Report on the pros, cons and �shadow budget� regarding by icecube

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 15

									SENIOR OFFICIALS GROUP
Heads of Delegations
First Meeting
Stockholm, Sweden
January 25, 2000




                                                                         SOG HoD 1/3/2

Item 3:
Comparative Analysis of the Implications of
Different locations of a Regular Baltic 21
Secretariat

Submitted by the Baltic 21 Secretariat
Required action: for consideration


Introduction

This is the second document referred to in the SOG 11 decision regarding agenda item 8. The
following text comes from the SOG 11/8 report. ”The SOG Chairman and the Baltic 21 Secretariat
will contact the chairmen and heads of the other three secretariats (CBSS, HELCOM, VASAB 2010),
to explore the current thinking on the long-term development of the intergovernmental co-operation in
their respective fields, and – based on these investigations – prepare a paper presenting the pros and
cons of the Baltic 21 Secretariat’s co-location with and integration into either of the two existing
secretariats (CBSS, HELCOM). Furthermore this paper should also include precise information
regarding Finland’s and Sweden’s offers as to their possible host country status – for this reason also
these two countries shall be asked for more detailed offers. Based on this information a ”shadow”
budget will be prepared which will clearly present the financial implications of each of the four
options (two places and two organisational schemes). The staff of today will be used for the
calculation as well as the salary levels of the two Secretariats in question. As soon as this paper is
ready a meeting will be called for by the Baltic 21 Secretariat where only the Heads of Delegations of
the members to SOG will be invited.”

The four locations that are referred to in the text are:
1. Co-location with the HELCOM Secretariat in Helsinki
2. Integration with the HELCOM Secretariat in Helsinki
3. Co-location with the CBSS Secretariat in Stockholm
4. Integration with the CBSS Secretariat in Stockholm
A definition of co-location is that the secretariats will be located in connection to each other, in the
same building and will function self-dependently. They will not share common administration or
leadership.

Integration can be defined as when the secretariats have joined their functions and share at least
administration. Different options exist, which the SOG will have to consider regarding the extent of
the integration, all from an economic, technical and administrative integration to a full integration of
all functions. In one option the Baltic 21 can function as its own unit with their own head and in the
other option everything can be integrated. In any case, there still is a need for three professionals
dealing with Baltic 21 matters.

After the establishment of the regular Baltic 21 Secretariat, it is assumed that the three organisations,
HELCOM, CBSS and Baltic 21 will continue to work self-dependently just as previously.

The staff of today includes three professionals, where one is the Secretary General. In addition to the
three professionals, there is an assistant working in the reception for Baltic 21 for 2 hours per day.
Economic administration accounts for another 2 hours per day of work for the Baltic 21. The Ministry
of Environment in Sweden currently supplies this. Other assumptions were also stated to make the
calculations of the four shadow budgets comparable.

Contacts have been taken with both the HELCOM and CBSS Secretariats, who have obligingly
supplied some figures for the calculation of the four shadow budgets. Contacts have also been taken
with both Finland and Sweden to provide the offers regarding the countries extra contribution.

The assumptions for the calculations and the four shadow budgets are annexed to this report (Annex 1
and 2). The offers for a host country contribution from Finland and Sweden will be supplied as
information papers.



1. Baltic 21
Political and geographical area of work

The geographical focus of Baltic 21 is the same as for the CBSS. The member countries are Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, the Russian Federation and
Sweden. The European Commission is also a member of Baltic 21. The entire countries are included
in the scope of Baltic 21:s work (except for Russia where only the north-western part is included).
Also participating NGO:s, IGO:s and IFI:s are members of the Baltic 21 steering group, the Senior
Officials Group, SOG. These organisations have full membership and participate in all activities and
meetings. That includes HELCOM, IBSFC and VASAB.

