side management and energy conservation investments in the
province, with particular attention to the commercial, agricultural and oil and gas sectors
where greenhouse gas emissions have sharply risen.



6   Examples of the kinds of projects that might be undertaken include installation of energy efficient pump systems, redesign of
    ducting and pumping systems, installation of variable speed drives, fixing air leaks in a compressed air system, retooling changes to
    a production line to make it more energy efficient or installation of advanced control systems to more precisely control industrial
    processes.

7   In addition to energy savings, industrial customers often achieve production benefits and waste reduction.

8   Manitoba Hydro provides incentives to industry of up to $250,000 per energy conservation project. It also covers 50 per cent of the cost
    of feasibility studies up to a maximum of $7,500.




                                                                                                                                               23
     A consultant with a reputation for achieving deep savings is recommended.9 This kind of
     outside expertise will also be important in helping to develop the knowledge and capacity-
     building within Saskatchewan to support our long term needs for demand side management.

     SaskPower Should Launch a High Performance Building Program for Large Electricity
     Intense Facilities

     In British Columbia, B.C. Hydro (Power Smart) helps developers, owners and designers of new
     large, electricity-intense facilities to create better, more efficient buildings by offering financial
     incentives to offset the incremental costs of the energy-efficient measures in the high
     performance design. Power Smart also helps to identify energy saving strategies early in the
     design process and to evaluate alternative design options. SaskPower should deliver a similar
     program focused on electricity intense buildings that achieve major energy efficiency gains as
     a result of wise investments in their design process and the energy efficient technologies that
     are built in.

     Energy Efficiency Leaders in the Workplace Program

     It could be extremely useful for SaskPower to have a series of advocates in the workplace for
     energy efficiency measures.

     The Conservation Bureau of the Ontario Power Authority is writing to each Chief Executive
     Officer in Ontario asking them to appoint an energy conservation champion in their
     workplace. I suggest the President of SaskPower consider a similar measure.

     The Conservation Bureau in Ontario is also working with and encouraging managers to
     involve employees in identifying low cost electricity conservation measures that can be
     implemented on the shop floor. These may involve simple changes in how things are done or
     in how a production line operates. Employees are recognized for their contribution. SaskPower
     could consider a similar initiative.




     9   An example of an organization that should be invited to bid on a SaskPower tender in this area is the Rocky Mountain Institute in
         Colorado. Rocky Mountain Institute is a non profit organization with an exceptionally strong R&D capacity. It has an excellent track
         record in achieving deep savings in both electricity consumption and greenhouse gas emissions and has the range of contacts in
         North America to be able to identify appropriate industry experts to do highly specialized audits and appropriate follow-up work. See:
         www.rmi.org



24
LARGE SCALE WIND POWER TO PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE
DEVELOPMENT OF RENEWABLE ELECTRICITY IN THE COMING DECADE
– High Priority

Under the direction of Premier Lorne Calvert, Saskatchewan has become a leader in Canada
in wind power. Our staff at SaskPower have worked hard to successfully implement the
Centennial Wind Power project and we now have 172 megawatts of installed wind power
capacity. On a per capita basis, this is the highest installed wind power capacity in Canada.
Another two wind projects totalling just over 28 megawatts are currently under consideration
through the Environmentally Preferred Power (EPP) Program.

I recommend that SaskPower make large scale wind power an important part of its
plan for increasing the production of renewable and sustainable electricity in our
province over the next 8 years. SaskPower should plan to produce a total of at least 500
megawatts of its electricity from wind power by 2015.

This would constitute a 300 megawatts increase in wind power capacity over the next 8
years. This expanded wind power capacity would need to be backed up with new natural
gas generating stations that can ramp up and down quickly. The combination of green wind
power and back up natural gas electrical generation should be viewed as a major option for
meeting base load electricity supply needs.10

Integrating wind power into the grid requires careful planning as wind is an intermittent
energy product. Many utilities in North America have hired experts in wind power integration
to facilitate this work and the national laboratory system in the United States is doing
extensive wind power integration and testing work.

The amount of natural gas electrical generation that is required as backup to wind power can
be reduced significantly by strategically locating wind power facilities.11 SaskPower will want
to consider a more diversified set of locations for its next wind power projects. These locations
should take account of where electricity loads are in the province, where the best wind
regimes are and where the wind regimes are most complementary to one another.



10   Natural gas generating stations work well as a backup to wind power. They can fire up and down within 5 – 10 minutes, quickly
     complementing changes in wind power production. Natural gas generating stations can be flexibly located since we have a broad
     natural gas distribution network. General Electric is working on new natural gas generator designs that will ramp up and down even
     faster and will be ideal backup facilities. Saskatchewan already has a number of natural gas electrical generation facilities around the
     province and as part of the integration work we should ask SaskPower to look at the best ways of fully utilizing existing natural gas
     generation facilities for wind power backup.

11   The large bulk of the cost associated with natural gas generating stations is fuel rather than capital expense. Good site location for wind
     turbines becomes key because this can substantially reduce the backup natural gas fuel costs.




                                                                                                                                                   25
     SaskPower should work intensively over the next 2 to 3 years to identify wind regimes in
     Saskatchewan that are complementary to one another. By this, I mean wind regimes that
     when combined together would allow electricity to be generated at complementary times
     of day and at complementary periods over more than one day. To date, this kind of mapping
     work has not been done. We are likely to find that a widely dispersed series of smaller wind
     power projects (25-50 megawatts) will serve us most effectively as we move from 172
     megawatts to 500 megawatts of wind power capacity. 12

     SaskPower should also carefully examine the potential to more fully utilize existing natural
     gas generation as a source of backup. Other future sources of backup to a larger wind power
     regime in Saskatchewan are expanded hydro capacity in our province and contracting with
     Manitoba for a limited amount of hydro backup.

     SaskPower should also be asked to consider a role for First Nations and for private wind power
     producers in its wind power planning.

     Some First Nations have excellent wind resources they could be helped to develop. Interested
     First Nations will need access to wind power mapping data and the ability to borrow capital
     through the loan program referred to later in this report. They could develop projects for
     submission to the EPP Program. Mapping work may also conclude that some reserve locations
     are highly suitable for larger wind power projects, subject to approval by the Band Council.
     This would provide the First Nation with construction job opportunities and rental income.

     Many independent power producers have leases on land that has been mapped for its wind
     power potential. There may be financial advantages to SaskPower buying wind power from an
     independent power producer because under federal tax policy, these producers are eligible
     for flow through shares under the Canadian Resource Energy Credit and as a result may be
     able to deliver a lower price for wind power electricity. A limited role for independent power
     producers would also help SaskPower avoid undue debt as it expands its renewable energy
     portfolio.

     Saskatchewan has a vast wind resource that could ultimately generate between 15 and 20
     per cent of our electricity needs, if integration issues are satisfactorily overcome and if some
     additional transmission capacity is developed. Wind power is economically attractive and will
     readily compete on price with other electrical generation options. Medium term planning
     work should therefore focus on overcoming wind power integration challenges at higher
     levels of wind penetration than 500 megawatts.


     12   One of the important advantages of choosing several different locations for wind power production is that the sites that work
          particularly well are then easy to expand. If new wind generation is sited at one central point, adjustments become much more difficult.




26
Germany, Spain and Denmark are rapidly reaching the 20 per cent mark and will
have surpassed it by 2010. Given the outstanding wind regime we are blessed with in
Saskatchewan, SaskPower should be asked to adopt a carefully planned but equally vigorous
approach.

SaskPower will need to develop a very high level of expertise in wind power integration.
SaskPower should be asked to co-operate with leading edge jurisdictions around
the world to assist it in accomplishing this goal and to become a world leader in its
own right in wind power development and wind power integration. With this in mind,
SaskPower should establish a world class wind power integration unit to recruit and
develop expertise in all facets of wind power.

To facilitate the best decisions on the location and size of future wind power facilities,
SaskPower and Saskatchewan Research Council should undertake intensive work on
identifying complementary wind regimes. SaskPower and Saskatchewan Research Council
should be asked to provide a preliminary report within 18 months on the wind locations
in Saskatchewan that are most complementary to one another and a final report within 30
months. The final results should be publicly available and should be used by SaskPower to
help finalize major new wind power facility locations. Two years of ‘time of day’ wind data
assessment at a wide variety of sites will be required.

These results should also be available to help communities and private wind power
developers submit smaller proposals under the EPP Program.

ENCOURAGE NET METERING – High Priority

In my Saskatchewan consultations to date, net metering has been the policy change most
often requested. There is a strong desire among many people to contribute to making
renewable energy a reality in Saskatchewan. These citizens are anxious to be able to produce
renewable electricity and sell it to the grid. The current price offered by SaskPower (3.14 cents
per kilowatt hour) makes it very unattractive to install measures such as a small wind power or
a solar energy system for producing electricity.

I have concluded that the Government of Saskatchewan should encourage net metering
for small scale producers of green, low impact electricity and should adjust the
SaskPower rate structure for net metering so that customers who install safe renewable
energy systems can sell electricity to the grid at a rate equivalent to the retail price for
electricity.




                                                                                                    27
     Most U.S. states now have some form of net metering. In Canada five provincial governments
     have approved a net metering policy. Ontario and British Columbia are the most advanced.

     In Ontario net metering is available to all customers that want it. The provincial government
     has adopted a goal of 100,000 homes being powered by alternative sources of energy within
     a decade. It is offering customers who install and sell wind-powered electricity to the grid a
     price of 11 cents per kilowatt hour. To encourage customers to install photovoltaic systems it
     is offering to pay 42 cents per kilowatt hour.

     In British Columbia net metering has been in place since 2004. The current compensation rate
     is 5.4 cents per kilowatt hour and the meter is installed at no cost to the customer.

     SaskPower has introduced a small power producer policy that is intended to permit the
     installation of electrical generators up to 100 kilowatt in size. Any customer owned installation
     must meet SaskPower’s interconnection requirement to ensure that safety and reliability are
     addressed. SaskPower currently purchases excess energy generated by the customer at 3.14
     cents per kilowatt hour. However this price is too low to encourage green energy installations.
     A price in the 9 cent range would be more attractive.

     To encourage the installation of small scale, environmentally friendly, low impact renewable
     energy systems, I recommend that interested customers who install low impact, green
     renewable energy systems be allowed to sell electricity to the grid at a price identical to the
     retail price of electricity.

