Format for Executive Summary--4th version by aya20861

VIEWS: 94 PAGES: 93

									SBE Meeting 01/2010                                                                                                                             Attachment: TCP 1

                                                                   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title:       Revised Mentor Standards and Training

Type of Executive Summary:

         Consent               Action
                               A                  Action on First Reading                          Discussion                     Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #
        SBE Policy #
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other 2007 and 2008 Budget Bills

Presenter(s):              Dr. Rebecca Garland (Chief Academic Officer, Academic Services and Instructional Support) and
                           Mr. Eric Hirsch (Special Projects Director, New Teacher Center)

Description:
Both the 2007 and 2008 budget bills contained special provisions regarding
     • the appropriate use of mentor funds;
     • plans, both local and state, that should guide the expenditures of mentor funds; and
     • the need for adequate mentor training.

During the 2008-2009 academic year, the State Board authorized a task force to address new program standards, the
establishment of a network of mentor programs, a new training program for mentors, and a review of the current NC
SBE policies on Beginning Teacher Support.

At this meeting the Mentor Task force will present for discussion Revised Standards for Mentor Programs, Revised
Standards for Mentors, and a system of accountability and support to enhance induction quality for beginning
teachers throughout North Carolina.

Resources:


Input Process:
Task Force meetings and input from Professional Teaching Standards Commission

Stakeholders:
LEAs and beginning teachers

Timeline For Action:
Implementation in 2010-2011

Recommendations:
It is recommended that the State Board of Education adopt the proposed mentoring and education program
standards.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
             Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
             Specify:

             Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
             Specify:

             Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                                     Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________          No __________                                                   Abstain __________
Approved __________     Disapproved __________                                                Postponed __________     Revised __________

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates: Linda Jones, 807-3914
      NORTH CAROLINA MENTOR TASK FORCE




Draft Report Presented to the 21st Century Professionals Subcommittee of the
                 North Carolina State Board of Education

                              December 2009
Executive Summary
In response to the 2008 budget bill special provision, the North Carolina State Board Education
made recommendations about how LEAs should use their mentor funding for 2008-2009. The
Department of Public Instruction and the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards
Commission (under their authority to consult and create standards for mentor training) created
the North Carolina Mentor Task Force to advise the State Board on utilization of mentor funding
for the 2009-10 school year and beyond and necessary revisions to mentor program standards,
accountability and support.

The Task Force offers the following recommendations to the North Carolina State Board for
their consideration:

Recommendation 1: Revise Standards for Beginning Teacher Support Programs.
Recommended Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards and an accompanying continuum
are presented. Proposed standards address: systemic support, mentor selection, development and
support, mentoring for instructional excellence, beginning teacher professional development and
formative assessment of candidates and programs.

Recommendation 2: Develop Standards for Mentors That Clearly Articulate How They
Can Assist Beginning Teachers in Meeting North Carolina’s Professional Teaching
Standards. Recommend Mentor Standards and an accompanying continuum are presented.
Proposed standards align with the state’s Professional Teaching Standards and address:
demonstration of leadership, establishing a respectful environment for a diverse population of
students, content knowledge, facilitating student learning, and reflecting on practice.

Recommendation 3: Revise Mentor Program Accountability and Support Policies to
Include a Five Year Formal Review and an Annual Peer Review Process. The Task Force
recommends that the State Board revise the requirements of the annual plan, integrate a formal
program evaluation into the Title II monitoring process every fifth year, and create an annual
peer review support system

Recommendation 4: Create and coordinate mentor support opportunities to ensure all
LEAs and mentors are prepared to provide high quality support to all beginning teachers
in North Carolina. The Task Force recommends that DPI develop or broker mentor training
that meets proposed Mentor Standards. The State Board of Education should consider
reestablishing a licensure endorsement for mentors who demonstrate their effectiveness.

These recommendations come at a challenging time for North Carolina and local school systems.
Yet, if the State Board is to meet its goal of creating future ready students for the 21st Century,
ensuring schools are staffed with beginning teachers who receive the highest quality support is
essential.




                                                 1
Acknowledgements
The North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards Commission (NCPTSC) and Department of
Public Instruction would like to thank the members of the task force for their time and efforts to
assess and improve new teacher support in North Carolina. In particular, the New Teacher
Center (NTC) has helped to organize and support the Task Force. Eric Hirsch, Director of
Special Projects with Andrew Sioberg, Policy and Research Analyst, facilitated Task Force
meetings, provided data and research from North Carolina and other states, and ensured that the
work of the Task Force continued through budget and staffing changes. The NTC using funding
from the National Educational Association and the Joyce Foundation, funded travel and meeting
costs for Task Force members in 2009 and provided staffing and support.

In addition to members of the Task Force, NCPTSC would like to thank several people who
contributed to this work. Colleen Stobbe, a consultant to the New Teacher Center helped take
the work of the Task Force and create drafts of the standards and continuums for the Beginning
Teacher Support Program and Mentor Standards. Her patience, attention to detail and wisdom
benefited our work tremendously. Additionally, Task Force member Fred Williams assembled
seven outstanding mentors from the Durham Public Schools to help enhance and refine the ideas
of the Task Force in creating initial drafts of the Mentor Standards and continuum, including
Michelle Tuck Thomas, Mechia Dupree, Karen Rodenhizer, Lori McNulty-Pope, Meena
Singh and Cheryl McFadden. They serve as stellar examples of teacher leadership and their
service to North Carolina will benefit beginning teachers for years to come. Wendy Baron,
Associate Director of the New Teacher Center and member of the California Beginning Teacher
Support and Assessment Task Force, provided valuable information to the Task Force on
policies in California to support and hold mentor programs accountable. Finally, members of the
NCPTSC provided valuable insight on the Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards and
continuum.




                                                2
Task Force Members
The following individuals were Task Force members and participated in developing the
standards and drafting the recommendations in this report

   •   Donald Barringer, Teacher Advisor to Governor Bev Perdue
   •   Cheri Boone, Assistant Superintendent, Yancey County Schools
   •   Glenn Carrozza, Senior Administrator/Office of Recruitment, Wake County Public
       School System
   •   Jesse Dingle, Former Director of the Division of Talent Management and Development,
       Department of Public Instruction
   •   Angela Farthing, Manager, Center for Teaching and Learning, North Carolina
       Association of Educators
   •   Hazel Gibbs, Executive Director, Human Resources, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools
   •   Pat Hensley, Assistant Superintendent, HR, Catawba County Schools
   •   Heather Higgins, Assistant Professor, UNC-Pembroke
   •   Eric Hirsch, Director Special Projects, New Teacher Center
   •   Lynne Johnson, Director of Educator Recruitment and Development, Department of
       Public Instruction
   •   Adriane Mingo, Regional Education Facilitator, Southwest Region
   •   Dan Holloman, Executive Director for Human Resources and Operations, Person County
       Schools
   •   Joan Kister, Director, Human Resources, Wake County Public School System
   •   Joyce Loveless, Executive Director, Program and Equity, National Board Professional
       Teaching Standards
   •   Carolyn McKinney, Executive Director, North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards
       Commission
   •   Paula Mickey, Personnel Director, Camden County Schools
   •   Delores Morris, Principal, Rowan Salisbury Schools
   •   Cindi Rigsbee, NC Teacher of the Year, Orange County Schools
   •   Fred Williams, Executive Director of Recruitment and Retention, Durham Public Schools
   •   Cindy Wheeler, Manager of the Teacher Licensure Unit, Office of School Readiness,
       Department of Public Instruction
   •   Ren Bryan, Associate Director, NC Teacher Academy




                                              3
Charge of the Task Force

The 2008 Budget Bill contained a special provision that requires the State Board of Education
(SBE) to allot funds for mentoring services to local school administrative units based on the
highest number of employees in the preceding three school years who (i) are paid with State,
federal, or local funds, and (ii) are either teachers paid on the first step or the second steps of the
teacher salary schedule or instructional support paid on the first step of the instructional support
personnel salary schedule. Local Education Agencies (LEAs) are to use these funds to provide
mentoring support to eligible employees in accordance with a plan approved by the State Board
of Education. This plan shall also include information on how all mentors in the LEAs will be
trained to provide mentoring support.

In accordance with the 2008 Budget Bill special provision, the State Board of Education
approved the following recommendation:

During the 2008-2009 School Year, LEAs could continue to use their mentor funds in the
following ways to support new teachers:

    1.    Implementation of full-time mentor plans previously approved by the State Board;
    2.    Employment of full-time mentors;
    3.    Contracted services of full-time or part-time mentors; or
    4.    Monthly supplements for practicing classroom teachers who serve as mentors.

If the beginning teacher was not assigned a full-time mentor, to ensure that the mentor had
sufficient time to provide support to the beginning teacher, it was recommended that the mentor
teacher be assigned only one beginning teacher at a time. If the assigned mentor was not housed
in the same building as the beginning teacher (e.g., to provide a mentor in the licensure area [art,
music, physical education] the system could assign a mentor housed in another school, the
system must assure that the mentor is provided sufficient time to meet with and support the
beginning teacher.

LEAs could use federal Title II funds, low wealth and small county funds, Disadvantaged
Student Supplemental Funds (DSSF) (if part of the LEA DSSF plan), and other appropriate
funding sources to employ mentors.

No formal recommendation to use these funds was approved by the State Board of Education for
2009-2010, school year. Instead, the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) and the North
Carolina Professional Teaching Standards Commission (NCPTSC)—under their authority in
SL2007-0323, Sec. 7.17b to consult with the State Board of Education on standards for mentor
training—convened a Task Force of practitioners and stakeholders from across the state to
develop recommendations to be submitted to the State Board of Education as it relates to
improving the quality of new teacher support across the state.

The Task Force met in October and November 2008 to assess where improvements in new
teacher support could benefit schools, LEAs and the state. A brief report of the North Carolina
Mentor Task Force was presented as an information item to the 21st Century Professionals
subcommittee of the State Board of Education in January 2009. At that time, the North Carolina

                                                   4
Mentor Task Force received a charge to proceed in developing recommendations for
consideration by the State Board in four areas:

   1.    Create new Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards around identified induction
         purpose areas and design elements such as mentor selection, training, ongoing support,
         time, optimal working conditions and professional growth. The standards should align
         with the state’s Professional Teaching Standards and the Teacher Evaluation System
         rubric for growth.

   2.    Consider ways to support mentor programs and mentor program leaders in not only
         meeting minimal requirements, but aspiring toward excellence in the design and
         implementation of their beginning teacher support programs.

   3.    Develop Mentor Standards and consider ways in which the State Board of Education
         can enhance opportunities for mentor support.

   4.    Review and recommend necessary changes to State Board of Education policies on
         Beginning Teacher Support Programs to ensure they reflect expectations delineated in
         the Professional Teaching Standards.




                                              5
Beginning Teacher Support in North Carolina: Policy and Impact
Summary of Current Policy
Since the mid 1980s, North Carolina has had an induction program for beginning teachers.
Initially, the program was two years in length. Since January 1, 1998, all teachers who hold
initial (Standard Professional 1) licenses are required to participate in a three year induction
period with a formal orientation, mentor support, observations and evaluation prior to the
recommendation for continuing (Standard Professional 2) licensure. Beginning teachers have
paid mentors during their first two years of employment. Within the requirements and guidelines
described below, LEAs have the flexibility to develop induction programs that meet the needs of
their beginning teachers.

Each LEA must develop a plan that conforms to the SBE Mentor Plan and provide a
comprehensive program for beginning teachers. This plan must be approved by the local board
of education. The plans, which are to be on file in the LEA for review, must:

  (1)    Describe adequate provisions for efficient management of the program.
  (2)    Designate, at the local level, an official to verify eligibility of beginning teachers for a
         continuing license.
  (3)    Provide for a formal orientation for beginning teachers which includes a description of
         available services, training opportunities, the teacher evaluation process, and the process
         for achieving a continuing license.
  (4)    Address compliance with the optimum working conditions for beginning teachers
         identified by the SBE.
  (5)    Address compliance with the mentor selection, assignment, and training guidelines
         identified by the SBE.
  (6)    Provide for the involvement of the principal or the principal's designee in supporting the
         beginning teacher.
  (7)    Provide for a minimum of 4 observations per year in accordance GS 115C-333, using the
         instruments adopted by the SBE for such purposes. The plan must address the
         appropriate spacing of observations throughout the year, and specify a date by which the
         annual summative evaluation is to be completed.
  (8)    Provide for the preparation of an Individualized Growth Plan (IGP) by each beginning
         teacher in collaboration with the principal or the principal's designee, and the mentor
         teacher.
  (9)    Provide for a formal means of identifying and delivering services and technical assistance
         needed by beginning teachers.
  (10)   Provide for the maintenance of a cumulative beginning teacher file that contains the IGP
         and evaluation report(s).
  (11)   Provide for the timely transfer of the cumulative beginning teacher file to successive
         employing LEAs, charter schools, or non-public institutions within the state upon the
         authorization of the beginning teacher.
  (12)   Describe a plan for the systematic evaluation of the Beginning Teacher Support Program
         to assure program quality, effectiveness, and efficient management.
  (13)   Document that the local board of education has adopted the LEA plan, or that the charter
         school or non-public institution plan has been approved by the SBE.

                                                  6
Charter schools and non-public institutions that have a state-approved plan to administer the
licensure renewal program may submit a Beginning Teacher Support Program Plan to the SBE
for approval.

In compliance with GS 115C-333, each beginning teacher is to be observed at least three times
annually by a qualified school administrator or a designee and at least once annually by a
teacher. Each beginning teacher is to be evaluated at least once annually by a qualified school
administrator. Each observation must be for at least one continuous period of instructional time
that is at least 45 minutes in length and must be followed by a post-conference. All persons who
observe teachers must be appropriately trained. The required observations must be appropriately
spaced throughout the school year. The Beginning Teacher Support Program Plan must specify
the role of the beginning teacher's assigned mentor in the observations. Whether or not the
assigned mentor may conduct one of the required observations is a local decision.
Local school systems are responsible for providing training and support for mentor teachers.
Systems may choose to use programs developed by the Department of Public Instruction, other
programs (e.g., Teacher Academy), or develop programs of their own.

Based on the belief that quality mentors are a critical key to the success of beginning teachers,
providing needed instructional, emotional and organizational support, each beginning teacher is
to be assigned a qualified, well-trained mentor as soon as possible after employment. If the
beginning teacher is not assigned a full-time mentor, to ensure that the mentor has sufficient time
to provide support to the beginning teacher, it is recommended that the mentor teacher be
assigned only one beginning teacher at a time. If the assigned mentor is not housed in the same
building as the beginning teacher (e.g., to provide a mentor in the licensure area [art, music,
physical education] the system may assign a mentor housed in another school), the system must
assure that the mentor is provided sufficient time to meet with and support the beginning teacher.

State Board policy specifies that the following guidelines should be used for mentor teacher
selection:

   1. Successful teaching in the area of licensure
       • Appraisal ratings among the highest in the school (regardless of instrument/process
          used);
       • Strong recommendations from principal and peers;
   2. Commitment
       • Willingness to serve as a mentor;
       • Willingness to participate in on-going annual professional development related to
          mentoring;
   3. Other
       • Preference for career status teachers who have experience in the district norms,
          culture, and mission, as well as the North Carolina's goals (ABC's), strategic
          priorities, and standard course of study; and
       • Preference given to those who have successfully completed a minimum of 24 contact
          hours of mentor training.

Each beginning teacher must be provided an orientation. This orientation should be conducted
prior to the arrival of students. If the teacher is employed during the school year, the orientation
                                                  7
should be conducted within the first ten days of employment. At a minimum, the orientation
should provide the beginning teacher with an overview of the school’s/system’s goals, policies,
and procedures; a description of available services and training opportunities; the Beginning
Teacher Support Program and the process for achieving a Standard Professional 2 (continuing)
license; the teacher evaluation process; the NC Standard Course of Study; local curriculum
guides; the safe and appropriate use of seclusion and restraint of students; the State's ABC's
Program; and the State Board of Education's Strategic Priorities, and Goals.

To ensure that beginning teachers have the opportunity to develop into capable teachers, the
following working conditions are strongly recommended:

       •   Assignment in the area of licensure;
       •   Mentor assigned early, in the licensure area, and in close proximity;
       •   orientation that includes state, district, and school expectations;
       •   Limited preparations;
       •   Limited non-instructional duties;
       •   Limited number of exceptional or difficult students; and
       •   No extracurricular assignments unless requested in writing by the beginning teacher.

Status of Beginning Teacher Support in North Carolina
In 2008, more than 104,000 educators (87 percent) across North Carolina participated in
Governor Easley’s Teacher Working Conditions Survey, providing critical information for every
traditional public school about whether or not the faculty perceives that the trusting, supportive
environments necessary to enhance student learning and retain teachers are present.

These conditions are especially important for new teachers entering the profession. High quality
mentoring is dependent on the presence of many of these working conditions to be effective,
including: a supportive environment, teacher engagement in decisions about instruction, school
leaders who facilitate the creation of clear and predictable decision making processes,
opportunities for mentor and new teacher professional development, and time for educators to
work collaboratively.

In addition to general trends evident from the main sections of the survey, specific questions
were designed to assess perceptions of the quality of mentoring across the state. Approximately
19,000 teachers in their first three years in the profession (about 7,000 in their initial year) were
asked a series of questions about the support they received. About 26,000 North Carolina
teachers reported serving as a mentor to new colleagues over the past three years and were asked
about their perceptions of the frequency of mentoring and any additional support they received.

Beginning Teachers Have Different Perceptions and Professional Development Needs

Beginning teachers report differing perceptions of the working conditions in their school and
areas where they need additional support to improve. Consider the following:

   •   New teachers are more likely to agree that they have positive working conditions than
       mid-career and veteran teachers. On virtually all questions, teachers in their first year are

                                                  8
         the most likely to note the presence of positive working conditions, followed closely by
         those in their second and third years.

     •   In most professional development areas, new teachers are more likely to report needing
         additional opportunities to be more effective with their students. While there is little
         disparity based on years of experience in feelings of preparedness in their content area,
         closing the achievement gap and with English Language Learners, there are significant
         differences in the areas of classroom management, methods of teaching and student
         assessment. For example, while half (52 percent) of first year and one-third of teachers
         with two to three years experience (36 percent) indicate a need for more professional
         development in classroom management, less than one-fifth of those with eleven or more
         years report a need.

