Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan by iqm86975

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									             Commercial Market Analysis
                 and Action Plan



                Downtown Grimsby
                                      April 2008




                                                   DRAFT
                                                     April 2009


                         URBAN MARKETING COLLABORATIVE a division of J.C. Williams Group
17 DUNDONALD STREET, 3RD FLOOR, TORONTO, ONTARIO M4Y 1K3. TEL: (416) 929-7690 FAX: (416) 921-4184 e-mail: umc@jcwg.com
          350 WEST HUBBARD STREET, SUITE 240, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60654. TEL: (312) 673-1254 FAX: (312) 822-9162
                                                         Commercial Market Analysis
                                                         and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

                  
      Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1 
      1.0  Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 


      COMMERCIAL MARKET ANALYSIS
      2.0  Fact-finding and Analysis..................................................................................................................................................................................10 
      3.0  Key Person Interviews......................................................................................................................................................................................49 
      4.0  Retail/Commercial Audit ................................................................................................................................................................................ 58 
      5.0  Retail Potential ....................................................................................................................................................................................................61 
      6.0  Strenths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) ...................................................................................................................64 


      ACTION PLAN
      7.0  Downtown Grimsby Commercial Realities, Niche, Vision, and Principles .......................................................................................... 67 
      8.0  Strategy ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 74 


      Appendices .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 131
      Appendix A Consumer Survey Results 
      Appendix B Retail Demand Calculations 
      Appendix C Management Agreement 
      Appendix D Downtown Resident Relations 




                         URBAN MARKETING COLLABORATIVE a division of J.C. Williams Group
17 DUNDONALD STREET, 3RD FLOOR, TORONTO, ONTARIO M4Y 1K3. TEL: (416) 929-7690 FAX: (416) 921-4184 e-mail: umc@jcwg.com
          350 WEST HUBBARD STREET, SUITE 240, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60654. TEL: (312) 673-1254 FAX: (312) 822-9162
                                                     Executive Summary
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

UMC has been contracted by the Town of Grimsby to develop a comprehensive commercial
strategy with an emphasis on the Downtown area. The work conducted to date includes key
person interviews, retail audits, consumer surveys, workshops, and a review of businesses and
physical conditions.

Based on the fact finding the following are the key findings:


Strengths

Key strengths of Downtown Grimsby include:
> Consumer
   - Growing residential in Grimsby and surrounding areas – need to ensure Downtown
       Grimsby retailers participate in the growth.
   - Higher than average household income – while households have higher incomes they
       recognize quality and do not want to be taken advantage of. Tend to expend a higher
       proportion of resources on entertainment.
   - Small groups of loyal customers – true Grimsby shoppers to build upon for successful
       retail strategies.
> Business Climate
   - Some businesses are successful.
   - Close proximity to major markets of Hamilton and St. Catharines.
   - Good mix of retail, convenience, and food services but heavy in services.
   - Good service levels.
   - Good brand identity
> Environment
   - Attractive retail setting nestled by the escarpment.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   1           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                  Executive Summary
Weaknesses

There are a number of issues that require improvements with respect to Grimsby’s commercial
development. These include:
> Consumer
   - Can be polarized in terms of age and income, length of residency, etc. – need to find
       common denominator to appeal to a broader selection of the trade area (e.g.
       contemporary attitudes).
   - Younger consumer and those who have been in Grimsby for a shorter period of time
       tend to be less loyal Grimsby shoppers.
> Business Climate
   - Large Downtown including main street and plazas – have to address each issue.
   - Competition for convenience shopping and destination shopping. Other areas are closer
       for convenience (e.g., Real Canadian Superstore, Costco, etc.) and other towns are more
       appealing to the contemporary, sophisticated visitors (e.g., Jordan, NOTL, Dundas,
       Burlington, etc.).
   - DIA just beginning to develop retail programs.
> Community
   - Lack of coordination and cohesiveness among businesses and organizations.


Opportunities

Opportunities for Grimsby include the following points:
> Overall Strategy
  - Make a commitment to being the friendliest and most service oriented shopping area.
  - Build upon the convenience aspects of Downtown.
  - Enhance culture/entertainment as a strategy to guide the Downtown strategy.
  - Increased roles and responsibilities for DIA.
  - Look to increase residential in Downtown – intensification.
  - Create mixed-use developments west and east of Downtown core.
> Tactics
  - Go after strengths – concentrate on the core customers for increased expenditure rather
      than pursuing new customers (this includes Grimsby residents and those in the Primary
      Trade Area).


Threats

Reported and observed threats to Grimsby include:
> Further development at Casablanca Road and the QEW.



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                                                     Executive Summary
Action Items

Immediate
 Organization                                                        Responsibility
 Establish a committee and develop business case for DIA             Grimsby DIA
 budget increases and allocation including the need for
 permanent staff and a maintenance memorandum of
 understanding
 Programs for Enjoyable Shopping                                     Responsibility
 Ensure urban design guidelines, landscaping plan, and CIP           Town, Region, and Grimsby
 work towards enhancing linkages between activity centres            DIA
 and retailers
 Town, Region, and DIA are to determine who is responsible           Town, Region, and Grimsby
 for each program (e.g., should the DIA assume responsibility        DIA
 for Downtown maintenance? etc.) and draw up agreements


Short Term
 Organization                                                          Responsibility
 DIA to canvas for support and increase communication both             Grimsby DIA
 internally and externally
 Develop a full set of communication tools depending on                Grimsby DIA
 budgets and resource time
 Evaluate DIA committees ensuring that the following are               Grimsby DIA
 included: executive, beautification, maintenance (clean and
 safe) and urban design, events, marketing, retention and
 recruitment, and parking
 Commit to staff training and learning with respect to                 Grimsby DIA
 facilitation, board management, real estate, marketing, retail
 recruitment, etc. of DIA staff
 Develop roles, responsibilities, and organizational needs of          Grimsby DIA, Town,
 supporting and partnership groups for the implementation of           Region, other stakeholders
 the action plan (Town, Region, Chamber of Commerce, library,
 houses of worship, farmers’ market, wineries, tourism, etc.)




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                                                      Executive Summary
 Commercial Development                                           Responsibility
 Hold regular meetings (two-to-three times a year) with           Grimsby DIA
 stakeholders on the status of the commercial environment
 and upcoming changes (e.g., urban design, CIP, bylaws,
 new commercial developments, and other changes) with
 learning as a key component.
 Commit to a program of fostering learning for merchants          Grimsby DIA
 and property owners through education, seminars, sharing
 demographic information, and increased networking.


 Develop a committee of property owners, brokers, and             Grimsby DIA
 developers
 Use the existing database as a starting point to profile each    Grimsby DIA, property
 business.                                                        owners, property managers,
                                                                  businesses
 Marketing                                                        Responsibility
 Review all special events with an aim of creating a link         Grimsby DIA
 between retail sales activity and the event.
 Develop a full calendar of events both large and small and       Grimsby DIA and partners
 determine whether they should be DIA lead, DIA
 supported, or encouraged. If lead or supported, determine
 the level of involvement by the DIA.
 Programs for Enjoyable Shopping                                  Responsibility
 Develop partnerships to bring plan into action                   Town, Region, and Grimsby
                                                                  DIA




Urban Marketing Collaborative                     4          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                   Executive Summary
Medium Term
 Organization                                                    Responsibility
 Search other funding sources such as LCBO, corporations,        Grimsby DIA, Town
 etc.
 Commercial Development                                          Responsibility
 Develop a simple retail recruitment package on why a            Grimsby DIA
 business should locate in Downtown Grimsby. When a
 property becomes vacant, Downtown Grimsby will be able
 to react immediately with a list of prospective tenants to
 call upon to market the property successfully.


 Programs for Enjoyable Shopping                                 Responsibility
 Review zoning bylaws and regulations on an as needed            Grimsby DIA, Town, Region
 basis.
 Marketing                                                       Responsibility
 Work on developing a hospitality program.                       Grimsby DIA and hospitality
                                                                 organizations
 Continue to develop relations with neighbourhood groups.        Grimsby DIA and
                                                                 neighbourhood organizations




Urban Marketing Collaborative                 5             Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                        Introduction
1.0       INTRODUCTION

The consulting firm Urban Marketing Collaborative (UMC) was retained by the Grimsby
Downtown Improvement Area (DIA), the Town of Grimsby, the Grimsby Chamber of
Commerce, and the Niagara Regional Municipality to undertake a retail commercial market
assessment and Action Plan as part of a larger Community Improvement Plan (CIP) being
conducted for the Downtown. This work is sponsored as part of both the DIA’s and the Town’s
sustained effort to improve upon Grimsby’s vital retail commercial centre.

The purpose of this final report is to develop a comprehensive retail commercial market
strategy for the Downtown. This report, the market analysis and the action plan contains
information related to the development of retail in Grimsby and the strategy elements required
to put the recommendations into action.

Much of the information contained in this report is the result of primary research conducted by
UMC consultants, the DIA and by the Town of Grimsby. UMC thanks all those involved for
their participation and input into this process.




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                                                                       Introduction
1.1       Background and Project Insight

The CIP study boundaries and the Downtown Grimsby retail commercial study boundaries are
slightly different. For this study, the Downtown Grimsby study area is similar to the DIA
boundaries. This includes the retail commercial properties primarily located along Main Street
and Livingston Avenue. The boundaries are the rail lands to the north, the escarpment to the
south, Kerman Avenue to the west, and Maple Avenue to the east.

Downtown Grimsby and DIA Boundaries




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  7          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
Commercial Market Analysis
Grimsby
                                    Commercial Market Analysis
Report Format

As a first step to develop a Retail Development Strategy and Action Plan, UMC conducted fact-
finding initiatives as part of the Market Analysis to identify the retail area’s strengths,
weaknesses, opportunities and threats. These initiatives included:


Customer Profile
>    Trade area delineation;
>    Demographic analysis of Downtown Grimsby’s trade areas;
>    Trade area consumer survey; and
>    Resident workshop (to be conducted).


Retailer/Supply Side Profile
>    Interviews with a variety of retailers, property owners, businesses and key Downtown
     stakeholders to identify issues and opinions about retail commercial success in the area;
>    Inventory and inspection of businesses and services; and
>    Review of the physical environment.


Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT)
>    Summary of key findings and the implications for retail commercial businesses.

The following report summarizes the findings of these activities and provides background
information from which the following Retail Commercial Action Plan wwas developed.




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                                      Commercial Market Analysis
2.0       FACT-FINDING AND ANALYSIS

Both the fact-finding and the analysis step are vital to the development of a customized and
comprehensive Action Plan. This section of the report provides general demographic and
consumer profile data of the target markets for Downtown Grimsby retailers.


2.1       Downtown Grimsby Trade Area Delineation

Trade area delineation is a fundamental part of any market analysis. This section of the report
delineates trade areas for Downtown Grimsby retailers based on location factors of the site, the
natural and man-made barriers, the direct competitive retail environment, the travel time
distance, and the license plate survey.


Factors Influencing the Trade Area Delineation
A trade area is considered to be the geographic region from which a majority of the retail sales
originate. The remaining sales are in-flow, or sales derived from areas outside of the delineated
trade area. The boundaries of a trade area are influenced by the following factors:
> The size and type of the existing commercial environment;
> Accessibility and visibility;
> Travel time features;
> Relative location and strength of competitive retail facilities; and
> Natural and man-made barriers.

While each of these factors in isolation has a bearing on the trade area boundaries, the
culmination of these factors defines a trade area. The importance of each of these factors was
considered for the trade area boundaries. For Downtown Grimsby, the trade area delineations
relates to whether a business is more destination oriented and thus draws from the secondary
trade area or more convenience based and thereby is primarily dependent upon the Town of
Grimsby or the Primary Trade Area.

The size and type of the existing commercial environment: a historic commercial district that
includes a neighbourhood community function and a destination retail function as well as
neighbourhood plazas on the west and east sides of the Main Street.

Retail is primarily found along Main Street and Livingston Avenue in a relatively long, broad
path that extends over 4,000 feet. Main Street’s historical core, however, is shorter, extending
less than 650 feet. Accordingly, the entire length of Downtown Grimsby is too large for a visitor
to walk the entire length.




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                                 Commercial Market Analysis
The historic Downtown Grimsby core exhibits attributes that are commonly associated with
traditional small towns, and is quite walkable. For instance, buildings reflect retail growth from
past years as there is a mix of building styles reflective of the Town’s progression.

In total, there is a sizeable retail area similar in size to a medium sized mall (approximately
368,000 sq. ft.). The retail mix has ample convenience related merchandise (i.e., grocers, drug
stores, etc.) as well as a high proportion of personal and professional services. The plazas on
each end are primarily vehicular, dependent and geared to convenience and comparison-
shopping.



Accessibility and Visibility: Good
Downtown Grimsby is located along the major thorough fare through the Town and funnels
west/east traffic flows: it is the central convergence point for vehicular traffic from all
directions. This high accessibility and visibility is good for retailers but it can lead to traffic
problems. Specifically, slow moving traffic can harm retailers as congested traffic compromises
people’s ability to shop.

The Downtown is also well positioned, as it is adjacent to Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), mid-
way between Hamilton and St. Catharines. It is also in an attractive setting, nestled beside the
Beamer Falls/Forty Mile Creek area.

In addition, future rail links including a GO service will make Grimsby more residentially
appealing.

