Compute This - DOC by keara

VIEWS: 198 PAGES: 19

									>Compute This

    -------------------------------------------------------------
>    >
>    > Problem:
>    >
>    > Create a line graph showing the average annual
>    > temperature of Colorado
>    > Springs, CO from 1950 to 2000.
>    >
>    > Short Answer:
>    >
>    > 1. What is the lowest annual average temperature
>    > for Colorado Springs
>    > between 1950 and 2000? In what year did this
>    > average temperature occur?
>    >
>    > 2. Would you expect the average temperature for
>    > the month of April to be
>    > above or below the average annual temperature for
>    > a given year? Why?
>    >
>    > 3. What different weather factors can help to
>    > explain the average annual
>    > temperature?
>    >
>    > 4. What are some of the potential effects of
>    > changes in the average annual
>    > temperature?
>    >
>    >
>    >
>    -------------------------------------------------------------
>    >
>    > --
>    > Chris Smith
>    > PPHSG Science Olympiad
>    >



So in that spirit, here's our first week's exercise. Since it's the
first
week I'm focusing on graphing and searching skills, leaving graph
analysis
for later in the semester. The short answers don't really relate to one
another, but are designed to get the kids familiar with the NOAA Web
space
as well as some of the major ongoing projects and concepts. Hope this
is
useful :)

1) To start out practicing graphing with Excel, I'd like you to look at
the data for water temperatures on the Eastern Gulf Coast, at
http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/dsdt/cwtg/egof.html
    Note that the data is presented as January through December,
without
being clear where the split from last year to this year is (for
instance, is the September data this year's or last year's?). For this
graph, just assume it's for a whole year.

Use Excel to
     a) Make a table of the data that resembles the one on the Web site.
     b) Use a line graph with a different-colored line for each data
station
     (actually these data stations are buoys).
     c) Include a title, labeled axes, and a legend that identifies each
line
     color.

2) Assemble the answers to the following questions in a Word document.
Make sure to include the URL of where you found the answer. As always,
good
spelling and complete sentences are important.
     a) What is the "Argo" project? When did it start and what kind of
data
is it collecting?
     b) What are “El Niño” and “La Niña”? How are they different, and
what
are their effects on global climate?
     c) What is NEXRAD and what is it used for?


> thanks Chris...I needed some help to get started and really
appreciate
> your willingness to share
> KD
>
>Problem:

    NOAA tracks various climate information via the Global Monitoring
    Division, which was formerly known as the CDML (Climate Monitoring
    and Diagnostics Laboratory). Among the information gathered there
    are measurements of the ozone layer. Ozone measurements are taken
    from various monitoring stations situated around the world.

    Your task is to gather information about the amount of ozone
    measured from these stations throughout the year 2004. The
    stations for which you should gather information are:

        -   Perth, Australia
        -   Boulder, Colorado, USA
        -   Bismarck, North Dakota, USA
        -   Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

    Provide a line graph showing the average ozone measurements in
    Dobson Units for each month of the year 2004. A separate line
    should be provided for each monitoring station.

Short Answer Questions:

1. Based on the information on your line graph, it would be reasonable
   to guess that most areas experience the lowest levels of total
   ozone during which of the four seasons?

2. Does there appear to be a relationship between latitude and measured
   total ozone levels?

3. What is a Dobson Unit (DU)?

4. What are some possible causes of losing ozone?   What are the effects
   of lower amounts of ozone?

--
Chris Smith

The NOAA.gov website maintains oceanic information on protecting marine
mammals, sea turtles, habitats, statistics, economics, enforcement,
etc., collectively listed under Fisheries. For this assignment, you
are to research the NOAA.gov website looking for the annual per capita
consumption of fish and shellfish for human food.



Your task is to locate consumption information by countries and regions
of the world. The regions are North America, the Caribbean, Latin
America, Europe, the Near East, the Far East, Africa, and Oceania.



