Assessment of US GHG cap-and-trade proposals

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Assessment of US GHG cap-and-trade proposals
SERGEY PALTSEV1*, JOHN M. REILLY1, HENRY D. JACOBY1, ANGELO C. GURGEL1, GILBERT E.
METCALF1,2, ANDREI P. SOKOLOV1, JENNIFER F. HOLAK1

1
 Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
2
 Department of Economics, Tufts University, Medford, MA, USA and National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge,
MA, USA



In 2007 the US Congress began considering a set of bills to implement a cap-and-trade system to limit the nation’s
greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) – and its economic component, the
Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model – were used to assess these pr
				
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Description: In 2007 the US Congress began considering a set of bills to implement a cap-and-trade system to limit the nation's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) - and its economic component, the Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model - were used to assess these proposals. In the absence of policy, the EPPA model projects a doubling of US greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Global emissions, driven by growth in developing countries, are projected to increase even more. Unrestrained, these emissions would lead to an increase in global CO2 concentration from a current level of 380 ppmv to about 550 ppmv by 2050 and to near 900 ppmv by 2100, resulting in a year 2100 global temperature 3.5-4.5C above the current level. The more ambitious of the Congressional proposals could limit this increase to around 2C, but only if other nations, including developing countries, also strongly controlled greenhouse gas emissions. With these more aggressive reductions, the economic cost measured in terms of changes in total welfare in the United States could range from 1.5% to almost 2% by the 2040-2050 period, with 2015 CO2-equivalent prices between $30 and $55, rising to between $120 and $210 by 2050. This level of cost would not seriously affect US GDP growth but would imply large-scale changes in its energy system. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
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