Travel Time Features: Good
Most roads into and around Grimsby provide reasonably good access. Downtown Grimsby is
directly accessible to a primary trade area of over 67,000 residents. As stated, slow vehicular
traffic can be a cause for concern for retailers. Furthermore, sidewalk widths are not excessive
but were not noted as a detriment to business activity.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                    11          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Relative Location and Strength of Competitive Retail Facilities: Very Competitive
As noted, Grimsby lies midway between two large commercial centres – Hamilton and St.
Catharines. In addition, many residents commute to Toronto and other GTA communities on a
regular basis for work – this provides a competitive set of retailers for Downtown Grimsby.

However, Grimsby is the largest community for the trade area between Hamilton and St.
Catharines, and attracts visitors for convenience shopping. This secondary trade area has
approximately 125,000 residents.



Natural and Man-made Barriers
There are a number of natural and man-made barriers affecting the trade area of the study area:
> QEW and rail lands; and
> Niagara Escarpment.


License Plate Survey
During December 2008 and January 2009, 662 license plates were recorded in Downtown
Grismby. The surveys were conducted at different times of the week including weekdays and
weekends at different parking locations throughout the Downtown area. This included plaza
parking lots, Main Street parking, and the north and south parking lots.

The following two maps illustrate the locations of the Dissemination Areas (DA) for the license
plates. The DA references assist in determining where each vehicle home registration is. No
license plate was repeated. UMC also understands the limitations of this survey as it was
conducted primarily in January, which is one of the slowest retail months of the year. In
addition, the driver of the vehicle may not reside at the license plate address due to a number of
reasons such as driving a family/friend vehicle or, by virtue of the fact that they may have
moved recently and not updated their home address.




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                                Commercial Market Analysis
Downtown Grimsby License Plate Survey – Zoomed Out




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                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Downtown Grimsby License Plate Survey – Zoomed In




The size of the pie charts relate to the number of license plates that come from a specific DA. In
addition, the graphical colour distributions indicate where the vehicle was found. It is
interesting to note that Northern Grimsby residents tend to prefer the north parking lot and
Southern Grimsby residents tend to prefer the south parking lot. This is also true of west and
east end residents. Another salient finding was that residents who live further away can be
found in the west end parking lots primarily due to the larger format retailers located there
(e.g., Food Basics, Sobey’s, Canadian Tire, Shoppers Drug Mart, etc.).




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                                Commercial Market Analysis
Trade Area Boundaries
Based on the analysis from the previous section, trade areas and benchmarks have been
developed for Downtown Grimsby:
> Primary Trade Area – Lake Ontario to the north, Sixteen Road to the south, Fruitland
   Road/Woodburn Road to the west, and Highway 24/Victoria Avenue to the east;
> Secondary Trade Area – Lake Ontario to the north, Highway 65 and Highway 20 to the
   south, Centennial Parkway to the west, and 11th Street approximately in Jordan to the east;
> DIA Boundary – rail lands to the north, escarpment to the south, Kerman Avenue to the
   west, and Maple Avenue to the east; and
> Town of Grimsby (Grimsby CSD).

In addition, a portion of the sales of Downtown Grimsby businesses originates from outside of
the delineated trade areas. This represents “in-flow” from other areas outside the designated
trade area (e.g. Hamilton, Burlington, and St. Catharines).




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  15          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
Downtown Grimsby Trade Areas




Urban Marketing Collaborative         16   Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                        Commercial Market Analysis
2.2       Trade Area Population Characteristics

An analysis of the demographic composition of local neighbourhood area residents and
Grimsby residents provides the most accurate description of the target markets that will be
generating the demand for business products and services in the Primary Trade Area. The
following analysis is based upon the preceding trade area analysis.


Residents
The Primary Trade Area is home to an estimated 67,099 residents. It has enjoyed a high-
annualized growth rate of 3.5% over the past five years. The Town of Grimsby has also
experienced high growth rates of 3.26%, with its current estimated population of 27,182. The
Secondary Trade Area has an estimated 124,188 residents, which has increased annually by
2.1%. The Downtown area of Grimsby is home to 1,890 residents and has seen a slight decrease
of -0.3% in its population growth. It is noted that the Town of Grimsby is reaching its
maximum growth build-out and will now start to look to intensification to satisfy growing
residential demand. The fast paced growth of the Town within the past decade has exceeded
population forecasts.

Household growth is faster than population growth in all of the trade areas, reflecting an
overall shift in household size as larger families are replaced with singles and smaller families.

There is no significant difference in gender among the trade areas.

                                               Primary       Secondary           Grimsby
                                                                                                     Grimsby
                                              Trade Area     Trade Area         Downtown
Population 2009                                  67,099       124,188                1,890             27,182
           Annualized Growth                          3.5%       2.1%                -0.3%               3.3%
Households 2009                                  23,938        45,259                  878              9,968
           Annualized Growth                          4.1%       2.8%                 0.3%               3.7%
Gender
Male                                             50.0%          50.0%               49.3%              49.5%
Female                                           50.0%          50.0%               50.7%              50.5%

Source: Statistics Canada, Environics




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                                        Commercial Market Analysis
Age Profile
The Primary Trade Area reflects a high proportion of younger children (under fourteen years)
and a high proportion of senior residents (over sixty-five years of age). A similar polarization is
noted in the other three trade areas as well. This polarization in any one trade area makes it
difficult to market to two distinctly different demographics.

The median age of the Primary Trade Area is 39.5. The Primary Trade Area, Secondary Trade
Area and the Town of Grimsby share similar age characteristics, while Downtown Grimsby is
home to a slightly older crowd.

                                               Primary      Secondary           Grimsby
Age                                                                                                 Grimsby
                                              Trade Area    Trade Area         Downtown
< 14                                            17.9%          16.6%              12.5%               16.6%
15 to 19                                         7.1%           6.9%               7.0%                 7.0%
20 to 24                                         6.7%           6.9%               7.5%                 7.1%
25 to 34                                        11.8%          12.3%              11.6%               11.0%
35 to 44                                        14.6%          13.9%              12.1%               14.4%
45 to 54                                        15.3%          15.7%              15.0%               15.8%
55 to 64                                        12.1%          12.8%              15.3%               12.8%
65+                                             21.7%          22.6%              27.5%               23.2%
Median Age                                        39.5           40.5               44.4                 40.9
Source: Statistics Canada, Environics




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                                          Commercial Market Analysis
As stated, the Town of Grimsby has witnessed significant population growth. A further
analysis of those age groups that grew more than others is highlighted in the following chart.
There were significant increases in the 15 to 24 year age range (most notably in the 20 to 24 year
olds) as well as older adults in the 25 to 64 year age range.

                                Town of Grimsby Absolute Age Change 2001 to 2009
  2,500




  2,000




   1,500




   1,000




    500




      0
                    0 to 14             15 to 24        25 to 44             45 to 64                   65+




Urban Marketing Collaborative                          19          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
A further examination of age within the trade areas is revealed in the median age map. Higher
median ages are observed east of Downtown (where there are a number of senior care facilities)
and younger median ages are observed west of Downtown (where a number of new
developments have been built).

Trade Area Median Age




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                                        Commercial Market Analysis
Household Status and Size
There are a high percentage of home-owners in the Primary and Secondary Trade Areas,
compared to Downtown Grimsby.

Despite the trend towards smaller family sizes, as indicated by the household growth compared
to the population growth, both the Primary and Secondary Trade Areas still have relatively
large, average household sizes. The average household size is 2.70 people per household. In
comparison, Downtown Grimsby is home to smaller families of 2.24 people per household.
There are a higher proportion of older, single seniors in Downtown Grimsby.

                                              Primary      Secondary           Grimsby
Housing Status                                                                                     Grimsby
                                             Trade Area    Trade Area         Downtown
Own                                             88.4%         81.4%              67.7%               89.0%
Rent                                            11.6%         18.6%              32.3%               11.0%

Source: Statistics Canada, Environics


                                              Primary      Secondary           Grimsby
Household Size                                                                                     Grimsby
                                             Trade Area    Trade Area         Downtown
1                                               17.5%         19.5%              34.1%               18.6%
2                                               35.0%         34.0%              35.8%               36.3%
3                                               17.0%         16.9%              12.2%               16.3%
4 to 5                                          26.9%         25.9%              16.3%               26.2%
6+                                                  3.6%       3.8%               1.7%                 2.7%
Persons Per Household                               2.74        2.70               2.24                 2.67
Source: Statistics Canada, Environics


Over half of residents in all trade areas are married or in common-law relationships, with a
higher proportion noted in the Primary and Secondary Trade Areas. Downtown Grimsby has
the highest percentage of separated, divorced or widowed residents which link back to its high
percentage of smaller households.




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                                           Commercial Market Analysis
                                                            Primary            Secondary           Grimsby
Marital Status
                                                           Trade Area          Trade Area         Downtown             Grimsby
Single                                                         18.7%              20.4%              20.7%               18.8%
Married, Common-law                                            66.6%              64.3%              57.8%               66.0%
Separated, Divorced, Widowed                                   14.7%              15.3%              21.5%               15.2%

Source: Statistics Canada, Environics; Based on population >15 years of age;



Education, Occupation, and Household Income
While the majority of residents in all trade areas are primarily high school or college graduates,
it is noted that the Town of Grimsby has the highest percentages of university-educated
residents compared with the Primary and Secondary Trade Areas.

                                                           Primary             Secondary          Grimsby
Education                                                                                                             Grimsby
                                                          Trade Area           Trade Area        Downtown
Less than High school                                         21.2%              23.4%               23.1%              17.7%
High school Graduate                                          28.2%              28.4%               29.5%              28.5%
Technical or College Degree, Cert.                            35.9%              34.8%               31.2%              36.6%
University                                                    14.8%              13.4%               16.1%              17.3%

Source: Statistics Canada, Environics; Based on population >15 years of age;


The top three occupations in all four trade areas are: Sales/Services, Trades/Transport and
Finance/Insurance/Administration. Downtown Grimsby employs almost ten percent more of
its population in the Sales/Services sector compared to the other trade areas.

The Primary Trade Area has a slightly larger workforce in the Art/Culture/ and Recreation/
Sport sector, as well as a smaller workforce in the Natural and Applied Science sector compared
with Downtown Grimsby. However, this is only a small segment of the working population.




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                                           Commercial Market Analysis
                                                           Primary             Secondary           Grimsby
Occupation                                                                                                             Grimsby
                                                          Trade Area           Trade Area         Downtown
Sales/Services                                                21.3%               21.9%               32.4%              22.4%
Finance, Insurance, Admin.                                    16.9%               16.7%               13.6%              17.5%
Education, Government, Faith, Social                            7.2%               6.3%                 5.4%               7.3%
Management                                                    11.0%               10.2%                 8.7%             10.8%
Trades, Transport                                             17.7%               18.8%               15.0%              16.3%
Health Profession                                               5.9%               5.2%                 4.1%               6.6%
Natural and Applied Science                                     5.1%               4.8%                 8.2%               6.2%
Manufacturing, Utilities                                        5.5%               7.9%                 3.5%               5.1%
Art, Culture, Recreation, Sport                                 2.3%               2.1%                 0.9%               2.4%
Primary Industry                                                6.1%               4.8%                 4.5%               4.3%

Source: Statistics Canada, Environics; Based on population >15 years of age;


Average household incomes are relatively high across all trade areas. The Primary Trade Area
and the Town of Grimsby specifically, enjoy a significantly higher average household income of
$97k and $101k respectively, compared to the rest of the trade areas.

While Downtown Grimsby has the highest percentage of low-income earners (under $10,000),
over one-quarter of the residents in Downtown Grimsby and one third of the residents in the
other trade areas earn over $100,000.

                                                           Primary             Secondary           Grimsby
Household Income                                                                                                       Grimsby
                                                          Trade Area           Trade Area         Downtown
Under $10,000                                                   2.3%                2.5%                7.4%                2.3%
$10,000 to $19,999                                              5.0%                6.2%              11.6%                 4.7%
$20,000 to $39,999                                            12.9%                15.5%              20.7%               12.1%
$40,000 to $59,999                                            15.0%                16.5%              16.1%               13.2%
$60,000 to $79,999                                            14.5%                14.8%              11.3%               13.2%
$80,000 to $99,999                                            14.5%                13.4%                7.2%              14.7%
$100,000+                                                     35.8%                31.2%              25.7%               39.7%
Average Household Income                                    $97,159              $90,230            $73,372            $101,625

Source: Statistics Canada, Environics




Urban Marketing Collaborative                                 23                 Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map highlights average household income. In comparing the average household
income map with the median age reveals that east of Downtown there are higher income and
older residents. The older residents west of Downtown tend to have moderate average
household incomes but the younger residents have higher average household incomes.

Trade Area Average Household Income




Urban Marketing Collaborative              24          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                     Commercial Market Analysis
2.3       Consumer Expenditure and Attitude Analysis

The estimates of consumer spending by major category for the delineated trade areas are
derived from the combination of (a) an analysis of income characteristics, and (b) an analysis of
consumer expenditure and lifestyle information as determined by Statistics Canada and
Environics1.

The amount of consumer spending is a function of many influencing factors such as income,
family size, and age. Of all the influencing factors, income is the most important because the
more money people make, the more able and likely they are to spend. While the relationship
between income and expenditures is strong, it is not a directly proportional relationship. As
incomes rise (in real terms), a greater share of the income is spent on services, vacations,
investments, and other non-consumable items. In addition, lifestyle plays an important factor
because urban dwellers tend to spend more on eating out and less on larger family purchases
such as large entertainment units, garden supplies, and large furnishings.