Mandate and focus of work – Baltic 21

The idea to develop an Agenda 21 for the Baltic Sea Region was launched by the Prime Ministers at
the Visby Meeting in May 1996. This was confirmed by the Foreign Ministers at the CBSS Meeting
in Kalmar in July 1996. The Ministers of Environment further defined the scope of Baltic 21 in
Saltjöbaden in October 1996 and mandated a special international group, the SOG to elaborate the
Agenda 21 for the Baltic Sea Region- Baltic 21. The Agenda 21 for the Baltic Sea Region was
adopted by the Foreign Ministers in Nyborg, Denmark in June 1998. The aim of Baltic 21 is to, by
means of regional co-operation, start the transition towards sustainable development in the Baltic Sea
Region and within a time horizon of one generation (until 2030) take decisive steps to reach
sustainable development as defined in the Baltic 21 document. Sustainable development emphasises




                                                   2
  three pillars: the environmental, social and economic dimension. Baltic 21 has its focus on the
  environment, on natural resource management and on economics. Social aspects are covered but to a
  less extent. Important is to make all sectors of society responsible for the transition to sustainable
  development. Baltic 21 relies on this sector responsibility. Environmental protection is a necessary
  prerequisite for sustainable development in this context. Because of its long-term perspective and
  stress on structural changes Baltic 21 is more preventive rather than remedial.

  Organisation and decision making process

  Baltic 21 is a democratic, open and transparent process. It is steered by the Senior Officials Group
  (SOG), with members from the Governments of CBSS and the European Commission, NGOs,
  intergovernmental organisations like HELCOM, VASAB, International Baltic Sea Fisheries
  Commission (IBSFC), Nordic Council of Ministers and the international development banks (World
  Bank, EBRD, EIB, NIB, Nefco). Decisions are taken by consensus by all members. All Baltic 21
  documentation - back ground documents, SOG meeting reports, workshop reports, draft texts - are
  published on the Baltic 21 website (http://www.ee/baltic21).

  The emphasis of Baltic 21 is on regional co-operation with a focus on the environment and economy.
  The work focuses on seven sectors of crucial economic and environmental importance in the region.
  For each sector, goals and scenarios for sustainable development have been elaborated, as well as
  sector action programmes including time frames, actors and financing. The responsibility for the
  sector work is distributed among the SOG members in the form of lead party responsibilities. Baltic
  21 is based on sector integration, which means that the sectors take on full responsibility for the
  implementation of its sector goals and action programme. The work is divided into seven sectors
  (Agriculture, Forests, Fisheries, Energy, Industry, Transport and Tourism) and, on the
  intergovernmental level, in general the sector ministries are responsible for the implementation of the
  sector programmes in each country. The seven sectors and their lead parties are: Agriculture
  (HELCOM and Poland), Energy (Denmark and Estonia), Fisheries (IBSFC), Forests (Finland and
  Lithuania), Industry (Russia and Sweden), Tourism (currently missing) and Transports (Germany and
  Latvia).

  An interim secretariat is established in Stockholm, co-located to the CBSS until July 1, 2000. Sweden
  provides the financial resources for the interim secretariat. A decision on the provisions for and the
  establishment of a regular Baltic 21 secretariat, either connected to the HELCOM or the CBSS
  secretariat, will be taken no later than July 1, 2000 according to the decision by the CBSS in June
  1998.

2. HELCOM and the HELCOM Secretariat in Helsinki
  Political and geographical area of work

  The geographical focus of HELCOM is the drainage basin to the Baltic Sea. The following countries
  are contracting parties to HELCOM: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, the
  Russian Federation and Sweden. The EU is also a contracting party to HELCOM. It is only the parts
  of the countries that are inside the drainage basin to the Baltic Sea are considered for actions within
  HELCOM.

  In HELCOM PITF, responsible for the implementation of the Baltic Sea Joint Comprehensive
  Environmental Action Programme (JCP), the contracting parties to the Helsinki Convention are
  members, with an addition of Belarus, the Czech Republic, the Slovak Republic, Norway and
  Ukraine, as well as five International Financial Institutions and the IBSFC.




