Science and Technology Studies (STS) by rfb16446

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									                                                                                              TECHNOLOGY STUDIES
                                                                                                 SCIENCE AND
    Science and Technology Studies (STS)
Science and technology are powerful forces in society today and come with a vast and
complicated array of social, legal and ethical issues. A person cannot be considered
well-educated, therefore, nor can they make the best decisions about the future, without
substantial knowledge of what science and technology are and how they both influence
and are influenced by society. Science & Technology Studies (STS) courses give students
in the social sciences and humanities the opportunity to understand and engage in
debates about the impact of science and technology on today's world.

The Goals of a Liberal Education as set out in the St. Thomas calendar include the goal
that students acquire a breadth of knowledge and depth of understanding. The value of
a liberal education includes the ability to participate in the improvement of society by
engaging in reasoned debate over important issues. For thousands of years, the original
Seven Liberal Arts included science and mathematics. Students in the humanities and
social sciences need some meaningful exposure to science and technology. Ideally, this
means not just basic scientific literacy and exposure to basic science courses, but also
exposure to science and technology specifically from the perspectives of the humanities
and social sciences.

Students may obtain a Minor, Major or Honours in Science and Technology Studies
(through Interdisciplinary Studies; see separate Calendar entry). The Minor, Major and
Honours requirements are stated below.

Areas of Concentration
The foundation course in Science and Technology Studies is STS 1003. Science,
Technology and Society I. All other courses in Science and Technology Studies are divided
into four groups, or areas of concentration, which reflect the interdisciplinary nature of
interactions between science, technology and society in today’s world. The four areas of
concentration are:

Area 1. Historical/Sociological:
STS 2243. Science & Technology in World History: Prehistory to 1543
STS 2253. Science & Technology in World History: 1543 to present
STS 2503. History of Disease
STS 2703. History of the Life Sciences
STS 3063. Historical Perspectives on Science & Religion
STS 3533. Science & Scientific Knowledge (SOCI)

Area 2. Philosophical/Ethical:
STS 2603. Animals: Rights, Consciousness & Experimentation
STS 3163. Contemporary Perspectives on Science & Religion
STS 3203. Science, Technology and Nature
STS 3503. Feminist Critiques of Science
STS 3563. Philosophy of Science (PHIL)


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      Area 3. Legal/Political:
      STS 2103. Science, Technology & Society II
      STS 2303. Natural Disasters
      STS 2803. Controversies in the Earth & Environmental Sciences
      STS 2903. The Politics of Science
      STS 3803. Space Exploration

      Area 4. Scientific/Mathematical:
      MATH 1013. Introduction to Calculus I
      MATH 1023. Introduction to Calculus II
      MATH 1033. Finite Mathematics for the Social Sciences
      MATH 1103. Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning
      MATH 2513. Introduction to Logic (PHIL)
      MATH 3813. Introduction to Logic II (PHIL)
      STS/BIOL 1503. Principles of Biology I
      STS/BIOL 1513. Principles of Biology II
      STS/CHEM 1613. Everyday Chemistry
      STS/GEOL 1713. Science, Technology & the Earth
      STS 3003. Scientific Reasoning

      Honours in Science and Technology Studies
      The Honours in Science and Technology Studies is completed under Interdisciplinary
      Studies (see separate Calendar entry). 57 credit hours are required for an Honours in
      Science and Technology Studies. The 57 credit hours must include:

      (i) The following courses:
      STS 1003. Science, Technology and Society I
      Either STS 2243. Science & Technology in World History: From Pre-history to 1543 or
      STS 2253. Science & Technology in World History: From 1543 to the Present
      STS 3003. Scientific Reasoning
      STS 4006. Honours Thesis

      (ii) The remaining courses must include 6 credit hours in either Methods or Theory.