The table on the following page provides a breakdown of major spending categories and
selected shopping behaviour that relates to pinpointing those residents that would demand
products and services from a well functioning eclectic urban neighbourhood retail area.
Information on expenditure and shopping behaviour on a per capita basis for the trade areas
are shown. They do not, however, represent sales to Grimsby retailers; rather, they denote
potential sales from the residents that are spent throughout the Town and region.

Generally the expenditure percentages highlight the fact that after basic necessities (Shelter,
Transportation and Food), residents spend more on Recreation, Household Equipment,
Clothing and Home Furnishings in all four trade areas. Residents in the Primary Trade Area do
spend 2.5% on health care, which is slightly higher compared to the expenditure percentages of
the other trade areas.




1   Environics updates consumer expenditure information from Statistics Canada and makes it available to
UMC based on defined geographic trade areas.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                       25            Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                        Commercial Market Analysis
                                              Primary     Secondary           Grimsby
Annual Per Capita Expenditure                                                                    Grimsby
                                             Trade Area   Trade Area         Downtown
Shelter                                        20.4%        19.6%               19.4%              19.5%
Transportation                                 14.0%        14.5%               15.1%              14.7%
Food                                           10.4%        10.0%               10.3%              10.8%
Recreation                                      5.8%         6.3%                6.4%               6.1%
Household Equipment                             5.3%         4.9%                5.0%               4.9%
Clothing                                        3.9%         3.9%                3.8%               4.0%
Home Furnishings                                3.0%         3.1%                3.1%               2.9%
Tobacco products and alcoholic beverages        2.3%         2.1%                2.4%               2.4%
Health care                                     2.5%         2.0%                2.0%               2.2%
Miscellaneous expenditures                      1.4%         1.5%                1.7%               1.7%
Education                                       1.6%         1.6%                1.5%               1.8%
Personal care                                   1.3%         1.3%                1.3%               1.3%
Reading Materials and Other Printed Matter      0.5%         0.4%                0.5%               0.5%
Games of chance (net)                           0.3%         0.3%                0.3%               0.4%
Source: Statistics Canada, Environics




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  26          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
2.4       Consumer Survey – General Overview

Background and Methodology
Based on the trade area analysis, a telephone survey was conducted of 300 residents in the
Primary Trade Area. This included both 276 ‘Visitors’ (visited Downtown Grimsby within the
past six months) and 24 ‘Non-Visitors’ (have not visited Downtown Grimsby within the past six
months). Note: The number of non-visitors is considered to be a small sample size and any
analysis in reference to this subgroup is made with this in mind.

These surveys were undertaken as part of the research required to understand the consumer
market, including Downtown Grimsby’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats as it
relates to developing a stronger commercial retail core. The Consumer Survey examines the
behaviour of a wider cross-section of regional residents who primarily visit Grimsby for
shopping and entertainment on an occasional basis.

Detailed graphs regarding the consumer survey are located in Appendix A.


Market Penetration
The market penetration of Downtown Grimsby is 92% of Primary Trade Area households. This
represents 22,023 households who have visited Downtown Grimsby in the past six months.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                27          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Respondent Profiles
Before proceeding to analyze the survey results, it is important to understand the way in which
the profile of the various survey respondents differ from one another, and from the population
of the Primary Trade Area. Differences in demographic characteristics offer important insights
that can help explain survey results.


                                             Consumer Survey    Consumer Survey
                                                (Visitors)       (Non-Visitors) Primary Trade Area
Population 2009                                     276                  24*                     67,099

Gender

     Male                                           51%                 46%                        50%
     Female                                         49%                 54%                        50%
Age Profile

     16 to 24                                       12%                 25%                        14%
     25 to 34                                       16%                 29%                        12%

     35 to 44                                       19%                 17%                        15%
     45 to 54                                       20%                 13%                        15%
     55 to 64                                       14%                  8%                        12%

     Over 65                                        20%                  8%                        22%
Household Income Profile
     Less than $25,000                              12%                 15%                        10%
     $25,001 to $50,000                             28%                 39%                        18%
     $50,001 to $75,000                             23%                 23%                        22%
     $75,001 to $100,000                            19%                  8%                        18%
     Over $100,001                                  18%                 15%                        36%
Children at Home
     Yes                                            39%                 33%                        52%

     No                                             61%                 67%                        48%
*Indicates a small sample size




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  28          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Trade Area Demographics (continued)
                                            Consumer Survey    Consumer Survey
                                                                                Primary Trade Area
                                               (Visitors)       (Non-Visitors)*
Occupation
     Not Working                                   5%                   0%                       N/A
     Student                                       5%                  17%                       N/A
     Homemaker                                     5%                   4%                       N/A
     Retired                                       26%                 21%                       N/A
     Work Outside Grimsby                          42%                 58%                       N/A

     Work in Grimsby                               16%                  0%                       N/A
Length of Residency
     Under a year                                  3%                  17%                       N/A

     1 to 5 years                                  28%                 21%                       N/A
     6 to 10 years                                 22%                  8%                       N/A
     11 to 15 years                                15%                  8%                       N/A

     16 to 20 years                                8%                  13%                       N/A
     Entire life                                   24%                 33%                       N/A
Source: Statistics Canada
*Indicates a small sample size


A summary of some of the most significant differences between the consumer survey’s visitors,
non-visitors and the Primary Trade Area’s residents is provided below.

Non-Visitors
>   Females
>   Young; 16 to 34 year-olds
>   Lower-middle household income
>   Do not have children living at home

Visitors
> Equivalent mix of genders
> Mix of 35 to 54 year-olds
> Lower-middle household income – although a high proportion refused to answer this
  question
> Do not have children living at home




Urban Marketing Collaborative                 29          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                   Commercial Market Analysis
Primary Reason for Coming to Downtown Grimsby
Amongst visitors to Downtown Grimsby, 39% mainly arrive to do their grocery or food
shopping. A significant drop is noted in secondary and other reasons for visiting; 19% come to
shop for retail goods, 11% for eating or drinking and 10% for personal services. Of the 11% who
visit eating or drinking establishments, three-fourths of the respondents were 16 to 44 years of
age.

The top reasons for female respondents to visit Downtown Grimsby were: grocery or food
shopping (51%), retail goods and services (13%), personal services (10%) and eating or drinking
(7%).

Primary Reason for Coming to Downtown Grimsby
                                                    % Visitors
                                                     N=276
Grocery or food shopping                               39%
Retail goods shopping                                  19%

Eating or drinking                                     11%
Personal services                                      10%
Drug store, pharmacy, health related                    5%

Library, House of Worship                               4%
Passing through                                         4%
Professional business                                   3%

Work related                                            2%
Meeting people                                          2%
Culture, entertainment, special event                  1%
Fitness, recreation                                    1%
Museum, art gallery                                   <1 %
Downtown resident                                     <1 %




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  30            Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
Choice of Parking in Downtown Grimsby
Nearly two-thirds of visitors park at specific businesses or plazas while over one quarter park
on the street. Among older visitors 45 years of age and over, nearly 30% opt to park on the
street versus only 20% of visitors aged 16 to 44.

Furthermore, the use of the north and south parking lots was split by respondents (22% and
21% respectively). A lower percentage (9%) of respondents walk or travel by bicycle, where 4%
are driven or dropped off Downtown.

Choice of Parking in Downtown Grimsby
                                                     % Visitors
                                                      N=276
Specific business or plaza                              62%
Park on street                                          26%
North parking lot                                       22%

South parking lot                                       21%
Walk, bicycle                                            9%
Driven or dropped off                                    4%


Visitation Frequency
Most visitors to the Downtown area can be considered high frequenters as a little under
two-thirds visit daily, visit two or more times a week or visit the area once a week. Nearly
one-half of visitors over 45 years of age and 44% of visitors with no children visit Downtown
two or more times per week.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   31            Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
Only 29% in total can be considered as infrequent visitors, (including those who visit two-to-
three times a month, once a month and less than once a month).

Visitation Frequency
                                                    % Visitors
                                                     N=276
Daily                                                  13%
Two times a week or more                               38%
Once a week                                            20%
Two-to-three times a month                             16%
Once a month                                            9%
Less than once a month                                  4%


Length of Visitation
Almost three-quarters of visitors stay 30 minutes to two hours when they visit Downtown
Grimsby. As earlier indicated, the high percentage of visitors visiting the Downtown area for
grocery and retail shopping may explain this average visitation length.

On the other hand, 11% of visitors stayed for two hours or more and 15% typically stay for less
than 30 minutes.
Length of Visitation
                                                    % Visitors
                                                     N=276
Less than 30 minutes                                   15%
30 minutes to 1 hour                                   39%
1 to 2 hours                                           35%
2 to 3 hours                                            5%
3 to 4 hours                                            1%
4 to 5 hours                                            1%
5 to 6 hours                                            1%
More than 6 hours                                       3%




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  32            Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                      Commercial Market Analysis
Image of Downtown Grimsby
When asked what word they would use to describe shopping in Downtown Grimsby, close to
two-thirds of respondents picked descriptors that portray an average experience such as: good,
fair, and okay; however, important attributes like ‘convenient’ and ‘accessible’ were also noted.

Eight percent of visitors felt the brand does portray a ‘friendly’ and ‘helpful’ image, which is
important when building upon Downtown Grimsby’s brand image of “Friendly By Nature”.

Image of Downtown Grimsby
                                                                                 % Visitors Who Agree
                                                                                         N=276
Good, pleasant, fine, fair, nice, okay, clean                                              24%
Convenient, easy, quick, fast, accessible, available, close                                22%
Satisfactory, adequate, average, mediocre, simple, alright, reasonable,
                                                                                           14%
acceptable, decent, not bad, ordinary, sufficient
Enjoyable, excellent, fun, great, happy, wonderful, eventful, fulfilling,
                                                                                           10%
leisurely, love it
Friendly, helpful                                                                            8%
Quaint, cute, unique                                                                         7%
Limited, boring, poor, unpleasant, tedious, dismal, bad, bland,
                                                                                             6%
challenging, dated, useless, not exciting, insufficient
Busy, bad parking, congested, traffic                                                        6%
Diverse, rare                                                                                2%
Cheap                                                                                        1%
Expensive                                                                                  0.4%
Spread out                                                                                 0.4%

Essential                                                                                  0.4%




Urban Marketing Collaborative                         33            Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                  Commercial Market Analysis
Downtown Grimsby Improvements
An improvement to the commercial district that would encourage respondents to visit more
often include a greater variety of store types and sizes – e.g. better specialty stores (26%), better
stores in general (20%), and better/larger stores (11%).

Enhanced functional attributes were also identified, such as greater accessibility/less traffic
(11%), better parking (10%), and better shopping hours (8%).

Over a third of respondents however had no idea on how to improve the commercial district.

Downtown Grimsby Improvements
                                                 % Visitors Who Agree
                                                         N=276
Better specialty stores                                  26%

Better stores in general                                 20%
Better larger stores                                     11%
Accessibility, less traffic                              11%

Beautify the shopping area                               10%
Better parking                                           10%
Better shopping hours                                     8%

More services                                             7%
Better restaurants                                        5%
Better prices                                             3%

Friendlier                                              0.5%
Nothing/ don’t know                                      37%




Urban Marketing Collaborative                     34           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                      Commercial Market Analysis
Strengths and Weaknesses
The most important factors visitors use to determine where they go to shop or eat include the
service, cleanliness and overall appearance, access to clean and up-to-date businesses, a friendly
atmosphere, and the safety of the business/location. These factors were highly rated amongst a
greater number of older residents and female residents.

Downtown Grimsby’s top ratings included safety, friendly atmosphere, excellent service, family
friendly and, cleanliness and overall appearance.

However, there is room for improvement in the commercial district. The top rated deficiency
was in the selection of stores and restaurants. There is also a significant gap between the
importance given and the rating received for the quality of stores and restaurants, the
availability of parking, the price of goods and services and the availability of clean, up-to-date
businesses.

Importance vs. Satisfaction Ratings
                                                Importance          Rating                 Gap
Excellent service                                     8.81           7.93                 -0.88
Cleanliness and overall appearance                    8.58           7.81                 -0.77

Clean, up-to-date businesses                          8.44           7.56                 -0.88
Friendly atmosphere                                   8.39           8.21                 -0.18
Safety                                                8.34           8.23                 -0.11

Easy to get to                                        8.32           7.75                 -0.57
Availability of parking                               8.24           7.27                 -0.97
Quality of stores and restaurants                     8.23           7.15                 -1.08
Price of goods and services                           8.14           7.24                 -0.90
Easy to get around                                    8.13           7.36                 -0.77
Selection of stores and restaurants                   7.82           6.43                 -1.39
Family friendly                                       7.72           7.89                  0.17
Open in the evening                                   6.93           6.33                 -0.60




Urban Marketing Collaborative                    35           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
Downtown Grimsby Competitive Positioning
The mean scores, given to each of the Downtown areas listed below, put Downtown Grimsby in
third place with a score of 7.4. Downtown Niagara on the Lake and Downtown Burlington
placed higher, with mean scores of 8.1 and 7.7 respectively.

Younger respondents aged 16 to 44, females, and visitors residing in their homes for less than 10
years tended to rank each of the below mentioned Downtowns higher than the mean score.

Downtown Grimsby Competitive Positioning
                                                    % Visitors
                                                     N=276
Downtown Grimsby                                       7.4
Downtown Niagara on the Lake                           8.1
Downtown Burlington                                    7.7
Downtown Dundas                                        7.1
Downtown Stoney Creek                                  6.5
Downtown St. Catharines                                6.0
Downtown Beamsville                                    5.8


Special Event Visitation
Of the special events held in Downtown Grimsby, the Santa Claus Parade was the most
popular; 23% of respondents stated they attend the event all the time. By contrast however,
42% had also never been to the parade. Among newer residents – those living in their home for
less than 10 years – 48% had never attended the event.