 Ideally, induction can build upon and foster new teachers’ positive perceptions of supportive
 working conditions while also providing the additional support new teachers identify as
 necessary. However, it appears that not all beginning educators are receiving the support they
 need.

 Induction Support Does Not Reach All New Teachers

 Nine out of ten teachers report being assigned mentors for both their first year and/or their first
 and second year of teaching. And of the new teachers assigned a mentor, many do not receive the
 support that research demonstrates is necessary to improve performance and keep them in the
 profession (Table 1). One-third of new teachers assigned a mentor report never planning during
 the school day (32 percent) or planning instruction with their mentor (33 percent). One-fifth of
 new teachers indicate that they were not observed by their mentor.

                                             Table 1
            Frequency of Mentoring Activities Reported by New Teachers and Mentors

                Mentoring Activity                                   Supported New Teacher
                                                                Never     Sometimes At Least Once
                                                                                        Per Week
Planning During the School Day                                  32%          38%          30%
Being Observed by My Mentor                                     20%          72%           8%
Planning Instruction with My Mentor                             33%          43%          24%
Having Discussions with My Mentor About                           4%              45%                51%
Teaching
 Note: The sometimes category includes responses ranging from less than one per month to several times per month.

 While many novice teachers are not being reached, those who were assigned a mentor and met
 with them more frequently indicate that the support they received was effective in many areas.
 Three-quarters of new teachers receiving mentoring agree that their mentor was effective in
 supporting instructional strategies (76 percent), classroom management/discipline (76 percent),
 school and/or district procedures (76 percent). Eighty percent report that their mentor supported
 their completion of required documentation and 85 percent of new teachers agree that their
 mentor provided effective general support and encouragement. Two-thirds report effective
 support from their mentor in their subject area.
                                                        9
   Mentors, like new teachers, are not receiving systematic support across schools and districts.
   While three-quarters (77 percent) of North Carolina educators serving as mentors to new
   teachers received some mentor training (i.e. seminars or classes), other supports are rare. About
   one-third of mentors report receiving release time to observe their mentee (38 percent), receiving
   common planning time with their mentee (31 percent), and regular communication with school
   administration (34 percent). Less than one out of ten receive release time to observe other
   mentors (7 percent) and virtually none receive a reduced number of preparations (2 percent) or
   teaching schedule (2 percent).

   Four out of ten mentors report working with only one beginning teacher and seven out of ten (67
   percent) work with two or less.

   Impact of Mentoring

   Three-quarters of new teachers mentored report that it made at least some contribution to their
   success as a beginning teacher (four out of ten report that their mentoring experience mattered
   quite a bit or a great deal). About half (45 percent) agree that their mentoring experience was
   important in their decision to continue teaching at their school.

   On the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey, all teachers were asked about their
   future employment plans: whether they wanted to “stay” teaching in their current school, remain
   teaching but “move” to a new school, or “leave” teaching altogether. New teachers who plan to
   stay in their school receive more frequent mentoring support than those who want to move to a
   new school or leave the profession (Table 2). In an examination of the self-reported future
   employment plans of new teachers who were mentored, those who want to stay in their school
   more frequently planned during the school day, planned instruction, had discussions about
   teaching and were observed than those who wanted to move to another school or leave teaching
   altogether.

                                        Table 2
     Future Employment Plans of New Teachers and the Frequency of Mentoring Activities

Mentoring                  Frequency of Mentoring as Reported by New Teachers
 Activity             Never                    Sometimes           At Least Once Per Week
              Stayers Movers Leavers Stayers Movers Leavers Stayers Movers Leavers
Planning       28.5%  37.2%    37.8%    38.8%    37.7%    39.3%    32.7%    25.1%    22.9%
During the
School Day
Being         18.1%     22.7%      23.1%     72.8%      69.1%     69.2%       9.1%      8.2%         7.7%
Observed
by My
Mentor
Planning      29.6%     38.6%      41.1%     44.1%      40.9%     41.1%      26.3%     20.5%         17.8%
Instruction
with My
Mentor

                                                   10
Having          3.1%        5.1%        6.5%        43.4%      49.8%        49.9%       54.5%      45.1%       43.6%
Discussions
with My
Mentor
About
Teaching
   Note: The sometimes category includes responses ranging from less than one per month to several times per month

   Two-thirds of teachers responding to the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey
   agree that school leadership makes sustained efforts to address concerns about new teacher
   support. Approximately one out of six teachers (17 percent) disagree that efforts are made. By
   comparison, 64 percent agreed efforts are made to address concerns about leadership, 66 percent
   agreed efforts are made to address concerns about teacher empowerment, and 72 percent agreed
   efforts are made to address concerns about professional development and facilities and resources
   respectively.

   Additionally, only half of principals (53 percent) agree that they have sufficient time to focus on
   instructional leadership issues. Six out of ten principals (57 percent) spend three hours or less in
   an average week on instructional leadership issues (nine out of ten spend 5 hours per week or
   less) and one-quarter spend three hours or less (26 percent) observing and coaching teachers.




                                                         11
Recommendation 1: Revise Standards for Beginning Teacher
Support Programs
The Mentor Task Force recommends that the State Board of Education revise current
standards to align with the state’s Professional Teaching Standards and reflect current best
practices across the state and the nation. The Task Force reviewed research and standards from
several states—California, Idaho, Illinois, Ohio, Mississippi, Maine, South Carolina, Arizona—
assessing critical areas of mentor program design and practice. The Task Force concluded
revised standards should:

       •   Focus on the elements of beginning teacher support programs that are essential to
           mentor success. The current Mentor Program Standards focus exclusively on the
           knowledge, skills and dispositions mentors should demonstrate. Other states are
           explicit in areas such as funding, time, professional development, evaluation and
           systemic support.

       •   Include a continuum similar to the principal and teacher evaluation systems in order
           to clearly articulate different levels of intensity of support in each standard—from a
           developing program to a distinguished induction program—allowing districts to
           better reflect on their current approach and consider ways to strive toward high
           quality beginning teacher support.

       •   Align with the North Carolina’s Professional Teaching Standards, utilizing similar
           language and setting similar goals and benchmarks.

The Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards and accompanying continuum created by
the Task Force and recommended to the State Board can be found in Appendix A. Ensuring
that beginning teacher support programs in North Carolina are not only proficient, but
distinguished on these standards is imperative. Close to twenty-five per cent, over 22,000, of
North Carolina’s teachers are in their first three years in the profession. Of these beginning
teachers, twenty-six percent, close to 6,000, are starting their teaching careers prior to earning a
Standard Professional I license. If the beginning teachers of North Carolina are going to be able
to meet the state’s professional teaching standards, impact the learning of all students in positive
ways, choose to remain in the profession and become future master teachers, teacher leaders and
skilled administrators and superintendents, then a quality induction program to support the
instructional growth of beginning teachers must be in place in each of the 115 school districts in
the state.

The standards highlight critical elements for a robust induction program for beginning teachers.
Exemplary programs:

   •   Establish professional norms that sustain their work throughout a career;

   •   Support an expectation that teachers are leaders, problem solvers and advocates for
       students;



                                                12
   •   Utilize the talents of veteran educators who have the disposition, time, skills and
       professional development required to serve as a mentor;

   •   Recognize that, in addition to the support of a mentor, induction is enhanced by the
       relationships and guidance established within the entire school community;

   •   Facilitate the understanding that teaching standards and grade-level and course standards
       serve as a guide for professional development and design of instruction;

   •   Foster a spirit of inquiry and resiliency to adapt to changing educational environments;

   •   Develop the expectation that teachers can create positive classroom environments to
       assure that each student will have the opportunity for successful learning.

To address these elements, the Task Force recommends the State Board of Education approve
five proposed Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards explained in detail in Appendix A.

Standard 1: Systematic Support for High Quality Induction Programs – This standard is
designed to promote the commitment of all stakeholders in seeing mentoring and induction
programs succeed. Key program elements include the creation of an institutional plan,
demonstrating institutional commitment and support and principal engagement.

Standard 2: Mentor Selection, Development, and Support – This standard articulates the
process and criteria for mentor selection, discusses mentor roles and responsibilities, and
delineates foundational mentor training. Key program elements include mentor selection,
defining the role of mentors and mentor professional development.

Standard 3: Mentoring for Instructional Excellence – Mentors are given protected time to
provide beginning teachers with support to achieve success in the areas set forth by the North
Carolina Professional Teaching Standards. Key program elements include providing time for
mentors and beginning teachers, ensuring mentoring is focused on instruction and addresses
issues of diversity.

Standard 4: Beginning Teacher Professional Development: Professional development is
provided to beginning teachers that orients them to their new career and supports their efforts to
meet the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards. Key program elements include
structured orientation to school site and professional development designed to meet the unique
needs of beginning teachers and aligned with the North Carolina Professional Teaching
Standards and the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation System.

Standard 5: Formative Assessment of Candidates and Programs – New teachers and
mentoring programs are monitored and supported using a formative assessment system to guide
their work. Key program elements include formative assessment systems and program
evaluation.




                                                13
Recommendation 2: Develop Standards for Mentors That Clearly
Articulate How They Can Assist Beginning Teachers in Meeting
North Carolina’s Professional Teaching Standards
While Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards and the accompanying continuum provide
guidance to school districts about induction programs, they are not explicit to the thousands of
mentors in North Carolina about their role. Therefore, the Task Force concluded that Mentor
Standards should be developed that:

   •   Align directly with the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards. The role of
       mentors is to ensure that beginning teachers meet, and ideally exceed, the standards set
       by the state for all teachers. Much has changed since the current Mentor Program
       Standards (QP-A-004) were approved by the SBE in February, 2004. The state has an
       aligned system of 21st Century standards, revised Professional Teaching Standards, and a
       new teacher evaluation system. Current standards focus on the mentor and what skills
       they need to demonstrate. The Task Force believes that revised standards should focus
       on what knowledge, skills, and dispositions beginning teachers need and clearly articulate
       how mentors can help teachers attain them. The proposed Mentor Standards by the Task
       Force purposely use the exact language number and language of the state’s Professional
       Teaching Standards to make these connections clear to beginning teachers, mentors,
       teachers, principals, mentor program leaders and the community at large.

   •   Include a continuum of practice to provide a vision of what high quality mentoring and
       support look like for mentors to self reflect and to inform districts and other professional
       development providers in developing and delivering mentor training and support.

The Task Force recognizes that induction is a critical phase in the development of a teacher.
These formative years anchor a teacher’s sense of professionalism, belief in the ability of all
students to achieve academic growth, receptivity to collaborative practice and commitment to
instructional and professional growth. The five proposed Mentor Standards and continuum of
practice align with North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards and 21st century goals and
establish a powerful vision for the positive impact a high quality instructional mentor can have
on a beginning teacher.

The proposed Mentor Standards and accompanying continuum created by the Task Force and
recommended to the State Board are located in Appendix B. Underlying the proposed Mentor
Standards are the personal and professional habits and dispositions of a mentor that allow him or
her to serve effectively in the role. As school leaders consider who should serve as a mentor the
North Carolina Mentor Task Force encourages the selection of mentors who demonstrate the
following attributes:

   •   A sense of optimism for teaching;

   •   Ability to listen well;



                                                14
   •   Capacity to engage in reflective dialogue that nurtures the independent ability of a
       beginning teacher to assess and enhance his or her practice;

   •   Commitment to continuous professional development;

   •   Desire to serve all students equitably regardless of socio-economic status, first language,
       exceptionality or race;

   •   Facility to adapt instructional methods to the individual needs of students;

   •   Commitment to collaboration; and

   •   Ability to utilize multiple types of assessment of student work and adapt instruction from
       the analysis of assessment data.

Mentors should have a demonstrated record of success on the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation
and the support of school leadership and their peers. Mentors willing to serve need to work in an
environment that facilitates their success, including close proximity and scheduling that allows
time to plan and collaborate with beginning teachers.

To address these core elements of effective mentoring, the Task Force recommends the State
Board of Education approve five Mentor Standards anchored in the concept that effective
teacher mentoring drives beginning teachers’ practice forward in the North Carolina
Professional Teaching Standards and the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation System.

Standard 1: Mentors Support Beginning Teachers to Demonstrate Leadership – Mentors
utilize effective communication skills to establish quality professional and confidential
relationships with beginning teachers to impart knowledge of ethical standards, instructional best
practice, and leadership opportunities. Key elements of the standard include building trusting
relationships and coaching, promoting leadership, facilitating communication and collaboration,
sharing best practice, imparting ethical standards and advocating for beginning teachers and their
students.

Standard 2: Mentors Support Beginning Teachers to Establish a Respectful Environment
for a Diverse Population of Students – Mentors support beginning teachers to develop strong
relationships with all learners, their parents or guardians, and the community through reflective
practice on issues of equity and diversity. Key elements of the standard include supporting
relationships with students, families, peers and the community, honoring and respecting
diversity, creating classroom environments that optimize learning, and reaching students of all
learning needs.

Standard 3: Mentors Support Beginning Teachers to Know the Content They Teach –
Mentors have strong knowledge of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (NCSCOS) and
21st Century goals and assist beginning teachers in the utilization of these tools to promote
student achievement. Key elements of the standard include imparting and utilizing the NCSCOS
and 21st Century goals into beginning teacher practice.


                                                15
Standard 4: Mentors Support Beginning Teachers to Facilitate Learning for Their
Students: Mentors support beginning teachers in their understanding and use of student
assessment tools to drive student achievement. Mentors also support beginning teachers to
understand their professional licensure obligations and pursue professional growth. Key
elements of the standard include developing and improving instructional and professional
practice and understanding and analyzing student assessment data.

Standard 5: Mentors Support Beginning Teachers to Reflect on Their Practice - Mentors
continually work on improving their mentoring and observation skills to improve their
effectiveness with beginning teacher support. Key elements of the standard include allocating
and using time with beginning teachers, developing reflective practitioners and gathering data on
beginning teacher practice.




                                               16
Recommendation 3: Revise Mentor Program Accountability and
Support Policies to Include a Five Year Formal Review and an
Annual Peer Review Process.
The Task Force reviewed policies from California, Idaho, Ohio and Connecticut to examine
ways to both support and hold mentor programs accountable for meeting state standards. The
Task Force first and foremost, wanted to ensure that mentor program leaders had the opportunity
and support to use the proposed continuum to reflect on district progress in meeting and
exceeding the Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards. Policies in California provided
the Task Force with a framework to consider.

   •   There are regional directors overseeing the state’s Beginning Teacher Support and
       Assessment (BTSA) overseeing the credentialing of beginning teachers, facilitating
       program review, etc.

   •   Every induction program must provide evidence on an annual basis of their ability to
       meet each of the state’s program standards. Programs participate in an annual peer
       review and submit an annual improvement plan.

   •   Every fifth year, a formal program review is conducted by members of the BTSA Task
       force and selected program directors. If a program does not meet a significant number of
       program standards, the task force intervenes and the program is put on an improvement
       plan. If progress is not made, local districts can lose their authority to move beginning
       teachers to their Level 2 credential.

The Task Force recommends the State Board adopt aspects of this system in North Carolina,
including:

Submission of an Annual Plan

Currently each LEA must develop a plan and provide a comprehensive program for beginning
teachers and keep it on file for review. This plan must be approved by the local board of
education. Board policy (QPA-A-004, section 4.120) is explicit about what the plan must
include.

The Task Force recommends that the State Board continue to require an annual plan and
review the required components to ensure that they align with the proposed Beginning
Teacher Support Program Standards and Mentor Standards. Requirements should include
evidence of demonstrated proficiency on the proposed Beginning Teacher Support Program
Standards and strategies to progress along the continuum of high quality program practice.

Additionally, each LEA, charter school, or non-public institution with an approved Beginning
Teacher Support Program plan must submit an annual report to the Department of Public
Institution. The current format of the report to DPI gathers data on the number of new teachers
who leave the district and a self report the reason for not returning. While this retention data is
important and should be gathered, it provides no information to DPI on progress along the
approved plan or in meeting standards. The Task Force recommends that the State Board
                                                 17
include evidence of demonstrated proficiency on the proposed Beginning Teacher Support
Program Standards and of mentor success in meeting the proposed Mentor Standards.

Formal Beginning Teacher Support Program Evaluation

While plans are submitted to the Department of Public Instruction, there currently is no review
process in place to assess the success of Beginning Teacher Support Programs in meeting state
standards and providing high quality support. Induction program reports to DPI provide
information on teachers who do not return, not on the progress made by beginning teachers who
remain in enhancing student learning due at least in part to the support provided by mentors.

The Task Force recommends that the State Board continue to utilize the every fifth year Title
II Monitoring Visit to assess Beginning Teacher Support Programs and that DPI develop
criteria to incorporate a formal review process to ensure LEA program proficiency is
demonstrated on all Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards. As part of the Title II
monitoring visit, teams from DPI assess the Initial Licensure Program, ensuring that LEAs have
a plan to support beginning teachers approved by the local board, that beginning teachers are
provided mentors, observed annually at least once by a teacher, provided an orientation and not
assigned extra curricular duties unless they request them in writing (see
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/recruitment/materials/teamreport.pdf for specific criteria
included in the team report).

The monitoring process should include a team review of LEA provided evidence that Beginning
Teacher Support Programs meet all recommended program standards. The monitoring team
should report any standards and key elements where programs are not deemed at least proficient
to the Department of Public Instruction. Programs that are rated developing on the standards
continuum should be put on an improvement plan and re-reviewed more frequently to ensure that
all beginning teachers are supported.

Annual Peer Review of Beginning Teacher Support Programs

In order to assist LEAs in progressing along the proposed continuum to provide the highest
quality support to beginning teachers, the Task Force recommends that State Board approve
and DPI implement a regionally-based annual peer review system. The Task Force
recommends that the following be considered in designing the system.

    •   Utilizing the eight Regional Education Facilitators (Regional Teachers on Loan) to
        coordinate and facilitate the peer review process. These educators with a demonstrated
        record of accomplishment currently support efforts in their region for the North Carolina
        Center for Recruitment, Retention, Recognition and Professional Advancement,
        including projects that address new teacher support and mentor training. The Regional
        Education Facilitators already spearhead the Title II monitoring process and are familiar
        with the unique and diverse recruitment and retention challenges faced in each region
        across the state.