     The ideal way for net metering to operate in Saskatchewan would be to have only one meter
     per residential or small business customer and to simply allow that meter to run backwards
     when green electricity is being sold to the grid. However, there is currently one obstacle to
     this approach, in that Measurement Canada has not yet certified meters in Canada to operate
     both forwards and backwards.

     In the interim, I recommend that SaskPower install a second meter at no cost for
     customers who install small scale, zero emission, green electricity generation systems.

     Net metering for solar photovoltaic energy systems should be permitted in both urban and
     rural Saskatchewan. Small wind power systems will primarily be installed on acreages and
     farms in rural Saskatchewan. In the longer term biomass applications that generate electricity
     on farms are also a possibility.




28
The participation rate in net metering in the first five years is likely to be small, probably less
than a total of three megawatts. However, net metering has the potential to become a much
more significant contributor to electrical generation in the period 2012 to 2025. Saskatchewan
people are inventive and the solar and wind resource in this province is large. While small
wind and solar electric systems are expensive ways to produce electricity, there are many
people who want to install them for reasons of environmental sustainability and who will
appreciate being able to sell surplus electricity back to the grid at retail rates. The price of
renewable energy technologies will also continue to fall making their installation more
financially practical in a few years time.


OTHER MEASURES THAT COULD HELP ADVANCE THE USE OF RENEWABLE
ELECTRICITY

Contracting With Environmental Organizations to Market Green Power and Promote
Public Education and Awareness Aimed at Greenhouse Gas Reductions

Saskatchewan Power Corporation should contract with environmental organizations
and other non-profit organizations in Saskatchewan to market green power. A few U.S.
utilities have used this approach with success creating a win-win arrangement for both the
utility and the non-profit organization.13

Accelerating SaskPower’s Environmentally Preferred Power Program

SaskPower has done a very good job of launching an EPP Program. Contracts are now in
place for 25 megawatts of environmentally preferred electricity and two additional projects
totaling just over 28 megawatts are currently under consideration. Proposals for producing
well in excess of 200 megawatts of electricity in an environmentally friendly way have been
presented to SaskPower. This clearly shows the potential for expanding the program. Another
indication of interest is that SaskPower staff receive a large number of inquiries each year
about opportunities for green independent power production.

Projects that are eligible for being submitted under the EPP Program include wind power,
heat recovery, low impact hydro, biomass, biogas, flare gas and solar photovoltaic systems. To
date the projects chosen have principally been in the area of wind power and heat recovery.

I recommend that SaskPower expand the Environmentally Preferred Power Program
targeting another 200 megawatts of environmentally preferred power over the next six
years.


13   In Washington and Oregon, utilities contract with the environmental organization ‘Renewable Northwest’ to market green power.




                                                                                                                                     29
     An area of special emphasis should be low impact, environmentally sustainable power
     projects that will either help meet Saskatchewan’s need for continuous electricity (24 hours a
     day) or that will contribute to meeting SaskPower’s peak electrical needs. Another priority for
     the EPP program should be areas of the province where SaskPower faces higher transmission
     losses, particularly Northern Saskatchewan.

     To date the EPP program has offered a premium price of one cent per kilowatt hour
     of electricity produced under EPP. This price premium should be increased for high
     environmental performance projects that meet the needs of SaskPower as described above.14

     In addition to paying a premium for high environmental performance projects that meet
     SaskPower’s electricity needs, our government needs to be conscious of the fact that the
     Government of Ontario is now offering independent power producers much higher prices
     than Saskatchewan, in effect setting a base price (11 cents per kilowatt hour for projects
     under 10 megawatts). This will influence where mobile capital chooses to invest in renewable
     energy development in Canada. While Saskatchewan does not need to offer 11 cents, if
     we want to facilitate investment in high environmental performance renewable electricity
     projects, we will have to increase our price offers under the EPP program. 15

     Moreover, because these projects are small scale and diversified, they will take a few years
     to develop. If we want them to be in place to help meet Saskatchewan’s power needs in the
     next decade, the work to develop them needs to get underway right now, so that careful
     planning is done, high environmental performance is achieved and the appropriate pricing
     arrangements are negotiated.

     Consideration should be given to a standard offer of at least 9 cents per kilowatt hour for
     high environmental performance projects with an additional bonus if they provide electricity
     continuously 24 hours a day.




     14    A good example of where a higher price premium would be warranted is biomass projects with a very high level of environmental
          performance. These would be particularly valuable in Northern Saskatchewan where transmission line losses are higher. They would
          provide base load electricity. They would be valuable for economic development in local communities. Yet, without a higher EPP price,
          they are unlikely to get off the ground.

     15   On October 3, 2006 the Alberta Government announced a special producer credit for biogas projects, making Alberta a very attractive
          location for generating electricity from biomass.


30
Financial Incentives to Promote Conservation and
Renewable Energy in All Sectors of the Economy
The following sections examine many aspects of conservation and renewable energy, but
have their greatest impact in the buildings sector. The recommendations in these sections are
intended to lay the foundation for the buildings sector of Saskatchewan to achieve a sharp
reduction in fuel consumption and fuel costs. They are also intended to lay the foundation for
the buildings sector in Saskatchewan achieving 25 per cent of its energy use from renewable
energy by 2025.

Incentive programs aimed at promoting energy conservation and renewable energy are now
widely in place across North America. Saskatchewan has strong incentive programs for energy
conservation in the residential space heating sector, but needs to broaden those incentive
programs to cover a much wider range of initiatives in all sectors of the economy.

There are several reasons why incentive programs for conservation and renewable energy
are important. First, they encourage investment by individuals, institutions and businesses in
a field of endeavour that benefits society as a whole. Second, the urgency of climate change
means that an investment in energy conservation and renewable energy must be accelerated
and incentives will help quicken the pace of that investment.

Third, incentive programs help put conservation and renewable energy on a more equal
playing field with fossil fuels, which to date have been heavily subsidized. There is no longer
any doubt that when individuals purchase fossil fuels they are not paying the real price. The
subsidies given by national governments to promote the discovery and extraction of fossil
fuels are not included in the price. The enormous environmental damage fossil fuels are
creating is also not included in the price.

The incentive programs outlined here are designed to shorten the payback period on
investments made by businesses, institutions and individuals in the area of conservation and
renewable energy. Businesses often operate in an environment where accepted pay back
periods are quite short and there are many competing opportunities for pay backs such as
alternative capital investments or new inventory investments. Individuals often keep their
home or car purchase for only a few years and may not own it long enough to recoup their
conservation or renewable energy investment before they sell their home or car. Public
institutions tend to have a longer term perspective; here the issue tends to be the difficulty of
finding within their annual operating budget the room to finance capital expenditures which
generate savings over the long term.

I therefore recommend the introduction of a carefully planned set of incentive programs
for conservation and renewable energy across the Saskatchewan economy.




                                                                                                    31
     Some jurisdictions have achieved success with an exceptionally wide range of conservation
     and renewable energy incentives, some of which are geared for niche markets. California, for
     example, has over one hundred incentive programs which have helped it to achieve no per
     capita growth in electricity consumption over the past twenty-five years and a renewable
     energy component in its electrical sector of 10.8 per cent (excluding large scale hydro).
     However, on balance I have chosen a more modest approach with incentive programs in some
     key strategic areas where the opportunities for adoption are large and where impacts could
     also be large.


     BUSINESS ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY TAX CREDIT
     – High Priority

     The Government of Saskatchewan should introduce a Business Energy Efficiency
     and Renewable Energy Tax Credit.16 The business tax credit should help offset costs
     incurred by businesses, farms and co-operatives that install renewable energy systems
     and invest in conservation measures.

     This business tax credit should apply to projects that use wind, solar, small scale hydro, or
     biomass to produce energy, displace energy or reclaim energy from waste. Projects should
     replace at least 10 per cent of the electricity, natural gas or oil used and should have a net
     greenhouse gas emissions reduction of at least 10 per cent. Geothermal projects should be
     eligible in all circumstances where they are sourced with green electricity or have built in
     extremely high levels of energy efficiency. 17 For renewable energy measures the tax credit
     should be based on the total cost of the installation.

     Energy conservation investments that reduce space heating and/or electrical use by 10 per
     cent or more and are listed in an energy audit report would also be eligible.18 Examples of
     eligible projects would include the conducting of commercial energy audits, the installation
     of high efficiency furnaces with high efficiency motors, the installation of condensing or near



     16    The concept for the business energy efficiency and renewable energy tax credit is adapted from a similar tax credit that is delivered by
          the Oregon Department of Energy. My sincere thanks to the director and senior management at the Oregon Department of Energy for
          their assistance.

     17   The reason why geothermal energy projects should have a green electricity source is because the current foundation of Saskatchewan’s
          electrical grid is coal. While geothermal energy will reduce natural gas demand, it will increase electricity use and if the source of that
          electricity is coal, greenhouse gas emission reductions will be negligible or non-existent. Geothermal projects should also be eligible
          when a major effort has been made to super insulate a building thereby reducing heating and cooling needs.

     18   It is important to establish an energy audit program for small commercial business in the same way that an audit service currently exists
          for homeowners.




32
condensing boilers, attic, floor and wall insulation, installation of passive solar technology,
installation of radiant floor heating, caulking and weather stripping, installation of energy
efficient windows and doors, duct insulation, heat recovery from refrigeration systems,
improved pumps and motors, lighting retrofits that install high efficiency lighting, variable
speed drive motor controls, and controls for heating and cooling systems. Several of the
electrical initiatives in this list may ultimately become part of the SaskPower Demand Side
management program and could thus be funded through that.19

The energy savings tax credit for business would also be available for the installation of
energy efficiency measures during new construction that result in new buildings exceeding
Commercial Building Incentive Program Standards (25 per cent above the Model National
Energy Code for Commercial Buildings) or rental property that exceed Energy Star (E-80)
standards for residential construction. The tax credit should apply to the incremental cost of
making the project exceed these standards. The Office of Energy Conservation should give
particular encouragement to the construction of new commercial or institutional buildings
that meet the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards and to the
construction of net zero energy homes which produce as much energy as they consume.

The business tax credit should be administered by the Office of Energy Conservation.20

RESIDENTIAL AND HOMEOWNER INCENTIVES

EXPAND AND STRENGTHEN THE SASKATCHEWAN ENERGY SHARE
RESIDENTIAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM - High Priority

Saskatchewan’s Energy Share residential energy conservation program introduced in
the fall of 2005 is due to expire on March 31, 2007. The program has proved popular with
homeowners and is an effective way to facilitate energy efficiency in the residential sector.
In the summer of 2006, our provincial Cabinet made several more positive changes to the
program to offset the negative cutbacks introduced by the Harper government.