Twelve percent of respondents attended Happening on the Park all the time, while 24% said
they sometimes attended. Festival on the Forty had a similar turnout with 11% attending all the
time and 23% attending sometimes. Among newer residents (< 10 years in their home), 62%
never attended either event vs. 41-42% of respondents, who had been in their home for more
than 11 years.

Both Winter Green and the Blossom Festival were poorly attended as 91% and 92% respectively
had never been to the event.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  36            Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                        Commercial Market Analysis
Special Event Visitation
                                                      % Visitors - N=276
                 Santa Claus Parade Happening on the Park Festival on the Forty Winter Green Blossom Festival
All the time                23%              12%                   11%                  2%                    1%
Sometimes                   20%              24%                   23%                  3%                    3%
Rarely                      15%              12%                   14%                  5%                    4%
Never                       42%              52%                   53%                 91%                  92%


Special Events Improvements
Over one fifth of visitors indicated they are not interested in attending special events in general.
However, when asked for improvement ideas to encourage more visitors to the special events,
27% said there should be better types, kinds and number of events.

Better awareness through advertising was also recommended by 17% of visitors: amid younger
respondents, aged 16 to 44, 22% recommended better advertising/awareness.

Also, among all respondents, better accessibility and shuttle service was recommended by 12%
and better parking was recommended by 10%. Specifically among older visitors, aged 45 and
over, 14% requested better parking options.

Twenty-two percent of visitors were not interested in attending special events.

Special Events Improvements
                                                             % Visitors
                                                              N=276
Better types, kinds, number of events                           27%
Better awareness, advertising                                   17%
Better accessibility, shuttle service                           12%
Better parking                                                  10%
Better stores, better services                                   9%
Beautify Downtown                                                4%

Better prices                                                    2%
Not interested special events in general                        22%




Urban Marketing Collaborative                           37            Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                       Commercial Market Analysis
Non-Visitation Reasons and Improvement Suggestions
Of the small number of people surveyed who had not visited Downtown Grimsby within the
past six months, 38% stated it was because other stores are located closer to them. However,
29% could not point to any clear reason, indicating an opportunity to increase the visitation
rate.

Inconvenience and the traffic flow was mentioned by 17%, a lack of things to do was mentioned
by 13% and having better stores elsewhere were noted by 8% of non-visitor respondents.

Non-Visitation Reasons
                                                 % Non-Visitors
                                                    N=24*
Other stores are closer to me                         38%
No particular reason                                  29%
Inconvenient to get to, traffic flow                  17%
Nothing to do there, not enough to do                 13%
Better stores elsewhere                                8%
Inconvenient hours, close too early                    4%
Poor selection of stores                               4%
Quality of the stores                                  4%


While the vast majority of respondents felt they were too far away to make the trip Downtown,
others suggested better stores and a better variety of products (18%), increased awareness/
advertising (18%), better parking (12%) and friendlier people (12%) to entice them to visit more
often.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  38           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Non-Visitor Improvement Suggestions
                                                % Non-Visitors
                                                   N=24*
Closer location                                      41%
Better stores, better variety                        18%
Better awareness, advertising                        18%
Better parking                                       12%
Friendlier people                                    12%
Better special events                                 6%
More services                                         6%
Nothing, don't know                                  40%
*Indicates a small sample size


Market Share by Retail Category
The market share by retail category indicates how often respondents make their purchases in
Downtown Grimsby, in each of the retail categories listed below. For example, 20% of
respondents do not purchase from grocery and supermarkets in the Downtown Grimsby trade
area. Eight percent, however, do make their grocery and supermarket purchases Downtown,
anywhere from 1% to 9% of the time; meanwhile, 13% of respondents make their grocery and
supermarket purchases Downtown 100% of the time.

Additionally, thirteen percent of visitors are loyal shoppers of Downtown Grimsby when
buying grocery and supermarket products. On average, visitors purchase a significant proportion
(40.4%) of their grocery and supermarket products Downtown.

Seventeen percent of visitors are loyal customers of Downtown Grimsby when buying drug &
pharmaceutical products. On average, visitors make 31.1% of their drug & pharmaceutical
purchases Downtown.

Only 3% of visitors are loyal customers of Downtown Grimsby when it comes to purchasing
clothing and shoe products. In general, visitors make 12% of these purchases Downtown. While
this average is normal for a typical Downtown, 53% of visitors do not shop for these products
Downtown. This high proportion points to a need to look at niche marketing strategies in order
to capture some of this market share.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                 39           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                        Commercial Market Analysis
Only 4% of visitors are loyal customers of Downtown Grimsby, when buying sporting goods.
Given the competitive nature and prices for these products, and the fact that 76% of visitors do
not shop Downtown for them, it will be difficult to grow the market share of the sporting goods
sector.

Sixteen percent of visitors are loyal customers of Downtown Grimsby, when purchasing beauty
& barber services. On average, visitors make 22.4% of these purchases Downtown. Given that
59% of visitors never come Downtown for these products, it is worthwhile to further investigate
this trend in order to increase Downtown Grimsby’s market share in the beauty & barber services
sector.

The eating and drinking sector displays a wide range of spending habits with little loyalty to the
Downtown area.

On average, 15% of gift purchases, by visitors, are done in Downtown Grimsby. Hardware and
home improvement products are only sought after on average 17.9% of the time.

Market Share by Retail Category
                                               % Visitors - N=276
                                                             Beauty &                          Hardware &
             Grocery &      Drug &     Clothing & Sporting Barber Eating &                        Home
           Supermarkets Pharmaceuticals Shoes      Goods Services Drinking          Gifts     Improvement
0                   20%          35%      53%      76%       59%        27%            40%            46%
1 to 9               8%          14%      13%          4%     8%        17%            12%             9%
10 to 19            11%           9%      15%          8%     4%        17%            17%            12%
20 to 39            13%          10%       8%          4%     6%        16%            16%            13%
40 to 59            15%           7%       6%          3%     4%        14%              8%            9%
60 to 79             9%           3%       2%          1%     1%          4%             3%            5%
80 to 99            11%           5%       1%          1%     2%          3%             1%            1%
100                 13%          17%       3%          4%    16%          3%             1%            4%
Mean             40.4%          31.1%    12.0%    8.8%      22.4%     21.1%          15.0%         17.9%




Urban Marketing Collaborative                     40          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where visitors to Grimsby shop for grocery & supermarket
products.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  41          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where visitors to Grimsby shop for drug store &
pharmaceutical products.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  42          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where visitors to Grimsby shop for clothing & shoes.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  43           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where visitors to Grimsby shop for sporting goods
products.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  44          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where, visitors to Grimsby shop for gift products.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  45           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where visitors to Grimsby shop for hardware & home
improvement products.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                 46          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where visitors to Grimsby shop for beauty & barber
services and products.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  47          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
The following map illustrates the areas where, visitors to Grimsby go for eating and drinking.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   48          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                   Commercial Market Analysis
3.0       KEY PERSON INTERVIEWS

The following summary is provided from key person interviews conducted during January and
February 2009. It summarizes major themes related to organizational management; image,
marketing and branding; physical and beautification issues; and, retailing and customer service
issues.

It is important to note that these are the opinions of the stakeholders who were interviewed
and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Urban Marketing Collaborative, J.C. Williams
Group, the DIA, the Town of Grimsby, the Grimsby Chamber of Commerce, or the Niagara
Region.


Organizational Management

DIA
>     Focuses on one small section of the street and not elsewhere
>     DIA focus is lost on professional businesses
>     DIA was non-existent before hiring staff
>     DIA is better since adding staff, they are doing a committed job, more professional
>     DIA primarily represents merchants’ interests and not those of the property owners


Town Planning
> Contractors have said they refuse to work with Town of Grimsby due to problems and lack
  of cooperation
> Town is not doing anything for us – want a sign on the highway
> Town lacks vision
> More communication


Chamber of Commerce
>     Promote member businesses
>     Voice for Grimsby area businesses in provincial and federal levels of government
>     Work on tax related issues among many other programs and initiatives
>     Provide education programs
>     Promote tourism through information desk
>     Chamber has a gift certificate that they encourage people to give away. Town will use them
      as a prize




Urban Marketing Collaborative                    49           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Image, Marketing, Branding

Marketing
>   Marketing does not return any customers
>   Marketing should focus on what is here in Downtown
>   Downtown is unique, not any place else
>   Niagara is similar to the Napa Valley of Canada – over 30 wineries
>   Need to showcase the wine aspect in Main Street
>   Local media outlets – too much (2 locals 2 times a week is too much, plus regional papers)
>   It should all be about building community
>   Need to market that all the conveniences of life are here in Downtown Grimsby
>   Good referral system from wineries to Downtown
>   Some wineries tell visitors to avoid Downtown Grimsby because of traffic
>   Need to do more to complement winery industry
>   Virtually everything you need is here
>   Residents don’t read their own newspapers
>   Customer service is key to success – 24/7 have to commit to it
>   Portray an image of urban, fun, good quality
>   Want to get into database marketing and a new website
>   Need to get more people aware of it and they will love Downtown Grimsby
>   Not sure what the Downtown niche is?
>   Very involved in the community
>   Very good service in the stores
>   More marketing to tourism component, use winery trails



Special Events
>   Incentive to bring new people to Downtown
>   Events are good but our business does not participate
>   Very active in special events and provide a good return for my business
>   Special events and festivals are better run now that there is staff – smoother and soundly run
>   DIA is good at doing the festivals
>   Ontario Street is neglected during events




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   50           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Friendly By Nature
> We offer the best customer service and quality
> Very volunteer oriented
> Very personable businesses, excellent service, know you, go out of their way to help you
> Residents are resistant to change – can be a closed community to outsiders. Does not live up
  to its slogan
> Friendly small town feel but really becoming a City
> Businesses support one another – this is not always the case
> Very community minded


Physical Issues and Beautification

Design Standards
> Want less control over the development and business practices
> Need to set up good communication programs to achieve shared vision
> The town should not set extremely strict standards but allow individuals to express their
  own plans
> Customers appreciate good design
> Lack common sense for some things on why things are allowed and others are not
> Want more coordination with signage, consistent guidelines, visually appealing


New Developments
>   Two lots that are vacant – do something with them
>   Want to see more effort put into design and less into uses and zoning
>   Want to preserve uses – keep residential as residential
>   Want to encourage more residential in Downtown
>   Need to redesign, redevelop gas stations and plazas on the west end


Residential Development
> Currently, many upper level uses in Downtown are lower income residential
> Would like to see more residential and increased density condo in Downtown – current
  height maximum is four storeys
> Town is almost at its limit of urban expansion – will have to look at more intensification




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                                   Commercial Market Analysis
Building Details
>   Building is over 100 years old and needs tender loving care
>   Facades need to be improved
>   Stroller friendly buildings/businesses are required
>   Retailers do not take pride in their businesses or buildings
>   Store owners do not fix their buildings – many in sorry state


Streetscaping and Beautification
> Improve alley ways – access from Main Street to the parking lots
> Need signage on Ontario Street – not just from north end into Downtown but also from Main
    Street up Ontario Street
>   Need places for socialization, meeting people – more benches
>   Need benches and places to gather
>   Needs to be child friendly
>   Wheelchair accessible for the senior population
>   Fix clock on Main Street
>   Concern regarding who is responsible for what (e.g., snow shovelling, sweeping, etc.)
    between the region, the town, and individual businesses/property owners – does not make it
    conducive to walking and good pedestrian flow
>   Need for more of a seamless look and feel to the Downtown – coordinate business look with
    the town look so it blends together better
>   Why should the private business spend money on beautifying the Downtown – this is the
    Town’s responsibility
>   Cardboard and garbage pick up is difficult – often doesn’t occur
>   Should be beautiful to reflect the contemporary and sophisticated tastes associated with the
    wineries
>   Better coordination of snow removal and garbage pick up is required
>   Planters are old style – no consistent look and feel to the planters
>   Lack of garbage cans
>   Downtown could be spectacular with old facades and signage
>   Very pretty Downtown




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                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Traffic
>   Traffic is horrendous, annoys locals
>   Taxi system has improved but can wait a long time
>   No public transit
>   Cars line up at the Main Street and Mountain/Christie going east all the way back up the hill
>   More control of traffic


Safety
>   Youth often vandalize properties and streetscaping
>   Issue with youth loitering and vandalizing
>   Turn Main Street into a pedestrian street in the summer
>   Could develop youth work programs for Downtown, hire young apprentices – take pride in
    their Downtown


Parking
> Officially – there is no cash in lieu of parking but businesses have been able to satisfy the
    requirement by purchasing excess spots elsewhere in the Downtown
>   Not much organization to the parking – could be better laid out
>   DIA has worked to secure an arrangement with the north Main businesses parking to
    provide increased coordination
>   Lack of convenient parking
>   Lots of parking
>   No official count on the number of parking spaces
>   Parking is enforced on a part-time basis – primarily to keep fire lanes open and unobstructed
>   No parking meters – better management
>   Better access to parking from behind buildings
>   More education and marketing on parking alternatives
>   Well lit walkways with nice interlocking pavers/stones – wayfinding and safety
>   People don’t know that parking is there
>   Parking is hard to find
>   Parking is critical