    •   Coordinating with the Personnel Administrators of North Carolina and other
        organizations to coordinate with annual meetings, trainings and other opportunities
        where Beginning Teacher Support Program leaders meet regionally and statewide.
                                               18
    Additionally, promoting the standards and establishing the network could be
    incorporated into trainings related to the implementation of the Teacher Evaluation
    System in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011.

•   Exploring virtual platforms and other means to facilitate extended time for program
    leaders to reflect and work together to assess their programs along the Beginning
    Teacher Support Program continuum, share successes, challenges, etc.

•   Documenting programs deemed distinguished through the peer review system to share
    best practices with other LEAs throughout the state.

•   Minimizing paperwork and administrative burdens placed on LEAs.




                                           19
Recommendation 4: Create and coordinate mentor support
opportunities to ensure all LEAs and mentors are prepared to
provide high quality support to all beginning teachers in North
Carolina.
LEAs across the state bring different resources and capacities to address their unique challenges
in supporting beginning teachers. The North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey
results demonstrate that high quality support is not systemic across the state and that additional
assistance may be necessary to ensure that mentors across the state receive the ongoing training
and support they need to be successful.

The Task Force recommends that DPI develop or broker mentor training that meets the
proposed Mentor Standards. While many LEAs have the capacity to provide mentors the
support they need to be successful (and will be assessed on whether that training is of sufficient
quality through the revised Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards), others rely on DPI,
Regional Educator Facilitators, the North Carolina Teacher Academy, NCAE and other groups
to help train mentors. DPI should create criteria to determine if training meets the proposed
Mentor Standards and help ensure that LEAs who need assistance are supported.

The Task Force recommends that following be considered in delivering or brokering mentor
training:

   •   Promoting the proposed Mentor Standards and raising awareness of the continuum as part
       of the DPI trainings of the Teacher Evaluation System.

   •   Creating a directory of providers that can align their mentor training and support with the
       proposed Mentor Standards and highlighting and disseminating best practices.

   •   Utilizing virtual platforms to provide additional support to mentors throughout the state,
       and in particular to those serving in high needs schools and those working with beginning
       teachers in hard to staff subjects such as math, science, special education, etc. Virtual
       mentoring should supplement local efforts and should utilize carefully selected, well
       trained, accomplished educators to provide ongoing support to mentors in a robust
       community of practice.

   •   Updating and expanding tools similar to the North Carolina Mentor Teacher’s Handbook
       to align with new Mentor Standards and the Professional Teaching Standards.

The Task Force recommends that the State Board of Education consider reestablishing a
licensure endorsement for mentors who demonstrate at least proficiency on the proposed
Mentor Standards and receive training from an LEA (or independent provider on their behalf)
that meets the Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards. North Carolina used to offer a
license endorsement for mentors. By establishing a license endorsement, the State Board will
standardize the rigor and continuity of mentor selection, training and support across the state.
LEAs and principals will more easily be able to recruit experienced mentors into service,


                                                20
consider more customized mentor training that takes into account the knowledge and skills
attained and demonstrated in other North Carolina LEAs.




                                              21
                                         Conclusion

These recommendations come at a challenging time for North Carolina and local school systems.
Mentor funding was cut 18 percent for 2009-2010 and many professional development resources
were eliminated. Yet opportunities abound in integrating these standards and training into the
state’s Race to the Top proposal and utilizing the opportunities presented through the new
Teacher Evaluation System and implementation of the state’s Professional Teaching Standards.

All North Carolina students deserve effective teachers. Beginning teachers will only reach their
fullest potential with systems of support from the state, LEAs, schools and mentors. One out of
ten beginning teachers report that they are not assigned a mentor and almost one-third of those
receiving a mentor never planned instruction and one-fifth were never observed by their mentor.
North Carolina can do better. If the State Board is to meet its goal of creating future ready
students for the 21st Century and staffing schools with 21st Century professionals, providing the
highest quality support for all of the state’s newest educators will be essential. The Task Force
believes that the first step is for the State Board of Education is to revise standards and create
continuums that clearly articulate not only what is minimally expected of Beginning Teacher
Support Programs and mentors, but what is exemplary practice. Systems of support and
accountability will ensure that these standards are met, and exceeded.

One area not considered by the Task Force, but essential to the State Board’s goals of staffing
schools with 21st Century Professionals and providing schools with innovative leadership, is
mentoring and induction for new principals. Principals play a critical role in supporting
beginning teachers and creating conditions that embrace and promote continuous improvement.
Yet, on the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey, less than one-third (31 percent),
of new principals—those with three years in the principalship or less—were assigned a mentor,
and many of those were never observed nor supported in school improvement planning. The
State Board of Education in its continued efforts to enhance school leadership should consider
the induction and support of the state’s newest principals.




                                                22
                                                    Appendix A
                                    Beginning Teacher Support Program Standards
Vision for Mentoring and Induction
The North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards establish a powerful vision for the roles of teachers in their classrooms and schools in
the 21st Century. The standards challenge teachers to:

   •   Pursue leadership opportunities in their school, district and community
   •   Make the content they teach engaging, relevant and meaningful to students’ lives
   •   Teach existing core content that is revised to foster the abilities of students to think critically, problem solve and use information
       technology responsibly
   •   Nurture classroom environments that help students discover how to learn, innovate, collaborate and communicate their ideas
   •   Incorporate global awareness, civic literacy, financial literacy and health awareness in the core content areas
   •   Utilize interdisciplinary instructional approaches and relationships with home and community in the learning process
   •   Reflect on their practice and craft assessments that are authentic and structured and place an emphasis on the demonstration of
       knowledge
   •   Develop the value of lifelong learning and the joy of encouraging their students to learn and grow

The attainment of this vision is challenging for all educators and is particularly daunting for the newest teachers in the profession. Close to
twenty-five per cent, over 22,000, of North Carolina’s teachers are in their first three years in the profession. Of these beginning teachers,
twenty-six percent, approximately 6,000, are starting their teaching careers prior to earning a Standard Professional I license. If the
beginning teachers of North Carolina are going to be able to meet the state’s professional teaching standards, impact the learning of all
students in distinguished ways, choose to remain in the profession and become future master teachers, teacher leaders and skilled
administrators and superintendents, then a quality induction program to support the instructional growth of beginning teachers must be in
place in each of the 115 school districts in the state.




                                                                       1
Standard 1: Systemic Support for High Quality Induction Programs
The commitment of all stakeholders—beginning teacher, mentor, faculty members, school level administrators, district level
administrators, school board, state board of education, dept of public instruction, post secondary education institutions, professional
organizations—to the effectiveness, sustainability, and success of the mentoring and induction program is felt system-wide. Stakeholders
foster a climate that values the support of beginning teachers through mentoring and induction and promote conditions for high quality
mentoring and induction by evaluating, designing, and revising related policy and practices. Stakeholders support ongoing program
improvement and accountability through multiple processes including data analysis and program review.

The leadership of the principal is instrumental in ensuring the success of mentoring and induction program at the site level. Principals
establish and maintain a positive school environment that supports mentor-beginning teacher interactions and targeted professional
development. Principals provide clear and consistent communication to staff regarding the role of mentor and the multiple facets of
mentoring, including the essential component of confidentiality.
1a. Institutional Plan
    Key Features:
            Plan is approved by the Board of Education
            Plan is based on State Board Policy
            Plan clearly outlines responsibilities and procedures for all stakeholders

1b. Institutional Commitment and Support
    Key Features:
           Stakeholders acknowledge the value and importance of mentoring and induction.
           Stakeholders appoint and support designated leadership for oversight of the mentoring and induction program.
           Stakeholders support the creation of policies and practices that meet state mentoring-induction program standards.
           Stakeholders advocate for conditions that promote high quality mentoring and induction.
           Stakeholders support data collection, program improvement and program accountability.

1c. Principal Engagement
    Key Features:
           Principals provide positive working conditions for beginning teachers.
           Principals provide a positive context for beginning teacher work with mentor.
           Principals endorse and/or support the development of a mentor role that encompasses a range of dimensions.
           Principals clearly communicate mentor’s role to staff.
           Principals respect the nature of the mentor’s relationship with the beginning teacher.


                                                                       2
Standard 2: Mentor Selection, Development and Support
The selection of well-qualified mentors is essential to creating mentoring and induction programs that support beginning teacher
development, teacher retention and improved student learning. Selection criteria are developed through interaction and collaboration with
a variety of stakeholder groups. Selection criteria are well-defined, explicit and clearly communicated to all stakeholders by program
leadership. The application, interview and selection processes are transparent and uniformly implemented.
The wide range of roles and responsibilities of mentors are clearly defined and broadly communicated to all staff. The initial role of
mentors is to assist in the orientation of beginning teachers to the induction program and to their school. At this time mentors often
provide logistical and emotional support. Throughout the year mentors work with beginning teachers during and after school to promote
growth along the indicators defined in the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards, the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation System
and to ensure quality student learning.
Mentors are provided a formal orientation to the induction program and foundational training in mentoring before they work with
beginning teachers. Following formal training, mentors will participate in ongoing professional development and in facilitated
professional learning communities of mentoring practice to refine mentoring skills, advance induction practices and improve student
learning.
2a. Mentor Selection
    Key Features:
          Selection criteria include input from a variety of stakeholder groups.
          Mentor selection criteria are clearly articulated by program leadership.
          Process for mentor application and selection is transparent and uniformly applied.
2b. Mentor Role
    Key Features:
          Mentors support beginning teacher orientation and provide logistical and emotional support.
          Mentors focus their primary support on improving instruction and learning.
          Mentors provide ongoing support and encouragement for the beginning teacher.

2c. Mentor Professional Development
    Key Features:
          Mentors receive initial training regarding their role as mentors and their responsibilities in the induction program.
          Mentors receive ongoing training to advance their knowledge and skills.
          Mentors have opportunities to participate in professional learning communities of mentoring practice.



                                                                      3
Standard 3: Mentoring for Instructional Excellence
Effective mentor-beginning teacher interactions and relationships are at the core of a successful mentoring and induction program.
Program, district and site leadership collaborate to ensure that sufficient time is provided for mentors to meet with their beginning teachers
to engage in the improvement of teaching and learning and induction-related activities both during and outside of school time.
The North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards and the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation System is the comprehensive guide used
by all teachers, mentors and beginning teachers to advance practice and student learning. Mentors are regularly present in the classrooms
of beginning teachers to observe and to strategically collect data on management, instruction, and student learning. Mentors and
beginning teachers collaboratively analyze observation data, develop next steps and together monitor results in an ongoing process
designed to continuously improve teaching and learning.
Mentors support their beginning teachers to appreciate the wide-range of assets that all students bring to the classroom through their
diversity. Mentors guide beginning teachers in the development of positive, inclusive and respectful environments that support learning
for a diverse student population. Mentors and beginning teachers design and implement a broad range of specific strategies designed to
meet the diverse needs of their students and promote high levels of learning.
3a. Time
    Key Features:
          Mentors are provided time to work with beginning teachers during and outside of the school day.
          Mentors and beginning teachers have protected time to engage in required mentoring and induction-related activities.
3b. Instructional Focus
    Key Features:
           Mentors utilize the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards and the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation System to
           guide, refine and deepen their work with beginning teachers across the full range of teaching practices.
           Mentors make classroom observations to support beginning teachers in developing effective classroom management, lesson
           planning and instruction.
3c. Issues of Diversity
    Key Features:
           Mentors support beginning teachers to appreciate diversity and to create a respectful environment for a diverse population of
           students.
           Mentors support beginning teachers to design and implement instruction that meets the diverse learning needs of students.




                                                                      4
Standard 4: Beginning Teacher Professional Development
Beginning teachers benefit most by participating in professional development that is targeted to meet their needs as novice instructors. To
meet the needs of beginning teachers and promote their successful entry and engagement in the school community, principals ensure that
beginning teachers receive a structured orientation and often provide a school handbook with detailed explanations of school policy and
procedures.

Ongoing professional development is tailored to meet the needs of beginning teachers and scheduled before the start of school or soon
thereafter. Provision is made to support late hire beginning teachers to receive information provided at site and district professional
development.

Professional development for beginning teachers is aligned with the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards and the North
Carolina Teacher Evaluation System.

4a. Beginning Teacher Professional Development
    Key Features:
          Beginning teachers participate in a structured orientation to their school.
          Beginning teachers participate in district-wide professional development designed for beginning teachers prior to the start of the
          school year or soon thereafter.
          Professional development for beginning teachers is aligned with the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards, the North
          Carolina Teacher Evaluation System and takes into account the unique needs of beginning teachers.




                                                                     5
Standard 5: Formative Assessment of Candidates and Programs
The system-wide use of the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards and the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation System provide
standards-based aligned descriptions of practice and expectations for beginning teacher development. Mentors utilize the language and
expectations of these foundations in the use of formative assessment tools for ongoing collaborative data collection, analysis, reflection
and implementation of next steps to improve beginning teacher practice and student learning.

The North Carolina Mentoring and Induction Program Standards form the basis on which individual mentoring and induction programs are
assessed. District mentor program leaders and stakeholders partner to design a reliable infrastructure to support the collection, analysis and
use of standards-based data to promote continuous high quality program improvement. All stakeholders work together to mediate
challenges to program improvement and to advance positive impacts and successes of mentoring and induction programs.

5a. Formative Assessment
    Key Features:
          Mentors utilize the language and expectations in the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards and the North Carolina
          Teacher Evaluation System in supporting their beginning teachers’ practice and student learning.
          Mentors use formative assessment tools to gather data on classroom practice and student learning to promote and guide their
          work with beginning teachers.

5b. Program Evaluation
    Key Features:
          Infrastructure exists that assists in the collection and use of data regarding beginning teacher practice and program
          implementation overtime.
          Program leaders and stakeholders use data to identify impacts, successes, and challenges and to inform program improvement




                                                                      6
                       North Carolina Beginning Teacher Support Program Continuum
Standard 1: Systemic Support for High Quality Induction Programs
  Program             Developing                     Proficient                     Accomplished                        Distinguished
 Component
Institutional   The institution has a        The plan is approved by the     Stakeholders are aware of       Stakeholders are engaged in
Plan            written mentoring and        local Board of Education        responsibilities and            developing and monitoring progress
                induction plan.              and in accordance with the      procedures as outlined in the   in implementing the mentoring and
                                             State Board of Education        plan.                           induction plan.
                                             policy.
Institutional   Stakeholders ensure          Stakeholders support the        Stakeholders show interest in   Stakeholders work together to support
Commitment      that federal, state and/or   creation of policies and        and advocate for mentoring      quality mentoring and induction that
and Support     local funding is             practices that meet state       and induction and work to       is aligned with district and site
                allocated to support         mentoring and induction         modify organizational           initiatives. Representatives from these
                elements of the              standards and acknowledge       policies to improve beginning   groups help guide policies that
                mentoring and                the value importance of         teacher working conditions.     influence beginning teachers from
                induction program.           mentoring and induction.        Stakeholders support data       recruitment into induction and on to
                                             Mentors may receive a           collection and program          experienced practice.
                                             stipend.                        accountability.
Principal       Principals are involved      Principals provide positive     Principals provide time for     Principals are knowledgeable of the
Engagement      in the assignment and        working conditions for          and promote mentor’s work       full scope of mentor’s work,
                supervision of the           beginning teachers.             with beginning teachers.        including formative assessment and
                mentor, as appropriate.      Principals clearly              Principals endorse and/or       use of professional standards.
                Principals endorse           communicate mentor’s role       support development of a        Principals endorse s and/or support
                mentor’s role and            to staff and provide positive   complex, multi-faceted and      development of a mentor role that is
                contribute to the            context for beginning           confidential mentor role.       informed by a variety of stakeholders.
                definition and direction     teacher work with mentor.       Principals are available to     Principals communicate regularly
                of the mentor’s work.        Principals endorse and/or       meet/communicate with           with mentors while respecting
                                             support the development of      mentors.                        confidentiality of mentor role.
                                             a mentor role that                                              Principals encourage beginning
                                             encompasses a range of                                          teachers to share evidence of
                                             dimensions and respects the                                     professional growth as part of
                                             confidential role of the                                        evaluation process.
                                             mentor and beginning
                                             teacher.



                                                                             1
Standard 2: Mentor Selection, Development and Support
 Program            Developing                      Proficient                        Accomplished                        Distinguished
Component
Mentor         Mentors are selected by     Mentor selection criteria are        Mentor selection may involve    Mentors are selected using a rigorous
Selection      the principal and/or        clearly articulated by program       input from a variety of         process that involves a variety of
               designee based upon         leadership and include input         stakeholders. Selection         evidence and multiple stakeholders.
               availability, interest or   from a variety of stakeholder        criteria include a range of     Criteria are aligned with widely-
               seniority. Process for      groups. Process for                  characteristics, experiences    accepted and research-based
               selection is                application and selection is         and dispositions that may       understandings of effective
               communicated as             transparent and uniformly            indicate mentoring potential.   mentoring practices and
               needed and is based         applied.                             Application and selection       characteristics.
               upon criteria that are                                           process is communicated
               communicated to                                                  broadly.
               interested candidates.
Scope of       Mentors serve largely       Mentors provide ongoing              Mentors’ role is multi-         Mentors tailor support to the needs
Mentor Role    as a resource and           support and encouragement            dimensional and includes        of the beginning teacher based on the
               “buddy”-type support        for the beginning teacher,           opportunities to observe and    use of the North Carolina
               provider.                   including orientation,               give feedback on classroom      Professional Teaching Standards, the
                                           logistical and emotional             practice. Mentors and           North Carolina Teacher Evaluation
                                           support. Mentor’s role               beginning teachers              System and other formative
                                           primarily focuses on                 collaborate on lesson           assessments. Mentors’ role involves
                                           instruction and student              planning and problem-           instructive, collaborative, and
                                           learning.                            solving.                        facilitative approaches to mentoring.
Mentor         Mentors are oriented to     Mentors receive ongoing              Mentors are involved in a       Mentors have opportunities to
Professional   their role and the          training to advance their            facilitated community of        observe and coach colleagues, design
Development    induction program and       knowledge and skills.                mentoring practice that meets   and facilitate mentor professional
               receive preliminary                                              regularly to support mentor     development and engage in inquiry
               professional                                                     learning and problem-solving.   into their practice.
               development to prepare
               them for their role.