      Major in Science and Technology Studies
      The Major in Science and Technology Studies is completed under Interdisciplinary Studies
      (see separate Calendar entry). 36 credit hours are required for a Major in Science and
      Technology Studies. These must include:

      (i) The following three courses:
      STS 1003. Science, Technology and Society I
      Either STS 2243. Science & Technology in World History: From Pre-history to 1543 or
      STS 2253. Science & Technology in World History: From 1543 to the Present
      STS 3003. Scientific Reasoning




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(ii) Six credit hours from:
MATH 1013. Introduction to Calculus I
MATH 1023. Introduction to Calculus II
MATH 1033. Finite Mathematics for the Social Sciences
MATH 1103. Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning
STS/BIOL 1503. Principles of Biology I
STS/BIOL 1513. Principles of Biology II
STS/GEOL 1713. Science, Technology and the Earth
or any other courses in Science or Mathematics.

(iii) The remaining 21 credit hours must include at least 6 credit hours from each of three
    of the four areas of concentration listed above.

Minor in Science and Technology Studies
The Minor in Science and Technology Studies is completed under Interdisciplinary Studies
(see separate Calendar entry). 18 credit hours are required for a Minor in Science and
Technology Studies. These must include:

(i) STS 1003. Science, Technology and Society I
(ii) At least 6 credit hours in STS courses at the 1000-2000 and 9 credit hours in STS
    courses at the 2000-4000 level.

Programme Approval
All students contemplating either a Major or an Honours in Science and Technology
Studies must obtain the approval of the Programme Director for their proposed course of
studies before the end of their second year. Any and all subsequent changes to their
course of studies must also have the approval of the Programme Director.

Course Offerings
STS-1003. Science, Technology and Society I
Science and technology are powerful forces in society today and come with a vast and compli-
cated array of social and ethical issues. In order to make the best decisions about the future, it
is important to have some understanding of what science and technology are and how they
both influence and are influenced by society, and also to engage in thoughtful analysis of the
issues that arise for science and technology. These goals will be achieved by focusing on scien-
tific and technological developments in two main areas: health and medicine, and the natural
environment.

I. Historical and Sociological
STS-2243. Science and Technology in World History: From Pre-History to 1543
Examines the transformation of civilizations around the world by technologies such as stone
tools, catapults, hydraulic engineering, metallurgy, and gunpowder. Also examines the growth
of the abstract, theoretical sciences of astronomy, mathematics, and medicine in various regions
including China, the Americas, Egypt and Greece. Aims to understand the social, political,
economic, and religious consequences of science and technology from the Paleolithic Era to the
mid-16th century.




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      STS-2253. Science and Technology in World History: From 1543 to the Present
      Examines the transformation of civilizations around the world by technologies such as steam
      engines, electricity, airplanes, and nuclear bombs. Also examines the development and impact
      of new scientific theories of universal gravitation, evolution, genetics, and bio-engineering. Aims
      to understand the social, political, economic, and religious consequences of science and tech-
      nology from the mid-16th century to the present.

      STS-2503. History of Disease
      This course studies the impact of disease outbreaks on human populations and on economic,
      social, intellectual, religious, and political aspects of life from ancient times to the present.

      STS-2703. History of Life Sciences
      This course examines the historical background and development of the life sciences from the
      ancient Greek world to the present. Particular attention will be focused on the fields of biology,
      ecology, medicine and genetics.

      STS-3063. Historical Perspectives on Science and Religion
      Examines the complex interactions between Western science and the Judeo-Christian religious
      tradition. Primary focus is on their historical relations in ancient, medieval and early modern
      thought to reveal how variable and complex these interactions have been, characterized at dif-
      ferent times by conflict, cooperation, separation, understanding, misunderstanding, dialogue,
      and alienation. Prerequisite: STS 2243.

      STS-3503. Feminist Critiques of Science
      This course is an introduction to the feminist literature on science, technology, and mathemat-
      ics. Topics will include the possibility that a new science based on feminist principles might be
      qualitatively different from modern science. Related topics include the role played by values in
      science, the relation between pure scientific research and technology (especially military tech-
      nology), the possibility that there might be a feminist alternative to classical mathematics and
      logic, and whether young women and men with feminist beliefs should be encouraged to
      become scientists (given the close connection between science and military technology).
      Readings will represent a range of different feminist perspectives on each of these questions,
      and we will examine the arguments for and against each of these views. Prerequisite: at least 9
      credit hours in STS or permission of the instructor.

      STS-3533. Science and Scientific Knowledge
      This course examines the study of science and scientific knowledge from a sociological perspec-
      tive. It focuses on the effort of the Edinburgh School to provide a materialist resolution to the
      debate between positivist and relativist epistemologies.