                                                    3
Mandate and focus of work

The co-operation between the Baltic Sea countries on environmental matters has already existed for
25 years in the frame of the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM). HELCOM’s mandate concerns the
marine environment of the Baltic Sea and the Convention is a legally binding instrument. The
contracting parties are under a legal obligation according to international law to implement the
articles and regulations of the Helsinki Convention and its Annexes.

On the 17th of January 2000 the 1992 Helsinki Convention will enter into force. In the new
convention the scope is expressed in article 3, Fundamental principles and obligations, and in article
4, Application. In article 3 is stated that the objective is to ”...prevent and eliminate pollution in order
to promote the ecological restoration of the Baltic Sea Area (as defined in article 1) and the
preservation of its ecological balance”. In article 4 it is stated that ”This convention shall apply to the
protection of the marine environment of the Baltic Sea Area.” The recent review of HELCOM has not
changed that mandate. Instead the review led to a strengthening of the capacity of HELCOM to
discharge its duties as laid down in the goal articles of the previous and the 1992 conventions and did
not consider a change of scope of the convention.

HELCOM is based the Helsinki Convention and its instrument to adopt recommendations on i.a. Best
Available Technology and Best Environmental Practice that could be used as the necessary legal tools
for contributing to implementing the goals of sustainable development. The protection of the marine
environment of the Baltic Sea is an indispensable contribution to sustainable development of the
region in its own right.

Organisation and decision making process

The recent review of HELCOM has changed the organisation to a certain extent. The steering group
in HELCOM is the Heads of Delegation, consisting of a representative from each contracting party
and the European Commission. However, all formal decisions are taken by the Helsinki Commission.
Parallel to the Heads of Delegation is the Programme Implementation Task Force, PITF, who still
retains its autonomy within the framework of HELCOM. Under the Helsinki Commission the work is
divided into five working groups:
     Strategy Group
     Land-based pollution Group
     Monitoring and assessment Group
     Sea-based pollution Group
     Nature Conservation and Coastal Zone Management Group

The Helsinki Commission meets annually and, from time to time, meetings are held at ministerial
level. Decisions and recommendations taken by the Helsinki Commission must be taken by
consensus. The chairmanship of the Commission rotates between the Contracting Parties every two
years in alphabetical order.

Only the contracting parties can vote in the decision making process. In HELCOM other organisations
can only be observers, such as intergovernmental organisations, NGO:s and IFI:s, which means that
they can not participate in all meetings, such as Head of Delegation Meetings without a specific
invitation. The same can be relevant for countries, such as Norway, who has been granted observer
status in HELCOM


Offices and practical preparations




                                                     4
There are thirteen people working at the HELCOM Secretariat: the Executive Secretary, an
Environment Secretary, a Maritime Secretary, a Programme Co-ordinator (of PITF), a Technological
Secretary, an Administrative Officer and seven Assistants. The secretariat is financed by contributions
from the contracting parties, an host country contribution from Finland and a contribution also from
the EU. The contributions according to the convention are shared in equal parts between the member
countries. However, during the 1990´s exceptions to this formula has been applied as some countries
pay less and others pay more than the equal shares.

The Baltic 21 Secretariat will be able to have offices in the same building in the Marina Congress
Center, as the HELCOM Secretariat has today, as possibilities exist to house two to four additional
staff members. Finland will take care of the headquarters agreement containing the same conditions
that apply to the HELCOM Secretariat staff.

In the case of a complete integration it might be difficult to have a different system of sharing
contributions to the budget than the current HELCOM scale.



3. CBSS and the CBSS Secretariat in Stockholm
Political and geographical area of work

CBSS has in principle the same political and geographical area of work as Baltic 21. The political and
geographical focus is eleven countries in the ”enlarged” Baltic Sea Region: Denmark, Estonia,
Finland, Germany, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Russia (but for Baltic 21 only the
north-western part) and Sweden. The European Commission is also a member. HELCOM is identified
as the competent organisation for the protection of the marine environment of the Baltic Sea.