                                                                            2
Standard 3: Mentoring for Instructional Excellence
  Program           Developing                    Proficient                     Accomplished                         Distinguished
 Component
Time            Mentors work with        Mentors work with beginning      Mentors and beginning             Mentors are provided sufficient
                beginning teachers       teachers during and outside of   teachers have protected time to   time to engage with beginning
                occasionally.            the school day, based upon       engage in induction-related       teachers and support their
                                         schedule and mentor              activities.                       professional growth. Beginning
                                         flexibility.                                                       teachers are released to work with
                                                                                                            mentors, and other support
                                                                                                            providers as appropriate.
Instructional   Mentors focus on         Based on classroom               Mentors work with beginning       Mentors work with beginning
Focus           logistical and           observations, mentors work       teachers across the full-range    teachers on a strategic focus as
                operational issues,      with beginning teachers on       of teaching practices as          determined by the North Carolina
                such as school           issues of classroom              defined by North Carolina         Teacher Evaluation System and
                practices and culture,   management, lesson planning,     Professional Teaching             other assessments of classroom
                administrative and       delivery of instruction and      Standards and identified by the   practice and student learning.
                classroom procedures     student learning aligned with    North Carolina Teacher
                and norms.               the standard course of study.    Evaluation System.
Issues of       Mentors are aware of     Mentors support beginning        Mentors guide the beginning       Mentors proactively engage
Diversity *     equity issues as they    teachers’ development to         teachers’ appreciation for        beginning teachers around issues of
(*race,         arise in beginning       meet the needs of all students   diversity and responsive          diversity. Mentors guide beginning
ethnicity,      teachers’ practice.      and create a respectful          approaches to instruction         teachers in the ongoing
gender,                                  environment for a diverse        during analysis of student        development of responsive
religion, and                            population of students.          work, planning of                 curriculum and practices.
other aspects                                                             differentiated instruction and
of culture)                                                               other opportunities as they
                                                                          arise.




                                                                          3
Standard 4: Beginning Teacher Professional Development
  Program           Developing                   Proficient                      Accomplished                        Distinguished
 Component
Beginning      Beginning teachers      District-wide professional         Beginning teachers              Beginning teachers participate in a
Teacher        receive a structured    development is provided for        participate in a variety of     wide range of professional
Professional   orientation to school   beginning teachers, often          professional development        development offerings based upon
Development    policy, practices and   prior to the start of the school   opportunities designed more     their assessed developmental needs.
               procedures.             year. Professional                 specifically for beginning      Participation is collaboratively
                                       development is aligned with        teachers. Professional          determined in consultation with
                                       the North Carolina                 development activities may      mentor and principal.
                                       Professional Teaching              include some opportunities
                                       Standards, The North               for inter-visitation.
                                       Carolina Teacher Evaluation        Participation in professional
                                       System, and beginning              development may be
                                       teachers’ Professional Growth      mandatory at the
                                       Plan and is based on the           recommendation of the
                                       needs of the beginning             principal, suggested by the
                                       teacher.                           mentor or be open-choice.




                                                                          4
Standard 5: Formative Assessment of Candidates and Programs
  Program        Developing                  Proficient                     Accomplished                          Distinguished
 Component
Formative    Mentors utilize the   Mentors apply the language        Mentors use a wide range of       Mentors integrate formative
assessment   North Carolina        and expectations in the North     formative assessment tools in     assessment into their interactions
             Professional          Carolina Professional             their ongoing work with           with beginning teachers and innovate
             Teaching Standards    Teaching Standards and the        beginning teachers. Mentors       upon the tools and their use. Mentors
             and the North         North Carolina Teacher            use formative assessment          help beginning teachers draw
             Carolina Teacher      Evaluation System in              information to guide              connections between the use of
             Evaluation System     supporting their beginning        mentoring practice in             formative assessment to inform and
             with beginning        teachers’ practice. Mentors       alignment with the North          improve classroom practice and
             teachers.             support their beginning           Carolina Professional             student learning.
                                   teachers in developing a          Teaching Standards and the
                                   Professional Development          North Carolina Teacher
                                   Plan to support professional      Evaluation System.
                                   growth.
Program      Beginning teachers    Program leaders collect and       Program leaders engage with       Program leaders ensure that all
Evaluation   and mentors give      use data on beginning teacher     others to collect and analyze a   stakeholders are aware of program
             feedback on the       practice and program              range of data on program          successes, impacts, and challenges.
             induction program.    implementation over time for      implementation to guide           Data are used to guide ongoing
                                   use in program improvement.       program improvement.              program implementation and
                                   Data collection should            Results and next steps are        continuous improvement.
                                   include, but not be limited to,   shared within and outside of
                                   retention, Teacher Working        the program.
                                   Conditions Survey and
                                   student learning.




                                                                     5
                                                          Appendix B
                                                   Revised Mentor Standards
A New Vision of Mentors
Induction is a critical phase in the development of a teacher. These formative years anchor a teacher’s sense of professionalism, belief in
the ability of all students to achieve academic growth, receptivity to collaborative practice and commitment to instructional and
professional growth. The five mentor standards in North Carolina align with North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards and 21st
century goals and establish a powerful vision for the positive impact a high-quality instructional mentor can have on a beginning teacher.

Underlying the mentor standards are the personal and professional habits and dispositions of a mentor that allow him or her to serve
effectively in the role. As school leaders consider who should serve as a mentor the North Carolina Mentor Task Force encourages the
selection of mentors who demonstrate the following attributes:

   •   Sense of optimism for teaching
   •   Ability to listen well
   •   Capacity to engage in reflective dialogue that nurtures the independent ability of a beginning teacher to assess and enhance his or
       her practice
   •   Commitment to continuous professional development
   •   Desire to serve all students equitably regardless of socio-economic status, first language, exceptionality or race
   •   Facility to adapt instructional methods to the individual needs of students
   •   Commitment to collaboration
   •   Ability to utilize multiple types of assessment of student work and adapt instruction from the analysis of assessment data

Mentors should have a demonstrated record of success on the North Carolina Teacher Evaluation and the support of school leadership and
their peers. Mentors willing to serve need to work in an environment that facilitates their success, including close proximity and
scheduling that allow time to plan and collaborate with beginning teachers.




                                                                      1
                                          North Carolina Standards for Mentors
Mentor Standard 1: Mentors support beginning teachers to demonstrate leadership.
Developing relationships between mentors and beginning teachers is foundational to ensuring a quality induction experience, fostering
professional growth, and supporting leadership in the classroom and beyond. Mentors establish and maintain trusting confidential
relationships with beginning teachers as they provide on-going support. Mentors develop and refine a repertoire of coaching skills so that
they may be responsive to the needs of beginning teachers and promote their professional growth.

Mentors support beginning teachers to engage in leadership at school and district levels. Mentors share opportunities for leadership with
beginning teachers and encourage their involvement. As beginning teachers take on leadership roles mentors provide on-going support
and guidance in reflection on experiences and outcomes.

Mentors model effective communication skills in interactions with beginning teachers. Mentors support beginning teachers to develop and
utilize effective communication with colleagues and administration and to engage in collaborative dialogue to improve teaching, learning
and school effectiveness.

In partnership with beginning teachers mentors provide support to improve teaching and learning by promoting the use of best practices in
instruction that focus on student learning. Mentors are knowledgeable about best practices and share them with beginning teachers.
Mentors model best practices and collaborate with beginning teachers to ensure classroom implementation.

Mentors demonstrate professional and ethical behavior in all settings with beginning teachers, with administration, with colleagues, with
community, and with students. Through their actions mentors convey to beginning teachers the importance and value of upholding
professional standards and ethics. Mentors engage in collaborative conversations with beginning teachers regarding ethical and
professional behavior.

Mentors seek to inform themselves about the needs of beginning teachers and are their advocates. Mentors work to ensure that beginning
teachers have essential instructional supplies, resources and working conditions as basic needs in developing quality teaching and learning.
Mentors coach beginning teachers in practicing skills of advocacy for themselves and their students. Mentors engage in advocacy for
initiatives and policies to improve education for all students and the profession.

1a Trusting Relationship and Coaching
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
             Mentors establish and maintain confidential relationships with beginning teachers.


                                                                     2
              Mentors develop a range of coaching skills to support beginning teachers.
              Mentors adapt their use of coaching skills and strategies to effectively support beginning teachers.

1b Leadership
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
             Mentors ensure that beginning teachers are aware of leadership opportunities.
             Mentors encourage and support beginning teachers to engage in leadership at the school and district levels.
             Mentors guide beginning teacher’s reflection on leadership experiences to promote leadership development.

1c Communication and Collaboration
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
            Mentors utilize effective communication skills with beginning teachers.
            Mentors support beginning teachers to develop effective communication skills in collaborative interactions with colleagues
            and administration.
            Mentors support beginning teachers to engage in collaborative dialogue to improve professional practice and school
            effectiveness.

1d Best Practices
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors possess knowledge of best practices with a primary focus on student learning.
              Mentors provide resources for and modeling of best practices for beginning teachers.
              Mentors support beginning teachers’ implementation of best practices.

1e Ethical Standards
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors are knowledgeable about ethical and professional standards.
              Mentors demonstrate ethical and professional behavior in interactions with beginning teachers, staff, administration,
              community members, and students.
              Mentors initiate collaborative dialogue with beginning teachers regarding ethical and professional behavior.

1f Advocacy for Beginning Teachers and Students
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:




                                                                     3
               Mentors advocate for beginning teachers to ensure they have appropriate instructional resources and supportive working
               conditions.
               Mentors coach beginning teachers on methods of advocacy for themselves and their students.
               Mentors advocate for initiatives and policies to improve education for all students and promote positive change practices.


Mentor Standard 2: Mentors support beginning teachers to establish a respectful environment for a diverse
population of students.
Forming strong relationships with students is central to establishing respectful learning environments for all students. Mentors support
beginning teachers to understand the importance of building relationships with their students and provide them with methods for doing so.
Mentors guide beginning teachers in using effective communication strategies with their students in a variety of settings and situations.
Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to assess the effectiveness of teacher-student communications and make connections to
impacts on relationships, teaching, and learning.

Mentors support beginning teachers in developing relationships with parents/families. Mentors share with beginning teachers a range of
methods to connect, communicate and partner with parents/families in formal and informal settings. Mentors collaborate with beginning
teachers to engage with families and significant adults in the lives of their students and include them regularly in identifying and improving
student achievement.

Mentors assist beginning teachers in becoming familiar with the school and community in which their students are immersed. Mentors
support beginning teachers to get to know their colleagues, the administration, and partners in the community. Mentors facilitate
beginning teachers’ development of activities that foster collaboration between school and community and promote high levels of learning
for all students.

Demonstrating honor and respect for the diversity of students, their school and community is a building block that supports positive
productive teaching and learning. Mentors support beginning teachers to understand the diversity of their students, the school, and the
community by sharing a wide range of information including demographics. Mentors support beginning teachers in utilizing this
information to plan instruction and promote effective interactions with students, parents/families and community members. Mentors
support beginning teachers to reflect on their perspectives regarding diversity and how personal viewpoints and assumptions impact
teaching and learning. Mentors promote inclusion of culturally inclusive practices by sharing strategies and providing on-going support
for implementation.



                                                                      4
Mentors place a high value on establishing and maintaining respectful inviting learning environments for students. Mentors support
beginning teachers in designing and implementing effective classroom management strategies that contribute to quality environments for
learning. Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to better understand specific student behaviors and methods of adjusting strategies
to meet student needs and maintain engagement in learning.

Throughout conversations about the individual needs of students, mentors engage with beginning teachers in reflection on complex issues
surrounding the labels assigned to students with identified academic, social, and emotional needs. Mentors share a wide range of
instructional strategies targeted to meet the individual needs of students and collaborate to plan and implement differentiated learning
activities, and to reflect upon and improve outcomes for student learning.

2a Relationships with Students
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors support beginning teachers to be aware of the importance of building strong relationships with their students and
              share ways to get to know them.
              Mentors provide beginning teachers with strategies and methods to communicate effectively with students in a variety of
              settings and situations.
              Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to assess the effectiveness of communications and interactions with students
              and their impact on relationships and learning.

2b Relationships with Families
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors support beginning teachers to develop relationships with families and significant adults in the lives of their students
              Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to design and implement effective ways of connecting and communicating
              with parents and guardians in formal and informal settings.
              Mentors facilitate the beginning teacher’s development of methods to support inclusion of families in the on-going process
              of identifying and improving student achievement.

2c Relationships at School and in Community
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors assist beginning teachers in learning about the context of the school and community.
              Mentors support beginning teachers to meet and engage with school colleagues and partners in the community.
              Mentors support beginning teachers to develop activities that foster positive collaboration between school and community.




                                                                     5
2d Honor and Respect for Diversity
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
            Mentors support beginning teachers to know the cultural, ethnic, gender and socioeconomic characteristics of their
            classroom, the school and the community.
            Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to expand self-awareness regarding issues of diversity as they impact teaching
            and learning.
            Mentors support beginning teachers to expand their awareness of culturally inclusive practices and to include them in
            planning, implementing, and reflecting on lessons.

2e Classroom Environments that Optimize Learning
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
             Mentors possess a broad of knowledge of systems and techniques for classroom management.
             Mentors support beginning teachers in developing effective designs for classroom management to create and maintain a
             respectful inviting classroom community.
             Mentors support beginning teachers to better understand the specific behaviors of their students and ways to adjust
             strategies to meet student needs and maintain engagement in learning.

2f Reaching Students of all Learning Needs
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
             Mentors engage in dialogue with beginning teachers regarding the individual learning needs of their students and
             corresponding labels that might be assigned to them.
             Mentors support beginning teachers’ understandings of diversity and appropriate instructional strategies to meet individual
             learning needs.
             Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to implement and assess differentiated lessons designed to meet learning needs
             and promote student success.

Mentor Standard 3: Mentors support beginning teachers to know the content they teach.
Having in depth knowledge of the subject matter for the scope of a teacher’s grade level or content area is essential in promoting student
achievement. Mentors demonstrate strong knowledge of subject matter and the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (NCSCOS) for
their own grade levels/subjects. Mentors are able to support beginning teachers in accessing and utilizing the NCSCOS for their grade
levels/subject areas. Mentors support beginning teachers to plan, implement, and reflect upon standards based lessons that integrate 21st
century goals and skill development. Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to promote their participation in professional learning
communities focused on the full implementation of NCSCOS and the achievement of 21st century goals.


                                                                     6
State and district curriculum is designed to provide teachers with necessary instructional resources to support students to meet the
NCSCOS and 21st century goals. Mentors are fully aware of state and district curriculum resources and collaborate with school leadership
to ensure that beginning teachers have the appropriate curriculum resources for their grade levels/subject areas and corresponding
NCSCOS. Mentors guide beginning teachers in the use of NCSCOS and required curriculum to develop and implement standards based
lessons. Mentors assist beginning teachers in designing both short and long term lessons that show application of content and connections
to the lives of students.

Student achievement data is a powerful resource for improving teaching and learning. Mentors foster the beginning teachers’
understanding of the importance of the wide range of formal and informal student achievement data available to them. Mentors support
beginning teachers to disaggregate student data and to identify the learning needs of individual students and groups. Mentors collaborate
with beginning teachers to plan, implement, reflect upon and improve differentiated learning activities that promote student achievement of
NCSCOS and 21st century goals.

3a NCSCOS and 21st Century Goals
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
            Mentors demonstrate strong knowledge of NCSCOS for own grade levels/subjects and support beginning teachers to
            become knowledgeable of NCSCOS for their grade levels/subjects.
            Mentors demonstrate vertical alignment of NCSCOS so can understand where came from (put in accomplished on rubric)
            Mentors support beginning teachers to design lessons that integrate 21st century goals and skill development with NCSCOS
            and to reflect on implementation.
            Mentors support beginning teachers’ participation in professional learning communities focused on full implementation of
            NCSCOS and achievement of 21st century goals.

3b Content and Curriculum
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
             Mentors ensure that beginning teachers receive necessary NCSCOS and state/district curriculum resources.
             Mentors assist beginning teachers in the use and implementation of NCSCOS and required curriculum.
             Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to develop standards-based short and long term curriculum plans that show
             application of content and connections to the lives of students.




                                                                    7
Mentor Standard 4: Mentors support beginning teachers to facilitate learning for their students.
Mentors encourage and support the efforts of beginning teachers to plan, implement and assess the results of teaching and learning.
Mentors share with beginning teachers their dedication to improving instruction and student learning as informed by student assessments.
Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to provide on-going support to improve teaching and learning through plan, teach/observe,
reflect processes. As needed, mentors provide additional targeted assistance and professional development to individual beginning
teachers.

Mentors model behaviors of professional practice and support beginning teachers in demonstrating professionalism. Mentors support
beginning teachers to be fully aware of elements that contribute to professional practice such as the basics of licensure requirements,
professional norms and collaboration. Mentors promote beginning teachers’ pursuit of professional development and professional practice.
Mentors engage with beginning teachers and others in professional learning communities designed to improve teaching and learning.

At the core of improving teaching and learning is the use of student assessment to guide instruction. Mentors ensure that beginning
teachers have and use required assessments, as well as supporting the design and use of teacher-made assessments. Mentors guide
beginning teachers in the analysis and interpretation of student assessment data. Based on results of assessments, mentors collaborate with
beginning teachers to adjust instruction and develop differentiated lessons that are responsive to student needs.

4a Instructional Practice
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors support the planning, implementation and assessment efforts of beginning teachers.
              Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to improve instruction and learning.
              Mentors provide additional assistance and professional development to beginning teachers in areas of need.

4b Professional Practice
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
             Mentors ensure that beginning teachers are fully aware of professional licensure requirements.
             Mentors model behaviors that demonstrate professional practice and support beginning teachers to pursue professional
             growth and to maintain professional practice.
             Mentors facilitate on-going dialogue with beginning teachers to reflect on and enhance professional practice.

4c Student Assessment
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
             Mentors support beginning teachers to have and use required student assessments.


                                                                     8
               Mentors assist beginning teachers in the analysis of student assessment data from a variety of sources and to make
               adjustments in instructional delivery based on results.
               Mentors support beginning teachers to design and use student assessment tools to inform the planning of differentiated
               lessons that are responsive to identified student needs.


