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Increase in Quantitative Variation After Exposure to Environmental Stresses and/or Introduction of a Major Mutation: G E Interaction and Epistasis or Canalization?

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Why does phenotypic variation increase upon exposure of the population to environmental stresses or introduction of a major mutation? It has usually been interpreted as evidence of canalization (or robustness) of the wild-type genotype; but an alternative population genetic theory has been suggested by J. Hermisson and G. Wagner: "the release of hidden genetic variation is a generic property of models with epistasis or genotype-environment interaction." In this note we expand their model to include a pleiotropic fitness effect and a direct effect on residual variance of mutant alleles. We show that both the genetic and environmental variances increase after the genetic or environmental change, but these increases could be very limited if there is strong pleiotropic selection. On the basis of more realistic selection models, our analysis lends further support to the genetic theory of Hermisson and Wagner as an interpretation of hidden variance. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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									Copyright Ó 2008 by the Genetics Society of America
DOI: 10.1534/genetics.108.091611




                                                                      Note
        Increase in Quantitative Variation After Exposure to Environmental
             Stresses and/or Introduction of a Major Mutation: G 3 E
                      Interaction and Epistasis or Canalization?

                                                                Xu-Sheng Zhang1
                        Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, United Kingdom
                                                        Manuscript received May 16, 2
								
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