      II. Philosophical and Ethical
      STS-2103. Science, Technology and Society II
      This course is designed to introduce students to social and environmental problems raised by
      science and technology. Specific topics may vary from section to section. Past topics have
      included the genetic basis for human intelligence, new reproductive technologies, and the poli-
      tics of fisheries science. The aim of this course is to prepare students to enter into debate over
      key issues by introducing them to scientific research, technology, legal, and political issues
      arising from them. Prerequisite: STS 1003.

      STS-2603. Animals: Rights, Consciousness, and Experimentation
      This course is an introduction to the scientific, legal, philosophical, and political debates over
      animal rights, animal consciousness, and animal experimentation.



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STS-3163. Contemporary Perspectives on Science and Religion
This course examines the recent debates over the relation between science and religion. A
resurgence of interest in these debates has been sparked by developments in the sciences,
particularly in physics and genetics, as well as by a newly-emerging understanding of what
science is. The central questions include whether science and religion are compatible and
whether recent developments in the sciences give new answers to religious and theological
questions. Readings will represent all sides of these debates. Prerequisite: STS 2253.

STS-3563. Philosophy of Science (PHIL)
This course will examine science from the perspective of philosophy. Topics will include the his-
torical relation between science and philosophy, the differences between the social and the
physical sciences, the nature of scientific change in history, the role of values in science, the
reality of 'theoretical' objects of science, and feminist alternatives to traditional scientific
research. Examples will be drawn from both the physical and the social sciences. Prerequisite:
at least 9 credit hours in STS or permission of the instructor.

III. Legal and Political
STS-2303. Natural Disasters
This course focuses on various forms of natural disaster that affect human populations. The sci-
ence of the physical processes involved will be addressed and the human impact of the
processes will be illustrated with case studies. Disaster preparedness at various local scales for
various types of natural phenomena will also be discussed. Lectures will be accompanied by
group activities and a group presentation of a chosen case study.

STS-2803. Controversies in the Earth and Environmental Sciences
The Earth is affected by human activities which may be motivated by financial benefit, societal
needs, or political goals. This course serves to introduce some of the more controversial issues
that face the environment. The topics will vary according to class interests, but could include:
the banning of DDT, mining space resources, nuclear energy and wastes, disputed water
resources, population control measures, exploiting resources in wildlife refuges, and the value
of space exploration. Traditional lectures will be accompanied by student group presentations
and debates on both sides of each chosen issue. Basic research training will be developed.

STS-2903. The Politics of Science
This course introduces students to the many ways in which science interacts with political inter-
ests. This includes the ways in which political considerations from outside of science and elect-
ed officials influence the development of science. It also includes the ways in which political
interests from within science itself control the development of science and how scientific con-
cerns often guide the development of public policies made by politicians.

  .
IV Scientific and Mathematical
STS-1503. Principles of Biology I (BIOL)
This course introduces students to the study of life. Topics include the scientific method, biolog-
ical molecules, cell structure and function, energy flow, respiration, and photosynthesis.

STS-1513. Principles of Biology II (BIOL)
This course examines mitosis, meiosis, and genetics. Surveys the structure, function, and evolu-
tion of the kingdoms of life. Discusses the basics of ecology, culminating in ecological interac-
tions and the impact of humans on the planet.

STS-1613. Everyday Chemistry
Introduces students to chemistry through the examination of the various roles that chemical
elements and reactions play in our everyday lives. Topics could include the role of oxygen in

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      combustion and the growth of living organisms, the formation of water molecules, and the role
      of carbon-based and organic molecules in fuels, food, and everyday objects.

      STS-1713. Science, Technology and the Earth (GEOL)
      The course introduces various elements of basic science using the Earth as its laboratory. Earth
      Science is well suited for this purpose. Topics are varied and include: the origin of the Earth;
      gravity, density and seismic waves and what they can tell us about the Earth; physical properties
      of minerals and what they can tell us about atomic structure; energy sources; water resources;
      wastes; life in the context of creationism and evolution. Lectures are augmented by online and
      hands-on exercises and a self-lead fieldtrip.