Mandate and focus of work – CBSS and Baltic 21

The annual meeting of the Ministers for Foreign Affairs is the forum for co-ordination and decisions.
The CBSS steering group, the Committee of Senior Officials, CSO, is composed of representatives
from the different countries and the EU. The work of the Council is based on the principles laid down
in the UN Charter as well as in the Helsinki Final Act, the Charter of Paris and other OSCE
documents. The focus is on security matters, economic development and the promotion of democracy.

CBSS is the forum for the Foreign Ministers in the Baltic Sea Region. The CBSS is already involved
in the Baltic 21 process, as it has participated in the elaboration and also adopted the Agenda 21 for
the Baltic Sea Region - Baltic 21 - in 1998.

The Energy Ministers are establishing a small secretariat as a project for three years, consisting of two
people co-located to the CBSS Secretariat.

Organisation and decision making process

The Council of the Baltic Sea States’ organisational framework is based on the Terms of Reference
accepted by the Foreign Ministers of the participating states. The Council consists of the Ministers for
Foreign Affairs of each Member State and a member of the European Commission. Chairmanship of
the Council rotates on an annual basis. The Committee of Senior Officials consists of high-ranking
representatives of the Ministries for Foreign Affairs of the Member States as well as of the EU
Commission. The "Troika" consists of the present, the previous and the future chair-holding Member
State. The purpose of the "Troika" is to assist the chairman of the Committee of Senior Officials, to




                                                    5
maintain informal co-ordination, promote better exchange of information and ensure more effective
decision-making.

The Working bodies consist of the Committee of Senior Officials (CSO) and three Working Groups
under the auspices of the CSO:
- Working Group on Assistance to Democratic Institutions (WGDI)
- Working Group on Economic Co-operation (WGEC)
- Working Group on Nuclear and Radiation Safety (WGNRS)

The permanent international Secretariat of the Council of the Baltic Sea States was established
following a decision adopted by the 1998 CBSS Ministerial conference in Nyborg, Denmark. It
started its operations in mid-August and was officially inaugurated on 20 October 1998.

Offices and practical preparations

The secretariat has been established for a period of 5 years and will be reviewed after this time period.
The staff of the Secretariat includes four full-time professional members: the Director and three
Senior Advisors, one part-time professional member, and the Chief of Staff and a secretary. The staff
members are employed on the basis of three-year individual contracts; rotation (replacement upon
termination of contracts) of staff members is foreseen, with consideration given to the professional
skills of candidates, as well as to adequate geographical and gender representation.

The budget of the Secretariat is formed through contributions paid by the governments of the 11
CBSS Member States. The shares are distributed according to the following scale. Denmark, Finland,
Germany, Norway, Poland, Russia and Sweden pay 12 % and Estonia, Iceland, Latvia and Lithuania
pay 4 %.

The CBSS Secretariat and the Baltic 21 Secretariat are currently located in the same building,
Strömsborg in Stockholm. The physical layout would allow for co-location as now or an integration
with the CBSS Secretariat, without any problems. This alternative would be the easiest to perform, as
no move would be necessary for the Baltic 21 Secretariat. The offices for the interim Baltic 21
Secretariat could be transformed to the offices of the regular Baltic 21 Secretariat.
The Swedish government would elaborate a Headquarters agreement containing basically the same
conditions that apply for the CBSS personnel.



4. Advantages and disadvantages with the different alternatives
When comparing the different alternatives it could be useful to establish what factors that might be of
interest in such a comparison. The secretariat has identified seven factors that could be of use in this
context. There might be other factors and some of the ones we have used in this document may not be
that decisive. However, the factors we have considered are:
 Financial implications - economy
 Work conditions
 Exchange of knowledge and competence between secretariats
 Long-term prospects
 Political implications
 Recruitment