The residential energy conservation component of the Energy Share program should be
expanded and strengthened with the following modifications:



19   SaskEnergy currently delivers an excellent grant program to help commercial customers install condensing or near condensing boilers.
     The size of the grant varies depending on the equipment size. The program runs to December 2007. To date 24 condensing boilers
     have been installed. There is a waiting list of applicants. Condensing boilers should be covered under the proposed business tax credit;
     alternatively the grant program for installation of condensing boilers should be extended and expanded.

20   For solar and biomass projects, the Saskatchewan business tax credit should be combined with funding under the federal government’s
     Renewable Energy Deployment Initiative. The REDI program provides a financial incentive to business and industry to install active solar
     water heating systems, active solar air heating systems and high efficiency biomass combustion systems between 75 kilowatts and 2
     megawatts capacity. Saskatchewan participation rates have been low. The Office of Energy Conservation should be mandated to work
     with interested Saskatchewan businesses to assist them in accessing federal funds as well as provincial incentives.


                                                                                                                                                33
     Expand the program to include electrical energy and domestic hot water conservation
     measures

     To date the program has focused on reducing energy use related to space heating. The
     program should be extended to include electrical energy conservation measures and
     measures to reduce demand for domestic hot water.

     The energy audit done for the homeowner should therefore include cost effective
     opportunities for increasing electrical efficiency in the home, increasing the efficiency of hot
     water use and reducing electricity and fuel costs. Eligible expenditures should be broadened
     to include energy efficient lighting, the installation of Energy Star appliances, the installation
     of premium efficiency water heaters, and the purchase of devices such as low flow shower
     heads and hot water heater blankets.

     Increase the maximum grant available and enable residents to access the program for a
     second round of eligible improvements

     To reflect the broadening of the program mandate, the maximum eligible grant should be
     increased. Homeowners should also be eligible for more than one grant if at a later date they
     undertake a second round of eligible improvements.

     Broaden the eligibility to include renters for a prescribed list of improvements

     To date, only homeowners have been eligible for the program. It should be broadened to
     make renters eligible for assistance with the following tenant-owned purchases: energy
     efficient lighting, Energy Star appliances, low flow showerheads and hot water heater blankets.

     The above prescriptive measures are known to produce highly cost effective energy savings
     and greenhouse gas emission reductions. A home energy audit would thus not be necessary
     in order to effectively implement the renters’ portion of the program.

     Some of above mentioned measures could receive at least partial funding by SaskPower
     through an expanded Demand Side Management Program.

     Re-establish the Low Interest Loan Program for Energy Efficient Furnaces

     SaskEnergy and its Network Dealers should re-establish the low interest loan program for
     helping customers finance the purchase of high efficiency furnaces. The cost of this program
     was being jointly funded by SaskEnergy, SaskPower and Natural Resources Canada, but as a




34
result of federal government climate change cuts, the federal contributions were abolished
and the program was dismantled. It was, however, an effective program.

Distribute free conservation kits through the EnerGuide audit process

SaskPower should have significant involvement with the new electricity conservation
component of the Energy Share residential conservation program. SaskPower’s staff who
specialize in demand side management should train auditors to provide advice on electricity
saving measures in the home.

SaskEnergy and SaskPower should provide free kits that the EnerGuide auditor brings to every
home. These could include very low cost conservation technologies that could be installed
on site such as free compact fluorescent lights or a low flow showerhead. The corporations
should develop the content in these kits in such a way that on site installation will have
immediate impact at very low cost per unit of energy saved. This should be considered part of
their respective Demand Side Management strategies.

Ensure Measurability of program outcomes and results

Measurability of results is important and a renewed program should use actual energy
readings from a customer’s bill to determine the actual energy savings achieved from
conservation measures. In the next round of the program, consumers should be asked to
sign a waiver which allows SaskEnergy and SaskPower to look at a customer’s energy bill to
determine what energy efficiency gains have been achieved.

ASSISTANCE FOR HOMEOWNERS AND LANDLORDS TO INSTALL
RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY – High Priority

The Government of Saskatchewan should establish a Renewable Energy Grant Program
to assist homeowners and landlords with the installation of safe, renewable energy
technology in new and existing homes.

Eligible projects should include solar hot water heating systems, solar collectors used for
space heating, photovoltaic systems, and small wind power systems.21 Geothermal systems
for space heating should be eligible providing a green electricity source is used or providing
that extremely high levels of energy efficiency have been built into the project.




21   Eligible makes of solar, wind and geothermal systems should be identified for reasons of quality control.




                                                                                                                 35
     The grant program for homeowners should be allowed to be used more than once in a ten
     year time frame as long as complementary systems are being installed to reduce greenhouse
     gas emissions. Thus, if a homeowner wanted to install a solar hot water system now and a
     photovoltaic system for electrical generation five years from now, they should be eligible
     for financial assistance on both installations. Similarly, a rural homeowner could install a
     geothermal system for space heating and meet a large part of their electrical needs through
     a small wind power installation. They would be eligible for assistance on both systems. The
     provincial grant program should be administered by the Office of Energy Conservation.

     INCENTIVES FOR HOMEOWNERS TO BUILD TO R-2000 OR ENERGY STAR
     STANDARDS – High Priority

     The Government of Saskatchewan should introduce a New Home Grant Program to
     assist homeowners with the incremental cost of building to R-2000 standards. A slightly
     smaller grant should be available to homeowners that buy Energy Star houses.

     R-2000 represents a standard 40 per cent more energy efficient than the average home with
     a rating of 80 on the EnerGuide scale. Homeowners face incremental costs of $5,000 to $7,000
     to achieve the standard.22 Approximately 7 per cent of Saskatchewan homes were built to
     R-2000 standards in the last fiscal year. R-2000 homes are individually tested to ensure they
     meet energy efficiency standards.

     Energy Star is a standard of building construction that is being promoted by the
     Saskatchewan Home Builders Association. It is more prescriptive in nature and each individual
     home would not be tested to ensure it complies precisely with the targeted energy rating. For
     this reason, these homes will be slightly less expensive to build. However, these homes will on
     average achieve a very high level of energy efficiency and will include important electricity
     conservation and water conservation measures in their design.

     Three thousand new homes are built in Saskatchewan each year. The Government of
     Saskatchewan should target at least 50 per cent of new home construction to meet
     either R-2000 or Energy Star standards by 2010. The strong partnership between the
     Home Builders and the Office of Energy Conservation should be continued and the promotion
     program on these houses should be ramped up.


     22   The incremental cost of building to an R-2000 standard is 3 per cent to 5 per cent of the cost of constructing the new home.




36
FINANCIAL INCENTIVES FOR MUNICIPALITIES AND NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATIONS – High Priority

The Government of Saskatchewan should establish a grant program to assist non-profit
organizations and municipalities with upgrading the energy efficiency of the existing
buildings they own. Assistance should also be provided for the installation of renewable
energy technologies in existing buildings.

In the short term, in existing buildings renewable energy installations will most frequently
constitute installing solar hot water heating technology. Some ice rink facilities will also install
ground source heat pumps, especially if they plan a conversion from natural to artificial ice.

In brand new municipal and non-profit buildings there is excellent potential to apply passive
solar, active solar and geothermal technologies. In some rural locations there will also be
potential to utilize small wind power systems.

In new buildings, our Government should also cover a portion of the incremental cost
of building to a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standard and a
portion of the incremental cost of building to a net zero energy standard. A higher level
of assistance should be provided to those who achieve net zero energy building status to give
special encouragement to this target being achieved.

The grant program should be administered by the Office of Energy Conservation.23


ESTABLISH A LOW INTEREST ENERGY LOAN PROGRAM FOR LARGER
CONSERVATION AND RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS OVER TEN THOUSAND
DOLLARS – High Priority

The Government of Saskatchewan should establish a new energy loan program that
is based on the Province making available money for energy efficiency and renewable
energy initiatives at the same cost that the Province incurs to borrow plus any
administration costs.


23   Solar and biomass projects undertaken by non-profit organizations and public institutions are also eligible for assistance under the
     federal REDI program. The provincial Office of Energy Conservation should be mandated to ensure public institutions are helped
     to access assistance at both the provincial and federal level. OEC should promote widespread and large scale participation in these
     programs.




                                                                                                                                            37
     In this way, the Government of Saskatchewan can pass on to the people of Saskatchewan the
     benefits that have come with 16 straight credit rating upgrades achieved by our Government.
     The program would offer low interest, fixed rate loans for any qualified project that invests
     in energy conservation, safe renewable energy, irrigation efficiency or creating products
     from recycled materials. The Office of Energy Conservation should work closely with project
     applicants to help them shape their projects in the most sustainable and cost effective
     manner possible. All projects should be designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.24

     Individuals, businesses, co-operatives, farms, school boards, municipalities, First Nations and
     non-profit organizations could all qualify. The minimum size of loan would be $10,000. To
     accommodate large projects the maximum loan would be $2,000,000.

     The kinds of projects that would be eligible include:
         • conservation projects of $10,000 or more;
         • wind power and solar energy installations of $10,000 or more;
         • geothermal systems that access a green electricity source or incorporate extremely
            high levels of energy efficiency into the project ($10,000 or more);
         • energy efficiency lighting projects of $10,000 or more;
         • building management and control systems;
         • motors and motor controls;
         • district heating projects;
         • methane gas recovery projects;
         • small scale cogeneration projects; and
         • irrigation system changes that improve energy efficiency and conserve water.

     The Energy Loan Program should have two components. The first should be a Revolving
     Energy Conservation Fund under which all approved projects should be structured in such a
     way that the loan can be repaid within 8 years through the energy savings. All loans for energy
     conservation and efficiency projects should fall under the Revolving Fund. The creation
     of this Fund should be a particularly high priority for our government. By structuring the
     projects in such a way that the loan is paid for solely by energy savings, the Province and local
     proponents should experience a high level of success. The work done under this loan program
     will be labour intensive and should be spread all across Saskatchewan. Thus its employment
     and economic impact will be high.


     24   The concepts in the proposed loan program are very similar to those contained in a loan program delivered by the Oregon Department
          of Energy. My sincere thanks to the director and senior management in the Oregon Department of Energy for their advice.