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   53           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Retail Issues and Customer Service Excellence

Trade Area
>   60% of customers come from outside of Grimsby
>   70% are women
>   75% are local
>   Customers are aged 30 to 40+ – 75% are older
>   Businesses do not respect Grimsby people – they set their own rules
>   Downtown has many small specialized stores that are well run – the staff/owners know you
    and add personality to the business. It is very personable
>   Customer traffic varies throughout the day/week
>   Most customers are from out of town
>   Customers tend to come more from the west than from the east – skewed west
>   Customers 60% from Grimsby
>   There is a split between the long-term residents and the new residents. The long-term
    residents prefer the way things were and not receptive to change and the new ones don’t
    know what there is to offer in Downtown but are slightly more receptive to change. Also,
    newer residents are more apt to travel elsewhere (previous shopping area) for several
    reasons
>   I don’t think anybody shops Downtown
>   If residents want a contemporary experience they will go to Toronto, that is their mindset –
    that contemporary is elsewhere
>   Customers have a problem with shopping locally despite quality goods and services here
>   70% are Grimsby locals – all age ranges but attitude is younger and contemporary
>   Some businesses have a very strong local following
>   Trade area is wealthy but that doesn’t mean that they are high spenders
>   Older population
>   Over 80,000 in trade area
>   30 to 55 year olds – more educated and self aware
>   Will pay for quality


Downtown Districts
> Prefer to move away from districts and have one Downtown designation
> West end of Downtown is cut off from the main area
> There are five districts – Train Station, Museum- Historic, West End, East End, and Main
    Street




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                                  Commercial Market Analysis
Business Location Strategy
> Niche player – want to stay within the community, very involved with the community
> Saw a gap in the marketplace for my business
> The business is an extension of who I am
> Often little choice in business location as the vacancy was very low
> Have to buy the building to make the business successful
> When opened business there was a gap in the marketplace
> Strong believers in Downtown – want to be here
> Started as a service and expanded into retail
> Close to other major centres
> Grimsby was a growing town and there were missing businesses
> If you have a good quality space in Downtown, it will rent. There is demand for space
> Downtown is a quaint, friendly, nice place – really pretty town that allows you to enjoy all
  four seasons equally
> A lot of service based businesses on the Main Street
> Businesses in the region who are looking for another locations (e.g., 2nd or 3rd) will look to
  Grimsby


Rent
>   $28.80/sq. ft. TMI inclusive
>   $15 to $20/sq. ft. TMI additional
>   Rents are fair ($19/sq. ft TMI inclusive)
>   Rent $15/sq. ft.
>   Plaza rents are $20/sq. ft. plus $5 to $9/sq. ft. for TMI
>   Overall, lease structure on Main Street is relatively low


Price Point
> Mid range in price point
> Customers tend to be tight with their money – want value for their money
> Want quality for price




Urban Marketing Collaborative                    55             Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
Missing Businesses
> Should match the winery niche – goods and services related to relaxation, luxury, culinary
    excellence, space services, photography, boutiques – shoes, clothes, jewellery, chocolate,
    cigars, florists, wine tasting room
>   Want small boutique type stores
>   Giant Tiger does not belong on Main Street – should be elsewhere in Downtown
>   Businesses have to have more insight into a bedroom community and the types of goods and
    services they require including hours of operation
>   Some businesses are understocked and not sure how they survive
>   Whole bridal industry is missing from dresses to cakes, florists, etc.
>   Want to expand my current business
>   Contemporary men’s clothing, shoes, book store
>   More bistros
>   Lack quality restaurants
>   Some businesses are hobby businesses
>   Hobby store, book store, entertainment in evening, gift, leisure, home furnishings
>   One stop shop – emporium
>   If you have a good idea – people will support you
>   Bank of Nova Scotia
>   Pharma Plus
>   Staples
>   Need more variety
>   Businesses are viable in Downtown – able to make a good living
>   Good quality clothing in mid-market price range
>   Private dining rooms
>   Grimsby is too small to support newer restaurants such as Asian themed
>   Not enough population for entertainment
>   Have all major needs in Downtown including grocery stores – they drive traffic to
    Downtown
>   Hard to do all your gift type shopping in Downtown – lack of selection




Urban Marketing Collaborative                 56          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                 Commercial Market Analysis
Business Hours
> Grimsby has to come to terms that it is a bedroom community
> Stores need to open early and open late if they want to take advantage of the customer traffic
> Need consistent hours of operation for the business – cannot just close store when they feel
  like it
> Need to go after the unique businesses


Competition
> Customers will inevitably shift to big box retailers – especially as their budgets tighten




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                                   Commercial Market Analysis
4.0       RETAIL/COMMERCIAL AUDIT

An audit of the existing retail/commercial businesses in Downtown Grimsby was conducted
during January and February 2009 in order to completely understand the current retail/
commercial situation in the area. The area studied is depicted on the map on the following
pages, and is comprised of all commercial uses and other ground-level land uses. Only easily
accessible professional service (doctors, lawyers, and accountants) space was included in the
inventory. Churches, social and cultural institutions, residential buildings, offices, and
government buildings were noted for their adjacencies to retail in the accompanying map.

In completing this inventory, the strengths and weaknesses of Downtown Grimsby’s BIA’s
business mix were identified. The following are the salient findings based on the retail audit.
> Downtown Grimsby has 3 core commercial areas and 2 sub-areas:
    - Core region 1 – hub at Main Street and Christie/Mountain Street; includes a mix of
       retail, professional, personal, and food and beverage merchants.
    - Core region 2 – commercial district on Livingston Avenue, west of Patton Street;
       includes convenience, professional, and automotive merchants.
    - Core region 3 – commercial district East of Elm Street; includes a mix of commercial
       businesses.
    - Sub-area 1 – commercial district on Ontario Street, spanning Clarke Street to Main Street
       east; includes professional and personal services.
    - Sub-area 2 – commercial district at the intersection of Christie/Elm Street spanning
       towards Oak Street/Melrose Avenue; includes a mix of commercial businesses.

>     In aggregate, there are 191 commercial businesses in Downtown Grimsby. A further 11 are
      for other non-retail uses including library, churches, gyms etc.
>     The total commercial square footage is approximately 368,450.
>     There are eight vacant properties totalling 18,200 square feet of space for a low vacancy rate
      of 4.9%.
>     Personal and professional services together make up one third of the commercial area in
      Downtown Grimsby. While these services are important to the Downtown area, this
      percentage is relatively high: it is important to maintain a strong retail focus in order to
      further draw residents and increase their average visitation time.
>     Retail accounts for 25.5% of the commercial space Downtown. While this number is not
      low, it does serve as a cautionary flag to reiterate the importance of preventing further
      decreases in the commercial space, allocated for retail activities.
>     Food and Beverage retailers account for 11.1% of the commercial space and 13.6% of the
      total number of stores. This would be considered relatively low for an experiential
      Downtown area.
>     Convenience makes up a healthy 17.9% of the commercial space.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                     58           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                Commercial Market Analysis
Downtown Grimsby Commercial Audit
                                      Number of Businesses                     Square Footage
                                    Number         % of Total               Total             % of Total
Automotive                            12              6.3%                  21,500                 5.8%
Convenience                            8              4.2%                  65,800               17.9%
Food and Beverage                     26             13.6%                  40,800               11.1%
Personal Services                     33             17.3%                  45,250               12.3%
Professional Services                 64             33.5%                  81,050               22.0%
Retail Merchandise                    38             19.9%                  94,050               25.5%
Vacant Commercial                      8              4.2%                  18,200                 4.9%
Other Retail                           2              1.0%                    1,800                0.5%
Total Commercial                     191              100%                 368,450                100%
Other buildings                       11




Urban Marketing Collaborative                59          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                                                                                              Commercial Market Analysis
4.1       Retail Mapping

Colour-coding the different retail/commercial operations in Grimsby facilitates a better understanding the area’s strengths and weaknesses.




Note: commercial uses are not to scale and reflect ground floor uses


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                                 Commercial Market Analysis
5.0       RETAIL POTENTIAL


Based on the preceding analysis, Downtown Grimsby retail demand for 2009 and 2014 has been
calculated.


Assumptions

Timing
A 2014 year interval has been chosen to reflect a five year time horizon.


Target Markets
The target markets identified to have a significant impact on retail demand include:
> Town of Grimsby households
> Primary Trade Area households
> Secondary Trade Area households

Household growth is based on the estimates and projections provided by Environics. This is
based on relatively healthy population growth. Yet, the current economic recession may mean
that these household growth estimates may take slightly longer to materialize.

It is important to note that each trade area reflects the cumulative number of households and
excludes those trade areas contained within it. This factor is also reflected in average household
incomes.


Retail Categories
Based on the major Downtown Grimsby retail categories, the retail demand analysis included
the following:
> Convenience retail – grocery, supermarkets, specialty food, alcohol, and health and wellness
> Retail merchandise – general merchandisers, apparel and accessories, furniture and home
   furnishings, appliance and electronics, home improvement, and leisure retailers
> Food services – limited and full-service restaurants, cafes, coffee shops, and drinking
   establishments




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                                 Commercial Market Analysis
It does not include personal and professional services as these are too difficult to develop a
demand analysis based on consumption patterns (e.g., banking, travel agents, beauty services,
etc.). Personal services are often estimated to remain within 20% and 30% of the total square
footage in the Downtown Grimsby study area. In addition, other categories such as fitness and
recreation centres, automotive dealers and gasoline stations, large department stores, and large
home improvement and garden stores have not been included either because of the difficulty in
estimating demand or the overall lack of demand and competitive positioning.


Expenditure Levels
For the major retail categories, household expenditures have been assigned. This is based on an
analysis of Ontario consumption relative to household income and allowances for elasticity in
demand. Because the new developments will bring in new residents, where it is anticipated
that the surrounding areas will attract newer families with higher disposable incomes, UMC has
anticipated that household incomes will increase as per Environics estimates and projections.
Overall sales levels are anticipated to increase by 2% annually.


Capture Rates
Current retail demand and square footage were used as a starting point to ascertain appropriate
capture rates for Downtown Grimsby and were supplemented by findings in the consumer
survey retail demand. These capture rates have been assigned to each target market and major
retail category.


Sales Level
Total retail sales are a combination of each target market’s retail demand for the retail
commodity in question.




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                                      Commercial Market Analysis
Warranted Space
Based on higher than average sales per foot levels for each major retail category than the current
Downtown Grimsby retailers are achieving, the total amount of supportable space is calculated.

In 2014, the demand for retail space increases by approximately 25,000 square feet for retail
merchandise, food services, and convenience retail (excludes personal and professional
services). Estimating that personal and professional services will only account for 25% of the
new space equates to 8,182 square feet.

2014 Additional Retail Demand for Downtown Grimsby
                                                       2014 Additional Demand (Sq. Ft.)
 Convenience Retail                                                      5,775
 Food Services                                                           7,737
 Retail Merchandise                                                    11,033
 Personal and Professional Services                                      8,182
 Total                                                                 32,727


Details of the retail demand calculations are located in Appendix B.




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                                Commercial Market Analysis
6.0       STRENTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS (SWOT)

6.1       Strengths

Key strengths of Downtown Grimsby include:
> Consumer
   - Growing residential in Grimsby and surrounding areas – need to ensure Downtown
       Grimsby retailers participate in the growth.
   - Higher than average household income – while households have higher incomes they
       recognize quality and do not want to be taken advantage of. Tend to expend a higher
       proportion of resources on entertainment.
   - Small groups of loyal customers – true Grimsby shoppers to build upon for successful
       retail strategies.
> Business Climate
   - Some businesses are successful.
   - Close proximity to major markets of Hamilton and St. Catharines.
   - Good mix of retail, convenience, and food services but heavy in services.
   - Good service levels.
   - Good brand identity.
> Environment
   - Attractive retail setting nestled by the escarpment.




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                                Commercial Market Analysis
6.2       Weaknesses

There are a number of issues that require improvements with respect to Grimsby’s commercial
development. These include:
> Consumer
   - Can be polarized in terms of age and income, length of residency, etc. – need to find
       common denominator to appeal to a broader selection of the trade area (e.g.
       contemporary attitudes).
   - Younger consumer and those who have been in Grimsby for a shorter period of time
       tend to be less loyal Grimsby shoppers.
> Business Climate
   - Large Downtown including main street and plazas – have to address each issue.
   - Competition for convenience shopping and destination shopping. Other areas are closer
       for convenience (e.g., Real Canadian Superstore, Costco, etc.) and other towns are more
       appealing to the contemporary, sophisticated visitor (e.g., Jordan, NOTL, Dundas,
       Burlington, etc.).
   - DIA just beginning to develop retail programs.
> Community
   - Lack of coordination and cohesiveness among businesses and organizations.


6.3       Opportunities

Opportunities for Grimsby include the following points:
> Overall Strategy
  - Make a commitment to being the friendliest and most service oriented shopping area.
  - Build upon the convenience related aspects of Downtown.
  - Enhance culture/entertainment as a strategy to guide the Downtown strategy.
  - Increased roles and responsibilities for the DIA.
  - Look to increase residential in Downtown – intensification.
  - Create mixed-use developments west and east of Downtown core.
> Tactics
  - Go after strengths – concentrate on the core customers for increased expenditure rather
      than pursuing new customers (this includes Grimsby residents and those in the Primary
      Trade Area).