                                                    6
   Financial implications - Economy
    Financial implications of all four alternatives
    To make it possible to compare the economic implications of co-location and integration at the
    two sites, Stockholm and Helsinki, certain assumptions for the calculations have been decided on
    by the SOG 11. Please find the four shadow budget alternatives annexed, providing detailed
    information on the costs.
    The calculations show that the costs for running the Baltic 21 Secretariat differs a little between
    the two locations, but is not affected by the two alternatives, co-location or integration in
    respective city, Helsinki or Stockholm. The reason for this is that the size of the secretariat is not
    affected by the two alternatives, as three professionals are needed in all cases. Even if
    possibilities for sharing administrative staff exist, if the secretariats are integrated, there still will
    be a cost for the Baltic 21 Secretariat to pay for the services, which will not differ between the
    alternatives.
    The cost for co-locating or integrating the Baltic 21 Secretariat with the HELCOM Secretariat is
    6 248 000 Swedish Crowns (appr. 740 300 USD per year) per year. If the Baltic 21 Secretariat is
    co-located or integrated with the CBSS Secretariat the cost is 5 680 000 Swedish Crowns
    (673 000 USD per year). The main difference between the two calculations seems to be the size
    of salaries and remuneration, which can be explained as two different systems are used, the
    United Nations and the Nordic Council of Ministers.
    The income part of the budget will be composed of the extra host country contribution, country
    contributions and possible other voluntary contributions. It is possible that the Nordic Council of
    Ministers and the EU could consider some type of regular contribution. Some initial contacts
    have been taken here.
    It will be up to SOG to decide on the scale to be used for the different country contributions. The
    forthcoming Energy secretariat at CBSS will have a different scale for contributions than the one
    used for the CBSS secretariat, in fact based on voluntary contributions, where the Nordic Council
    of Ministers is contributing the major part.

    Extra host country contributions
    Finland: The Finnish offer is 560 000 SEK per year (66 350 USD). For more details regarding
    the Finnish offer see the information document (SOG HoD I/3/info 1).
    Sweden: Sweden has not submitted any offer at the time of distribution of this document but has
    announced that an offer will come forward before the end of this week (SOG HoD I/3/info 2).

   Work conditions
    As the Baltic 21 Secretariat is currently co-located to CBSS in Stockholm, there would be some
    gains in continuing in the same location in the short-term perspective. The regular Baltic 21
    Secretariat could function from the start, depending on the recruitment of staff. In the long-term
    perspective, the current location of the Baltic 21 Secretariat is not a major aspect to take
    consideration of, as it would only effect the function of the regular Baltic 21 Secretariat for at
    most 6 months. Another aspect that must be considered in connection to a move is changing well-
    established addresses such as the home-page and e-mail which may be of some importance
    initially.
    As far as it is possible to judge today, it seems reasonable to expect that the work conditions
    offered in both Helsinki and Stockholm will be comparable to each other, and should not affect
    the Baltic 21 secretariats possibilities to function in any negative way. It is also reasonable to



                                                      7
    expect that the work conditions would not be affected to any large extent depending on if the
    Baltic 21 Secretariat is co-located or integrated to the other two secretariats. A large degree of
    co-operation already exists today between these three secretariats. It is possible to partake in each
    other’s planning and to ”share coffee breaks ” in all alternatives.
    It is further assumed that English will continue to be the working language of the secretariat and
    will not differ between the alternatives.


   Exchange of knowledge and competence with the other secretariats staff
    Helsinki

    The exchange of knowledge and competence will be different depending on the location of the
    Baltic 21 Secretariat. If the location is Helsinki, there will be good possibilities to establish even
    a greater degree of co-operation with the HELCOM Secretariat. HELCOM is already a member
    in SOG in Baltic 21 and also functions as the Lead Party for the Agriculture Sector in Baltic 21
    together with Poland. The discharge of nutrients and pesticides to the Baltic Sea make the
    Agriculture Sector one of the most important sectors for the health of the Baltic Sea and for
    HELCOM. The Agriculture Sector is also a major sector in Baltic 21, as the production of food,
    fodder, bio-energy, landscapes, recreation, as well as of clean water and employment for some of
    the population, are a precondition for sustainable development.