Using Excel do the following:



   Make a table of countries within region listing the pounds of fish
and shellfish consumed.
   Insert functions that calculate the total pounds by region, a count
of countries per region, and the average number of pounds consumed by
the countries listed.
   Create a pie chart that demonstrates the percentage of fish and
shellfish consumed by each region of the world. Include a title,
labeled axis, and a legend that identifies each region of the world.
(Hint – making this chart will be easier if you create a second table
consisting of only the total pounds by region.)



Using Word to give short answers to the following questions; as always
good spelling and complete sentences are important:



1.                  What is the method used by this website to
calculate per capita consumption? Describe the method.

2.                  How much more was the per capita consumption of
fish and shellfish in the United States during 2003 than in 2002?

3.                  What is the difference between per capita
consumption and per capita use?
Chris Morales


Chris Smith <cdsmith@twu.net> wrote:
I've just agreed to write one Division B Compute This problem per week
for my team members who are working on the event. I could pretty
easily just copy this list when I send it to them. Does anyone think
that's not an appropriate use of the list?

Here's the first one.

-------------------------------------------------------------

Problem:

    Create a line graph showing the average annual temperature of
Colorado Springs, CO from 1950 to 2000.

Short Answer:

1. What is the lowest annual average temperature for Colorado Springs
between 1950 and 2000? In what year did this average temperature
occur?

2. Would you expect the average temperature for the month of April to
be above or below the average annual temperature for a given year?
Why?

3. What different weather factors can help to explain the average
annual temperature?

4. What are some of the potential effects of changes in the average
annual temperature?

-------------------------------------------------------------

--
Chris Smith
PPHSG Science Olympiad

Dear Linda,

You can do this without going to word first. Just
copy the text into excel then select data and then
convert text to columns. I use excel 95 so I know
this works even with the "older" version.

Sincerely
Sandra Webster


--- Linda Plymesser <indalay@cox.net> wrote:

> Hi - none of this worked for me, but this did:
>
>
>
> 1.    in the PDF, using the Text tool, Select the rows
> and columns that
> you want
> 2.    Ctrl-C to copy
> 3.    Open Word - Ctrl V to paste
> 4.    Select the text you want to make a table out of
> 5.    from Menu => Tables => Convert Text to Table
>
> a.    Identify the number of columns you want = to # of
> columns in table
> b.    In 'Separate text ' - select Other and put in a
> [space]
> c.    Click OK
> d.    Table is created with rows and columns - in grid
>
> 6.    Select table - Ctrl C - Copy
> 7.    Open Excel - Ctrl V - Paste
> 8.    Voila
>
>
>
> Good luck
>
> Linda
Hi Compute This Group

Thanks Atish, Christian and Everyone else for their help.   It is very
useful to me, a first time coach.


I have been looking at this and found a way to get data from the file,
or PDF file into EXCEL

What you can do is copy and paste the data of interest into Notepad as
a .txt file. Then open the file from EXCEL as a space delimited File
(a two step process, first delimited choice and then next screen
space). This is not perfect, and doing some editing in Notepad before
and EXCEL afterward maybe necessary. However the data will arrive, one
number/word per cell and one row per row.

I have another couple of problems I have worked up and pasted
below. Please let me know if they are useful. I also would like to
get other peoples problems.

PROBLEM ONE:

Find the Pinot Noir Grape Harvest Dates in Burgandy France and Spring-
Summer Temperature Reconstruction for Dijon France for the years 1370
to 2003.

Plot Grape Harvest and Spring-SUmmer deviation from Normal vs
year. Put a moving average thru each data set.

Plot Grape Harvest vs Spring Summer Temperature Deviation from Normal.
What does the year 2003 look like.   Lets talk about what this data
point might mean.

ftp://ftp.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/paleo/historical/france/burgundy2004.t
xt


Find CO2 concentration in the gas of the Vostok Antartica Ice Corp for
the last 160,000 years. Graph the CO2 vs year into the past. Put the
years in reverse order. Are CO2 levels higher than they have been
during that time period? Is the rate of change faster than at any time?
Find ice Corp data from Antartica for the last 1000 years. Add this to
the plot.
Plot it also with log X axis. Answer the two questions above.