Mentor Standard 5: Mentors support beginning teachers to reflect on their practice.
Mentors initiate making connections with beginning teachers and begin providing support before or near the start of school starts or at the
time of employment for those hired later in the year. Mentors ensure that beginning teachers receive information about program
orientations, support them to attend, and clarify program information as needed. Mentors schedule and maintain regular meetings with
beginning teachers. Mentors dedicate their coaching efforts and use of time to meet the needs of beginning teachers effectively.

Mentors are highly aware of the importance of developing and refining their coaching skills. Mentors fully participate in mentor trainings
and continually work to improve their use of instructive, collaborative, and facilitative approaches in coaching. Mentors coach beginning
teachers to self identify their practice and identify instructional strengths and challenges. Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers in
the on-going improvement of instruction and student learning through reflection.

Mentors value the opportunity to observe in beginning teachers’ classrooms, gather data, and support their reflection on practice. Mentors
become skilled in the use of a range of observation tools so that they may be responsive to the needs and interests of beginning teachers.
Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to plan for data collection, to reflect on results, and develop next steps in an on-going cycle of
improvement.

5a Allocation and Use of Time with Beginning Teachers
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors initiate making connections with beginning teachers and learning about their needs before or near the start of
              school or at the time of hire if later in the year.
              Mentors support beginning teachers to attend a program orientation and support clarification of program information.
              Mentors meet regularly with beginning teachers and focus their efforts on effective coaching and time management to meet
              individual needs.

5b Reflective Practice
       Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
              Mentors become highly skilled in the use of instructive, collaborative and facilitative approaches to coaching.


                                                                      9
               Mentors support beginning teachers to reflect on practice and self identify their instructional strengths and challenges.
               Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers in the on-going improvement of teaching and learning through reflection.

5c Mentor Data Collection
      Key Elements of Mentor Practice:
            Mentors observe in beginning teachers’ classrooms to gather data and reflect on instructional practice.
            Mentors expand their repertoire of observation tools to be responsive to the needs and interests of beginning teachers.
            Mentors collaborate with beginning teachers to select a focus for data collection, to reflect on results, and plan next steps.




                                                                     10
                                       North Carolina Mentoring Continuum

Mentor Standard 1: Mentors support beginning teachers to demonstrate leadership.
       Element                Developing                   Proficient                  Accomplished                   Distinguished
Trusting Relationship   Has awareness of the        Respects confidential         Honors confidential         Upholds confidential
                        need to maintain a          nature of mentor/BT           relationship. Provides      relationship. Focus of
                        confidential mentor         beginning teachers            coaching support tailored   coaching emerges from on-
                        relationship with the       beginning teacher             to meet the needs of the    going dialogue with BT
                        beginning teacher and the   relationship. Utilizes        beginning teacher.          beginning teacher and
                        importance of mentor        collaborative facilitative                                mutually agreed upon next
                        language.                   language when supporting                                  steps. Is responsive to the
                                                    the beginning teacher.                                    immediate and long-term
                                                                                                              needs of the beginning teacher.
Leadership              Provides beginning          Models shared leadership,     Supports the beginning      Assists the beginning teacher
                        teacher with a list of      encourages beginning          teacher’s involvement in    to assume leadership roles at
                        opportunities for           teacher engagement in         school leadership           school and district levels.
                        leadership.                 leadership activities, and    opportunities.              Provides on-going coaching
                                                    reflects with the beginning                               and support of leadership
                                                    teacher.                                                  development.
Communication and       Exhibits effective          Assists the beginning         Supports the beginning      Nurtures the self-efficacy of
Collaboration           communication skills.       teacher in developing the     teacher to use effective    the beginning teacher and
                                                    skills that would enable      communication skills in     his/her responsibility to utilize
                                                    them to communicate           collaboration with          effective communication skills
                                                    effectively within            colleagues to improve       in collaborative dialogue to
                                                    collaborative settings and    teaching and learning.      improve school effectiveness.
                                                    to develop positive
                                                    working relationships.




                                                                      11
Mentor Standard 1: Mentors support beginning teachers to demonstrate leadership.
       Element                  Developing                  Proficient                  Accomplished                    Distinguished
Best Practices           Brings knowledge about      Provides resources for the   Models best practices with     Uses observations and data
                         best practices into         beginning teacher on best    a focus on student learning    collection to provide
                         conversations with          practices with a primary     while working                  clarification for the beginning
                         beginning teachers.         focus on student learning.   collaboratively with the       teacher in implementing best
                                                                                  beginning teacher.             practices with a primary focus
                                                                                                                 on student learning.

Ethical                  Is aware of ethical and     Demonstrates ethical and     Initiates collaborative        Exemplifies ethical and
Standards                professional standards.     professional behavior in     dialogue with the beginning    professional behavior and
                                                     interactions with            teacher regarding ethical      serves as a role model within
                                                     beginning teachers and       and professional behavior.     the school and district
                                                     school administration.                                      community.

Advocacy for Beginning   Identifies and assists in   Advocates for improving      Advocates for initiatives to   Advocates for positive change
Teachers and Students    locating instructional      working conditions for       improve education for all      in policies and practices
                         resources for the           the beginning teacher and    students. Coaches the          affecting student learning.
                         beginning teacher.          his/her students when        beginning teacher on           Utilizes working conditions
                                                     needed.                      advocacy methods.              data to ground advocacy
                                                                                                                 efforts.




                                                                       12
Mentor Standard 2: Mentors support beginning teachers to establish a respectful environment for a diverse
population of students.
       Element             Developing                    Proficient                 Accomplished                     Distinguished
Relationships with   Supports the beginning      Provides the beginning        Collaborates with the         Supports the beginning teacher
Students             teacher to become aware     teacher with strategies for   beginning teacher to assess   to solicit and utilize on-going
                     of the importance of        effective communication       the effectiveness of          feedback from students
                     building strong             with students individually    communications and            regarding teacher/student
                     relationships with their    and in groups. Shares         interactions with students    communications and
                     students.                   methods of learning more      and reflect on their impact   interactions. Facilitates the
                                                 about students’ individual    on relationship and           beginning teacher’s reflection
                                                 backgrounds, strengths,       instruction.                  on the role of building and
                                                 and needs.                                                  maintaining relationship with
                                                                                                             students and effective
                                                                                                             outcomes for learning.

Relationships with   Brings awareness to the     Supports the beginning        Partners with the beginning   Facilitates the beginning
Families             beginning teacher of the    teacher development of a      teacher in the planning and   teacher’s development of a
                     importance of               home-school                   implementation of parent-     variety of lessons on school-
                     communication with          communication plan that       family                        related activities that regularly
                     parents/families. Shares    establishes regular use of    conferences/communicatio      include families in the on-
                     resources such as           tools that promote            ns. Reflects on               going process of identifying
                     telephone logs, classroom   effective communication       effectiveness of              and improving student
                     newsletters/website         with parents/families.        interactions and              achievement.
                     design, and phone/email                                   communications to meet
                     protocols.                                                both the beginning
                                                                               teacher’s needs and the
                                                                               parents/family’s needs.




                                                                    13
Mentor Standard 2: Mentors support beginning teachers to establish a respectful environment for a diverse
population of students.
        Element                   Developing                  Proficient                   Accomplished                   Distinguished
Relationships at School    Assists the beginning     Introduces school and          Assists the beginning       Fosters collaborative activities for
and in Community           teacher to become         community                      teacher with development    the beginning teacher that
                           familiar with             partners/resources to the      of activities that foster   includes and embraces the
                           faculty/staff. Shares     beginning teacher.             collaboration between the   cultural norms of the community.
                           availability of           Communicates context           school and the community.
                           community resources.      and history.
Honor and Respect for      Informs the beginning     Raises awareness of the        Introduces the beginning    Engages the beginning teacher
Diversity                  teacher of the            beginning teacher’s            teacher to culturally       proactively around issues of
                           demographical             perspective and cultural       inclusive practices.        diversity. Demonstrates culturally
                           composition of the school inclusiveness as evidenced                                 inclusive practices and guides the
                           and community.            in the classroom.                                          beginning teacher in developing
                                                                                                                his/her own.
Developing Classroom       Demonstrates knowledge    Assists the beginning          Observes and provides       Facilitates the beginning teacher’s
Environments that          about classroom rules,    teacher in developing          specific feedback on:       understandings of specific student
Optimize Learning          procedures and            classroom management           - Student behavior and      behaviors and use of strategies to
                           consequences.             plan in order to create and      engagement                address student needs and
                                                     maintain a respectful          - Routines/Procedures       maintain engagement in learning
                                                     inviting classroom             - Instructional delivery    activities.
                                                     community.                     - Classroom climate.
Reaching Students of all   Raises awareness of the   Supports the beginning         Guides the beginning        Facilitates reflective dialogue
Learning Needs             ways that students are    teacher to lessons that take   teacher’s understandings    with the beginning teacher on:
                           identified based on       into account individual        of diversity and             - Preparatory and supportive
                           special needs.            needs of students and          appropriate instructional    work
                                                     promote student success.       resources/practices, such    -Student/teacher interaction
                                                                                    as differentiated            -Interpretation of student output
                                                                                    instruction.                 -Development of multiple
                                                                                                                 teaching strategies to best
                                                                                                                 accommodates all learners.




                                                                        14
Mentor Standard 3: Mentors support beginning teachers to know the content they teach.
       Element                 Developing                    Proficient                  Accomplished                   Distinguished
Implementation of        Demonstrates strong          Implements strategies in      Collaborates with the        Facilitates the beginning
NCSCOS and 21st          knowledge of NCSCOS          weekly conversations that     beginning teacher in on-      teacher’s development of all
Century Goals            for his/her own grade        demonstrate awareness         going conversations on        strands of the NCSCOS and
                         level/subject and is aware   and understanding of the      how to integrate 21st         the scaffolding of the
                         of the scope and             NCSCOS. Facilitates           century goals into the        NCSCOS across grade
                         sequence of the NCSCOS       designing lessons that link   NCSCOS. Facilitates the       levels/subjects. Utilizes
                         across grade                 the NCSCOS with 21st          beginning teacher’s active    weekly professional
                         levels/disciplines.          century skill development.    participation in              conversations and professional
                                                                                    professional learning         development to support the
                                                                                    communities.                  beginning teacher reflect upon
                                                                                                                  the use of 21st century
                                                                                                                  standards in the curriculum.
Content and Curriculum   Provides NCSCOS for          Provides state and district   Promotes networking by       Supports the beginning teacher
                         the beginning teacher. Is    curriculum resources and      the beginning teacher        in designing lessons that show
                         aware of the need to         assists the beginning         within school and district   application of the content and
                         assist the beginning         teacher in determining key    to access a wide range of    demonstrate connections to life
                         teacher in its use.          concepts. Assists the         curriculum resources.        in the community.
                                                      beginning teacher in          Supports the beginning
                                                      establishing appropriate      teacher in developing both
                                                      pacing.                       short and long term
                                                                                    curriculum plans.




                                                                        15
Mentor Standard 4: Mentors support beginning teachers to facilitate learning for their students.
        Element                Developing                     Proficient                 Accomplished                     Distinguished
Instructional Practice   Informs and highlights        Supports planning,           Collaborates with the         Facilitates the beginning
                         for the beginning teacher     implementation, and          beginning teacher to          teacher’s in depth analysis of
                         the need for planning,        assessment efforts of the    improve instruction and       student work and planning for
                         implementing, and using       beginning teacher.           learning based on             differentiated instruction based
                         assessments.                                               assessments. Provides         on results. Provides on-going
                                                                                    professional development      support and coaching for
                                                                                    in areas of need using the    implementation.
                                                                                    cycle of assistance:
                                                                                    Preconference, Observe,
                                                                                    Reflect.
Professional Practice    Informs the beginning         Models and nurtures          Facilitates on-going          Facilitates beginning teacher
                         teacher of licensure          continual growth,            conversation with groups      application of action research,
                         requirements.                 professional ethics, norms   of teachers on professional   case studies, and other
                                                       of collaboration, equity,    norms, continuing             resources, such as book studies
                                                       and high expectations.       education, and overall        and community agents.
                                                                                    growth of students.           Creates opportunities for the
                                                                                                                  beginning teacher to talk with
                                                                                                                  others about professional
                                                                                                                  practice.
Student Assessment       Brings awareness of           Models need for data to      Supports the beginning        Provides/leads professional
                         achievement data sources      enhance teaching and         teacher in the development    development for beginning
                         to the beginning teacher.     improve student              and use of tools to assess    teachers on a range of
                         Exposes beginning             performance. Assists the     student work.                 assessment techniques and
                         teacher to school and         beginning teacher in         Collaboratively plans         how to utilize the data to meet
                         district data. Ensures that   interpreting data gathered   differentiated instruction    individual student needs.
                         the beginning teacher has     from informal and formal     based upon results.           Facilitates the leadership of
                         the required assessments      assessments and to apply                                   beginning teachers to inform
                         that accompany texts.         results in planning and                                    colleagues of their learnings
                                                       making adjustments in                                      regarding student assessment
                                                       instructional delivery.                                    and designing responsive
                                                                                                                  instruction.




                                                                         16
Mentor Standard 5: Mentors support beginning teachers to reflect on their practice.
       Element                Developing                   Proficient                 Accomplished                      Distinguished
Allocation and Use of   Is aware of importance of   Supports the beginning       Meets with the beginning       Meets with the beginning
Time with Beginning     meeting the beginning       teacher to attend a          teacher prior to their start   teacher prior to the start of the
Teachers                teacher and learning        program orientation within   of the school year to          school year and meets at least
                        about his/her individual    first two weeks of           support classroom planning     twice per week. Provides the
                        needs. Initiates            employment. Meets with       /preparation. Clarifies        beginning teacher with
                        introductions and offers    the beginning teacher at     program information as         additional ways to
                        availability for support.   least twice monthly.         needed. Regularly meets        communicate and get support
                                                    Focuses coaching efforts     (face to face, virtually, or   between scheduled meetings.
                                                    on meeting individual        through other medium that      Is dedicated to and skilled in
                                                    needs.                       best meet the needs of         providing quality coaching
                                                                                 beginning teachers) with       and targeted use of time to
                                                                                 the beginning teacher          effectively meet individual
                                                                                 weekly and honors start        needs.
                                                                                 and end times. Makes
                                                                                 conscientious effort to use
                                                                                 coaching skills and time
                                                                                 effectively to meet
                                                                                 individual needs.
Reflective Practice     Relies on instructive       Utilizes instructive,        Blends instructive,            Orchestrates highly refined use
                        approaches to tell the      collaborative, and           collaborative and              of instructive, collaborative
                        beginning teacher how to    facilitative approaches to   facilitative approaches to     and facilitative approaches to
                        enhance instructional       engage the beginning         facilitate the beginning       enhance a beginning teacher’s
                        practice and student        teacher to reflect and       teacher’s use of reflection    ability to reflect on strengths
                        achievement.                improve on practice.         to self identify his/her       and challenges. Nurtures the
                                                                                 instructional strengths and    beginning teacher’s capacity to
                                                                                 challenges and to engage       infuse reflection in his/her
                                                                                 in an on-going cycle of        practice to improve teaching
                                                                                 improvement.                   and learning.




                                                                       17
Mentor Standard 5: Mentors support beginning teachers to reflect on their practice.
       Element                 Developing                  Proficient                Accomplished                     Distinguished
Mentor Data Collection   Makes brief general        Collaborates with the       Observes the beginning        Utilizes a range of data
                         observations of the        beginning teacher to        teacher’s classroom           collection tools to best capture
                         beginning teacher’s        conduct classroom           regularly for both snapshot   information on the focus
                         classroom on multiple      observations and gathers    and formal visits to gather   established by the beginning
                         occasions to gather data   general data on practice.   data. Collaborates with the   teacher. Facilitates
                         on practice.               Has brief reflective        beginning teacher to define   conversation with the
                                                    conversation with the       a focus for data collection   beginning teacher regarding
                                                    beginning teacher           and to plan time to fully     the data collected and fosters
                                                    regarding knowledge         review the implications of    reflection and next steps based
                                                    gained from the data.       the data.                     on the data.




                                                                      18
1
SBE Meeting 01/2010                                                                                                                                Attachment TCP 2
                                                                  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title: Accrual of CEUs for Retired Teachers

Type of Executive Summary:
  Action             Action on First Reading                                            Discussion                        Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #
        SBE Policy # TCP-A-005
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other

Presenter(s):              Dr. Rebecca Garland (Chief Academic Officer, Academic Services and Instructional Support)
Description:
Currently retired teachers can only work up to their maximum earning capacity as defined by the North Carolina
Retirement System; thus, they are unable to earn a year of CEU credit for the time they taught or were employed by
the North Carolina Public School System as retirees. To improve conditions for the retired teachers, and to
encourage retired teachers to go back in the classroom, this proposed change would enable teachers to comply with
the North Carolina Retirement System’s requirement while still earning a year of CEU credit for the time they
taught while retired.

Resources:
NA

Input Process:
Retired Teachers and LEAs

Stakeholders:
Retired teachers

Timeline For Action:
The proposal was presented for discussion in December 2009, and is being presented for action in January 2010. It
will become effective upon Board approval.

Recommendations:
It is recommended that the Board approve the proposed changes to TCP-A-005.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
             Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
             Specify:
             Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
             Specify:
             Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                                  Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________                               No __________                           Abstain __________
Approved __________                     Disapproved __________                             Postponed __________                          Revised __________
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates:                                            Linda Jones (807-3355)
                  NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-005
Policy Title: Policies Regarding Renewal Requirements
Current Policy Date: 10/04/2007
Other Historical Information: Previous Board dates: 01/14/1998, 07/09/1998, 01/09/2003,
06/05/2003, 5/5/2005, 6/30/2005, 08/04/2005
Statutory Reference: Session Law 2002-178
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category: 16 NCAC 6C.307

Note: Only relevant sections of the policy have been included in this attachment.


5.00 General Requirements

Standard Professional 2 licenses shall be issued with five-year renewal cycles. Holders must
renew their licenses at the end of each five-year period. Credit earned for renewal purposes shall
apply to the person’s license field(s) and professional duties.

Renewal or reinstatement of a license shall be based on 15 units of renewal credit. A unit of
credit shall be equal to one-quarter hour or two-thirds of a semester hour of IHE credit, ten clock
hours of professional development, or one school year of teaching experience.

