BOOK TALK by keara

VIEWS: 5 PAGES: 2

									Book Talk with The Silly Chicken
 Read the story together with your child. Then talk to her about it. There is a lot to
  talk about.
        “What part do you like best? Why?”
 Ask your child “What do you like best in this story? Why?”
 Ask your child again each time you read it. His answers may change.
 You can also ask:
    “Is it a good idea to teach the chicken how to speak?
     Why or why not?”
    “Is the chicken silly? Why or why not?”
    “Is anyone else silly in this story? Why do you think so?”
    “Do the people really have to run away? Why or why not?”
    “How do you know when someone is silly?”
    “How can you tell when someone says something silly?”
    “If someone says something silly, what should you do?
     Why?”

Questions like these have no wrong answers! They help your children
think about the story in their own way. They can help children enjoy
sharing their ideas. They can teach children how to talk about books.

     “The people pack up their things and start to run away. What would you pack to
      take along? Why would you take these things?”
     “In the end, the people stop listening to the talking chicken. Is this a good idea?
      Why or why not?”

Your child may ask you to read the story many times. Go ahead. You may both
find something new each time.


Fun Things to Do
Word Hunt
Help your child find these words in the story: silly, chicken, run, up, down, earth, town.
Help him find other words.

Opposites
Talk to your child about words and their opposites. Here are some examples:
  day and night                    big and little                   front and back
                     wet and dry                     up and down
Print a word and its opposite on a big piece of paper. Above each word help your child
draw its picture. Repeat this with four more sets of opposites. Point to a drawing and
then point to the word below. Ask your child to say the word. He will feel like he is
reading the word when he says it.
Patterns and Repeats
There are patterns in this story. Many words repeat again and again.
   “You made us run from one town to another.”
   “You made us run through the fields and into the woods and across the meadows.”
   “You made us run up the mountains and down the mountains.”
Word patterns can help your child follow along and remember the story. After you read
it a few times, he may start to say or “read” many words with you.
Retell the Story with your child. It helps him remember it. If he learns the story by
heart, its lessons will come to mind and help him for a long, long time. You can use
some or all of the activities below to help tell the story:
Use pictures in the book. Help your child draw pictures from the story. Tape them
low on the wall so he can see them.
Make a paper bag puppet for each character. Or make stick puppets with cardboard
and sticks. (For directions, please visit: http://www.iceeducation.org/engl/project_guides.html)
In time, you and your child may retell the story without pictures or puppets.
Letʼs Pretend Act out the story. You and your children can take turns playing the
clever man, the chicken and others in the book.




In your home and out in the World
Visit a farm or petting zoo, and watch the chickens. Talk to your child about what they
look like and how they behave. Are they like the silly chicken? How are they the
same? How are they different?
Visit Your Library
Your child may want to read more about chickens. You can find books about them at
the library.


                                                                     For more about Hoopoe Books,
                                                                     visit: www.hoopoekids.com

                                                                     For more activities and to learn
                                                                     about ICE, visit:
                                                                     www.iceeducation.org

								
To top