Find The CO2 level in the atmosphere in the year 2000. Is it on the
projected path of the log graph? What is your prediction of CO2 level
in the year 2050.


ftp://ftp.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/paleo/icecore/antarctica/vostok/co2.tx
t
ftp://ftp.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/paleo/icecore/antarctica/law/law_co2.t
xt

Phillip Werth

 ----- Original Message -----
 From: Atish Sanyal
 To: science-olympiad-coaches@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Wednesday, November 23, 2005 6:20 PM
 Subject: Re: [science-olympiad-coaches] Compute This problems


  As soon as I sent the previous email, I discovered a really cool
Acrobat
  feature:
  The "Text Select Tool" (the icon with the capital T) has a little
drop-arrow
  to its right which lets you select a "Column Select Tool". Now you
can
  select columns from the pdf and paste them into Excel columns. Hurray!

  However, there is still a little gotcha -- the rows from each column
do not
  necessarily line up when pasted into Excel -- blank lines in the
columns are
  ignored when copied from the pdf. So be careful and remember to edit
the
  pasted Excel.

 Regards,
 Atish
  On 11/23/05, Atish Sanyal <atish.sanyal@gmail.com> wrote:
  >
  > The text in the PDF can be selected with the mouse and then copy-
pasted
  > (Ctrl-C/Ctrl-V) into Excel. But the pdf text is usually quite
unformatted --
  > the columnar form is lost and the words run into one another. There
is much
  > editing ahead, but you can get the data into Excel -- you don't
have to type
  > it all in and insert typographical errors into the mix!
  >
  > BTW, Christian, there are webpages with more current data than the
1991-93
  > data that you were working with. The latest I could find was for
1999-2001.
  > Did anyone do better?
  >
  > Regards,
  > Atish
  >
-------------------------------------------
As soon as I sent the previous email, I discovered a really cool
Acrobat
feature:
The "Text Select Tool" (the icon with the capital T) has a little drop-
arrow
to its right which lets you select a "Column Select Tool". Now you can
select columns from the pdf and paste them into Excel columns. Hurray!

However, there is still a little gotcha -- the rows from each column do
not
necessarily line up when pasted into Excel -- blank lines in the
columns are
ignored when copied from the pdf. So be careful and remember to edit
the
pasted Excel.

Regards,
Atish


On 11/23/05, Atish Sanyal <atish.sanyal@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> The text in the PDF can be selected with the mouse and then copy-
pasted
> (Ctrl-C/Ctrl-V) into Excel. But the pdf text is usually quite
unformatted --
> the columnar form is lost and the words run into one another. There
is much
> editing ahead, but you can get the data into Excel -- you don't have
to type
> it all in and insert typographical errors into the mix!
>
> BTW, Christian, there are webpages with more current data than the
1991-93
> data that you were working with. The latest I could find was for
1999-2001.
> Did anyone do better?
>
> Regards,
> Atish
>
The text in the PDF can be selected with the mouse and then copy-pasted
(Ctrl-C/Ctrl-V) into Excel. But the pdf text is usually quite unformatted --
the columnar form is lost and the words run into one another. There is much
editing ahead, but you can get the data into Excel -- you don't have to type
it all in and insert typographical errors into the mix!

BTW, Christian, there are webpages with more current data than the 1991-93
data that you were working with. The latest I could find was for 1999-2001.
Did anyone do better?