38
The proposal for this Revolving Energy Conservation Fund is similar to Toronto’s Atmospheric
Fund, which is now a proven success and has afforded many retrofit projects with the upfront
capital they needed to achieve substantial fuel savings and emission reductions.

The second component in the Energy Loan Program should be a Renewable Energy
Innovation Fund to encourage and promote the construction of renewable energy projects.25
Here the program should prioritize projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions of the user
in a significant way. The owner/user will have to demonstrate an ability to pay off the loan
either from fuel savings or from other sources.




25   In the case of municipalities, provincial loans should be designed to supplement the loan program provided by the Federation of
     Canadian Municipalities. The Province should encourage and assist municipalities in fully accessing the favourable interest rates
     provided under the FCM Green Funds program.




                                                                                                                                         39
     Advancing Energy Conservation and Renewables
     in the Commercial and Institutional Buildings Sector
     This section of my report focuses heavily on the commercial buildings sector. It also proposes
     new initiatives that we could take in advancing conservation and renewable energy in public
     buildings. Energy expenditures and greenhouse gas emissions have risen significantly in the
     commercial sector. There are many opportunities for cost savings. There are also important
     opportunities for the introduction of renewable energy technologies.


     IMPLEMENT AN ENERGY EFFICIENCY BUILDING CODE STANDARD FOR ALL
     NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS – High Priority

     The implementation of common sense energy efficiency standards for new commercial
     buildings should become a basic feature of Saskatchewan’s building code. The adoption
     of energy efficiency codes for new building construction is the most cost effective way for
     government to improve the energy efficiency of Saskatchewan’s building stock. It is much
     cheaper to build energy efficiency features into new buildings than it is to retrofit those
     buildings after they have been constructed.

     The adoption of energy efficiency standards in building codes is a common practice.
     For example, in the United States, 46 of the 50 states have an energy efficiency code for
     commercial buildings. In England, new measures to improve the energy efficiency of
     commercial and residential buildings by 40 per cent were adopted in April of this year. Energy
     efficiency requirements for all new buildings and for renovation of large existing buildings is
     standard throughout the European Union.

     In Canada there is increasing interest in the implementation of building codes for energy
     efficiency. Ontario has adopted the Model National Energy Code for Commercial Buildings
     and, effective 2012, will require new commercial buildings to achieve a standard 25% higher
     than that. Manitoba is also poised to adopt a standard for commercial building construction
     that is well above the Model National Energy Code for Buildings. Manitoba and Ontario have
     also adopted building code provisions for new construction in the residential sector that
     incorporate provisions such as common sense insulation requirements.

     In Saskatchewan the highest priority for the implementation of energy efficiency standards is
     in our commercial sector. Many new commercial buildings are not built with energy efficiency
     as a primary consideration, especially if utility costs are being passed on to a tenant who is
     leasing space in the building.




40
In 1997 the Government of Canada, in consultation with the provinces and the building
industry, developed the Model National Energy Code for Buildings. This code was not
mandatory, but was rather intended to guide the construction of commercial and institutional
buildings. Its adoption was left in the hands of the provinces. To date, only the Province of
Ontario has officially adopted it.

In light of improvements in energy efficiency technology since 1997, the Model National
Energy Code for Buildings is now viewed by professionals in the building industry to be out of
date and a collaborative effort is underway to update it.26

Meanwhile, the Government of Manitoba is poised to adopt the 1997 Model Code for all new
commercial construction in Manitoba, but is working to improve upon it with a Manitoba
supplement that is intended to further enhance energy efficiency. A September 2006 Report
from the Manitoba Energy Code Advisory Committee has been filed with the Minister of
Energy, Science and Technology in Manitoba.

In 2005, at the recommendation of the Minister of Corrections and Public Safety in
Saskatchewan, Cabinet directed that consultations be done in Saskatchewan with the view
to introducing an energy efficiency code in the commercial sector. Consultation work has
been done and Saskatchewan has conducted a detailed examination of 15 new commercial
buildings to better ascertain energy efficiency construction practices. An additional five
buildings will be studied in the coming months.

I recommend that Cabinet adopt the Model National Energy Code for Buildings as
a regulation and improve upon it with a separate Saskatchewan amendment that
adds additional energy performance requirements in areas that are achievable and
enforceable. This amendment should also take the form of a regulation.

I suggest we work closely with Manitoba in designing this amendment. Subject to final
consultations in our province, we should give consideration to adopting a regulation that
is similar to that of Manitoba. This would allow the commercial building industry to follow
similar requirements for energy efficiency in both provinces. The Model National Energy Code
for Buildings and the Saskatchewan amendment would then become the minimum energy
efficiency standard for new construction in the commercial sector in Saskatchewan.27



26   A new national committee to reevaluate the Model National Energy Code is being reconvened. Saskatchewan should actively
     participate in this process. The last time the Code was developed the process took seven years, so this one may also move slowly. When
     the work is complete, if the model code proposed is more stringent than the one I propose we adopt for 2008, our government should
     move to adopt the higher standard.

27   Once building code standards for energy efficiency are in place, incentive programs in Saskatchewan can then be targeted to
     encourage efficiency gains that go well beyond the code.




                                                                                                                                              41
     The new regulations should be targeted for adoption in 2007 with the new code to take effect
     by the end of 2008. In the meantime, as an interim measure Government should advise the
     building sector that as a matter of standard practice it is recommended that they build new
     commercial buildings to a level of energy efficiency that at a minimum follows the Model
     National Energy Code for Buildings and preferably exceeds it by 25 per cent.28 Advice on
     accomplishing this objective should be available to contractors through the Office of Energy
     Conservation.

     When the recommended new Saskatchewan regulations for energy efficiency in the
     commercial sector are adopted, the Department of Governmental Relations and/or the Public
     Safety Branch of the Department of Corrections and Public Safety should provide municipal
     building inspectors with training in the new building code provisions.29 In towns and cities
     with major new construction, additional staffing may be needed to enforce the energy
     efficiency section of the code. Financial assistance should be provided to these municipalities
     to ensure the level of staffing is in place to fully enforce the new commercial building code.

     The Office of Energy Conservation should identify a staff person who is available to assist
     municipalities during this initial implementation phase.


     PROMOTION OF NET ZERO ENERGY BUILDINGS – High Priority

     A net zero energy building produces as much energy from renewable energy sources as it
     consumes. To accomplish this objective the building must be extremely energy efficient and it
     must have a renewable energy production component. The most common components used
     will be solar hot water, solar space heat, geothermal heating and cooling, small wind power
     systems and solar photovoltaic systems.

     The Association of Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers has set as a U.S.
     target that 70 per cent of new commercial buildings in the U.S.A will be net zero energy
     buildings by 2015. This is a target that has been set by an experienced professional
     organization that clearly believes this is practical to achieve.




     28   In 2003 Cabinet adopted a requirement that all Saskatchewan public buildings that are funded 30 per cent or more with provincial
          government funds meet the Commercial Building Incentive Program Standard for commercial and institutional buildings. This
          constitutes a minimum of 25 per cent better than the Model National Energy Code for Buildings. Many of these buildings exceed the
          Code by 30 per cent or more. There are now 77 of these buildings in Saskatchewan. Thus, many firms in Saskatchewan have gained
          experience in designing and building to the higher 2003 standard for public buildings and should therefore have no trouble complying
          with a proposal for energy efficiency requirements in new commercial construction.

     29   SaskEnergy and SaskPower could be a potential source of funding to assist municipalities in hiring additional staff to enforce the new
          commercial energy efficiency provisions in the building code. This would be another highly cost effective demand side management
          measure and would also be an excellent way for our Crowns to continue to enhance relations with the municipal sector.



42
I recommend that our Government aggressively promote the construction of net
zero energy buildings in all sectors of our economy, with a particular emphasis on the
commercial sector and the institutional sector.

The Government of Saskatchewan should cover a portion of the incremental costs (extra
costs) of any Saskatchewan business, homeowner, farmer, municipality or First Nation that
builds a net zero energy building. Plans should be pre-approved by the Office of Energy
Conservation and the Office should offer advice on how best to achieve net zero energy
building status.

The Government of Saskatchewan, through the Office of Energy Conservation, should work
with private sector building owners to demonstrate net zero energy buildings in different
commercial settings. Further, the Crown Corporation sector and Saskatchewan Property
Management should plan to construct at least one net zero energy building in the next two
years.

The Government of Saskatchewan should also work with municipalities to plan for a few high
profile community facilities to be built as net zero energy buildings.


SOLAR ENERGY SHOULD BE PROMOTED IN SASKATCHEWAN INCLUDING
THE INTRODUCTION OF SOLAR RIGHTS LEGISLATION AND EXTENSIVE
CONSULTATION WITH MUNICIPALITIES TO ENCOURAGE THE PROPER
ORIENTATION OF NEW HOMES IN ORDER TO FACILITATE SOLAR ACCESS
– High Priority

Solar energy will be an important component of new building construction in the future.
Moreover, commercial and residential building owners are going to install solar technology in
existing homes, with the most frequent installations likely being solar collectors for domestic
hot water.

Solar hot water, solar space heating and solar photovoltaic systems are all proven
technologies and can be readily applied in urban and rural settings. Southern Saskatchewan
has enormous potential for solar applications because of our excellent sunlight resource with
more hours of sunlight each year than any other part of Canada.

To prepare for and encourage a transition to solar energy, I recommend that our
government introduce legislation to protect the solar rights of all Saskatchewan
residents who have installed solar systems on buildings they own.




                                                                                                  43
     I also recommend that our government undertake extensive consultations with
     municipalities to encourage municipal planners to facilitate solar access through
     appropriate subdivision layout and design. The Department of Government Relations
     should work to prepare a model municipal bylaw that goes further in guiding the layout of
     subdivisions, streets and buildings in such a way as to protect solar rights. 30 Our government
     should encourage municipalities to study and adopt the model bylaw.

     Finally, our government should encourage builders to design homes that are ‘solar
     ready’ even if they do not immediately deploy solar technology. For example, this would
     involve ensuring that a new home has a south facing roof and that electrical cable is run to
     the roof to accommodate the future installation of a solar photovoltaic system. It would also
     include incorporating passive solar design into new homes. New houses would be properly
     oriented so that they can make good use of the sun’s rays from the south, east and west
     during as much of the fall and winter heating season as possible. Windows would be primarily
     placed on the south side of new homes and would be minimized on the north side of new
     homes. New homes would be designed with effective thermal mass that stores free solar heat
     during the daylight hours for night time use. By actively encouraging these measures to be
     built into new homes, our government will give new homeowners immediate fuel savings at
     no additional cost and at the same time make the future use of solar technology easier and
     less expensive.


