; "Like a Lady of a Far Countre": Coleridge's "Christabel" and Fear of Invasion
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"Like a Lady of a Far Countre": Coleridge's "Christabel" and Fear of Invasion

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II In his essay on Jacobinism, Coleridge suggests that the Pitt ministry's anti-Jacobin campaign resides in indeterminacy: Party rage, and fanatical aversion, have dieir birth place, and natural abode, in floating and obscure generalities, and seldom or never burst forth, except from clouds and vapours. Just as it seems to rest on an image of the meditative man dreaming of "better worlds" amidst nature, the poem abruptly shifts its focus and plunges the reader into the dangerous world of England in 1798, a place poised between its own debilitating vices and a cruel enemy outside the gates.\n Assigning specific ideological labels to any of the poem's characters, however, risks reducing the poem to mere allegory whereas it is in fact the haunting evocation of a climate of alarm transcending partisan motives.

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