Regards,
Atish
When you go to the link below in Mozilla's Firefox browser, there is a note
at the top that directs you to the underlying pdf.
Go to that pdf,
choose "select table" from the Firefox menu bottom icon bar,
left click and drag over the table (you'll probably have to do each page
separately,
when highlited, right click on the selection and then you should be able to
save it as a csv (comma separated value) or open into a spreadsheet,
combine the two spreadsheets and you are off to the races.
No offense, but kids will probably learn this faster than you :o))

Chuck Merja
www.3rivers.net/~chuckm/index.htm
lat/long 47.52383 -111.67912
211 Adams Rd
Sun River, MT 59483
vx 406.264.5955
cell 406.799.5955
fax 406.264.5830

-----Original Message-----
From: science-olympiad-coaches@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:science-olympiad-coaches@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of cvt
Sent: Friday, November 18, 2005 5:01 PM
To: science-olympiad-coaches@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [science-olympiad-coaches] Compute This problems

Chris,
Thanks so much for all your help.

I found noaa website for the sample problem (countries
by region on shellfish consumption)

http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:R4TBI7iN1TcJ:www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st1/f
us/fus96/percapita/pc-wld.pdf+site:noaa.gov+shellfish+consumption+North+Amer
ica,+the+Caribbean,+Latin+America,+Europe,+the+Near+East,+the+Far+East,+Afri
ca,+and+Oceania&hl=en
But I seem to have a problem cutting and pasting the
information. I've tried to import in in excel and it
comes out in a single column. Do you have any ideas?

Thanks
Christian


--- Chris Morales <email4cmorales@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thanks for sharing your problems of the week.
>
> I've volunteered to coach a Division C team. Using
> your samples as a guide, here is a problem that I
> developed for my students.
>
>
> The NOAA.gov website maintains oceanic information
> on protecting marine mammals, sea turtles, habitats,
> statistics, economics, enforcement, etc.,
> collectively listed under Fisheries. For this
> assignment, you are to research the NOAA.gov website
> looking for the annual per capita consumption of
> fish and shellfish for human food.
>
>
>
> Your task is to locate consumption information by
> countries and regions of the world. The regions are
> North America, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe,
> the Near East, the Far East, Africa, and Oceania.
>
>
>
> Using Excel do the following:
>
>
>
> Make a table of countries within region listing
> the pounds of fish and shellfish consumed.
> Insert functions that calculate the total pounds
> by region, a count of countries per region, and the
> average number of pounds consumed by the countries
> listed.
> Create a pie chart that demonstrates the
> percentage of fish and shellfish consumed by each
> region of the world. Include a title, labeled axis,
> and a legend that identifies each region of the
> world. (Hint - making this chart will be easier if
> you create a second table consisting of only the
> total pounds by region.)
>
>
>
> Using Word to give short answers to the following
> questions; as always good spelling and complete
> sentences are important:
>
>
>
> 1.              What is the method used by this
> website to calculate per capita consumption?
> Describe the method.
>
> 2.              How much more was the per capita
> consumption of fish and shellfish in the United
> States during 2003 than in 2002?
>
> 3.              What is the difference between
> per capita consumption and per capita use?
>
>
> Chris Morales
>
>
> Chris Smith <cdsmith@twu.net> wrote:
> I've just agreed to write one Division B Compute
> This problem per week for
> my team members who are working on the event. I
> could pretty easily just
> copy this list when I send it to them. Does anyone
> think that's not an
> appropriate use of the list?
>
> Here's the first one.
>
>
-------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Problem:
>
> Create a line graph showing the average annual
> temperature of Colorado
> Springs, CO from 1950 to 2000.
>
> Short Answer:
>
> 1. What is the lowest annual average temperature for
> Colorado Springs
> between 1950 and 2000? In what year did this
> average temperature occur?
>
> 2. Would you expect the average temperature for the
> month of April to be
> above or below the average annual temperature for a
> given year? Why?
>
> 3. What different weather factors can help to
> explain the average annual
> temperature?
>
> 4. What are some of the potential effects of changes
> in the average annual
> temperature?
>
>
-------------------------------------------------------------
>
> --
> Chris Smith
> PPHSG Science Olympiad
>
>
>
> Files uploaded by members of the group are archived
> at:
>
http://www.assumption.edu/users/bniece/olympiad/YahooFiles/FileArchive.html
>
> he group are archived at:
>
http://www.assumption.edu/users/bniece/olympiad/YahooFiles/FileArchive.html
>
>
>
>
>
Here is a problem I have worked up for my kids.