     OTHER MEASURES TO PROMOTE ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN THE COMMERCIAL
     AND INSTITUTIONAL BUILDINGS SECTOR

     A Higher Standard for Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings

     In 2003 the Saskatchewan government led the way in Canada in mandating that all new
     buildings in Saskatchewan that were funded 30 per cent or more by the Province would
     be built to a standard at least 25 per cent better than the Model National Energy Code for
     Buildings. Seventy-seven public buildings in Saskatchewan have now been constructed to
     this standard. Many of these buildings have exceeded the energy efficiency provisions of
     the Model National Energy Code for Buildings by over 30 per cent. It is clear that within a
     few years energy savings in operating these buildings will readily pay for additional capital
     expenditures that were initially made to meet the higher energy standards.




     30   When designing solar rights legislation it is important to keep in mind that photovoltaic systems can be very negatively affected by
          relatively modest shading, whereas the efficiency of solar hot water systems is simply reduced at a scale proportional to the amount of
          shading that occurs.




44
Other jurisdictions are now moving to adjust the energy efficiency standards for their public
buildings upwards. In some cases, such as Manitoba, plans are in an advanced stage to move
to an even higher standard than Saskatchewan adopted in 2003. The Manitoba Government is
holding public consultations this fall on a Green Buildings Standard that would require every
public building in Manitoba to be built to an energy efficiency standard 33 per cent above
the Model National Energy Code for Buildings. The Manitoba plan also contains a requirement
for integrated planning among building design and construction professionals. A third
requirement in the Manitoba plan is new provisions for water conservation.

I recommend that Saskatchewan Property Management begin consultations with
School Divisions, Health Districts, our Universities, the Government of Manitoba and the
Canadian Green Building Council with the view to updating our energy policy for public
buildings and introducing even higher standards for energy conservation. Provisions for
water conservation should also be added to our public building standard in Saskatchewan.
In summary, I propose our Government target to build new public buildings to a LEED
standard.31 Consideration should be given to following the direction of Manitoba and setting
a Silver LEED standard for all new public buildings to which the Province contributes funding.
This will not only produce even larger energy savings over the life of our public buildings, but
will also create excellent work environments for employees.

The Government of Saskatchewan has been setting a fine example in Saskatchewan for
high energy efficiency standards in the public buildings sector. This is resulting in significant
utility savings for taxpayers. The public expects our government to lead by example and this
recommendation is intended to ensure that we will continue to do so.




31   LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. Sustainable sites are rated on the basis of energy use, indoor
     environmental quality, water efficiency, use of sustainable materials and innovation. There are four LEED ratings: Certified, Silver, Gold,
     and Platinum. The Century Plaza in Regina has already been built to the LEED Silver standard being suggested here. The Saskatchewan
     Forest Centre in Prince Albert has been constructed to the LEED Gold standard, and the addition to the College of Law at the University
     of Saskatchewan is also being built to the higher LEED Gold standard.




                                                                                                                                                   45
     Commissioning of Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings

     Beyond building code requirements, the Province of Saskatchewan should work to promote
     and encourage building construction to levels that meet or exceed Commercial Building
     Incentive Program Standards and R-2000 standards. The Commercial Building Incentive
     Program (CBIP) Standard is 25 per cent better than the Model National Energy Code for
     Buildings and is a recognized standard by the Government of Canada. The R-2000 Standard is
     approximately 40 per cent more efficient than conventional construction and is a recognized
     standard by the Government of Canada.

     Commercial and institutional buildings that are constructed to CBIP standards represent
     an important asset in Saskatchewan’s economy. As a matter of standard practice, all new
     buildings constructed to Commercial Building Incentive Program standards or better
     should be commissioned to make certain that each building operates at the energy
     efficiency levels it was designed to.32




     32   SaskEnergy and SaskPower could be asked to pay the costs of commissioning for new buildings built to CBIP standards and for net zero
          energy buildings. This would be extremely cost effective and inexpensive demand side management.




46
Policy Measures Aimed at Promoting Energy
Conservation and Renewable Energy Development
This section lays out policy measures that will help to advance conservation and renewable
energy development in all sectors of Saskatchewan’s economy. It proposes a new mandate for
the Office of Energy Conservation. It proposes a consistent allocation of funding for energy
conservation and renewable energy development and discusses funding options. It suggests
a number of innovative demonstration projects that Saskatchewan could launch to refine
and accelerate the changes we are seeking to promote. It also speaks to ways in which we can
recognize and thank individuals who are leading the way in this important field of endeavour.


THE FUTURE ROLE OF THE OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION - High
Priority

The Office of Energy Conservation should be renamed the Office of Energy Conservation
and Renewable Energy Development and its role should be expanded. The Office should
be mandated with responsibility for making Saskatchewan a North American leader
in energy conservation and renewable energy development. It should be expected to
work very closely with SaskEnergy and SaskPower in accomplishing this objective. It should
be charged with launching the new incentive and loan programs aimed at promoting
conservation and renewable energy.

The Office of Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy Development should be mandated
to:
    • enhance and accelerate the adoption of R-2000, CBIP (Commercial Building Incentive
       Program) and Energy Star in Saskatchewan;
    • promote the widespread adoption of solar hot water and solar space heating systems,
       and geothermal energy systems that are powered with a green electricity source;
    • work with SaskPower to vigorously promote small scale renewable electricity sources
       such as small wind systems, small scale hydro and photovoltaic energy systems;
    • promote the widespread adoption of hybrid vehicles and advance energy efficiency in
       the transport sector;
    • coordinate the implementation of high profile demonstration projects in energy
       conservation and renewable energy;
    • work with the Public Safety Branch of Corrections and Public Safety to develop a
       building code for energy efficiency in commercial buildings;
    • promote and advise upon the construction of net zero energy buildings;
    • work with Saskatchewan Property Management in developing even higher standards
       for energy efficiency in public buildings;
    • work with major developers in undertaking feasibility studies into large energy
       conservation and renewable energy investment opportunities;




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         • work with SaskEnergy and SaskPower to approach homeowners, business owners,
           farmers, non-profit organizations, municipalities, First Nations and industrial customers
           with the view to encouraging them to undertake significant conservation and
           renewable energy investments that will improve their operations, cut costs where
           possible and substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions;
         • assist Saskatchewan residents in accessing and leveraging all available municipal,
           provincial and federal incentive programs and provide expert advice that will help
           make projects sustainable and economically viable; and
         • measure and validate energy saving and greenhouse gas reductions on key projects.

     The Office of Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy should be explicitly given
     responsibility for bringing forward to Cabinet recommendations on new policy in the area of
     energy conservation and renewable energy. It should be mandated to co-operate closely with
     Industry and Resources in advising on the development of policy aimed at reducing green
     house gas emissions.

     It is imperative that the Office of Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy be
     properly staffed and funded to carry out its mandate. I recommend an expansion in the
     current staff allocation for the office.


     ENSURE STABLE, MUTI-YEAR PUBLIC FUNDING TO ADVANCE
     CONSERVATION AND RENEWABLE ENERGY – High Priority

     Jurisdictions that have made substantial advances in energy conservation and renewable
     energy ensure stable, consistent, multi-year public funding for conservation and renewable
     energy pursuits over and above regular utility investments in these fields.

     In the U.S. the most common approach is to levy a public benefits charge – a 2-3 per cent
     addition to every customer’s utility bill that is dedicated to financing conservation and
     renewable energy development. In the case of Oregon, for example, a 3 per cent public
     benefits charge is levied and the money is transferred to an arms length Energy Trust which
     makes strategic investments in energy conservation projects and in renewable energy
     projects.

     In Saskatchewan many of the necessary investments in energy conservation and renewable
     energy development can be made by SaskPower and SaskEnergy as regular business
     decisions. In the case of SaskPower, for example, investments in electrical conservation, wind
     power or other environmentally preferred power can simply be made as part of a capital




48
portfolio that currently plans for a 50 megawatt expansion in electrical generating capacity
each year and that also requires that between now and 2025 many of Saskatchewan’s existing
coal fired generating stations will need replacement. As referenced earlier, SaskPower is
currently planning to add at least 700 megawatts of new capacity and replace or massively
retrofit over 1000 megawatts of existing capacity between now and 2025. All proposals in
this report for renewable electricity or electricity conservation can simply substitute for other
planned supply side capital expenditures.

On the other hand, several of the proposals made in this report are not in the category of
regular capital investments that could be made by SaskEnergy and SaskPower. These are:
    • the Business Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tax Credit;
    • financial assistance for homeowners and landlords to install renewable energy
       technology;
    • some of the financial assistance for municipalities and non-profit organizations to
       practice conservation and all of the financial assistance for them to install renewable
       energy technologies;
    • financial incentives for homeowners to build to an E-80 standard;
    • an energy loan program for conservation and renewable energy projects over $10,000
       (Revolving Energy Conservation Fund and Renewable Energy Innovation Fund);
    • launching of a farm energy audit program;
    • an expanded staff component for the Office of Energy Conservation;
    • new training opportunities in areas such as conservation retrofit, building code
       enforcement, solar and wind installation;
    • administrative costs for placing energy efficiency measures in the building code and
       implementing solar rights legislation;
    • administrative costs for bulk buying of energy efficiency and renewable energy
       products;
    • extra cost of assigning a staff person to work full time with municipalities to access
       federal Green Funds;
    • energy studies that are needed to guide future work; and
    • costs associated with implementing demonstration projects.

To finance these recommendations and other measures that will be launched as we advance
our sustainable energy agenda, I recommend we consider the following options:

Option # 1 As a matter of policy, use a portion of the profits of SaskEnergy and SaskPower to
fund our government’s energy conservation and renewable energy initiatives.

Option # 2 As a matter of policy, use a portion of the revenues from oil and gas development
to finance energy conservation and renewable energy initiatives. In this way, oil and gas
revenues would be used to help build a sustainable energy future for Saskatchewan people.




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     With either option the proposed revenue stream should be used to create an Energy
     Conservation and Renewable Energy Fund that can be used to regularly fund
     conservation and renewable energy initiatives in Saskatchewan.