    The Agriculture Sector is also the Responsible Actor for the Joint Action 3. ”Establishment of
    demonstration areas and pilot projects for proving sustainable development in practice”. Both of
    these tasks are important for the implementation of the Baltic 21 Action Programme and a greater
    degree of co-operation would be possible. HELCOM PITF is also involved in the Baltic 21
    Transport Sector Action 1. ”Developing guidelines, criteria and recommendations for
    infrastructure investments in a sustainable transport system”. Other areas where common
    interests exist for both Baltic 21 and HELCOM are regarding the fisheries sector and public
    awareness. Some discussions have taken place regarding HELCOM:s eventual future
    involvement in Jo 7. ”Increasing consumers awareness of sustainable development”.

    As HELCOM:s mandate concerns the marine environment of the Baltic Sea, exchange of
    knowledge and competence would mainly focus on this area.

    Stockholm
    If the regular Baltic 21 Secretariat will be located with the CBSS Secretariat in Stockholm, other
    possibilities for co-operation and exchange of competence will exist. For example, as a new
    Energy Secretariat under the Energy Ministers is currently being established co-located to the
    CBSS Secretariat, good opportunities for increasing the co-operation between the secretariats
    will exist. This could be important for the Energy Sector in Baltic 21, as at the recent Energy
    Ministers Meeting in October 1999, it was decided that the Baltic 21 Energy Sector work would
    be included in the work of the Energy Sector under the Energy Ministers. To have experts in the
    Energy Sector sitting in the same office would increase the competence of the Baltic 21
    Secretariat and the possibilities of discussions, common planning and elaboration and
    implementation of projects. Such increased co-operation and exchange of competence would be
    possible even for the other sectors, if similar sector secretariats would be established in the
    future. Already today exchange of competence exists between the Baltic 21 Secretariat and the
    CBSS Secretariat.


   Long-term prospects




                                                    8
    It does not seem reasonable to expect that the choice of location will have any effect on the long-
    term prospects for the regular Baltic 21 Secretariat. HELCOM is an older organisation, from 1974
    compared to the CBSS that was initiated in 1992. Both organisations are internationally well
    anchored and will continue their work in the Baltic Sea Region for the foreseeable future.


   Political implications
    The future location of the regular Baltic 21 Secretariat could have some implications on the
    future of the involved organisations within the Baltic Sea Region. The focus of Baltic 21 is
    sustainable development in the Baltic Sea Region, while the focus of HELCOM is the marine
    environment. HELCOM has recently stated some interest in widening their mandate and will be
    discussing HELCOM`s possibilities in sustainable development. As the geographical area of
    concern differs between HELCOM on one side and between Baltic 21 and CBSS on the other
    side, this could be of some importance.

    Another problem will be the involvement of organisations, such as the NGOs, IGOs and IFIs.
    Openness, democracy and transparency are fundamental to the success of a transition to
    sustainable development. If the Baltic 21 Secretariat is co-located to HELCOM or CBSS, the
    membership of organisations should not be a problem. But, there exist to-day a substantial
    discrepancy in this respect between HELCOM and the CBSS on the one side and Baltic 21 on the
    other side which would have to be rectified the if secretariats are going to be integrated. The
    active participation of IGO:s , NGO:s and IFI:s in the Baltic 21 must also be handled effectively
    in an integrated solution. Documents must be processed in a different way to allow for the
    transparency and openness, which characterises Baltic 21.