Find data on New England Landings in pounds for the following four
species for the years 1950 thru 2003.

1.       Atlantic Cod

2.       Halibut

3.       American Lobster

4.       Yellowtail Flounder



Graph all Four on One Graph showing how landings changes with year.



Some fisherman think that lobster catch has increased because Cod,
which eat young lobster have dropped in population. Review the data
and see if this makes sense to you.. It takes about 5 to 7 years for a
lobster to grow big enough for harvest.



Make a graph of Lobster vs Cod Catch for the years 1980 thru 2003.

                Put a regression line thru the first series
               What do you think might be going on in the relative
populations.

               Do you think that this correlation has predictive power?



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Many thanks for the postings. They have been useful to me a first time
coach of a Middle School team.

I also had the same problem cutting and pasting.     I told them to just
transfer by hand to an EXCEL spreadsheet.

When I used this problem with the kids I talked to them about how they
could not take an average of an area, but in theory should take a
weighted average by population.    The difference could be significant
in places like Oceana where Australia as a low consumption and little
Islands have up to 10x the consumption. I wonder if this sort of issue
would come up in the competition.

Phillip Werth


 ----- Original Message -----
 From: cvt
 To: science-olympiad-coaches@yahoogroups.com
 Sent: Friday, November 18, 2005 7:01 PM
 Subject: Re: [science-olympiad-coaches] Compute This problems


 Chris,
 Thanks so much for all your help.

 I found noaa website for the sample problem (countries
 by region on shellfish consumption)

  http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:R4TBI7iN1TcJ:www.st.nmfs.noaa.go
v/st1/fus/fus96/percapita/pc-
wld.pdf+site:noaa.gov+shellfish+consumption+North+America,+the+Caribbea
n,+Latin+America,+Europe,+the+Near+East,+the+Far+East,+Africa,+and+Ocea
nia&hl=en

 But I seem to have a problem cutting and pasting the
 information. I've tried to import in in excel and it
 comes out in a single column. Do you have any ideas?

 Thanks
 Christian


 --- Chris Morales <email4cmorales@yahoo.com> wrote:

 > Thanks for sharing your problems of the week.
>
>   I've volunteered to coach a Division C team. Using
>   your samples as a guide, here is a problem that I
>   developed for my students.
>
>
>   The NOAA.gov website maintains oceanic information
>   on protecting marine mammals, sea turtles, habitats,
>   statistics, economics, enforcement, etc.,
>   collectively listed under Fisheries. For this
>   assignment, you are to research the NOAA.gov website
>   looking for the annual per capita consumption of
>   fish and shellfish for human food.
>
>
>
>   Your task is to locate consumption information by
>   countries and regions of the world. The regions are
>   North America, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe,
>   the Near East, the Far East, Africa, and Oceania.
>
>
>
>   Using Excel do the following:
>
>
>
>      Make a table of countries within region listing
>   the pounds of fish and shellfish consumed.
>      Insert functions that calculate the total pounds
>   by region, a count of countries per region, and the
>   average number of pounds consumed by the countries
>   listed.
>      Create a pie chart that demonstrates the
>   percentage of fish and shellfish consumed by each
>   region of the world. Include a title, labeled axis,
>   and a legend that identifies each region of the
>   world. (Hint - making this chart will be easier if
>   you create a second table consisting of only the
>   total pounds by region.)
>
>
>
>   Using Word to give short answers to the following
>   questions; as always good spelling and complete
>   sentences are important:
>
>
>
>   1.                   What is the method used by this
>   website to calculate per capita consumption?
>   Describe the method.
>
>   2.                  How much more was the per capita
>   consumption of fish and shellfish in the United
>   States during 2003 than in 2002?
>
> 3.                   What is the difference between
> per capita consumption and per capita use?
>
>
> Chris Morales
>
>
> Chris Smith <cdsmith@twu.net> wrote:
> I've just agreed to write one Division B Compute
> This problem per week for
> my team members who are working on the event. I
> could pretty easily just
> copy this list when I send it to them. Does anyone
> think that's not an
> appropriate use of the list?
>
> Here's the first one.
>
>
-------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Problem:
>
>     Create a line graph showing the average annual
> temperature of Colorado
> Springs, CO from 1950 to 2000.
>
> Short Answer:
>
> 1. What is the lowest annual average temperature for
> Colorado Springs
> between 1950 and 2000? In what year did this
> average temperature occur?
>
> 2. Would you expect the average temperature for the
> month of April to be
> above or below the average annual temperature for a
> given year? Why?
>
> 3. What different weather factors can help to
> explain the average annual
> temperature?
>
> 4. What are some of the potential effects of changes
> in the average annual
> temperature?
>
>
-------------------------------------------------------------
>
> --
> Chris Smith
> PPHSG Science Olympiad
>
>
>
> Files uploaded by members of the group are archived
  > at:
  >
  http://www.assumption.edu/users/bniece/olympiad/YahooFiles/FileArchiv
e.html
  >
  > he group are archived at:
  >
  http://www.assumption.edu/users/bniece/olympiad/YahooFiles/FileArchiv
e.html
  >
  >
  >
  >
I would like to see the answers too.