Five-year renewal cycles shall be initially based on the completion of credit requirements to
qualify for licensure, the completion of licensure renewal requirements, or a valid license held
from another state. A new five-year renewal cycle is established for a Standard Professional 2
license when an expired license is renewed. A new five-year renewal cycle also is established
upon the completion of program requirements for converting a Standard Professional 1 license to
a Standard Professional 2 license.

Individuals with expired, non-provisional North Carolina licenses shall be eligible for a three-
year Standard Professional 1 or Standard Professional 2 license based on the need of the
employing LEA. At least 15 renewal credits must be completed during the three years, with a
minimum of 5 credits required each year. At the end of the three-year cycle, if all 15 credits
have been completed, the license will be issued with a new five-year dating cycle or the license
remains expired until all renewal credits have been earned. Only an employing school system
can request reinstatement of a license for a person who holds an expired license. This shall not be
an option for currently employed individuals who have not met renewal requirements.

5.10 LEA Employees

LEA employees shall maintain an individual growth plan. During each five-year cycle,
individuals shall participate in professional development activities based on level(s) of expertise,
from beginning to accomplished, in the areas of content knowledge, content pedagogy,
assessment, diverse learners, leadership, technology, and others. An LEA may require a
                                                                                                  2
minimum number of hours in integrating technology to improve student learning. Individuals
teaching kindergarten through eighth grade must complete three renewal credits in reading
methods courses during each five-year renewal cycle. This reading methods requirement applies
to individuals renewing their licenses on or after July 1, 2003. Teachers of grades kindergarten
through twelve must complete three renewal credits in their academic subject areas, including
strategies to teach those subjects, during each five-year renewal cycle. This subject area
requirement applies to individuals renewing their licenses on or after July 1, 2009. Teachers
completing the National Board Certification process or the National Board Certification renewal
process during their renewal cycle are not required to complete the three renewal credits in their
subject area. School administrators must earn at least 5 renewal credits during each renewal
cycle focused on the principal’s role in teacher effectiveness, teacher evaluations, teacher support
programs, teacher leadership, teacher empowerment, and teacher retention. This requirement for
school administrators applies to individuals renewing their licenses on or after July 1, 2007.
When a retired teacher returns to active teaching or employment in a North Carolina public
school and works up to his or her maximum earning capacity as defined by the North Carolina
Retirement System for that school year, he or she will be granted 1 CEU of renewal credit for
that year’s service.


These persons may also obtain renewal credit for the following activities:
   a) college or university credit;
   b) teaching experience (one unit for each year);
   c) earning National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification or completion
       of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification process (fifteen
       units of renewal credit);
   d) completing National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Certification renewal
       (five units of renewal credit);
   e)      completion of activities that meet the following criteria (one unit of renewal credit per
       ten clock hours):
       i. The activity shall be delivered in a minimum of 10 clock hours over time with on-
             the-job application, feedback, and follow-up.
       ii. The activity shall have identified goals and objectives that are designed to increase
             knowledge or skills in the person’s license area or job assignment.
       iii. The activity shall include focused content and instruction that are sequenced to
             develop specified competencies of a specific population.
       iv. The activity shall be conducted by instructional personnel approved by the
             sponsoring school unit or employer.
       v. The activity shall include a focused evaluation designed to gauge the change in
             learner knowledge or skill and to guide the development of future programs.
   f) independent study of no more than five units of renewal credit per five-year period which
       meets the following criteria:
       i. Teachers and other licensed personnel help to develop local independent study
             procedures which the superintendent shall keep on file and periodically send to each
             licensed employee; and
       ii. The employee and the superintendent or his or her designee shall plan the
             experience in advance, including identification of competencies to be acquired and
             an evaluation to determine satisfactory achievement of those competencies.

5.20 Non-LEA Employees

Persons who hold a NC license but who are not currently employed in the public schools or by
governing boards of approved nonpublic schools may earn renewal credit through college or
                                                                                                  3
university coursework, or local courses and workshops on the same basis as currently employed
persons. The Licensure Section shall evaluate the appropriateness of the credits.




                                                                                           4
SBE Meeting 01/2010                                                                                                                                Attachment TCP 3
                                                                  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title: Adding Teaching Areas Based on 24 Semester Hours of Coursework

Type of Executive Summary:
  Action             Action on First Reading                                            Discussion                        Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #
        SBE Policy # TCP-A-001, TCP-A-003
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other

Presenter(s):              Dr. Rebecca Garland (Chief Academic Officer, Academic Services and Instructional Support)
Description:
The proposed policy change will enable all teachers who have a clear license to apply to the Licensure Section of
DPI to add teaching areas to their license upon completion of 24 semester hours of coursework, in which they earn a
C or better in a subject area.

Resources:
NA

Input Process:
DPI Staff, LEAs, and Personnel Administrators

Stakeholders:
North Carolina Teachers and Personnel Administrators

Timeline For Action:
The proposal was presented for discussion in December 2009, and is being presented for action in January 2010. It
will become effective upon Board approval.

Recommendations:
It is recommended that the Board approve the proposed changes to policies TCP-A-001 and TCP-A-003.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
             Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
             Specify:
             Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
             Specify:
             Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                                  Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________                               No __________                           Abstain __________
Approved __________                     Disapproved __________                             Postponed __________                          Revised __________
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates:                                            Linda Jones (807-3355)
                  NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-001
Policy Title: Policies on General Licensure Requirements
Current Policy Date: 04/02/2009
Other Historical Information: 01/05/1997, 07/09/1998, 01/13/1999, 07/01/1999, 07/13/2000,
09/14/2000, 10/04/2001, 01/09/2003, 2/6/2003, 06/05/2003, 08/07/03, 09/11/2003, 11/22/2004,
5/05/2005, 6/30/2005, 8/04/2005, 10/06/2005, 11/03/2005, 12/1/2005, 01/05/2006, 05/04/2006,
06/01/2006, 07/06/2006, 01/04/2007, 06/07/2007, 12/06/2007, 02/07/2008, 04/03/2008,
09/11/2008, 10/02/2008,12/04/2008
Statutory Reference: PL 107-110, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:

Note: Only relevant sections of the policy have been included in this attachment.

1.00 Licensure Required
Any person employed by a Local Education Agency (LEA) in a professional educator position
must hold a professional educator’s license. In addition, all persons teaching core academic
subjects at the elementary, middle school, or high school levels must be “highly qualified” as
specified by PL 107-110, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, and 1.01 and 1.02 below. Each
applicant shall file an application in the form prescribed by the Licensure Section with
appropriate supporting documentation and the required processing fee.

1.25 Adding Teaching Areas to Existing Teacher Licenses
Individuals who hold a clear teaching license in one area can add an additional teaching area to
the license by completing an approved teacher education program in the additional area and
meeting the federal requirement to be “highly qualified” in the additional teaching area or by
satisfying Praxis II testing requirements for the additional area or by completing 24 semester
hours in the subject area with a grade of C or better in the subject area. Individuals who hold a
clear teaching license can also add a language area to the license by earning a rating of at least
“Intermediate High” proficiency on the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages) Oral Proficiency Test, and, if available, the Writing Proficiency Test.


1.30 Temporary Permit
Temporary permits may be issued to individuals who have not met testing requirements but
otherwise qualify for a license. The permit is valid for the school year during which the license is
established. The permit may be extended for a second year of teaching provided the individual
has at least taken the required exam(s) during the first year of teaching. Effective June 30, 2006,
temporary permits will no longer be issued for the elementary grades level or at the middle and
high school levels in license areas required for teaching the core academic subjects.



                                                 2
At the request of the employing LEA, an individual whose license was not issued for a third year
due to not having met testing requirements may be granted a one-year extension for the 2003-04
school year. In requesting the extension, the LEA shall document the efforts of the individual to
satisfy testing requirements, provide evidence of the performance of the individual in the
classroom, and identify the support the individual will be provided to satisfy testing requirements
during the year.




                                                3
                  NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-003
Policy Title: Policies on Licensure Testing Requirements
Current Policy Date: 09/03/2009
Other Historical Information: Previous Board dates: 11/02/1994, 02/06/1997, 06/15/1997,
09/04/1997, 11/06/1997, 03/05/1998, 12/03/1998, 04/01/1999, 07/01/1999, 08/05/1999,
01/12/2000, 07/13/2000, 12/07/2000, 03/07/2002, 06/05/2003, 7/1/2003, 6/30/2005, 10/6/2005,
01/05/2006, 05/04/2006, 07/06/2006, 12/07/2006, 05/07/200903/01/2007, 05/05/2007,
06/07/2007, 03/06/2008
Statutory Reference: PL 107-110, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category: 16NCAC 6C.0310

Note: Only relevant sections of the policy have been included in this attachment.

3.10 Testing Requirements for a North Carolina License
Individuals seeking a North Carolina professional educator’s license must meet the testing
requirements established by the State Board of Education to be issued a clear license. Current
testing requirements are at the end of this section.

3.20 Adding Areas to an Existing License
Individuals who hold a clear teaching license in one area can add an additional teaching area to
the license by completing an approved teacher education program in the additional area and
meeting the federal requirement to be “highly qualified” in the additional teaching area or by
satisfying Praxis II testing requirements for the additional area or by completing 24 semester
hours in the subject area with a grade of C or better in the subject area. Individuals who hold a
clear teaching license can also add a language area to the license by earning a rating of at least
“Intermediate High” proficiency on the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages) Oral Proficiency Test, and, if available, the Writing Proficiency Test.

Individuals adding administrative and/or student services areas must satisfy the Praxis II testing
requirements for these areas.




                                                 4
                                                                      REQUIRED
                                                                      SCORE ON
                                                                       SUBJECT
AREA OF LICENSURE                    CODE      REQUIRED TESTS        ASSESSMENT
                                 Preschool/Elementary
Birth through Kindergarten            014            None**
Elementary (K-6)                      025         0011 and 0012      313 (total score)
Preschool Add-on                      015             none
                                     Middle Grades
Language Arts                        78180            0049                 145
Mathematics                          78200            0069                 141
Science                              78300            0439                 134
Social Studies                       78400            0089                 149
Agriculture                          78700            none
Business                             78760            none
Health Occupations                   78720            none
Family & Consumer Sciences           78710            none
Marketing                            78730            none
Technology                           78820            none
                                      Secondary
Anthropology                          433         0081 & 0084        320 (total score)
Bible                                 905            none
Biology                               310         0235 & 0234        302 (total score)
Business Education                    600            0100                  580
Chemistry                             330         0245 & 0483        307 (total score)
Earth Science                         302            0571                  136
Economics                             431         0081 & 0084        320 (total score)
English                               100         0041 & 0043        321 (total score)
French                                510         0171 & 0173        335 (total score)
Geography                             410         0081 & 0084        320 (total score)
German                                530            0181                  153
History                               420         0081 & 0084        320 (total score)
Latin                                 590            0600                  570
Mathematics                           200         0061 & 0065        281 (total score)
Physics                               320            0260                  510
Political Science                     405         0081 & 0084        320 (total score)
Russian                               580            none
                                                                    0435 & 0483 - 305
                                                     0435 &         0435 & 0234 - 303
Science (comprehensive)               300     either 0483 or 0234      (total score)

Social Studies (comprehensive)        400         0081 & 0084        320 (total score)
Sociology                             432         0081 & 0084        320 (total score)
Spanish                               520         0191 & 0192        327 (total score)



                                         5
                            Special Subject Areas (K-12)
Art                                  810         0131 & 0133        322 (total score)
Dance                                805             none
English as a Second Language         110             0360                 520
French                               511         0171 & 0173        335 (total score)
German                               531             0181                 153
Health Specialist                    098             0550                 640
Junior ROTC                          999             none
Music                                800         0111 & 0113        299 (total score)
Physical Education                   090             0091                 152
Reading (bachelor's level)           190             0200                 540
Reading (graduate level)             190             0300                 570
Safety and Driver Education          096             none
Spanish                              521         0191 & 0192        327 (total score)
Speech Communication                 109             0220                 560
Theater Arts                         108             none
                                    Exceptional Children
Academically Gifted                    88087             none
Special Education: Adapted                                            0544 = 144
Curriculum                             88092        0544 and 0511     0511 = 148
Special Education: General                                            0542 = 159
Curriculum                             88091        0542 and 0511     0511 = 148
                                                                      0371 =147
Behaviorally/Emotionally Disabled      88085        0371 and 0511     0511 = 148
                                                                      0352 =136
Cross Categorical                      88001        0352 and 0511     0511 = 148
Hearing Impaired                       88088            None
                                                                      0321 = 144
Mentally Disabled                      88081        0321 and 0511     0511 = 148
Severely Profoundly Mentally                                          0321 = 144
Disabled                               88002        0321 and 0511     0511 = 148
                                                                      0381 = 139
Learning Disabled                      88086        0381 and 0511     0511 = 148
Visually Impaired                      88083             0280            550

                               Career-Technical Education
Agricultural Education                 700            none
Career Development Coordinator         747            none
Handicapped/Disadvantaged              770            none
Health Occupations Education           720            none
Family & Consumer Sciences             710             0120               540
Marketing Education                    730             0560               690
Technology Education                   820             0050               580
Trade and Industrial Education         740            none
Business Education                     760             0100               580


                                            6
                                    Special Services Personnel
     Counselor                              005             0420                    570
     School Social Worker                   006             none
     School Psychologist                    026             0400                    620
     Media Coordinator                      076             0310                    610
     Audiologist                           88003            0340                    590
     Speech-Language Pathologist           88082            0330                    550
     Instructional Technology Specialist
     – Telecommunications                   074             none
                                    Administrative/Supervisory
     School Administrator—                              School Leaders
     Superintendent                         011     Licensure Assessment            163
                                                        School Leaders
     School Administrator—Principal         012     Licensure Assessment            163
     Curriculum-Instructional Specialist    113             0410                    590
     Instructional Technology Specialist
     – Computers                            077             none
     Media Supervisor                       078             0410                    590
     Career-Technical Education
     Director                               711             0410                    590
     Exceptional Children Program
     Administrator                         88099            0410                    590




**      Although no test is required for the Birth-Kindergarten (B-K) license, B-K teachers may
        be designated “highly qualified” to teach kindergarten by earning a score of 155 or
        higher on Praxis test 0022.




                                               7
SBE Meeting 01/2010                                                                                                                                     Attachment TCP 4


                                                                  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title:       Recommendations from the Advisory Board on Requests for Exception from Teacher Licensing
             Requirements

Type of Executive Summary:
        Action        Action on First Reading                                          Discussion                           Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #
        SBE Policy # TCP-A-021, TCP-B-009
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other

Presenter(s):              Ms. Shirley Harris (State Board of Education )

Description:
In April 2006 the Board adopted a policy to allow individuals who have not met licensing requirements due to
extenuating circumstances to request an exception from the requirement or an extension of time. The request must
include documents from the teacher, the principal, the superintendent, and the chair of the local board of education.
In June, a similar policy was approved to allow colleges and universities to submit requests for exception to Praxis I
testing requirements on behalf of students seeking admission to teacher education programs. Requests are evaluated
by a panel chaired by a member of the State Board. Panel recommendations will be presented in closed session.
Resources:
No additional resources are requested.
Input Process:
The requests for exception and supporting documentation are reviewed by the appeals panel. In addition, the
individual and the LEA/IHE seeking the exception are provided the opportunity to meet with the panel.
Stakeholders:
LEAs, teachers who have not been able to satisfy licensure requirements, prospective teachers who have not been
able to satisfy Praxis I testing requirements
Timeline For Action:
Panel recommendations will be presented in closed session.
Recommendations:
It is recommended that the actions related to each request be approved.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
             Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
             Specify:

             Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
             Specify:

             Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                                     Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________          No __________                                                   Abstain __________
Approved __________     Disapproved __________                                                Postponed __________     Revised __________
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates:                                            Nadine C. Ejire 807-3340
                 NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                               Policy Manual

Policy Identification
Priority: Quality Teachers, Administrators, and Staff
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: QP-A-021

Policy Title: Procedure for Seeking Exception from Licensure Requirements

Current Policy Date: 04/06/2006

Other Historical Information:
Previous Board Dates: 05/05/2005

Statutory Reference:

Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:


*** Begin Policy *** (Do not tamper with this line)


The State Board of Education will consider requests for exceptions from licensure requirements
in State Board Policy due to extenuating circumstances for individuals who: (1) following initial
licensure, have not completed the course work required to maintain a license; OR (2) have not
met other licensure requirements.

Exception from Required Course Work

A local board of education may apply to the State Board of Education for a one-year exception
from licensure requirements for an individual who, due to extenuating circumstances, has not
completed the course work required to maintain a license. The application must include:

1.     A document, signed by the individual, which includes:

       a. A description of the extenuating circumstances that the teacher claims prevented him
          or her from satisfying the requirements for licensure;

       b. A request for an extension of his or her license for one additional year to complete the
          course work required to maintain a license; and

       c. An acknowledgment that the teacher understands that the materials submitted to the
          State Board of Education in support of his or her request are public records subject to
          disclosure under Chapter 132 of the North Carolina General Statutes.




                                                1
2.   A document, signed by the North Carolina principal who most recently supervised the
     individual, which includes:

     a. The dates the principal supervised the teacher;

     b. Sufficient evidence of the individual’s academic and professional preparation to
        satisfy the State Board of Education that the individual is competent to teach the
        standard course of study and has demonstrated the ability to implement effective
        educational methods that provide differentiated, individualized instruction,
        assessment and remediation to all his or her students; and

     c. A statement that in the principal’s opinion the teacher is competent to teach the
        standard course of study and has demonstrated the ability to implement effective
        educational methods that provide differentiated, individualized instruction,
        assessment and remediation to the students in his or her classroom; and

     d. A copy of any of the individual’s summative annual evaluations for the past three
        years.

3.   A document, signed by the superintendent of the local school system, which includes:

     a. A statement certifying that, based upon a review of the individual’s and the
        principal’s documentation and evidence, the superintendent believes the individual is
        competent to teach the standard course of study and has demonstrated the ability to
        implement effective educational methods that provide differentiated, individualized
        instruction, assessment and remediation to the students in his or her classroom;

     b. A list of the required course work that the applicant has completed;

     c. A description of the efforts that the local school administrative unit has made to assist
        the teacher to complete the required course work;

     d. A list of the required course work that the applicant must complete to qualify for a
        license;

     e. A description of the efforts that the local school administrative unit will make to
        assist the teacher to complete the required course work during the next year of
        teaching; and

     f. A statement that the superintendent believes that the applicant is likely to complete
        the required course work within the one-year extension.