    As has become evident from the consultations with the CBSS, HELCOM and VASAB reported
    on in the separate document, SOG HoD 1/3/1, there are features of the long term development
    that could be necessary to consider even if they are not at present at a stage where they can have a
    decisive influence on the secretariat business.
    Another aspect is that a fourth secretariat has also figured in the discussions, the Vision and
    Strategies around the Baltic Sea 2010 (VASAB 2010) Secretariat in Gdansk, Poland. The
    VASAB 2010 is a political programme working within a framework for spatial development in
    the Baltic Sea Region. The VASAB 2010 Secretariat will continue to be situated in Gdansk,
    Poland until VASAB 2010+ is finished in the autumn of 2001. The discussions so far lead to a
    future location of the VASAB Secretariat to a country with an economy in transition. Today the
    Interreg IIC Secretariat is located in Rostock, Germany. A future co-location of the VASAB and
    Interreg Secretariats is also a possibility. Co-location in a Nordic country, possibly together with
    the secretariats of Baltic 21, HELCOM or CBSS, is not ruled out as a possibility. The decision
    regarding the future of the VASAB 2010 Secretariat will be taken at the Ministers of Spatial
    Planning Meeting in the autumn 2001.

    To create an effective well functioning secretariat working with sustainable development in the
    Baltic Sea Region, it could be an idea to co-locate or integrate all four secretariats in the future.
    This would, however, require a different process to establish a new framework for sustainable
    development and protection of the environment that is difficult to envisage now and from which
    impossible to draw any conclusions at the present time.

   Recruitment
    The recruitment of staff will be a task that will be a precondition for how the regular Baltic 21
    Secretariat will be able to function in the future. The possibility of finding the right staff for the
    secretariat posts is important. The conditions for the staff will be similar in all four alternatives.




                                                     9
Both in Sweden and Finland there will be a Headquarters agreement. The international staff will
have diplomatic immunity. The salary level will be slightly higher in Finland, as the United
Nations system is used. Also the level of remuneration is somewhat more generous in the United
Nations system than in the Nordic Council of Ministers system. Another difference is that in the
HELCOM Secretariat also Finnish citizens holding professional posts has diplomatic immunity
and tax-free salaries. This is not possible in Sweden and at the CBSS Secretariat. It is not clear
what the situation would be for Finnish national employees in a co-located regular Baltic 21
Secretariat with the HELCOM Secretariat.




                                              10
                                                                                      Annex 1




Draft Annual Budget Estimate for a regular Baltic 21 Secretariat
                           Assumptions for calculations
1. Salaries and remuneration: Use three professionals, all three of age 45 years old. All three
of the employees are married and have two school children each. Two of the professionals
will be Program Co-ordinators and one will be the Secretary General.
When applying the UN salary system, the salary level should be P4 for the two Program Co-
ordinators and D1 for the Secretary General.

Related costs to salaries and remuneration are: Pension; Dependency allowances; Education
grants; Removal costs; Installation grants; Insurance; Medical care.
2. Meetings

The post meetings includes travel, foreign and domestic, accommodations and hospitality,
subsistence allowance, conference fees and costs for arranging conferences.

3. Communications
The post communications includes computer accessories, computer services, mobile
telephones and costs of calls, telephone subscription and costs of calls, fax, and computer
communication.

4. Consultants
    The Baltic 21 Secretariat estimates that the following costs will be necessary for the future
    work of the secretariat:
- Arranging workshops and seminars, speakers
- Homepage /website
- 50% employment: Assistant Secretary and Economy administration
- Biennial and indicator reports
- Baltic 21 political support consultant
- Support to sectors

6. Publications
Publications includes costs for the Newsletter, reports, graphic display, publishing with an
exception of the Biennial and indicator reports.

7. Office material & equipment
Office material & equipment includes typical office material, such as paper, pens etc. and
books, copies of articles, subscriptions of magazines, newspapers, transports of goods,
postage, as well as equipment, such as computers. The cost of postage is approximated to be
200 000 SEK as postage for our quarterly Newsletter is included.

8. Travel support to Countries in Transition
Assuming that there will be two SOG meeting per year, and that 1-2 persons per CIT country
should receive travel and hotel support and that the financial support per person is 10 000
SEK, the cost per year will be 150 000 SEK. The Nordic Council of Ministers has
preliminarily reserved some financing of travel for the countries in transition (75 000 DKK).