  Also, the listserve does allow files to be uploaded, just not sent
as attachments. That might be a better way, or you may be
bombarded with people wanting the answers.

 Pam



Chris Morales <email4cmorales@yahoo.com> wrote:          Denise,

  I'll e-mail you the answer to the last problem separately since this
listserve doesn't allow attachments.

 Anyhow, here's another problem for division C.


In competition Division C teams may be asked to include best-
fit trendlines and to display the trendline equation and R2 value,
when XY charts are specified.



  Dr. Glenn Juday has done considerable research at the University
of Alaska Fairbank to learn how climate affects tree ring growth. He
has been studying white spruce trees near the Tanana River basin for
many years. Some of the trees he studies date back to the 1930's.

  Your task is to take the data from 1950 through 1994 in the attached
spreadsheet (http://vathena.arc.nasa.gov/curric/land/global/trdata.xls)
and perform the following steps:



 Using Excel:



     Use Excel’s average function to complete cells G4 through G48
with the average ring growth for Trees 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 for each year.
     Create a scatter chart that demonstrates the effect temperature
has on the average tree ring growth. Add a trendline to the scatter
chart. Display the trendline equation and R2 value. Include a title,
labeled axis, and a legend.
     Create a second scatter chart that demonstrates the
effect precipitation has on the average tree ring growth. Add
a trendline to the scatter chart. Display the trendline equation and
R2 value. Include a title, labeled axis, and a legend.
     Insert a new row for year 2006. If predictions are
that precipitation will be 23.45 centimeters for 2006 (completely made
up), use Excel’s forecast function to show what the average tree ring
growth could be expected for the year.

  Using your favorite Internet search tool, research the NOAA website
to find the article from where the attached spreadsheet was
downloaded from.



  Using Word give short answers to the following questions; as always
good spelling and complete sentences are important:



  1.                    List the URL of the website along with title of
the article.

  2.                    Other than age what other information can be
derived from growth   patterns.

  3.                   Of the two factors of climate; temperature and
precipitation, explain which has the greater correlation to tree ring
growth?

 4.                     What is the definition of Dendroclimatology?

 Chris Morales

  Denise Tretola <dmtretola@yahoo.com> wrote:
  Thanks so much for sharing problems. I'm just wondering if there is
any place/way I can get the answers.

      Thanks

 Chris Morales <email4cmorales@yahoo.com> wrote:
   Thanks for sharing your problems of the week.

  I've volunteered to coach a Division C team. Using your samples      as
a guide, here is a problem that I developed for my students.


