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TEACHING THE WOUNDED BODY: Mutilation and Meaning in Western War and Religion

VIEWS: 11 PAGES: 19

Though I am a historian of early modern Europe, most of this essay extends across time periods and disciplines to examine the idea and teaching possibilities of physical woundedness in war and religion, two of the most important discourses that treat the subject. Theorists such as JuHe Thompson Klein and William Newell, among others, have been particularly eloquent in recent years for their advocacy of an approach that, among other things, promotes in students "an ability to synthesize or integrate; [facilitates] enlarged perspectives or horizons; [fosters] more creative, original, or unconventional thinking. ..and [advances] sensitivity to disciplinary, political, and religious bias" - all of which the subject of wound representations may accomplish (Newell 35). ?

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