                                               11
                                                                   Annex 2




    Draft Annual Budget Estimate for a regular Baltic 21 Secretariat
co-located in Finland with the HELCOM secretariat for 12 months in SEK

                                 EXPENDITURE
Expenditure                                       12 months

1. SALARIES
   United Nations                                             1 566 000

 REMUNERATIONS:
  - UN                                                        1 450 000


2. MEETINGS (incl. travel & hotel):                             650 000



3. COMMUNICATION (computer,                                     203 000
    telephone, fax for 3 employees):



4. CONSULTANTS:                                               1 100 000


5. RENT AND MAINTENANCE                                         312 000
   OF THE OFFICE


6. PUBLICATIONS:                                                250 000


7. OFFICE MATERIAL & EQUIPMENT:                                 247 000
    Postage                                                     200 000

8. TRAVEL SUPPORT TO CIT:                                       150 000


9. MISCELLANEOUS:                                               120 000


Total excl. salaries                                            3 232 000

TOTAL EXPENDITURE                                               6 248 000




                                       12
 Draft Annual Budget Estimate for a regular Baltic 21 Secretariat
located in Finland integrated with the HELCOM Secretariat for 12 months
                                  in SEK

                                 EXPENDITURE
Expenditure                                       12 months

   1. SALARIES
   United Nations                                             1 566 000


 REMUNERATIONS:
  - UN                                                        1 450 000


2. MEETINGS (incl. travel & hotel):                             650 000



3. COMMUNICATION (computer,                                      203 000
    telephone, fax for 3 employees):



4. CONSULTANTS:                                                1 100 000


5. RENT AND MAINTENANCE                                          312 000
   OF THE OFFICE


6. PUBLICATIONS:                                                250 000


7. OFFICE MATERIAL & EQUIPMENT:                                 247 000
    Postage                                                     200 000

8. TRAVEL SUPPORT TO CIT:                                       150 000


9. MISCELLANEOUS:                                               120 000

Total excl. salaries                                            3 232 000

TOTAL EXPENDITURE                                               6 248 000




                                       13
 Draft Annual Budget Estimate for a regular Baltic 21 Secretariat
   co-located in Sweden with the CBSS Secretariat for 12 months in SEK

                                   EXPENDITURE
Expenditure                                        12 months

1. SALARIES
     Nordic Council of Ministers                               1 477 000


 REMUNERATIONS:
  - Nordic Council of Ministers                                1 104 000


2. MEETINGS (incl. travel & hotel):                              650 000



3. COMMUNICATION (computer,                                      129 000
    telephone, fax for 3 employees):



4. CONSULTANTS:                                                 1 100 000


5. RENT AND MAINTENANCE                                          400 000
   OF THE OFFICE


6. PUBLICATIONS:                                                 250 000


7. OFFICE MATERIAL & EQUIPMENT:                                  100 000
    Postage                                                      200 000

8. TRAVEL SUPPORT TO CIT:                                        150 000


9. MISCELLANEOUS:                                                120 000


Total excl. salaries                                             3 099 000

TOTAL EXPENDITURE                                                5 680 000




                                        14
 Draft Annual Budget Estimate for a regular Baltic 21 Secretariat
 located in Sweden integrated with the CBSS Secretariat for 12 months in
                                  SEK

                                   EXPENDITURE
Expenditure                                        12 months

1. SALARIES
     Nordic Council of Ministers                        1 477 000


 REMUNERATIONS:
  - Nordic Council of Ministers                         1 104 000


2. MEETINGS (incl. travel & hotel):                       650 000



3. COMMUNICATION (computer,                               129 000
    telephone, fax for 3 employees):



4. CONSULTANTS:                                         1 100 000


5. RENT AND MAINTENANCE                                   400 000
   OF THE OFFICE


6. PUBLICATIONS:                                          250 000


7. OFFICE MATERIAL & EQUIPMENT:                           100 000
    Postage                                               200 000

8. TRAVEL SUPPORT TO CIT:                                 150 000


9. MISCELLANEOUS:                                         120 000


Total excl. salaries                                      3 099 000

TOTAL EXPENDITURE                                         5 680 000




                                        15

								
To top