  The NOAA.gov website maintains oceanic information on protecting
marine mammals, sea turtles, habitats, statistics, economics,
enforcement, etc., collectively listed under Fisheries. For this
assignment, you are to research the NOAA.gov website looking for the
annual per capita consumption of fish and shellfish for human food.
  Your task is to locate consumption information by countries and
regions of the world. The regions are North America, the Caribbean,
Latin America, Europe, the Near East, the Far East, Africa, and
Oceania.



 Using Excel do the following:



     Make a table of countries within region listing the pounds of fish
and shellfish consumed.
     Insert functions that calculate the total pounds by region, a
count of countries per region, and the average number of pounds
consumed by the countries listed.
     Create a pie chart that demonstrates the percentage of fish and
shellfish consumed by each region of the world. Include a title,
labeled axis, and a legend that identifies each region of the world.
(Hint – making this chart will be easier if you create a second table
consisting of only the total pounds by region.)



  Using Word to give short answers to the following questions; as
always good spelling and complete sentences are important:



  1.                     What is the method used by this website to
calculate per capita    consumption? Describe the method.

  2.                     How much more was the per capita consumption of
fish and shellfish in    the United States during 2003 than in 2002?

  3.                   What is the difference between per capita
consumption and per capita use?


 Chris Morales


   Chris Smith <cdsmith@twu.net> wrote:
   I've just agreed to write one Division B Compute This problem per
week for
   my team members who are working on the event. I could pretty easily
just
   copy this list when I send it to them. Does anyone think that's not
an
   appropriate use of the list?

 Here's the first one.

 -------------------------------------------------------------

 Problem:
      Create a line graph showing the average annual temperature of
Colorado
  Springs, CO from 1950 to 2000.

     Short Answer:

  1. What is the lowest annual average temperature for Colorado Springs
  between 1950 and 2000? In what year did this average temperature
occur?

     2. Would you expect the average temperature for the month of April to
be
     above or below the average annual temperature for a given year?   Why?

  3. What different weather factors can help to explain the average
annual
  temperature?

  4. What are some of the potential effects of changes in the average
annual
  temperature?

     -------------------------------------------------------------

     --
     Chris Smith
     PPHSG Science Olympiad



  Files uploaded by members of the group are archived
at: http://www.assumption.edu/users/bniece/olympiad/YahooFiles/FileArc
hive.html

  he group are archived
at: http://www.assumption.edu/users/bniece/olympiad/YahooFiles/FileArc
hive.html




The questions asked during the Compute This event are actually supposed
to
be relatively easy. They serve to prove that a participant has actually
found
the site where the information appears.
Go to:
http://www.tufts.edu/as/wright_center/fellows/sci_olympiad/sci_olympiad
_misc.html
for practice exams.
Chris,

I'd have them attack both parts of the test before they even touch the
computer. One of them could examine the question set, getting a sense
for the kinds of short-answer questions they'll be answering so that
he/she will be on the lookout for the kinds of information they might
stumble on while doing the graph. The other could use the allowed piece
of blank paper to sketch out generally what the requested graph might
look like. Have them take 2 or 3 minutes doing this, then take 30
seconds or so summarizing what they've come up with. It'll give them
practice communicating succinctly, and also help them focus on where
they're going.

Steve Lovaas

Chris Morales wrote:
> I'd appreciate suggestions on how to approach Compute   This
competition when there's two equally proficient members   on a team. At
practice, they're both trying to come up with solutions   and it actually
takes longer together than what they could come up with   individually.
I'd like to divide tasks so they both feel like they're   contributing
and yet be more efficient during competition.
>
>   Any ideas?
>
>   Thanks,
>   Chris Morales
>
>

--
===================================================================
Steven Lovaas, MSIA, CISSP
Network & Security Resource Manager
Academic Computing and Network Services
Colorado State University
970-297-3707
Steven.Lovaas@ColoState.EDU

								
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