     TRAINING AND EDUCATION

     Saskatchewan can only embark on a major transformation towards conservation and
     renewable energy if it has the trained workforce to do so. Specialized training will be
     necessary in a variety of areas including energy efficiency retrofit, training for staff that are
     responsible for enforcing new energy efficiency provisions in the building code, training
     for solar and wind installation, training for biomass applications, and other renewable
     technologies.

     The Government of Saskatchewan should work with SIAST, the regional colleges
     and our other educational partners to ensure appropriate educational and training
     opportunities are available.

     The Office of Energy Conservation together with the Department of Advanced Education
     and Employment, the conservation and renewable technology industries, and related trade
     and labour organizations, should undertake a review of training needs for this area. Then
     a detailed curriculum plan should be developed in consultation with SIAST, the regional
     colleges and other educational institutions.


     PLANNING FOR A NEW FARM ENERGY AUDIT PROGRAM

     Farmers have been hit hard with escalating input costs including the ever increasing price
     of energy. Farm homes are well served by our residential energy conservation program, but
     there are many other opportunities for energy efficiency savings on our farms. There are also
     significant opportunities for renewable energy development on our farms in areas such as
     wind power, solar applications, biogas development and other biomass projects. In addition
     to economic savings, action on these fronts will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions which
     have been steadily rising in the agriculture sector.

     The Government of Saskatchewan should begin working intensively with the farm
     sector to plan for the launch of a farm energy audit program. Such a program would
     involve a full audit of farm energy use, the potential for cost effective conservation
     investments and a full examination of opportunities for renewable energy development
     on each farm. The approximate cost of these audits would be $2,000.




50
Action taken on these audits would have the potential to generate energy savings for
farmers and rural communities and open the door for new economic opportunities in rural
Saskatchewan. Rural communities will want the economic spin-offs to stay in their area as
much as possible, which means that local businesses must be in a position to respond when a
farmer wants to invest in energy conservation or renewable energy development.

This initiative requires consultation with the farm sector. It also requires a pilot project before
it is fully launched. I propose the pilot be concentrated in one area of the province, so that
the volume of audits is sufficient to generate a response that will impact positively on the
local economy and allow local businesses to build response capacity. One potential area to
consider is the Humboldt area where the expertise of the Prairie Farm Machinery Institute
could be very valuable.

I recommend that at least 100 farm energy audits be delivered in the test pilot area with
interested farmers volunteering to have their farm audited. Each farmer participating in the
audit would be provided with good verbal advice and a thorough written report. Each farmer
would pay for a portion of the audit cost, but at least half the costs would be covered by the
provincial government. The federal government should also be asked to participate.

As opportunities are identified and responses to the audit are planned by individual farmers,
greater clarity will be achieved on what types of provincial supports are needed in rural
Saskatchewan to help farmers and communities save energy and fully develop the potential
for a renewable energy economy.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, the Department of Regional Economic and
Cooperative Development and the Office of Energy Conservation would lead the project,
train the auditors and would work with all project participants on follow-up opportunities
for investment, cost savings and business development. The local agricultural service centre
industry would be involved in some of the audits and in all of the follow up work.


OTHER MEASURES TO ADVANCE CONSERVATION AND RENEWABLES
ACROSS SASKATCHEWAN’S ECONOMY

Establish a Premier’s Awards Program for Outstanding Leadership in Conservation and
Renewable Energy Development

The Government of Saskatchewan should establish a Premier’s awards program that
recognizes outstanding Saskatchewan achievements in the field of energy conservation and
renewable energy development.




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     An Enlarged Role for Saskatchewan Property Management as a Bulk Buyer of Energy
     Efficient and Renewable Energy Products to save money for Municipalities and Non-
     Profit Organizations

     Saskatchewan Property Management in conjunction with the Office of Energy Conservation
     has been working with rural municipalities to facilitate the installation of energy efficient
     lighting in municipal facilities. This has been popular with municipal government.
     Saskatchewan Property Management has saved municipalities money by bulk buying energy
     efficient lighting for them.

     This strategy should be extended to many other energy efficient products and to the
     purchase of renewable energy technologies that may be commonly bought in the future such
     as solar hot water collectors. Saskatchewan Property Management and the Office of Energy
     Conservation and Renewable Energy Development should be mandated to enhance the
     program and to extend it to the non-profit sector.

     Assign a Full Time Staff Person to Work with Municipalities on Applications for the
     Federation of Canadian Municipalities Green Municipal Fund and other Federal
     Programs that can Benefit Our Communities

     The Canadian Federation of Municipalities administers a $550 million fund established by the
     federal Parliament which provides municipalities across Canada with financial assistance in
     advancing environmental sustainability in their communities. Green municipal funds can be
     used to help finance energy efficient building retrofits, construction of new energy efficient
     municipal buildings, new renewable energy supply projects, landfill gas management and
     energy distribution systems, public transit, municipal fleets, alternative transportation systems,
     transportation demand management, the preparation of sustainable community plans and
     community and corporate greenhouse gas reduction plans. Each year between $50 million
     and $75 million is provided in low interest loans to municipalities and their private sector
     partners. Grants are also provided to the projects with the greatest environmental benefit.
     Smaller grants of up to $350,000 are available to help municipalities undertake feasibility
     studies.

     With the exception of the cities of Saskatoon and Regina, the participation rate by
     Saskatchewan municipalities in this program has been quite low. Similarly, Saskatchewan
     municipalities are not fully accessing a host of other federal programs. Part of the problem
     may be the lack of capacity for smaller cities, towns and villages to access these programs.

     I recommend that our government designate a full time staff person working in either
     Government Relations or the Office of Energy Conservation to help interested municipalities
     successfully apply for these national funds.



52
Participate in Collaboratives with other Provinces to revise Building Codes and
Standards

The Government of Canada coordinates the establishment of Working Groups that develop
model codes and standards designed to advance market transformation in the area of energy
efficiency. If three or more provinces wish to participate in a working group, it is termed a
‘collaborative’. At the present time the following collaboratives are underway:
     • Building Codes and the Labelling of Buildings To Rate Their Energy Performance;
     • Energy Efficiency Equipment Standards;
     • Energy Efficiency Standards in Lighting.

Our Provincial Government should ensure representation on each of these Working
Groups and should ask Saskatchewan representatives to return with recommendations
to our government on the implementation of energy efficiency standards in residential
homes, on implementation of Saskatchewan equipment standards for energy efficiency, on
Saskatchewan lighting standards for energy efficiency and on the implementation of labelling
provisions that would rate the energy efficiency of newly constructed buildings.

Studies Needed to Guide Future Work

To build on the work in this report and to plan for the best use of renewable energy capital
dollars, the Government of Saskatchewan should commission an Energy Resource Planning
Framework for Saskatchewan that looks in detail at precisely where our renewable energy
sources are (i.e. a detailed renewable energy resource inventory) and how these locations
compare with the points of energy consumption in our province. We should also do a careful
assessment of where there are opportunities for fuel switching.

The Saskatchewan Research Council would be well positioned to lead this work.

Documentation of all Actions that result in a Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions

The Government of Saskatchewan should carefully document all actions taken to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions, save energy and introduce renewable energy. These records
should not be subject to the usual government policies with respect to disposal of records, as
they may be needed for some time. To have a record of these on hand will be very useful in
future negotiations with the federal government around Saskatchewan obligations to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions.




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     Strategic Demonstration Projects

     Demonstration projects are an invaluable tool in engaging the public, educating the public
     and building owners about cost effective renewable energy initiatives and familiarizing the
     construction industry with the potential of renewable energy.

     At the present time, several provincial government agencies are collaborating in the design
     and construction of the Factor 9 House in Regina, a home that will achieve energy efficiency
     levels nine times greater than the conventional house. Saskatchewan Research Council
     is doing outstanding work in its development of prototype hydrogen vehicles. In Regina,
     SaskEnergy is working with Saskatchewan Solar Hydrogen Corporation and the City of Regina
     on a landfill gas project that will see hydrogen produced and sold to niche commercial
     markets. This kind of good demonstration work now needs to be enlarged upon to help
     launch a major transition to renewable energy.

     I recommend that the Government of Saskatchewan launch several high profile,
     practical demonstration projects that advance renewable energy development and
     conservation measures in Saskatchewan. The demonstration projects should be geared
     to proving and widely applying conservation and renewable energy applications. They
     should also help to build a vision of what a sustainable energy future in Saskatchewan will
     look like.

     One of the high profile demonstration projects that captured the public’s imagination 25
     years ago was the construction of a street of super-energy efficient homes in Saskatoon. The
     street is now known as Christopher Crescent and is located in Lakeview. The NDP government
     and the Office of Energy Conservation worked with local builders to plan the project. At least
     20 super energy efficient homes were built. Most incorporated passive solar technology in
     their design. The Province covered the incremental cost of integrating super efficient and
     passive solar features into the homes. In exchange, the developers displayed the homes for
     several months. Over one hundred thousand people visited the homes during that time and
     the project had a major impact in shaping the Government of Canada’s R-2000 program.

     I recommend that our Government budget for the launching of strategic, high visibility
     demonstration projects. The list of project suggestions below provides examples of potential
     demonstration projects that should be considered. It is not intended to cover all possibilities.
     Nor is it intended that all these suggestions should be acted upon. The examples simply are
     intended to give a sense of good places to start.




54
Construction of Several Net Zero Energy Homes around the Province

The Government of Saskatchewan, the Government of Canada and the Saskatchewan
Home Builders could partner together to construct at least one net zero energy home
in all Saskatchewan’s cities and larger towns. Each of these homes would be designed to
produce as much energy from renewable energy sources as it consumes. Incremental costs
of construction over and above the R-2000 standard would be paid for by senior levels of
government. All of these homes would be designed for high profile public display purposes
and would be on public display for several months before they are sold.

Major Energy Conservation Retrofit Program on a First Nation Reserve

The Government of Saskatchewan, the Government of Canada, the Federation of
Saskatchewan Indian Nations and a First Nations Reserve could partner together to
undertake an energy efficient retrofit of the entire housing stock on a First Nations reserve in
Saskatchewan.

The project could be financed with a low interest loan and the loan could be entirely paid for
within 7 years through the energy savings. First Nations staff could be trained and employed
full time undertaking the retrofit work.