6.4       Threats

Reported and observed threats to Grimsby include:

>     Further development at Casablanca Road and the QEW



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Action Plan
Grimsby
                                                                               Action Plan
7.0       DOWNTOWN GRIMSBY COMMERCIAL REALITIES, NICHE, VISION, AND
          PRINCIPLES

The action plan is structured to help Downtown Grimsby retail commercial businesses
capitalize upon its strengths. However, a number of commercial realities that Downtown
Grimsby businesses must face include the following:
> Of paramount importance is such that, all businesses in Downtown Grimsby are subject to
   threats. This includes the possibility for the closure of a business as well as the possibility of
   relocation to a more visible location such as sites adjacent to the QEW. This applies
   particularly to Downtown Grimsby’s anchor and
   convenience-based retailers such as grocers, drug stores, alcohol stores, banks, and home
   improvement stores.
> From a merchandising standpoint, destination-type retail businesses (e.g., apparel, home
   furnishings, gift, and leisure) must be exceptional in order to survive: mediocre retail
   businesses will not last. A professional approach to retail operations must be undertaken.
   This includes marketing, merchandising, staff training, operations, etc.
> Rents are low enough to make it less risky to start up a new venture, but high enough to
   make new retail development only marginally possibly.
> Downtown Grimsby businesses must differentiate themselves. There is too much large
   format, power centre, and suburban-type competition for
   comparison-shopping goods (e.g., basic apparel items).
> While Downtown Grimsby has a very high visitation level, it does not have an
   extraordinarily strong image. Reinforcement of the “Friendly by Nature” brand in
   marketing, physical design, and development must be paramount.


Niche

The niche for Downtown Grimsby’s retail and commercial businesses has as much to do with
emotional attachment as it does to the quality of the goods and services being offered. The
differentiating factor for Downtown Grimsby includes:
> Meeting point – Downtown Grimsby is the centre of a growing town of over 27,000
    residents, a primary trade area of over 67,000 residents, and a secondary trade area that
    includes 125,000 residents. It is also the centre of convergence for a number of streets and
    thereby offers very high visibility and accessibility features that retailers covet.
> Small town atmosphere and big town opportunities – Downtown Grimsby still retains that
    small town charm, look, and feel while at the same time offers a wider range of good and
    services that are demanded by a growing population as compared to many other small
    towns in Ontario.
> Congenial and friendly atmosphere – known by its slogan “Friendly by Nature”, consumers
    reaffirmed this unique quality of Downtown Grimsby especially related to better quality
    service. Even the residents will stop to let pedestrians cross the street.



Urban Marketing Collaborative                    67           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                                Action Plan
Overall, Downtown Grimsby retail commercial businesses must have a focus that works to
support the local population first and foremost. It would be very easy to recommend a strategy
that focuses on the tourist market to become akin to places such as Niagara-on- the-Lake,
Jordan, or St. Jacob’s. While these are interesting places, they lack focus as it relates to the local
population, and are primarily tourist destinations. This means they are at the mercy of
international exchange rates and fickle tourists.


Strategy

The retail strategy for Downtown Grimsby must work to enhance the needs of the local
population to want to shop and visit Downtown Grimsby’s retail commercial businesses. The
visitor strategy then works to re-enforce a genuine small town atmosphere with a true
personality and character – a culture that is authentic, real, and heartfelt. The visitors will want
to come and experience this slice of “town and nature” about which the local residents will be
passionate.

The Downtown becomes the place where locals socialize and interact – a type of third place
away from work/volunteer commitments, church, or home. This is where they meet their
friends and neighbours at the IDA, Home Hardware, Food Basics, over coffee at Coffee Culture,
or browsing through Cocoon. To that end, the physical improvements must work towards
enhancing that brand image of fostering this sense of casual socialization for local residents.

An economic development strategy that focuses on local residents related to convenience goods
and services as well as recreation, in addition to entertainment, arts, and culture will provide a
return on investment. Specifically, consumers want a more entertaining experience in their
Downtown Grimsby visitation, where they demand excellent service, knowledgeable staff, and
a friendly, fun, and casual atmosphere.


Vision/Brand

Downtown Grimsby will be the vibrant, active centre for the growing town/region. It is a
community that is close-knit and friendly. While reflecting a forward-looking and sophisticated
town, Downtown Grimsby will balance this with a sense of tradition and history, with
buildings, streets and streetscapes that illustrate its very unique past and its role as the town
meeting and gathering place.




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                                                                             Action Plan
Vision
>    Multi-faceted Downtown
>    Mix of historic main street shopping combined with vehicular dependent plazas
>    Convergence point for the region – meeting place
>    Convenient, easy to use shopping place
>    Builds off of its history and natural heritage
>    Caters to young and old, new residents, and long-term residents – lives the brand “friendly
     by nature”




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   69          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                              Action Plan
It will:
> Incorporate the small town feel between the country and the city. The word “quaint” does
    not fully encapsulate the atmosphere of Downtown Grimsby, as it is more sophisticated
    than most rural towns and villages due to the breadth and depth of commercial goods and
    services offered. Downtown Grimsby is vibrant twelve months of the year not just during
    the summer months.
> Play homage to its small town tradition with links to both the surrounding rural and
    agricultural areas as well as to the adjacent urban areas.
> Be a sociable and friendly community whose heritage and traditions will be preserved and
    enhanced. For retailers this can include an increased personalized approach to service.
> Maintain its historic Downtown core as a central meeting place and shopping area for the
    larger community while encouraging more urban-style mixed-use projects on the west and
    east ends of the Downtown.
> Be an environmentally aware community with an enhanced linked green space system,
    including protected natural heritage features.
> Be economically and physically accessible to people of all ages, length of residence, physical
    abilities, preferences, and interests.
> Be a well-designed community with attractive streetscapes and developments that
    encourage socialization in a friendly manner.

The scale of development should have a pedestrian-oriented focus, with strong linkages to trail
systems that link residential to Downtown areas, as well as to recreational activities. The ease
of vehicular access to the Downtown and the provision of parking areas should be effectively
promoted to enhance the visit to business areas and other amenities (e.g., library, museum,
community centre, etc.).

A proposed Community Centre would reinforce Downtown’s role as a meeting place, and
serves as a focal point of the Town. This should be located towards the east end of Downtown.
Coronation Park, on the west end of Downtown, will also serve as a recreation and cultural
anchor.

As stated, the Downtown area’s first priority is to serve its local community with retail stores,
businesses, recreation, entertainment, and cultural opportunities that support, and are
supported by, the residents. It will be this focus on a real and authentic place that will drive
visitor traffic to want to experience and participate in Downtown Grimsby’s unique sense of
quality of life.




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                                                                           Action Plan
Principles

Principle – Small Town Atmosphere
Any change in Downtown Grimsby’s retail commercial businesses should maintain or enhance
its unique small town character. This principle is intended to ensure that the personality and
character of Grimsby’s unique small town character, with its historic heritage and ties to the
surrounding rural/agricultural community is preserved. The qualities and features identified
as important to Downtown Grimsby’s personality and character include:
> Friendliness
> Exceptional personal service
> Natural heritage
> Linkages to the Downtown’s recreation opportunities
> Retail anchors

This is not meant to say that Downtown Grimsby is anti-development but that development
should not be generic and suburban type; rather, it should be mixed-use in nature and promote
interaction.

Objectives
> To provide for new development which will be respectful of the heritage of the community
  and its relationship with the surrounding region through appropriate design
> To protect the heritage of Downtown Grimsby through the preservation and enhancement of
  heritage buildings, streetscapes, and other features
> To provide for a linked open space and trail system including natural attributes and
  parkland as a central feature of Downtown Grimsby, which will reinforce its special
  character
> To provide for business development as well as housing forms in the Downtown core, which
  is consistent with the character of Downtown Grimsby, but allow for higher densities
> To encourage an urban design and development strategy at all levels of development that
  provides opportunities for social interaction and communications (e.g., between Downtown
  Grimsby residents and convenience goods and service retailers; between cultural groups and
  destination retailers; between tourists and restaurants, etc.)




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                                                                                      Action Plan
Principle – Preserve and Enhance the Integrity of the Natural Environment
Any change in Downtown Grimsby should be undertaken in a manner that will preserve and
enhance the integrity of the natural environment of the community.

This helps to ensure that the impact on environmental sustainability is considered as a major
factor in the assessment of any proposed changes in Downtown Grimsby. Environmental
sustainability refers to the preservation and enhancement of the natural environment including
surface and groundwater systems, natural habitats (e.g. aquatic, wetland, terrestrial),
landforms, natural area corridors, and the establishment of linkages between natural features.

Objective
> To maintain and enhance the natural systems


Principle – Economically Sustainable Community
Decisions made with respect to the future of Downtown Grimsby will reflect the need to
establish an economically sustainable community. This encourages a broadly based planning
approach that will maintain, and where feasible, enhance the economic health of Downtown
Grimsby. As one principle, economic vitality (e.g. sound retail commercial businesses) will be
encouraged through the promotion of Downtown Grimsby as a place for professionally run
retail businesses.

Objectives
> To foster an economic climate which supports the economic health of existing businesses and
  encourages the location of new businesses that fit within the vision
> To maintain and enhance the historic downtown as a central meeting place and shopping
  area for Downtown Grimsby and those who live nearby
> To foster opportunities for tourism through a wide variety of mechanisms which enhance the
  community for residents as well as visitors




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                                                                            Action Plan
Principle – Healthy Community
Decisions made with respect to the future of Downtown Grimsby will reflect the need to
establish a healthy community. This helps to encourage a broad based planning approach,
which will maintain, and where feasible, enhance the health of Downtown Grimsby.
Determinants of a healthy community include a sense of belonging to Downtown Grimsby,
features that foster social interaction, a caring community, and business and recreational
opportunities and linkages (i.e., strengthening opportunities and linkages between retail
commercial businesses and the following target groups – residents, recreation activity centre
users, cultural visitors, farmers’ market visitors, etc.)

Objectives
> To provide, within the context of Downtown Grimsby, a range of recreational, educational,
  and cultural facilities and activities that meet the needs of all residents
> To build and maintain the physical services required to ensure the health and safety and
  well-being of Downtown Grimsby
> To ensure that all changes to Downtown Grimsby promote safety through the use of
  appropriate design strategies
> To encourage pedestrian, bicycle and wheelchair/ability accessibility throughout


Principle - Financial Feasibility
Any change in Downtown Grimsby should be financially feasible both with respect to capital
and operating costs.

Objectives
> To keep the capital and operating costs of public sector development in Downtown Grimsby
  at a level that can be borne financially by residents and businesses
> To ensure that the capital costs of new development are covered




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8.0       STRATEGY

As stated, Downtown Grimsby is a mixture of both small town personality combined with a
larger town sophisticated retail services in a wide range of retail goods and services.


8.1       Organizational Strategy

The core principle of retail commercial revitalization is organizational strategy. Everything
cannot be accomplished by regulations and zoning. Downtown Grimsby DIA needs to be
commended for taking the “leap-of-faith” towards creating a more effective DIA through hiring
staff and taking on an effective branding study. In addition, the current Community
Improvement Plan study combined with urban design guidelines build upon charting a new
direction for Downtown Grimsby. The initial results of the DIA re-organization are noticeable,
garnering support from retailers and property owners for the increase in coordination and
communication efforts.

Although there have been some recent successes, another challenge for the DIA is that it has
recently expanded to include several plazas. The result is that the DIA is grappling with the
need to service a large Downtown area whose requirements are diverse.

Downtown Grimsby DIA has to continually develop support for the branding, retail, CIP, and
urban design strategies that is both broad and deep amongst the membership. These changes to
Downtown Grimsby DIA will probably push the retail district in different directions.
Persistence and commitment are necessary from the current members, the revitalization
committee, and Board of Directors as well as the Town and Region.


Organizational Characteristics, Structure, and Resources
>     The Downtown Grimsby DIA should develop into an organization similar to Downtown
      Orillia, Dundas, and Cobourg. While these other organizations are well established and
      assume a wide range of responsibilities, the Downtown Grimsby DIA will need to be
      selective as it moves through the revitalization process and develops programs. A
      concerted effort on easily achievable goals (low hanging fruit) should be a focus. Too much
      too soon will catapult the organization to failure as the weaknesses will overpower any
      planning efforts. The DIA organization must be seen as able to accomplish tasks and must
      set out achievable and relatively simple tasks. The marketing programs have been highly
      effective, but more emphasis on public relations will pay back tremendously. In addition,
      consumer surveys indicated that visitors thought Downtown Grimsby was “tired-looking.”
      Increased emphasis on façade improvements, landscaping and streetscaping combined with
      a longer-term strategy for redevelopment of select sites is important. The DIA must
      communicate what has been accomplished and what their plans are in moving forward.



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>     The DIA must have competent, energetic, and creative board members. There should be a
      strong preference for board members who are decision-makers and should include retailers,
      property owners, property managers, as well as arts, cultural, and recreational advocates,
      financial/accounting professionals, marketing professionals, architects, and the like.
      Leading the revitalization of a large Downtown is not easy or something that can be
      accomplished in a nine-to-five type job. Furthermore, there is a need to solidify the need for
      paid staff including an executive director, a part-time marketing person, and someone to
      oversee beautification programs2. The executive direct must possess both general
      organizational skills and facilitation skills (including board management experience) as well
      as a certain level of technical skill and knowledge related to Town and Region services, real
      estate development, and marketing.
>     The new organization must have the capacity to effect tasks. Acting as an advocate for
      Downtown Grimsby is very important, but not sufficient to accomplish the tasks at hand.
      At the same time, it should be recognized that the Downtown Grimsby DIA would not have
      sufficient resources to accomplish everything it sets out to do. It will have to establish
      partnerships and alliances with other organizations – the Town, the Region, the Chamber of
      Commerce, resident associations, houses of worship, libraries, schools, arts and cultural
      clubs, and recreational agencies – to leverage its resources.



