Adaptive Power Controlled MAC Protocol for Improved Throughput by cuv18981

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									                        Adaptive Power Controlled MAC
                      Protocol for Improved Throughput


The University of Florida is seeking companies interested in commercializing an innovative and
more efficient adaptive transmission power controlled medium access control protocol (ATP-
MAC) for wireless ad hoc networks. This new system incorporates a MAC protocol using only
one-radio and one-channel, while still significantly improving the throughput by up to 136%
compared to IEEE 802.11. This method provides the ability to enable concurrent transmissions
with maximal allowable transmission power levels without interfering each other. This new
MAC protocol from the University of Florida researchers will greatly improve the quality and
efficiency of transmissions of multi-hop wireless communications systems, providing a means to
regulate a large number of interactions over a wireless interface.


Applications
Improved throughput in multi-hop wireless ad hoc networks


Advantages
t   System requires a single transceiver, reducing ex-
    cess equipment to facilitate large interactions
    through a single channel
t   ATPMAC does not introduce any additional signaling
    overhead, providing a cost efficient means for
    implementation
t   ATPMAC can greatly improve the network through
    put by up to 136% compared to IEEE 802.11



Technology
Transmission power control (TPC) has been extensively used not only to save energy, but also
to improve the network throughput in multi-hop wireless ad hoc networks. Among the existing
throughput-oriented TPC protocols, many can achieve significant throughput improvement, but
have to use multiple channels and/or multiple transceivers. Those that require a single channel
and a single transceiver have only limited throughput enhancement. The new adaptive trans-
mission power control protocol, ATPMAC, will improve the network throughput significantly
using a single channel and a single transceiver. Specifically, by controlling the transmission
power, ATPMAC can enable several concurrent transmissions without interfering with each
other, which is impossible when using IEEE 802.11. Moreover, ATPMAC does not introduce
any additional signaling overhead. It has been shown that ATPMAC can improve the network
throughput by up to 136% compared to IEEE 802.11.
Technology (continued)
The method includes detecting an incoming packet at a wireless network interface and deter-
mining a minimum power level needed to successfully transmit to the incoming packet sender,
determining whether any neighboring node is transmitting and determining a maximal allow-
able power level used to transmit to the incoming packet sender.



The Inventors
Yuguang Fang, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and
Computer Engineering at the University of Florida. Dr. Fang has published
over 200 technical papers and has been the recipient of numerous awards,
including the 2006 IEEE ICNP Best Paper Award, the 2008 IEEE Fellow,
University of Florida Research Foundation (UFRF) Professorship, NSF
CAREER Award and ONR Young Investigator. His research interests in-
clude wireless networks, mobile computing, resource allocation, and wire-
less network security. Dr. Fang earned his first Ph.D. from the Department
of Systems, Control and Industrial Engineering at Case Western Reserve
University in 1994 and his second Ph.D. from Department of Electrical and
Computer Engineering at Boston University in 1997.


Pan Li is a student at the University of Florida pursuing his Ph.D. degree in Department of
Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Florida as a Research Assistant. His
research interests include medium access control, routing algorithms, and capacity and con-
nectivity analysis in wireless networks. He received a B.E. degree in Electrical Engineering from
Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, P.R. China, in 2005.




                    Contact:
                    Karl Zawoy
                    University of Florida
                    Office of Technology Licensing
                    (352) 392-8929 • kzawoy@ufl.edu
                    UF #12589 Patent Pending

								
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