      STS-3003. Scientific Reasoning
      This course provides students with the tools needed to pursue research in Science and
      Technology Studies. The course will typically cover the basic elements of a traditional conceptu-
      al framework used by scientists to describe their work, including the concepts of prediction,
      testing, theoretical models, and scientific change over time, as well as the basic elements of
      alternative theoretical frameworks. Some mathematical content. Prerequisite: at least 9 credit
      hours in STS or permission of the instructor. 3 credit hours.

      STS-3203. Science, Technology and Nature
      Examines the historical connections between society and nature by studying how science and
      technology, from the time of the ancient Mesopotamians to the present, have influenced how
      the natural world has been both perceived and used. Topics include: transition from sacred to
      secular views of nature, medieval technologies and land-use, artistic representations of nature,
      the scientific revolution and the utility of nature, the 17th-century mechanical philosophy of
      nature, the 18th-century Romantic culture of nature, impact of industrialization.

      STS-3803. Space Exploration
      This course presents a historical review of the exploration of space, discusses the
      benefits/problems associated with exploration, as well assessing how space exploration has
      changed society. The challenges that need to be overcome to continue exploration will be
      probed, and an introduction to the past and future technologies that have been/could be used
      to explore space are introduced. Controversial issues regarding terra-forming other planets,
      extracting resources from planets, asteroids or the moon, and the jurisdiction over these bodies
      are explored. The course is delivered predominantly via lecture, with some Socratic debates,
      student presentations, and self-directed research projects.

       .
      V Honours and Independent Studies
      STS-4006. Honours Thesis
      Students in their fourth year of the Honours programme in Science and Technology Studies will
      register for this course and receive credit for it upon successful completion of their Honours
      thesis.

      STS-4103. Independent Study
      Special courses in topics not normally covered in regular course offerings in Science and
      Technology Studies. Students work closely with a faculty member on a project involving inde-
      pendent research. Approval must be given by the by Director.




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Science Courses
   St. Thomas offers courses in the Sciences. These courses can be taken either as science
  courses or as courses in Science and Technology Studies. Students ought to note that these
  courses are not deemed to be suitable prerequisites for upper level science courses at UNB.

BIOL-1503. Principles of Biology I
This course introduces students to the study of life. Topics include the scientific method, biolog-
ical molecules, cell structure and function, energy flow, respiration, and photosynthesis.

BIOL-1513. Principles of Biology II
This course examines mitosis, meiosis, and genetics. Surveys the structure, function, and
evolution of the kingdoms of life. Discusses the basics of ecology, culminating in ecological
interactions and the impact of humans on the planet.

STS-1613. Everyday Chemistry (CHEM)
Introduces students to chemistry through the examination of the various roles that chemical
elements and reactions play in our everyday lives. Topics could include the role of oxygen in
combustion and the growth of living organisms, the formation of water molecules, and the role
of carbon-based and organic molecules in fuels, food, and everyday objects.

GEOL-1713. Science, Technology and the Earth
The course introduces various elements of basic science using the Earth as its laboratory. Earth
Science is well suited for this purpose. Topics are varied and include: the origin of the Earth;
gravity, density and seismic waves and what they can tell us about the Earth; physical proper-
ties of minerals and what they can tell us about atomic structure; energy sources; water
resources; wastes; life in the context of creationism and evolution. Lectures are augmented by
online and hands-on exercises and a self-lead field trip.

Students considering entering a B.Ed. programme after graduation should register for dual-
listed STS/Science courses using the science course code (e.g., BIOL1503/GEOL1713) so that it
can be considered for ‘teachable’ credit.

In addition to the courses listed immediately above, students may use any courses in the
Sciences to count toward the Minor, Major and Honours in Science and Technology Studies.
Students may apply more than one methods course toward their Major or Honours only with
the approval of the Programme Director.


Courses at the University of New Brunswick
The University of New Brunswick offers a number of courses in the Sciences and courses that
fall under the description of Science and Technology Studies but are offered by departments
such as history and sociology. St. Thomas students who wish to register for any of the courses
described immediately above may do so only with the approval of the Director of Science and
Technology Studies and the approval of the Registrar’s Office.


        NOTE: Not all courses listed are offered each year. Please consult with the
        Director for more information about current and planned course offerings.




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