If successful, this pilot project could be replicated on other First Nations reserves in
Saskatchewan and could be a source of additional employment for First Nations residents
living on reserve

Construction Of Renewable Energy Subdivisions In Saskatoon, Regina, Prince Albert
And Moose Jaw

The Government of Saskatchewan could propose a partnership with the Government of
Canada, the City of Saskatoon, the City of Regina, the City of Prince Albert, the City of Moose
Jaw, SUMA and the Saskatchewan Home Builders in which renewable energy subdivisions
were developed in each of our four large cities.

All homes in the subdivisions would be constructed to a level higher than R-2000 standards.
All homes would be oriented to optimize the use of passive solar energy and would use solar
energy for domestic hot water heat. Many homes would be designed to utilize radiant floor
heating and other innovative space heating technologies.




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     At least one of the subdivisions could integrate solar photovoltaic systems and wind turbines
     into the subdivision so that a large portion of its electricity comes from renewable energy
     resources. Another subdivision could provide for its homes to have their space heating needs
     met through active solar energy systems; some of the homes could demonstrate the concept
     of storing solar space heat for a large group of houses in a single centralized heat storage
     centre. A third could have super-insulated homes that are designed to reduce space heating
     costs at least five fold, while ensuring good air circulation. And a fourth subdivision might test
     geothermal heating systems in conjunction with a green electricity source such as wind or
     photovoltaics.

     All of these demonstration projects would be designed to test and display existing, proven
     technology. They would be designed to familiarize the building trades and the building
     industry with these technologies and to facilitate their widespread application across
     Saskatchewan.

     At the provincial level these demonstration projects would be facilitated and coordinated
     by the Office of Energy Conservation in co-operation with the Department of Government
     Relations. At least 50 per cent of the incremental costs of construction would be paid for by
     the Government of Saskatchewan and the Government of Canada. Public tours would be
     available through parts of the construction period and selective homes would be on display
     after construction was complete.

     Installation of Smart Meters in One of Saskatchewan’s Smaller Cities

     Smart meters provide customers with detailed information about their electricity use on a
     daily basis. This information can help customers conserve electricity and better manage their
     use of electricity. Some jurisdictions are aggressively installing this technology. For example,
     Ontario is installing a smart meter for every one of its customers by 2010. I suggest SaskPower
     pilot the use of smart meters in one of Saskatchewan’s smaller cities to assess customer
     acceptance and energy conservation potential.

     Development of a District Heating System in a Commercial Urban Setting

     The Government of Saskatchewan could work with Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities
     Association and Saskatchewan’s cities and larger towns to seek out good opportunities to
     demonstrate a district heating project in a group of institutional or commercial buildings or in
     a downtown core (for example a shopping mall).




56
Demonstration Wind/Hydrogen Project in Both Saskatoon and Regina at/or Near the
SOCO Research Parks

The Government of Saskatchewan could build a large scale wind turbine in both Saskatoon
and Regina to supply the research parks in both cities with electricity and to facilitate the
establishment of a demonstration hydrogen filling station in each city. This would create the
potential for a hydrogen highway between our two major cities.

Demonstration of a Commercial Ethanol Production Facility Using Wood Residue

It is widely acknowledged that the large reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from
ethanol production will be achieved when wood residue (for example, forest bark) can be
successfully used to produce ethanol. The Saskatchewan Research Council has been working
with the community of Nipawin to move such a project forward. The technological hurdles of
producing ethanol with wood residue are close to being overcome. When this project is ready
to commercialize, the Government of Saskatchewan should give it support. The project offers
significant economic development potential for the Nipawin area.

Demonstration Project Using Wood Waste To Generate Electricity

A high performance biomass demonstration project using wood waste from the forest fringe
to produce electricity should also be considered. Biomass projects can be clean or polluting
depending on the technologies used. To support a project with excellent environmental
performance is therefore increasingly important.

An example of a biomass demonstration project worthy of serious consideration is
Prairie Biogas’s proposal for the production of syngas from wood residue, which in turn
can be used to generate one and half to two megawatts of electricity. I find this potential
demonstration project to have merit on several fronts. It draws on high performance
technology already being utilized in Europe and approved by the Government of Germany’s
rigorous environmental review process. It operates at very high temperatures (1240 degrees
centigrade) greatly reducing pollution risks associated with conventional incineration. While
it proposes to use waste wood residue, it is not limited to that. In fact, it is capable of using 21
different feedstocks that contain carbon. It provides excellent flexibility for the end user as it
can respond to a variety of energy needs, producing heat as well as electricity. It has strong
potential for being manufactured in Saskatchewan.




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     Construction of A Biomass Project in a Northern Community that Generates Electricity
     And Uses The Waste Heat For District Heating

     Northern communities face especially high expenditures for propane, fuel oil and
     electricity. Many northern communities could benefit from energy savings and job creation
     opportunities that would stem from a community-based biomass investment designed to
     generate electricity for local consumption and at the same time provide heat for distributed
     hot water. A distributed hot water system would be intended to heat homes and other local
     buildings. It would work best in a community where homes are relatively close together.
     Communities should be large enough to justify at least a five megawatts biomass station that
     would most likely run on waste wood residue. Communities like Beauval, Pinehouse or Buffalo
     Narrows would have good potential for this kind of demonstration project. The Village of
     Pinehouse has expressed interest in pursuing such a project.

     Demonstration Project Using Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles Combined with Small Scale Wind
     and Solar Photovoltaic Systems

     Plug-in hybrid vehicles have been developed by researchers at the University of California.
     They incorporate the hybrid concept with a much larger battery system that facilitates the
     electric motor running a higher percentage of the time. These vehicles have the potential
     to sharply reduce fossil fuel use. They also have the potential to be used in conjunction with
     wind and photovoltaic energy systems and could be charged off these systems during non-
     peak periods of the day.

     This type of demonstration project could be located in a residential setting. It also might be
     ideally located on one of our two university campuses, particularly if a wind generator was
     built in or near one of our SOCO research parks. The plug-in hybrids could then be charged off
     the wind generator.

     Concluding Remarks Regarding Demonstration Projects

     There are dozens of other potential opportunities for demonstration projects. The Office of
     Energy Conservation should facilitate sharing of demonstration project information between
     communities so that information on best practices spreads widely. The Office of Energy
     Conservation should also encourage communities to work together in applying for provincial
     and federal assistance.

     Finally, the provincial government may need to assist some communities in undertaking
     feasibility studies before demonstration projects on renewable energy are launched. Our




58
government should equip the Office of Energy Conservation and the Department of Industry
and Resources to contribute to this kind of feasibility work. Help on feasibility work is also
available through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. Resources available through FCM
should be maximized in all demonstration initiatives.

The Office of Energy Conservation and the Saskatchewan Research Council should lead the
demonstration project work.


ACCELERATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS
IN THIS REPORT IN LIGHT OF THE URGENCY ASSOCIATED WITH THE
CONSEQUENCES OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Saskatchewan people are very familiar with what is happening in Canada regarding climate
change policy. What will be of interest are new trends emerging in the United States that will
ultimately impact on Canada.

The failure of the Bush administration to ratify the Kyoto Protocol (after the Clinton
administration played a major role in negotiating Kyoto) has been widely criticized around the
world. This sometimes leaves the impression with Canadians that little is happening to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. However, this is not the case. There are a large
number of U.S. state governments that fundamentally disagree with the position of President
Bush and are proceeding with their own state government greenhouse gas reduction policies
which are focused on building an energy efficient and renewable energy economy. There
are also several hundred U.S. mayors and city councils that are working to adopt equivalent
targets to Kyoto within their municipal service systems. These state and city governments are
also listening closely to the reports of earth scientists working with NASA who are warning
them that North America and the world has only 10 to 20 years to change course or the
consequences for the planet will be heart wrenching.

NASA scientists are advising that the consequences of not changing course and sharply
reducing fossil fuel use are enormous and include: the melting of Greenland and parts of
Antarctica, the rising of the oceans by several meters, the dislocation of hundreds of millions
of people living near the oceans, rising temperatures across the globe, changes in rainfall
patterns that expand the portion of the globe that will be hit by drought, the extinction of
a large number of species (particularly species that live in a relatively narrow geographical
range and cannot move habitats or adapt), growing intensity of hurricanes and tornadoes, an
escalation in the frequency and intensity of forest fires and growing intensity of other severe
weather events. There is consensus in the U.S. scientific community on these trends, although
there are differences of opinion on timelines and on the consequences of climate change for
each region of the U.S.



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     These consequences for life on the planet are obviously unacceptable and unthinkable.
     Moreover, the economic damage that will stem from these consequences is colossal.

     I believe we are going to witness a significant shift towards energy conservation and
     renewable energy in North America over the next twenty years. The scientific community
     is ahead of the public and governments on the climate change issue. They will be
     recommending sufficient fossil fuel reduction to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 70
     per cent within decades.

     In this context, getting started early is important. Saskatchewan should lay the foundation
     for an energy efficient and renewable energy economy now by planning to make
     substantial investments in a cost effective and carefully planned manner every year
     over the next decade. The stronger role recommended for the Office of Energy Conservation
     and the Demand Side Management unit in Saskatchewan Power Corporation will provide a
     place to start. I will make further recommendations on organizational change in my June 2007
     report.

     A large amount of financial assistance from the Government of Canada is essential over
     the medium term and we should maximize the use of existing federal programs and enter
     into negotiations with Ottawa as soon as possible for a major investment of federal funds.
     The blueprint outlined in these recommendations could form part of the provincial climate
     change strategy upon which cost sharing with Ottawa is then negotiated.

     Such action will avoid the need for Saskatchewan and Canada to make more expensive and
     more rushed expenditures over much shorter time periods later on to achieve the greenhouse
     gas emission reductions that will inevitably be required. Although the legal obligation to
     implement Kyoto lies with the Government of Canada, it seems obvious that Saskatchewan
     (with our emissions now well above the national average) will have to take action to reduce
     emissions and our energy conservation and renewable energy plan is the natural place to
     start.



                                                - End -




60
Contributions and Contacts

During the course of my work on this project, I have had the pleasure to meet with a great
many individuals and groups who have been most generous in sharing their ideas, their
knowledge, their experiences and their advice with me. To all of those listed below and any
others who I may have inadvertently omitted from this list, I offer my deep appreciation and
sincere thanks.