4.   A document, signed by the chair of the local board of education, which includes:

     a. A certification that the local board of education has investigated the extenuating
        circumstances that the teacher claims prevented him or her from completing the
        required course work for a license without undue hardship;


                                              2
       b. A statement that the local board of education is satisfied that the teacher’s description
          of the circumstances is true;

       c. A statement that the local board of education is satisfied that, due to the extenuating
          circumstances, the teacher could not have completed the required course work for a
          license without undue hardship;

       d. A certification that the local board of education has approved the employment of the
          teacher for the next school year, subject only to the State Board of Education’s
          decision to grant the requested one-year extension of the teacher’s provisional license.

Exception from Other Licensure Requirements

A local board of education may apply to the State Board of Education for an exception from
licensure requirements for an individual who has not fulfilled licensure requirements, other than
course work, due to extenuating circumstances. The application must include:

1.     A document, signed by the individual, which includes:

       a. A list of the licensure requirements from which he or she is requesting an exception;

       b. A description of the extenuating circumstances that the individual claims prevented
          him or her from fulfilling the licensure requirements; and

       c. An acknowledgment that the individual understands that the materials submitted to
          the State Board of Education in support of his or her request are public records
          subject to disclosure under Chapter 132 of the North Carolina General Statutes.

2.     If the individual is not currently employed in a North Carolina public school, the local
       board shall submit:

       a. Sufficient evidence of the individual’s academic and professional preparation to
          satisfy the State Board of Education that the individual is competent to teach the
          standard course of study and has demonstrated the ability to implement effective
          educational methods that provide differentiated, individualized instruction,
          assessment and remediation to all his or her students; and

       b. A copy of any teaching evaluations the individual received during the past three
          years.

3.     If the individual is currently employed in a North Carolina public school, the local board
       shall submit:

       a. Sufficient evidence of the individual’s academic and professional preparation to
          satisfy the State Board of Education that the individual is competent to teach the
          standard course of study and has demonstrated the ability to implement effective
          educational methods that provide differentiated, individualized instruction,
          assessment and remediation to all his or her students;

                                                3
     b. A document, signed by the North Carolina principal who most recently supervised the
        individual, which includes:

        i. The dates the principal supervised the teacher;

        ii. A statement that in the principal’s opinion the teacher is competent to teach the
            standard course of study and has demonstrated the ability to implement effective
            educational methods that provide differentiated, individualized instruction,
            assessment and remediation to the students in his or her classroom; and

        iii. A copy of any teaching evaluations the individual received during the past three
             years.

4.   A document, signed by the superintendent of the local school system, which includes:

     a. A statement certifying that, based upon a review of the individual’s and the
        principal’s documentation and evidence, the superintendent believes the individual is
        competent to teach the standard course of study and has demonstrated the ability to
        implement effective educational methods that provide differentiated, individualized
        instruction, assessment and remediation to the students in his or her classroom;

     b. A description of the deficiencies that prevent the individual from meeting licensure
        requirements;

     c. A description of any efforts that the local school system has made to assist the
        individual to complete the licensure requirements; and

     d. The reasons the superintendent believes that the individual should be granted a
        license despite the failure to meet the licensure requirements.

5.   A document, signed by the chair of the local board of education, which includes:

     a. A certification that the local board of education has investigated the extenuating
        circumstances that the individual claims prevented him or her from completing the
        requirements for a license;

     b. A statement that the local board of education is satisfied that the individual’s
        description of the circumstances is true;

     c. A statement that the local board of education is satisfied that, due to the extenuating
        circumstances, the individual could not have completed the requirements for a
        license without undue hardship;

     d. A certification that the local board of education has approved the employment of the
        teacher for the next school year, subject only to the State Board of Education’s
        decision to grant the individual a license.


                                              4
Decision of the State Board of Education

Upon the recommendation of the Chair, the State Board of Education shall appoint two or more
members of the Board and at least four professional educators to an Advisory Board on Requests
for Exception from Teacher Licensing Requirements. From those individuals appointed to the
Advisory Board, the Chair shall construct review panels consisting of no less than four
professional educators and one member of the State Board of Education. The panels shall
review those requests for exception from licensure assigned to them, evaluate the merits of the
requests and submit to the State Board of Education recommendations to grant or deny the
requests along with any other information the panels deem material.

Each review panel shall be chaired by a member of the State Board of Education. A panel may
require the representatives of the local school administrative unit which submitted the application
for exception as well as the individual in question to provide additional information, appear
before the panel, respond to questions, produce documents and otherwise cooperate with the
panel’s efforts to evaluate the merits of a request for exception. With the approval of the chair of
the panel, members may participate in panel meetings by telephone.

After it receives the panel’s recommendation, the State Board of Education shall make a decision
whether to grant or deny the requested exception, provided an extension for course work will not
extend the three-year time limit in which a lateral entry teacher must satisfy all course work and
testing requirements for a continuing license.

Nothing herein is intended to permit exceptions from licensure requirements mandated by State
or federal law.




                                                 5
                 NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                               Policy Manual

Policy Identification
Priority: Quality Teachers, Administrators, and Staff
Category: Teacher Education
Policy ID Number: QP-B-009

Policy Title: Procedure for Seeking Exception from Teacher Education Program Praxis I
Admission Requirements

Current Policy Date: June 1, 2006

Other Historical Information:

Previous Board Dates:

Statutory Reference:

Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:


*** Begin Policy *** (Do not tamper with this line)

An institution of higher education (IHE) may apply to the State Board of Education for an
exception from PRAXIS I for an individual who, due to extenuating circumstances, has not been
able to pass PRAXIS I. The application must include:

1.     A document, signed by the individual, which includes:

       a.     Copies of the official scores for all the PRAXIS I tests that the individual has
              taken;

       b.     A description of the extenuating circumstances that the individual claims
              prevented him or her from passing PRAXIS I; and

       c.     An acknowledgment that the individual understands that the materials submitted
              to the State Board of Education in support of his or her request are public records
              subject to disclosure under Chapter 132 of the North Carolina General Statutes.

2.     The dean of the school of education at the IHE shall submit:

       a.     Evidence that the individual has passed tests in reading, writing, and mathematics
              sufficient to demonstrate that the individual is qualified to successfully complete
              the teacher education program at the IHE and

       b.      A copy of the individual’s official transcript at the IHE.


                                                6
Decision of the State Board of Education

Requests for exceptions to teacher education program Praxis I admission requirements will be
considered by the Advisory Board on Requests for Exception from Teacher Licensing
Requirements. The panel may require the dean of the IHE that submitted the application for
exception, as well as the individual seeking the exception, to provide additional information,
appear before the panel, respond to questions, produce documents and otherwise cooperate with
the panel’s efforts to evaluate the merits of the request for exception. With the approval of the
chair of the panel, members may participate in panel meetings by telephone.

After it receives the panel’s recommendation, the State Board of Education shall make a decision
whether to grant or deny the requested exception.




                                                7
SBE Meeting 01/2010                                                                                                  Attachment: TCP 5
                                                    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title:    Final Decision in Contested Cases:
          Sandra P. Chesser v. State Board of Education; Frederick P. Moore v. State Board of Education,
          Dept. of Public Instruction

Type of Executive Summary:
        Action       Action on First Reading                            Discussion                 Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #150B-36
        SBE Policy #
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other

Presenter(s):        Ms. Katie Cornetto (Staff Attorney, State Board of Education)

Description:
Sandra P. Chesser filed a petition for a contested case to challenge the denial of her request for reinstatement of her
teaching license. The Administrative Law Judge upheld the agency’s action.

Frederick P. Moore filed a petition for a contested case to challenge the denial of his application for a teaching
license. The Administrative Law Judge upheld the agency’s action.

Resources:
NA

Input Process:
The administrative hearing process allows both parties to present evidence to an impartial fact-finder.

Stakeholders:
SBE, DPI, LEAs, Teachers

Timeline For Action:
This is a closed session item presented for action on first reading this month.

Recommendations:
The State Board shall issue a Final Agency Decision in each of the contested cases.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
                 Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
                 Specify:
                 Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
                 Specify:
                 Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                   Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________                       No __________                    Abstain __________
Approved __________                Disapproved __________                   Postponed __________                Revised __________


*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates: Katie Cornetto (807-3406)
SBE Meeting 01/2010                                                                                                                                Attachment TCP 6
                                                                  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title: Crediting Experience for NCVPS Teachers Currently Ineligible for Experience Credit

Type of Executive Summary:
  Action             Action on First Reading                                            Discussion                        Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #
        SBE Policy # TCP-A-006
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other

Presenter(s):              Mr. Philip Price (Associate State Superintendent, Financial and Business Services)
Description:
Currently there is no language in SBE policy that is specific as to how NCVPS teachers earn teaching experience
credit. This proposed policy modification is intended to add language to the existing SBE policy (TCP-A-006) to
specify how experience credit is earned for NCVPS teachers who are not otherwise eligible for experience credit and
to clarify language related to experience credit earned for college teaching. Both NCVPS teachers who are not
otherwise eligible for experience credit and college teachers must teach a minimum of six semester hours taught per
term or semester to qualify for half-time experience credit and a minimum of twelve semester hours per term or
semester for full time experience credit.

Resources:
NA

Input Process:
NCVPS Teachers and Personnel Administrators.

Stakeholders:
NCVPS teachers not otherwise eligible for experience credit

Timeline For Action:
The proposal is presented for discussion in January 2010, and will be presented for action in February 2010. It will
become effective upon Board approval.

Recommendations:
It is recommended that the Board approve the proposed changes to TCP-A-006..
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
             Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
             Specify:
             Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
             Specify:
             Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                                  Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________                               No __________                           Abstain __________
Approved __________                     Disapproved __________                             Postponed __________                          Revised __________
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates:                                            Linda Jones (807-3355)
                  NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-006
Policy Title: Policies related to experience/degree credit for salary purposes
Current Policy Date: 12/04/2008
Other Historical Information: Previous Board dates: 10/01/1998, 08/05/1999, 01/12/2000,
01/10/2001, 11/1/2001, 11/03/2005
Statutory Reference:
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:

Note: Only relevant sections of the policy have been included in this attachment.


POLICIES RELATED TO EXPERIENCE/DEGREE CREDIT FOR SALARY PURPOSES

6.00 Experience Credit as a Professional Educator

Salary for a NC public school employee shall be determined by the amount of creditable
experience an individual has. Credit awarded for professional school experience shall be
calculated according to the following rules:

   1) Full-time work in a school unit of not less than six calendar months within one fiscal year
      (July 1 through June 30) shall earn one year of experience credit (excluding experience in
      a one-teacher private school).

   2) Part-time work shall require a minimum of 15 hours per week to establish experience
      credit in a school unit. One year of experience can be earned, if the experience totals six
      calendar months of full-time experience during a single fiscal year.

   3) Partial years of full-time or part-time experience can be combined for experience credit.
      For example, two years of part-time work can be combined for one year of experience, if
      it is equivalent to six months of full-time experience. Full-time experience of less than
      six calendar months in a fiscal year can be combined with another partial year of part-
      time or full-time experience to equal one year of experience credit.

   4) Experience credit for a single year served in two or more school administrative units shall
      be allowed unless the State Board of Education has been advised that the person’s
      contract was willfully breached during the school year.

   5) Credit for college teaching shall be calculated based on the number of clock semester
      hours spent in the classroom teaching per week taught per term or semester. Six class
      hours per week shall be considered half-time teaching and twelve class hours per week
      shall be considered full-time teaching. A minimum of six semester hours taught per term
      or semester is required to qualify for half-time experience credit. Full-time experience
      credit requires a minimum of twelve semester hours taught per term or semester.
                                                                                             2
6) For NCVPS teachers who are not otherwise eligible for experience credit, experience
   credit shall be calculated based on the number of semester hours taught per term or
   semester in the virtual classroom environment. A minimum of six semester hours taught
   per term or semester is required to qualify for half-time experience credit. Full-time
   experience credit requires a minimum of twelve semester hours taught per term or
   semester.


7) Service as a tutor, clerical paraprofessional, or substitute teacher shall not be recognized
   for professional educator experience credit. It may be recognized for non-teaching work
   experience credit if it meets the criteria identified below in 6.20

8) Experience credit as a professional educator shall not be awarded for a period of time
   designated as a leave of absence except as required by Workmen’s Compensation and the
   Uniform Services Employment Re-employment Rights Act (USERRA).




                                                                                             3
SBE Meeting 01/2010                                                                                                                    Attachment TCP 7
                                                            EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title: Removal of Barriers to Lateral Entry Into Teaching

Type of Executive Summary:
  Action             Action on First Reading                                    Discussion                      Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #
        SBE Policy # TCP-A-001, TCP-A-002, TCP-A010, TCP-A-014, TCP-B-010
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other

Presenter(s):           Mr. Philip Price (Associate State Superintendent, Financial and Business Services)

Description: A team was formed with members of DPI staff including Academic Services, Exceptional Children,
Career and Technical, Teacher Education, English as a Second Language, Licensure and Financial and Business
Services was established in response to Section 7.21(a) of the Budget Bill (detailed below) to review the lateral entry
policy and remove barriers to lateral entry.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
REMOVE BARRIERS TO LATERAL ENTRY INTO TEACHING
SECTION 7.21.(a) The State Board of Education shall:
(1) Review the lateral entry program and identify and remove from it barriers to the lateral entry of skilled individuals from the
private sector into the teaching profession;
(2) Reduce the coursework requirements for lateral entry by consolidating the required competencies into fewer courses and fewer
semester hours of coursework; and
(3) Provide additional opportunities for individuals to complete coursework online and at community colleges.

SECTION 7.21.(b) The State Board of Education shall report to the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee by January 15,
2010, on its implementation of this section.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The team recommends that the pedagogy coursework be modified to align with the new Professional Teaching Standards, thereby
reducing the current required pedagogy course work from nine courses to five courses. The proposed pedagogy courses are listed
below.
     o    Planning
     o    Diverse Learners
     o    Instructional Methods
     o    Classroom Management
     o    Ability to Impact Student Learning

Additionally, the team recommends that DPI source with an outside online learning vendor to create online course modules for the
Planning course, the Meeting Special Learning Needs; Exceptionalities; Diversity course and the Instructional Methods course to
offer lateral entry teachers expanded options for course completion in addition to those currently only available via IHE's. The
Classroom Management/Organizing the Classroom to Maximize Learning requirement and the Ability to Impact Student Learning
requirement would be signed off on by the respective LEAs.

We will bring to the Board meeting suggested policy changes to the attached policies that will incorporate the above modifications.


Resources:
NA

Input Process:
Cross functional DPI divisions, Regional Alternative Licensing Centers, and Personnel Administrators

Stakeholders:
Potential lateral entry teachers

Timeline For Action:
The proposal is presented for discussion in January 2010, and will be presented for action in February 2010. It
would become effective upon Board approval for those lateral entry teachers hired beginning in the 2010/2011
school year.

Recommendations:
It is recommended that the SBE provide feedback relevant to the discussion of these policies.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
             Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
             Specify:
             Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
             Specify:
             Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                                  Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________                               No __________                           Abstain __________
Approved __________                     Disapproved __________                             Postponed __________                          Revised __________
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates:                                            Linda Jones (807-3355)




                                                                                                                                                                             2
                 NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                               Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-001
Policy Title: Policies on General Licensure Requirements
Current Policy Date: 11/05/2009
Other Historical Information: 01/05/1997, 07/09/1998, 01/13/1999, 07/01/1999, 07/13/2000,
09/14/2000, 10/04/2001, 01/09/2003, 2/6/2003, 06/05/2003, 08/07/03, 09/11/2003, 11/22/2004,
5/05/2005, 6/30/2005, 8/04/2005, 10/06/2005, 11/03/2005, 12/1/2005, 01/05/2006, 05/04/2006,
06/01/2006, 07/06/2006, 01/04/2007, 06/07/2007, 12/06/2007, 02/07/2008, 04/03/2008,
09/11/2008, 10/02/2008,12/04/2008,04/02/2009
Statutory Reference: PL 107-110, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:

Note: Only relevant sections of the policy have been included in this attachment.

1.60 Endorsement

An endorsement is an attachment to a full license area, which allows the individual to teach a
specific subject on a half-time or less basis. Endorsements shall be issued by the Department of
Public Instruction based on a minimum of eighteen semester hours in the specific content area.
Effective June 30, 2006, endorsements will no longer be issued in and can not be used for
teaching at the elementary grades level or at the middle and high school levels in license areas
required for teaching the core academic subjects.

Teachers with the following endorsements are not subject to the limits of half-time teaching and
may teach full time in the endorsement area:

       1)    Chemistry (assigned to teach physical science)*
       2)    Elementary second language*
       3)    Journalism
       4)    K-12 computer education
       5)    Physics (assigned to teach physical science)*
       6)    Principles of technology*
       7)    Chinese*
       8)    Italian*
       9)    Psychology

*Effective June 30, 2006, endorsements can not be used in these areas.

Endorsements can be converted to full licenses based on the following:
   (a) Completion of 6 additional semester hours (total of 24 semester hours) in the content
       subject area; or
   (b) Satisfactory completion of the required Praxis II Specialty Area Exams; or
   (c) Verification of three years of successful teaching in the subject area and the NC

                                                                                               3
       HOUSSE.

1.70 Lateral Entry License

An individual who has not completed an approved teacher education program may be licensed
under the following lateral entry provisions:
       (1)     Be selected for employment by a North Carolina school system;
       (2)     Hold at least a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or
               university in the subject area in which they are employed to teach or hold at least
               a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university and have
               satisfied Praxis II testing requirements for the license area and meet the
               requirements to be designated “highly qualified” as prescribed by No Child Left
               Behind. To be designated “highly qualified,” elementary and exceptional
               children’s teachers must pass a rigorous state assessment (currently Praxis II
               exams). To be designated “highly qualified,” middle school, high school, and
               special subject area teachers (e.g., art, music, second languages) must hold a
               bachelor’s or master’s degree in the specific area, or have 24 semester hours in
               the area, or pass a rigorous state assessment (currently Praxis II exams) in the
               area.
       (3)     Have a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or have five years
               of experience considered relevant by the LEA, or have passed the Praxis I exams
               and have attained one of the following:
               a) a GPA of at least 3.0 on all work completed in the senior year;
               b) a GPA of at least 3.0 in the major; or
               c) a GPA of at least 3.0 in a minimum of 15 semester hours of course work
                   completed after the bachelor’s degree was earned and within the last 5 years.