The Downtown Grimsby DIA’s primary responsibility is to improve the local business climate
through a combination of management, maintenance, and marketing. The DIA must play the
roles of:

>     Advocate – As stated, being an advocate for Downtown Grimsby businesses is important
      but it is only part of the DIA’s roles and responsibilities. The DIA must ensure that
      Downtown Grimsby’s interests are represented and advanced in policy and resource
      allocation decisions at the Town and regional levels (including the provincial level). The
      organizational plan provides recommendations for improving communication with the
      objective of better informing, engaging, and mobilizing all Downtown community interests.

>     Marketer – With continued Town growth, Downtown Grimsby DIA needs to solidify its
      role as the primary marketer of Downtown, aiming to develop a broader base of target
      markets to draw to the area. Eventually, it may also oversee communication to attract
      investor markets to create new businesses, residential units, cultural and recreational
      venues, and investment.




2   The DIA may contract out extra maintenance work or hire these workers as part of the organization to
facilitate street cleanliness.

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>    Facilitator – In the long-term, Downtown Grimsby DIA can play a strong role as facilitator
     or “deal maker” to encourage new types of marketable real estate investment. In addition, it
     may also take a more aggressive position on the real estate delivery system (e.g., ease of
     using incentive programs; beautification projects, permits, retail recruitment, etc.). This role
     will take some time to develop given the higher priority for other tasks and the skill that is
     involved.



Communication
Communications programs are intended to better inform and educate all Downtown Grimsby
stakeholders (including DIA members and non-members) on issues, challenges, and
opportunities affecting the area. To fulfill the Downtown Grimsby DIA’s role as the advocate,
promoter, and facilitator, the following program initiatives are recommended:
> Bi-weekly fax or e-mail: increasing the frequency of communication will provide timely
    updates on Downtown Grimsby issues and activities. The fax/e-mail is targeted to the
    primary Downtown Grimsby DIA retailers, property owners, and other stakeholders.
> Website: enhance the Downtown Grimsby Website (Friendly by Nature) to build both
    internal communications and external marketing.




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                                                                        Action Plan
The following are examples of effective Websites produced by Downtown Boulder and
Downtown Port Parry.




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>    Newsletter: continuing with the newsletter is recommended to achieve several
     communication goals including providing in-depth information on pertinent activities and
     improvements, and providing a visually stimulating medium with which to market
     Downtown Grimsby. Newsletters should have a broader distribution beyond DIA
     members.
>    Downtown Grimsby maps and directories: maps and directories can fulfill several
     objectives including providing an inventory of Downtown Grimsby businesses, promoting
     the diversity of Downtown Grimsby, providing a useful resource to employees and visitors,
     and offering a direct visible benefit to members; advertising could also be sought for the
     directory to defray costs.
>    It is important that the directory be directly applicable to select target markets such as
     workers, tourists, and locals. Additionally, eating and drinking establishments, being a
     primary need of map users, should be listed directly across from the map, making them
     easy to locate. These can be online first with hardcopy directories at a later date. Unique
     maps such as those located on hydro boxes, or located near recreational trails, bike racks,
     and municipal parking lots help to reinforce the depth and breadth of goods and services
     offered in Downtown. Each week the DIA can promote a different aspect of the Downtown
     businesses in the local newspaper along with a map of their locations. For instance, one
     week the DIA may promote all the food related businesses, another week those businesses
     that are open past 6:00 pm are promoted, and another week all the home improvement
     related goods and services businesses get promoted.
>    Annual community updates: the Downtown Grimsby DIA should continue the annual
     update at the Annual General Meeting in a town hall format to showcase Downtown
     Grimsby improvements, challenges, and opportunities.
>    Quarterly issue forums: quarterly forums can feature speakers on a variety of issues
     ranging from updates on projects, expansion news, festivals and events, construction
     projects, and retailing workshops (merchandising displays, trends, holiday season retail,
     etc.).

     In addition, open communication on who to contact for which service can be provided such
     as the Region, Town, DIA, etc.




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A copy of a “How can we help?” information sheet should be made available to all businesses



>     Member and ratepayer surveys: annual member surveys should be undertaken to track
      overall satisfaction with both the DIA’s programs and general Downtown Grimsby
      perceptions in order to establish benchmarks and monitor progress. The DIA has begun a
      program of asking retailers for changes in sales level activities to help monitor the success of
      programs such as events. These types of programs should be expanded and solidified. It is
      important, however, that anonymity be preserved for the retailers providing the
      information.
      Funding: the existing budget includes approximately $55,000 from the levy and an
      additional $15,000 from payments from the Great Canadian Superstore3. In the past, the
      budget did not reflect the full cost of the executive directory and marketing staff as these
      were paid for with a special program. The current 2009 budget allocates funds for a part-
      time executive director only as the special program funding has run out.



      The budget should be expanded to $120,000 over the next five years. Additional fees may
      be requested of non-levy paying businesses such as the LCBO, houses of worship, etc. This
      type of funding is similar to other similar sized Towns.




3   Note that this additional funding will only last under 2017.

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     Community                   Population   BIA Budget
     Downtown Cobourg              19,000     $120,000
     Downtown Dundas               30,000     $115,000 plus sponsorship and municipal support
     Downtown Bracebridge          15,000     $100,000
     Downtown Bowmanville          25,000     $138,000 plus municipal support


     In addition, the DIA may consider developing a memorandum of understanding with the
     Town and the Region regarding maintenance. The DIA can assume responsibility for
     garbage pick up, snow removal, sidewalk cleaning, and overall landscaping in one
     coordinated program. This eliminates duplication of services and can often be more cost
     effective as the DIA may not have to use unionized labour. The Town and Region would
     both contribute to the DIA to pay for these services. (See Appendix C for an example)




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                                                                                            Action Plan
     The split in expenses for Downtown Grimsby DIA includes the following:
     Administration (salaries and office expenses) 34%
     Marketing                                     21%
     Maintenance and Beautification                14%
     Events                                        21%

     The following BIAs were surveyed for the split in their expenses.

                                                                                   The           Junction
                                                                                  Beach,         Gardens,
                                Downtown      Downtown          Downtown         Toronto,        Toronto,         Downtown,
                                Orillia, ON   Picton, ON        Perth, ON          ON              ON             Rutland, VT
       Levy Funds                 $232,000     $80,000          $76,000          165,000         $277,000           $237,000
                                              moving to
                                               $120,000
       Additional                $40,000       See note         $19,000                                             $63,000
       Funds                                    below
       Administration              34%           60%              53%               31%             28%               47%
       Marketing                   27%           30%              22%               39%             55%               22%
       Maintenance                 28%         10% see            25%               30%             14%               10%
       and                                    note below
       Beautification
       Events                      11%                          See note                                              16%
                                                                 below
       Business                                                                              3%               5%
       Development
     Notes:
     1. Orillia: additional funds are raised through special events. Most revenues and expense are flow-through
         accounts but the BIA is able to make a small profit.
     2. Picton: not included in the maintenance and beautification budget is an allocation of $160,000 from the
         Province and $357,000 from the county for urban design improvements as well as an additional staff
         person and marketing budgets.
     3. Perth: special events and festival costs are $60,000 which the BIA raises and spends as a net flow through
         account.
     4. Plans for Perth BIA are to raise the levy by about 3% annually. The average levy for each business is
         approximately $1,000. The Town has a joint economic development officer and community development
         (heritage) person.


     The re-allocation of funds should place a greater emphasis on maintenance and
     beautification and less on events. Administration should be 40% to 50% of the budget.




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     Other budget considerations include:
     > As stated, the DIA may take over the maintenance and beautification (not capital
        improvements) for Downtown Grimsby through a memorandum of understanding that
        outlines the required services and payments to be received from the Town and the
        Region.
     > The DIA may share resources and equipment with other towns (e.g. marketing staff
        could work for Beamsville or Smithville and Downtown Grimsby or equipment such as a
        pressure washer or street sweeper can be jointly shared between different towns to help
        clean the sidewalks, etc.).



Recommendations – Organization
     Action Step                                           Time Frame           Responsibility
     Establish a committee and develop business case       Immediate            Grimsby DIA
     for DIA budget increases and allocation including
     the need for permanent staff and a maintenance
     memorandum of understanding
     DIA to canvas for support and increase                Short-term           Grimsby DIA
     communication both internally and externally
     Develop a full set of communication tools             Short-term           Grimsby DIA
     depending on budgets and resource time
     Evaluate DIA committees ensuring that the             Short-term           Grimsby DIA
     following are included: executive, beautification,
     maintenance (clean and safe) and urban design,
     events, marketing, retention and recruitment, and
     parking
     Commit to staff training and learning with respect    Short-term           Grimsby DIA
     to facilitation, board management, real estate,
     marketing, retail recruitment, etc. of DIA staff
     Develop roles, responsibilities, and organizational   Short-term           Grimsby DIA,
     needs of supporting and partnership groups for                             Town, Region,
     the implementation of the action plan (Town,                               other stakeholders
     Region, Chamber of Commerce, library, houses of
     worship, farmers’ market, wineries, tourism, etc.)
     Search other funding sources such as LCBO,            Medium-              Grimsby DIA,
     corporations, etc.                                    term                 Town




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8.2       Downtown Grimsby’s Commercial Composition

The relatively large size of the retail area for Downtown Grimsby necessitates a
sub-district approach to understanding the retail economic development opportunities.


Principles of Commercial Success
As Downtown Grimsby DIA is well aware, there are no overnight miracles in retail business
district development. The continued expansion and redevelopment of the Grimsby Square
Plaza and the Village Inn as well as the proposed dentist plaza are testament to the commitment
of retail growth in Downtown Grimsby.

The relatively low vacancy rate, however, has meant that the Downtown has not had to face a
severe problem of finding tenants. The high turnover of tenants, however, is a concern. The
steps by the DIA towards prioritizing projects and marketing itself reaffirm its commitment to
the goals of enhancing the area for the betterment of the community and, foremost, the
merchants.

The principles underlying the future commercial success of Downtown Grimsby are as follows:



1. Ensure there is an enabling organization to carry out the marketing, retail, and mixed-use
development, as well as ensure that cultural and physical requirements are met in order to
continually improve the area.
The strength of any revitalization program is based on having an effective organization. The
organization creates a broad-based partnership among public and private sector interests, to
provide leadership and resources to propel and maintain the DIA’s goals.

Currently, the Downtown Grimsby DIA board works effectively together to create positive
change and is managed by effective staff resources. The DIA needs to move into a position to
handle increased responsibility. Many retailers and property owners, although they do not
actively participate, need to be supportive of the DIA, its goals and objectives. Continued
communication to encourage support and participation comes from a “carrot and stick”
approach, such as façade improvement money for businesses (carrot) and peer pressure to
participate, as well as code enforcement (stick). Communication is vital as the DIA plans its
revitalization.



2. Ensure the basics are in place.
Downtown Grimsby is a neighbourhood main street including both vehicular and pedestrian
dependent businesses. The catchment area includes over 67,000 people in the primary trade
area. Overall, Downtown Grimsby offers a good range of convenience/neighbourhood

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oriented goods and services including grocery items, financial services, convenience stores,
drug stores, hardware and home improvement, alcohol, and restaurants and cafés. The area is
also relatively safe and clean. Of importance for Downtown Grimsby will be to ensure that
these successful businesses remain healthy. Retail retention programs should be enhanced so
that good, quality businesses will stay and remain competitive as new businesses open.



3. Build off strengths.
Like any marketed consumer product or brand, Downtown Grimsby has several important
commercial attributes, namely:
> An attractive environment
> Historical architecture
> A very low vacancy rate (non-existent)
> A wide selection of businesses
> Friendly people
> A small community atmosphere, very welcoming

It will be important for Downtown Grimsby to capitalize on these strengths.



4. Linkages are critical.
The power of retail commercial business districts is rooted in their diversity. This allows for
Downtown Grimsby to retain its unique small town personality and character while at the same
time expand with the depth and breadth of shopping formats and businesses to suit a wider
variety of consumer needs. There is a requirement for pedestrian flow within sub-districts as
well as between the sub-districts. Should pedestrian traffic not flow within and between the
various sub-districts and businesses, diversity will be compartmentalized and stifled. For this
reason, it is crucial to ensure that linkages within Downtown Grimsby are established and well
maintained.

Taking into consideration the recent DIA expansion that includes retail businesses from Kerman
Avenue to Robinson Street, it is important to ensure that there is a common voice that is
marketed to potential consumers. Yet, there will likely be requirements for select marketing of
certain sub-districts. Once again, there may be an overall design aesthetic but there is a need for
improved vehicular access in the west end as opposed to improved pedestrian movement in the
historic core. For example, the current Downtown Grimsby signs may be an appropriate size
for close-up pedestrian movement but are virtually impossible to see from a moving vehicle.

Linkages need to be enhanced and maintained on a continual basis. Actions that promote a
more cohesive feel should be encouraged. These include linkages under the following three
banners:



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> Urban design: urban design guidelines, gateway projects, public parking design and layout,
  linkages with Coronation Park, the trail system, landscape and streetscape master plan (e.g.,
  types of trees, benches, light standards), etc.
> Economic development: retail continuity, infill development, retail clustering that is
  mutually supportive, cultural, arts, entertainment, and recreational anchors (e.g., library,
  community centre, skating rink, etc.)
> Marketing: signage, banners, systematic symbols for parking, way finding programs, cross-
  promotion of businesses, arts, culture, and special events with a consistent branded focus,
  new social media, etc..