Almas, Margo. Manager, Marketing and Sales, SaskEnergy
Anderson, Sven. Manager of Renewable Energy, Oregon Department of Energy
Abbott, Brian. Director, Demand Side Management Unit, SaskPower
Armstrong, Michael. Senior Policy Analyst, Office of Sustainable Development, City of
Portland
Arnold, Elisabeth. Executive Director, Centre for Sustainable Community Development,
Federation of Canadian Municipalities
Asmuss, Margaret. Sustainability Coordinator, University of Saskatchewan
Bakken, Jim. Executive Director, Green Manitoba, Government of Manitoba
Beck, Tom. President and CEO, Solar Hydrogen Energy Corporation, Saskatoon
Bender, Sylvia. Manager, Demand Analysis Office, California Energy Commission, Sacramento,
CA
Benko, Lyle. City of Regina’s Green Ribbon Advisory Committee
Biglund-Pritchard, Mark. Renewable Energy Specialist, Borden, SK
Black, Rebecca. WindShare (Wind Power Co-op), Toronto, ON
Brennan, R.B. President and Chief Executive Officer, Manitoba Hydro,
Brodsky, Jack. Past President, Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce, Saskatoon
Brooks, Jake. Association of Power Producers of Ontario, Toronto, ON
Brown, Carol Ann. Climate Change Central, Calgary, AB
Chalmers, Brian. Executive Member, Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce, Saskatoon
Clarkson, John. Deputy Minister, Department of Energy, Science and Technology, Government
of Manitoba
Coxworth, Ann. Volunteer Program Director, Saskatchewan Environmental Society
Coxworth, Ewen. Researcher Emeritus at the Saskatchewan Research Council
Crone, James. Director, Energy Economic Development, Department of Energy, Science and
Technology, Government of Manitoba
Darragh, Keith. Orientation and Producer Services, PPM Energy Canada, Calgary, AB
Doncaster, Deb. Executive Director, Ontario Sustainable Energy Association
Dumont, Rob. Mechanical Engineer and Conservation Specialist, Saskatoon
Ellis, Vic. Founder and CEO, Ecology Products International Inc., Pilot Butte, SK
Fabian, Mike. Law Students Society, University of Saskatchewan (Student Representative on
Building Committee for construction for first LEED Gold building at the U of S)
Florizone, Sheri. Emissions Reduction Coordinator, City of Regina, Green Ribbon Advisory
Committee
Frank, Andrew. Professor of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of
California, Davis, California
Fraser, Marion. Senior Policy Advisor, Office of the Honourable Dwight Duncan, Ontario
Ministry of Energy
From, Ken. Senior Vice President, Gas Supply and Business Development, SaskEnergy
Gallagher, Dan. Arkay Energy, Moose Jaw, SK
Gallagher, Lin. Director, Green Policy Branch, Saskatchewan Environment


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     Galloway, John. Senior Energy Analyst, Clean Energy Program, Union of Concerned Scientists,
     U of C, Berkeley
     Golove, Bill. Scientist, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley
     National Laboratory, U of C, Berkeley
     Gordon, Fred. Director of Planning and Evaluation, Oregon Energy Trust
     Grainey, Michael. Director, Oregon Department of Energy
     Gravant, Ann. Senior Policy Analyst, Renewable Northwest Project, Portland, Oregon
     Gray, Jane. Executive Director, Energy Climate Change and Green Strategy Initiatives,
     Department of Science, Technology, Energy and Mines, Government of Manitoba
     Gullacher, David, P.Eng. President and Chief Executive Officer, Prairie Agricultural Machinery
     Institute, Humboldt, SK
     Hanley, Paul. Environmental Columnist, Saskatoon Star-Phoenix
     Hansen, Keith. President, Sunridge Group; Executive Member, Saskatchewan Home Builders
     Association, Saskatoon
     Hastings, Garry R.S. Assistant Deputy Minister, Energy Climate Change and Green Strategy
     Initiatives, Department of Science, Technology, Energy and Mines, Government of Manitoba
     Haugerud, Rod. Mayor of Craik, SK and owner/operator of the Solar Garden Restaurant, Craik
     EcoCentre
     Hawkins, William. Chief Building Official, Buildings Standards Division, Protection and
     Emergency Services, Saskatchewan Department of Corrections and Public Safety
     Henriques, Derek. BC Power Smart Program, BC Hydro, Vancouver, BC
     Hoffman, James. Executive Director, Strategy and Governance, Crown Investments
     Corporation of Saskatchewan
     Ireland, Jim. Erin Consulting and former Chair of Green Ribbon Committee, City of Regina
     Jenkins, Allan. Renewable Energy Specialist, Office of Conservation and Strategic Policy,
     Ontario Ministry of Energy
     Jessie, Darryl. President, Raum Energy (Wind Energy Company), Saskatoon, SK
     Jones, Louise. Roadmap 2020, Saskatoon, SK
     Kammen, Daniel M. Ph.D. Director of Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, U of C,
     Berkeley
     Kehrig, Ron. Vice President of BioProducts and BioProcessing, Ag-West Bio Inc., Saskatoon, SK
     Kelln, Ken. Owner, Kelln Solar Heating, Lumsden, SK
     Kendell, Mark. Senior Energy Analyst, Technology Development, Office of Energy, Salem,
     Oregon
     Kindrachuk, Glenn. Arkay Energy, Moose Jaw, SK
     Knight, Simon. President and CEO, Climate Change Central Alberta, Calgary, AB
     Knippel, J. Blair. 1st Vice President, Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce, Saskatoon
     Krebs, Martha. Ph.D. Deputy Director of Research and Development, California Energy
     Commission
     Kuczek, Lloyd. Division Manager, Consumer Marketing and Sales, Power Smart, Manitoba
     Hydro
     Layton, Jack. National Leader, New Democratic Party of Canada, Ottawa
     Loney, Shaun. Director of Energy Policy, Department of Science, Technology Energy & Mines,
     Government of Manitoba, Winnipeg
     Lontoc, Erika. Program Manager, Commercial and Institutional Programs, Conservation
     Bureau, Ontario Power Authority



62
Love, Peter. Chief Energy Conservation Officer, Conservation Bureau , Ontario Power
Authority, Toronto, ON
Mainzer, Elliot. Acting Head of Customer Services Engineering, Bonneville Power Corporation,
Portland, Oregon
McDonald, Rodney C. Sustainability and Standards Specialist, Special Projects and Evaluation,
Manitoba Hydro
McIntyre, Jamie. Executive Member, Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce, Saskatoon
McKinley, Ken. CEO, Saskatchewan Home Builders Association, Regina
McVicar, Grant. Director, Office of Energy Conservation, Government of Saskatchewan
Mohr, Brian. Acting Manager, Sustainable Supply Development, SaskPower
Morris, Richard. Consultant, Conservation Bureau, Ontario Power Authority
Morrison, Lois. Manager, Marketing Programs, Manitoba Hydro
Mortensen, Henning. City of Regina’s Green Ribbon Advisory Committee, Regina
Orb, Jocelyn. Volunteer, Saskatchewan Environmental Society
Orr, Rhonda. Manager of Government Relations and Current Issues Co-ordination, Manitoba
Hydro, Winnipeg, MB
Ormiston, Garth. IBEW Local 2067, Regina SK
Orta, Jason. Policy Analyst, Renewables, California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA
Paget, Keith. Manager of Special Projects, Sterling Homes, Okotoks Solar Demonstration
Project, AB
Patrick, Rick. Vice President Planning, Environment and Regulatory Affairs, SaskPower
Paul, Janine. Founder and Owner, Nexus Solar Corporation, Saskatoon
Peters, Roger. Senior Technical and Policy Advisor, Pembina Institute
Perry, Tim. Business Manager & Financial Secretary, IBEW Local 2067, Regina SK
Quick, David. Solar West (Company manufactures and distributes Solar Water Pumps and
Solar Services for Residential Units), Saskatoon
Reeve, Dean. Executive Vice President, SaskEnergy
Rinella, John. Senior Policy Advisor, Conservation Branch, Office of Conservation and
Strategic Policy, Ontario Ministry of Energy
Rogers, Lloyd. City of Regina’s Green Ribbon Advisory Committee, Regina
Rolett, John. Program Manager, Climate Change Central, Calgary, AB
Rose, Gerry. Vice President of Customer Service and Marketing, Power Smart, Manitoba Hydro
Ruggles, Bob. Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy and Risk Analysis Division, Saskatchewan
Department of Environment
Russell, Alice. City of Regina’s Green Ribbon Advisory Committee, Regina
Schmeichel, Dale. Vice President, Strategy and Governance, Crown Investments Corporation
of Saskatchewan
Schramm, Laurie. CEO, Saskatchewan Research Council
Shaw-Lennox, Lorna. Roadmap 2020, Saskatoon, SK
Shearer, Craig. Solar Freedom International, Saskatoon Workshop
Singh, Virinder. Developer, Renewable Energy Systems – North America, Portland, Oregon
Smith, Martine. Administrator, Village of Pinehouse, SK
Smith-Windsor, Kent. President, Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce
Soveran, Doug, P.Eng. Manager, Pipe Flow Technology Centre, Saskatchewan Research
Council
Stedwill, Robert. Chair, City of Regina’s Green Ribbon Advisory Committee, Regina



                                                                                                63
     Stoneham, Michael. Former Chair, Energy Management Task Force, Saskatoon, SK
     Sveinson, Lynn. Director of Planning, Climate Change Central, Calgary, AB
     Swisher, Joel, Ph.D. Managing Director of Research and Consulting, Rocky Mountain Institute,
     Denver, Colorado
     Symes-Grehan, Marie. Community Development Worker, Pinehouse, SK
     Szmurlo, Chuck. President of Enbridge Wind Power Inc., Calgary, AB
     Trueman, Heather. Roadmap 2020, Saskatoon, SK
     Tuliffson, Gary. Demand Site Management Unit, SaskPower
     Veikle, Glen. Associate Deputy Minister, Resource and Economic Policy, Saskatchewan
     Department of Industry and Resources
     Walsh, Joe. Plant Operations Supervisor, Toromont Energy Ltd., Guelph Landfill Gas Power
     Plant, Guelph, ON
     White, Terry. Solar Energy Society of Canada, Regina
     Wist, Floyd. Executive Director, Energy Policy, Saskatchewan Department of Industry and
     Resources
     Wittemund, Michael. Planning and Standards Supervisor, Guelph Hydro, Guelph, ON
     Young, Tom. Executive Director, Protection and Emergency Services, Public Safety Branch,
     Saskatchewan Department of Corrections and Public Safety
     Zipper, Diane. Renewable Northwest Project, Portland, Oregon




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