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The distribution of attention within objects in multiple-object scenes: Prioritization by spatial probabilities and a center bias by ProQuest

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This study investigates how the attentional distribution within objects is affected by spatial probabilities, bias toward objects' centers (Alvarez & Scholl, 2005), and object motion. In a multiple-object tracking task, observers tracked line objects while simultaneously detecting probes appearing on the objects. Experiments 1 and 2 manipulated the probabilities of probes appearing at the centers and ends of objects. Overall, probe detection was better at centers than at ends, but it was also affected by probe location probabilities; when probe locations were 100% certain, the center advantage was eliminated. Experiment 3 manipulated rotational, translational, and size-change components of object motion. The center advantage still occurred with stationary objects, and its magnitude was not affected by different motion types. These results indicate that attention is biased toward the centers of objects in multiple-object scenes, both for stationary and moving objects. They also imply that attentional prioritizations based on spatial probabilities can accompany moving objects. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

More Info
									Perception & Psychophysics
2008, 70 (7), 1185-1196
doi: 10.3758/PP.70.7.1185




                            The distribution of attention within objects
                              in multiple-object scenes: Prioritization
                             by spatial probabilities and a center bias
                                                               Cary S. Feria
                                               San Jose State University, San Jose, California

                 This study investigates how the attentional distribution within objects is affected by spatial probabilities, bias
              toward objects’ centers (Alvarez & Scholl, 2005), and object motion. In a multiple-object tracking task, observ-
              ers tracked line objects while simultaneously detecting probes appearing on the objects. Experiments 1 and 2
              manipulated the p
								
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