A person who holds a lateral entry license shall complete a program that includes the following
components:
        (1) completion of an approved teacher education program in the area of licensure at a
             college or university or completion of a program of study outlined by the
             Regional Alternative Licensing Centers;

               Prescribed academic content coursework that is available through community
               colleges may be used to satisfy licensure requirements. General pedagogy
               competencies can be satisfied as follows.

        General Pedagogy Competencies           Completed Through
        Educational/Instructional Technology    Approved Teacher Education Program or
                                                Community College or
                                                Local Education Agency (if employed)
        Understanding the Learner: Human        Approved Teacher Education Program or
        Growth and Development                  Community College
        Learning Theory; Learning Styles;       Approved Teacher Education Program or
        Motivation; How Children/Adolescents    Community College
        Learn
        Meeting Special Learning Needs;         Approved Teacher Education Program
        Exceptionalities; Diversity
        Literacy/Reading Methods                Approved Teacher Education Program
        Instructional Methods                   Approved Teacher Education Program
                                                                                                4
        General Pedagogy Competencies           Completed Through
        School Policies/Procedures              Approved Teacher Education Program or
                                                Community College or
                                                Local Education Agency (if employed)
        Home/School/Community                   Approved Teacher Education Program or
        Collaborations                          Community College or
                                                Local Education Agency (if employed)
        Classroom Management/Organizing the     Approved Teacher Education Program or
        Classroom to Maximize Learning          Community College or
                                                Local Education Agency (if employed)


        (2)    attaining passing score on appropriate PRAXIS subject exam(s) during the first
               three school years of holding the lateral entry license if the exam(s) was/were not
               the basis of qualifying for the license;
        (3)    completion of a staff development program that includes a two-week training
               course prior to beginning the work assignment;
        (4)    completion of a cumulative of six semester hours of course work in the approved
               program each school year;
        (5)    successful completion of at least a three-year initial licensure program in the
               lateral entry license area;
        (6)    completion of all above requirements within 3 years of becoming eligible for a
               lateral entry license and recommendation of the IHE or RALC for clear licensure.

Individuals who possess five or more years of experience considered relevant by the LEA and
satisfy testing requirements (currently Praxis II) for the licensure area within the first year of
teaching shall be issued a Standard Professional 1 License upon:

           a. Completion of the NC TEACH modules or the equivalent through an approved
              teacher education program: 1) The Teacher, The Learner, and The School; 2)
              Diversity; 3) Content Area Pedagogy. (Note: The NC TEACH modules are
              offered and administered through NC colleges and universities with approved
              teacher education programs. and

           b. Completion of the NC TEACH module on Instructional Technology or the
              equivalent through an approved teacher education program, community college,
              or through professional development offered by the LEA; and

           c. Completion of one year of successful teaching as verified by the employing LEA.

The employing school system shall formally commit to supporting the lateral entry teacher by:
       (1) providing a two-week orientation that includes:
             a. lesson planning,
             b. classroom organization,
             c. classroom management, including positive management of student behavior,
                 effective communication for defusing and deescalating disruptive or
                 dangerous behavior, and safe and appropriate use of seclusion and restraint,
             d. an overview of the ABCs Program including the standard course of study and
                 end-of-grade and end-of-course testing, and
             e. the identification and education of children with disabilities.
       (2) assignment of a mentor on or before the first day on the job;
                                                                                                5
         (3)   providing working conditions that are appropriate for all novice teachers;
         (4)   giving regular focused feedback to the teacher for improving instruction; and
         (5)   assisting the individual in accessing prescribed course work and professional
               development opportunities.

Individuals who do not fulfill the requirements of their lateral entry license within the three years
they are initially given may be issued another lateral entry license provided:

    1. they have passed the required Praxis II exam(s) for the specialty area in which the
       license will be issued and
    2. at least six years have elapsed since the prior lateral entry license was issued.

1.75 Lateral Entry for Licensed Educators
At the request of an employing school system, an individual who holds a clear (non-restricted)
license in a teaching, administrative, supervisory, or student services area may be issued a lateral
entry license in a teaching area provided he/she meets the federal requirements to be designated
highly qualified in the teaching area. Licensed educators who are issued a lateral entry license
shall be subject to the requirements for lateral entry teachers detailed in Section 1.70 of this
policy.




                                                                                                   6
                   NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                 Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-002
Policy Title: Policies on Routes to Licensure
Current Policy Date: 03/05/2009
Other Historical Information: Previous Board dates: 07/12/2001, 6/5/2003, 08/07/2003,
12/07/2006, 01/04/2007,06/07/2007
Statutory Reference: PL 107-110, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001; Session Law 2003-
284
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:


POLICIES ON ROUTES TO LICENSURE

Note: Only relevant sections of the policy have been included in this attachment.

2.20 Regional Alternative Licensing Centers

Regional alternative licensure centers shall be established by the Division of Human Resource
Management. The centers are authorized to review transcripts, prescribe plans of study leading
to licensure, and directly recommend teachers for licensure. These centers work with state-
approved teacher education programs and LEA personnel to provide assistance to lateral entry
and provisionally licensed teachers.

2.30 Direct Licensure

In the case of applicants for career-technical education licenses, international faculty licenses,
and on a case-by-case basis at the request of the employing LEA for other licenses, the Licensure
Section may evaluate individual records for the purpose of establishing eligibility for licensing
without the involvement of an IHE or other authorized recommending agency. Direct licensure
may be used when there are unique employment qualifications for a license area (e.g., career-
technical education, international faculty), a limited number of approved teacher education
programs in the license area, and in the case of extenuating circumstances which prohibit a fair
and equitable evaluation through other established routes to licensure. Employees earning a license
through the direct process must comply with all current provisional, beginning teacher, and testing
requirements, as well as any experience requirements for the area of licensure sought.

Individuals who have earned a least a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution or an
equivalent academic credential in another country, but who are not licensed to teach, may be issued a
lateral entry license in a world language based on a rating of at least “Intermediate High” proficiency on
the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Oral Proficiency Test, and, if
available, the Writing Proficiency Test. Individuals who have earned a least a baccalaureate degree
from a regionally accredited institution or an equivalent academic credential in another country,
but who are not licensed to teach, may be issued a lateral entry license in American Sign
                                                                                                         7
Language based on holding at least provisional certification from the American Sign Language
Teachers Association (ASLTA).

To be issued a lateral entry license, individuals must meet the 2.5 grade point average
requirement. Individuals clearing a license through the direct licensure route complete
coursework prescribed by the Licensure Section using the lateral entry templates to clear the
license.

Individuals who have completed their baccalaureate degree at an institution outside the United
States must submit an official credential evaluation completed by a recognized credential
evaluation agency (e.g., World Evaluation Services, Inc., Josef Silny and Associates, Inc.,
International Education Evaluators, Inc.). Credential evaluations are not accepted from
individual evaluators or from agencies with which the prospective teacher is or has been
affiliated.

Individuals seeking career and technical education licenses through direct licensure shall be required to
complete the coursework and requirements detailed in the following tables.

2.36 Teachers of Critical Language for the North Carolina Virtual Public School

The North Carolina Virtual Public School may request a lateral entry license from the Licensure
Section for individuals who meet the requirements for a lateral entry license in a critical
language. The Licensure Section will issue a program of study outlining the requirements the
individual must fulfill to be issued a Standard Professional 1 license. The requirements must be
fulfilled within the same time limits as other lateral entry teachers.




                                                                                                            8
                 NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                               Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-010
Policy Title: 16 NCAC 6C.0301 Policy governing general information on licensure
Current Policy Date: 08/01/2000
Other Historical Information: Previous Board dates: 05/08/1986, 07/01/1986, 03/01/1990,
05/06/1999
Statutory Reference: GS 115C-19(9)a; NC Constitution, Article IX, Sec.5
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category: 16 NCAC
6C.0301


.0301 GENERAL INFORMATION

(a)    Any person who desires to obtain employment from a LEA in a professional position
       shall apply for and obtain a license from the department. Each applicant shall file an
       application, together with an official transcript(s), a recommendation by a designated
       official of the approved IHE where preparation was completed, and the licensure fee
       specified in G.S. 115C-296(a2).

(b)    The department shall evaluate each application and its supporting documentation and
       shall notify each applicant of the action it takes.

(c)    An applicant who desires to upgrade, renew, or add new fields to a license shall supply
       documentation to the department that supports the desired action.

(d)    A class "A" teaching license may be changed from elementary, middle grades or
       secondary to either of the other categories upon the applicant's completion of the program
       required by the IHE for the license. An applicant who secures credit as provided in Rule
       .0302 of this Section for new subject or teaching fields may have these fields added to a
       teaching license.

(e)    The department shall base the effective date of a license on the date the applicant
       completed the educational program requirements of the IHE for the license. For
       applicants who completed these requirements before the current fiscal year in which the
       application is processed, the effective date shall be July 1. For applicants who have
       completed these requirements within the current fiscal year in which the application is
       processed, the effective date shall be the date the applicant completed the requirements.
       Every license shall expire on June 30 unless it is renewed or extended in accordance with
       the provisions of this Section. A provisional license issued pursuant to Rule .0305(c) of
       this Section shall be valid for one year. A lateral entry license issued pursuant to Rule
       .0305(b) of this Section shall be valid for two years. The initial license issued pursuant to
       Rule .0304(c)(1) of this Section shall be valid for three years. The continuing license
       issued pursuant to Rule .0304(c)(2) of this Section shall be valid for five years.

                                                                                                   9
(f)    Any licensed person may apply to the department on forms that it shall furnish for a
       duplicate license, in the event the original is lost, or for the change of the applicant's
       name.

(g)    Professional personnel may be assigned only to areas in which the individual holds a
       license, a provisional license, or endorsement as required by the department. The LEA
       may assign any licensed teacher who is the best qualified to teach remedial courses,
       regardless of license area. This provision shall not apply to any vocational license that
       has been restricted by the department as a part of completing licensure requirements.

History Note:   Authority N.C. Constitution, Article IX, Sec. 5; G.S. 115C-12(9)a.;
                Eff. July 1, 1986;
                Amended Eff. August 1, 2000; March 1, 1990.




                                                                                                    10
                 NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                               Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Licensure
Policy ID Number: TCP-A-014
Policy Title: 16 NCAC 6C.0305 Policies on licenses for non-teacher education graduates
Current Policy Date: 11/03/2005
Other Historical Information: Previous Board dates: 07/01/1986, 03/01/1990, 01/10/1991,
07/09/1998, 05/06/1999, 08/01/2000
Statutory Reference: GS 115C-12(9)a; NC Constitution, Article IX, Sec. 5
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category: 16 NCAC
6C.0305

Note: Only relevant sections of the policy have been included in this attachment.



.0305 LICENSES FOR NON-TEACHER EDUCATION GRADUATES

(a)    A person who has not graduated from a teacher education program that has been
       approved under Rule .0202 of this Subchapter who later desires to teach shall have
       his/her credentials evaluated by an IHE approved in accordance with these rules or
       regional alternative licensing center (“RALC”). The person shall satisfy the assessment of
       his/her needs and be recommended by the IHE or RALC for a license.
(b)    Persons who have been selected for employment by a LEA under the lateral entry
       provisions of G.S. 115C-296(c) may obtain a license as follows:
       (1)     To be eligible for a lateral entry license, a person shall:
               (A) have attained a bachelor’s degree in the license area from a regionally-
                       accredited IHE;
               (B) be recommended for a lateral entry license by the employing LEA; and
               (C) have had a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least a 2.5, have
                       five years of experience considered relevant by the employing LEA, or
                       have passed the NTE PRAXIS 1 exams (Preprofessional Skills Tests in
                       Reading, Writing, and Mathematics) and have attained one of the
                       following:
                       (i)     a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all work completed in the
                               senior year;
                       (ii)    a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the major; or
                       (iii) a grade point average of at least 3.0 on a minimum of 15 semester
                               hours of coursework completed within the last 5 years.
       (2)     A person who holds a lateral entry license shall complete a program that includes
               the following components:
               (A) Completion of an approved teacher education program in the area of licensure
                        at a college or university or completion of a program of study outlined by
                        the RALC;



                                                                                               11
             (B)      attaining a passing score on the PRAXIS subject exam(s) during the first
                      two school years of holding the lateral entry license if the exam was not
                      the basis of qualifying for the license;
              (C)     completion of a staff development program that includes a two-week
                      training course prior to beginning the work assignment;
              (D)     completion of six semester hours of course work in the approved program
                      each school year;
              (E)     successful completion of at least a three-year initial licensure program in
                      the lateral entry license area; and
              (F)     completion of all the requirements of this subparagraph (2) within 3 years
                      of becoming eligible for a lateral entry license and the recommendation of
                      the IHE or RALC for a non-provisional (clear) license.
      (3)     Individuals who possess five or more years of experience considered relevant by
              the employing LEA and who satisfy testing requirements for the licensure area
              within the first year of teaching shall be issued an initial license upon:
              (A)     completion of the NC TEACH modules or the equivalent through an
                      approved teacher education program: 1) The Teacher, The Learner, and
                      The School; 2) Diversity; 3) Content Area Pedagogy;
                      NOTE: The NC TEACH modules are offered and administered through
                      North Carolina colleges and universities that have approved teacher
                      education preparation programs.
              (B)     completion of the NC TEACH module on Instructional Technology or its
                      equivalent through an approved teacher education program, community
                      college, or through professional development offered by the employing
                      LEA; and
              (C)     completion of one year of successful teaching as verified by the
                      employing LEA.
      (4)     The employing LEA shall commit in writing to:
              (A) provide a two-week pre-work orientation that includes lesson planning,
                     classroom organization, classroom management, and an overview of the
                     ABCs Program including the standard course of study and end-of-grade
                     and end-of-course testing;
              (B) assign the person a mentor on or before the first day on the job;
              (C) provide working conditions that are similar to those for novice teachers;
              (D) give regular focused feedback to the person for improving instruction; and
              (E) assist the person in accessing prescribed course work and professional
                     development opportunities.
(c)   A person who is qualified to hold at least a class "A" teaching license may be issued
      additional areas of licensure on a provisional basis as needed by LEAs. The person must
      satisfy deficiencies for full licensure at the rate of six semester hours per year. The person
      must complete this yearly credit before the beginning of the following school year and
      the credit must be directly applicable to the provisional area(s). The person must
      complete all credit requirements by the end of the fifth year of provisional licensure.
(d)   The Department shall issue an emergency license to persons who hold at least a
      baccalaureate degree but who do not qualify for a lateral entry license. The emergency
      license shall be valid for one year and may not be renewed. When it requests an
      emergency license for a person, the LEA must document that no appropriately licensed
      professionals or persons who are eligible for a lateral entry license are available to accept
      the position.
      (1)     To be eligible for an emergency license, the person must have attained a
              bachelor’s degree from a regionally-accredited IHE and be recommended by the
              employing LEA.
                                                                                                  12
       (2)      A person who holds an emergency license shall complete a program that includes
                the following components:
                 (A) The employing LEA shall commit in writing to:
                         (i)   provide a two-week pre-work orientation that includes lesson
                               planning, classroom organization, classroom management, and an
                               overview of the ABCs Program including the standard course of
                               study and end-of-grade and end-of-course testing;
                         (ii)  assign the person a mentor on or before the first day on the job;
                         (iii) provide working conditions that are similar to those for novice
                               teachers;
                         (iv) give regular focused feedback to the person for improving
                               instruction; and
                         (v)   assist the person in obtaining a teaching license.
                 (B) The person shall complete a staff development program that includes a
                        two-week training course prior to beginning the work assignment.
                 (C) The LEA shall provide the person with on-going support designed to
                        enhance the person’s classroom teaching performance.

History Note:     Authority N.C. Constitution, Article IX, Sec. 5; G.S. 115C-12(9)a.;
                  Eff. July 1, 1986;
                                            Amended Eff. January 2, 2006; August 1, 2000;
March 1, 1990




                                                                                             13
                  NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                Policy Manual
Policy Identification
Priority: Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category: Teacher Education
Policy ID Number: TCP-B-010
Policy Title: Policy Defining Innovative/Experimental Programs for Lateral Entry Teacher
Licensure
Current Policy Date: 08/01/2007
Other Historical Information: Previous Board dates:
Statutory Reference:
Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:


INNOVATIVE/EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAMS FOR LATERAL ENTRY TEACHER
LICENSURE

(a)   An innovative/experimental program for lateral entry teacher licensure is an alternative to
      the regular approved program and involves public schools, the Department of Public
      Instruction, and the NC Professional Teaching Standards Commission in the planning and
      implementation of programs.

(b)   A school system, community college, or college/university shall receive approval by the
      SBE before it implements an alternative program. The Department of Public Instruction
      shall issue a license to all individuals who complete these approved programs who are
      recommended by the school system, community college, or college/university and who
      otherwise meet licensure requirements.

(c)   When the Department of Public Instruction receives a proposal to establish an alternative
      program, it will review the proposal in consultation with the NC Professional Teaching
      Standards Commission, including making on-site visits with agencies as required. The
      State Evaluation Committee on Teacher Education will review the proposal and
      information from the on-site visit and recommend to the SBE whether or not the proposed
      program should be approved.

(d)   The SBE may approve programs which meet the following standards:

      (1) The program is planned, developed, implemented and evaluated by a school system,
          or by a community college/college/university in conjunction with a school system and
          has been reviewed by the State Evaluation Committee on Teacher Education. The
          proposed innovation is sound and has the potential for strengthening the preparation
          process for lateral entry teachers.

      (2) The program is appropriately organized and administered. There is a structure for the
          oversight and management of the program which ensures flexibility and
          accountability.


                                                                                                14
      (3) The program has sufficient and appropriate human, fiscal, and physical resources.

      (4) The program addresses the needs of the students.

      (5) The program includes exit levels of competence, a procedure for recommending
          licensure, and a follow-up process.

      (6) The program has clearly defined measurable expected outcomes/results.

(e)   The SBE will evaluate approved innovative/experimental programs annually based on a
      written report submitted by the school system or IHE and/or by an on-site State visitation
      team to assure that the program is preparing lateral entry teachers who can function
      effectively in the public schools of the State. Based on the annual report, the SBE may
      continue or terminate the innovative/experimental program.




                                                                                               15

								
To top