The Backcountry and the City: Colonization and Conflict in Early America

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The Backcountry and the City: Colonization and Conflict in Early America Powered By Docstoc
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Description: Appealing to Marxist foundationalists like J. Franklin Jameson, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Barrington Moore Jr.,1 White posits a persistent divide between the colonial city dweller and his peasant farmer neighbor on the frontier, two distinct bodies from whose natural conflicts gradually emerged a kind of practical government, a utilitarian means of negotiating their respective demands or wills that stopped short of institutionalizing the ever-expanding "backcountry" yeomanry. [...] when he declares, without the least evidence of irony, that "long gone are the days when theory anthologies included a section on 'Sociological Approaches'" (17), the reader wonders how White could possibly ignore the extent to which sociology, empirical or otherwise, undergirds virtually every contemporary critical theory The reader is equally taken aback when White points to a single text, the Library of America edition of Franklin's Writings, to support his claim that American literary scholars tend to "bury" Franklin's work from "the 1750s, 1760s, and 1770s" between "the early prose pieces of the 1720s and 1730s and the stylistically different postrevolutionary writings" (176).4 There are even more surprising lapses in White's larger argument.
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