5. Create a specialty niche.
The niche for Downtown Grimsby is not a specific industry such as St. Jacobs - antiques, Jordan
- wine, Ottawa Street, Hamilton - fabric and home décor, Niagara-on-the-Lake - tourists but a
governing principle related to service. Service is the defining character of Downtown Grimsby.
The following are examples of how this may be marketed to consumers.
> Make it easy for visitors to stop and enjoy Downtown Grimsby including easy to use
    parking
> Commit to increasing staff service levels through education and training
> Provide free samples, service, advice, delivery, etc.
> Determine who the most loyal customers are and ensure that the majority of the marketing
    budget is spent on them




>    Stay ahead of the power centre and mall retailers (e.g., Winners, Home Depot, etc.) by
     stocking unique products that are sought after by your target markets.
>    Extend hours of operation in coordination with other retailers to service the commuter
     population.
>    Have private member only events such as men-only holiday shopping events.
>    Maintain a database of wish-list items and gift registries.
>    Offer gift wrapping.
>    Offer free outdoor movies (charge for food and drinks) projected onto a large wall in the
     Downtown – bring your own chair.



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                                                                             Action Plan
>    Use database marketing from list of special event attendees to target Downtown Grimsby
     visitors with follow up promotions.
>    Be solution oriented – highlight the fact that Downtown businesses can make your life
     simpler: showcase all the food merchants, all the businesses open past 6:00 pm; all the home
     improvement merchants; all the sporting and recreation oriented businesses; all the tax and
     accounting specialists; all in different weekly publications. Highlight a different business
     solution sector each week. Include images of family and friends socializing and shopping in
     Downtown to add life to the ads.

     There is shift in consumer shopping behaviour from commodity to solution and serviced
     based. The Container Store in the U.S. is an excellent example of a retailer that sells
     solutions.




     In addition, consumers are adding more criteria to their shopping requirements beyond the
     initial selection of a product or service

     Over eight in 10 women prefer to “do
     something for themselves” rather than “buy
     something for themselves,” it is no surprise
     that luxury services are often in strong
     demand and that, according to American
     Demographics, 72% of women said that
     their last luxury purchase was because they
     wanted to “treat themselves to something
     special”




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Finally, the definition of luxury is changing. It no longer means high end clothing but a range of
special products and services.




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Retail Recruitment
A cooperative approach among property owners towards leasing or opening retail stores,
restaurants, and services may be established. However, this is difficult to establish and
maintain but the benefits are worthwhile. This approach requires property owners, landlords,
and brokers to be involved in endorsing the idea of searching for retailers and restricting the
types of retailers to the agreed retail mix. Generally, this can work, but there are always
landlords who need cash flow and cannot delay leasing, and thus take the first or best offer
regardless of the plan. These landlords should not be able to compromise the program.

The program for the DIA entails open communication with property owners, property
managers, and brokers regarding the retail vision for Downtown Grimsby. Currently, the main
initiative of the Grimsby DIA is “The Merchants of Downtown Grimsby”. This is too limited.
There is a need for the DIA to represent both the merchants’ concerns and the property owners’
concerns. A special committee of the DIA should be established to address development and
leasing issues. The group does not need to meet often but regular updates are required.

While vacancy is not a problem for Downtown Grimsby, this program will be important for
Downtown Grimsby DIA in order to respond quickly when a vacancy occurs. Having the
resources in place to find the most appropriate tenant/retailer (or even developing a waiting list
of retailers) will ensure that Downtown Grimsby continually works towards its vision of
building complementary stores and services. The benefit is a Downtown that will be more
enjoyable for shoppers with fewer store turnovers. In addition, succession planning could be a
major role for the Downtown Grimsby DIA. Finding would-be entrepreneurs to take over
successful businesses is an important task.




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The types of retailers with an affinity for the target markets of younger families and seniors who
are aging-in-place include the following. Note that many of these already exist and this is not to
be interpreted as duplication. What is also worth mentioning is that in the historic Main Street
area there should be more emphasis on locally owned stores.

Retail               > Hardware and home improvement – hardware, paint store, interior decorating,
                         flooring, gardening (2,500 to 15,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Home furnishings and hand-crafted furniture, kitchen supply (3,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Specialty apparel – women’s work wear, children’s, women’s and children’s combined,
                         specialty men’s (1,000 to 2,500 sq. ft.)
                     >   Fabric (notions and sewing) store, knitting cafe (5,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Jewellery store – traditional, contemporary, handcrafted (1,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Discount store – Giant Tiger (12,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Specialty and gift stores (1,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Leisure retailers – sporting goods, music, books, pet and pet supply, florist, knitting cafe
                         (2,000 sq. ft.)
Eating and           >   Family restaurants (approx. 4,000 to 7,000 sq. ft.)
Drinking             >   Coffee houses
                     >   Small bistros (2,500 sq. ft.)
                     >   Quick service such as Subway, Fast Fresh Foods
                     >   Local pub, gastro pub (3,000 to 5,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Wine bar
Convenience          >   Supermarkets and larger format general merchandise stores that include grocery
                     >   Urban grocers (5,000 to 12,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Health – small, specialized, cosmetics (2,000 sq. ft.) and larger format (10,000 to 20,000
                         sq. ft.)
                     >   Home health store for disabilities (3,000 to 5,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Liquor store – newer larger format
                     >   The Beer Store
                     >   Wine store
                     >   Specialty food store – butcher/deli, cheese, bakery, ice cream, health, organic (approx.
                         1,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Convenience store and variety store (1,500 sq. ft.)
Services             >   Representation from at least four of the major banks (5,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Beauty services – hair, nail, and spa (1,200 sq. ft.)
                     >   Daycare (10,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Travel – e.g., CAA (1,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Photography (1,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Mobile phone (1,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Dry cleaning (500 sq. ft.)
                     >   Medical – dentist, doctor, specialist, walk-in clinic, veterinary (2,000 to 15,000 sq. ft.)
                     >   Professional services – accounting, legal, insurance, real estate, etc. (5,000 sq. ft.)




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Other                > Library
                     > Education services – art school, cooking school
                     > Culture and recreation services – martial arts, dance, theatre, bowling alley, fitness
                       studio
                     > Art gallery

It is noted that the DIA is not equipped to perform retail recruitment functions and that this
should be left to the property owners, property managers, and brokers. The DIA and the Town
can coordinate and pass along information on the demographics, redevelopment plans, transit
changes, etc., but cannot actively recruit or sign deals.


Retention Programs
Downtown Grimsby DIA will be able to supply retention services through the following means:
> Making educational tools (including videos, guidelines, and books) available to businesses.
> Offering seminars on topics such as merchandising, effective use of window displays, how to
  offer good customer service, how to develop an Internet site (multi-channel retailing), safety,
  and applying for grant programs.
> Making demographic information from this report and future studies available so that
  businesses can target their promotions to customers better.
> Providing businesses with networking opportunities by holding meetings at different
  locations throughout the DIA. This gives local retailers the opportunity to learn about each
  other’s businesses.
> Supporting cross-promotional efforts (e.g., a business directory). Reward businesses by
  providing marketing support for businesses that want to market themselves jointly. The BIA
  could supply additional marketing funds to those businesses that agree to cooperative
  advertising. For example, if four businesses wanted to pool their resources and advertise in
  a local publication, the DIA could reward these businesses by funding a portion of the total
  cost.
> Independent retailers should work towards establishing relationships with buying
  organizations, with the aim of achieving better discounts for buying in bulk.
> Additional sales can be generated by assessing service add-ons. This can include sporting
  goods stores providing repair services, delivery services especially for grocery type items,
  personal shopping services and assistance with wardrobe, interior design services, among
  others.

One of the most attractive selling points for prospective retailers is the knowledge that they will
be situated close to other strong stores. Because of this, upgrading existing retailers is also an
important part of recruitment activities. Also, just as these are important services for existing
retailers, new start-up retailers should be encouraged to take advantage of these services.



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                                                                             Action Plan
Redevelopment Sites
While many of these retailers are more averse to mixed-use developments (often due to poor
sight lines attributed to columns, ceiling heights, and underground parking requirements), they
have adapted. Options for some larger format retailers are to allow for development in a “dog’s
leg” type layout whereby the street entrance to the retailer is relatively small compared to the
larger square footage that is behind the retail storefronts. This preserves the interesting street
front of smaller retail units fronting onto the street.

                                                                                    The deeper purple coloured
                                                                                    retail units are “dog
                                                                                    legged,” allowing for
                                                                                    larger retail units but
                                                                                    preserving a consistent
                                                                                    street front layout.




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                                                                Action Plan
                                     Museum Place in Downtown Portland,
                                     Oregon represents a unique development that
                                     allows for mixed-use development over a
                                     large grocery store. Many large retail uses
                                     have issues with columns disrupting sight
                                     lines that are required for mixed-use
                                     developments.

                                     This design places the larger residential
                                     development to the back of the project where
                                     it will interfere less with the retail activity.
                                     Affordable and market-rate townhouses and
                                     apartments are located at the front of the
                                     development. The grocery store has high
                                     ceilings and an abundance of glass that allow
                                     for maximum permeability from the street
                                     into the store.

                                     Green space is created on the upper level
                                     courtyard connecting the residential
                                     developments.

                                     There are no backlit signs – the whole
                                     development blends well with the
                                     surrounding residential.




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District Analysis


i.   The Convenience District
     The Convenience District extends from Kerman Avenue to Christie Street but it is primarily
     located east of Brierwood Avenue. The north side of the street has developed into
     commercial units dating from the 1950s onwards. The historic homes on the south side
     have been maintained and converted for commercial uses. Also, the Village Inn Plaza is
     perpendicular to Main Street on the south side.

     This district is substantially automobile-oriented, with a wider roadway (4 lanes) and
     limited on-street parking. Off-street parking is located at the front/side of deeply set back
     buildings, highway commercial-style signage, and narrow sidewalks. The width of the
     street combined with gaps in the streetwall, deep setbacks, and low building heights, creates
     a less pedestrian-friendly, less ‘intimate’ street environment.




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                                                                                 Action Plan
Action Items
The convenience district can be enhanced over time through streetscaping improvements, new
infill developments, and redevelopments to become better integrated with the older portion of
Main Street.

Most of the properties on the north side from Murray Street to Christie Street could be
redeveloped as mixed-use developments that front onto Main Street/Livingston Avenue.
Special consideration should be made to preserve creek front access. In addition, the
redevelopments may take advantage of the sloping topography to provide unique access and
parking arrangements. With the possibility for a wide variety of retail, including convenience
based goods and services, it is important to note that stores should be primarily located along
Main Street rather than recessed into the plazas.

On the south side, efforts should be made to
maintain the historic home look of many of the
buildings without conversion to bland
commercial facades. Uses will include
appointment/reservation-based businesses (e.g.,
doctors, lawyers, aestheticians, high-end dining)
as well as destination businesses (e.g., unique,
one-of-a-kind gifts, home furnishings, apparel,
etc.).

The Grimsby Square Plaza is relatively new and         The Claramont Spa and Inn in Downtown Picton
is currently undergoing a redevelopment and
expansion. In the future, the plaza
could be redeveloped with retail units
closer to the street with parking
located at the rear/side.

A similar redevelopment scenario
should be envisioned for Village Inn
Plaza but include more mixed-use
developments.




                                                 This retail layout shows retail units fronting onto the main
                                                 street and the development of a side main street leading to the
                                                 larger format stores.




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ii. The Main Street District
    The Main Street District overlaps all other districts. It primarily runs from Christie/Mountain
    Street to Elm Street. It contains features of a well-preserved 19th century Ontario Main Street
    with the following features:
    > A narrow 2-lane roadway
    > On-street parking
    > Heritage lighting
    > Narrow setbacks
    > Generally consistent streetwall
    > Commercial uses on the ground floor with residential or office uses on upper floors
    > Rows of trees on either side




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                                                                                 Action Plan
Action Items
This is the heart of Downtown Grimsby for socializing and meeting with friends. A dominance
in retail merchandise combined with eating and drinking is the focus of this district –
particularly related to cultural and leisure businesses. In addition, convenience based retailers
focus in on the working population.

Unique buildings, stores on the ground level, a continuous streetwall, on-street parking, and
rows of trees are some of the ingredients that make Main Street an attractive destination.

Opening up Ontario Street to Elm Street should be a priority to achieve a safe crossing, open
views to the escarpment, and create a town square for social gatherings.

Retailers must have excellent sight lines into their stores with good merchandising. Outdoor
patios should be encouraged.

Retail merchandise can range from specialty apparel, gift, home furnishings, electronics,
specialty food, health, sporting goods, and leisure. Services should include personal care,
banking, travel, etc. While there are a large number of professional services it is recognized that
these are very important businesses in the Downtown but they should be primarily located on
side streets, upper levels, and fringes of the Main Street District.

                                                 Details in Downtown Alliston, Ontario provides over 5,000
                                                 square feet of home furnishings including custom designed
                                                 furniture. The store is intensely merchandised on two floors
                                                 with a wide array of unique products.




                                                 An interesting mixed-use development with a strong corner
                                                 entrance.




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                                                                                      Action Plan
iii. The Cultural and Civic District
     The absence of the Town Hall in Downtown Grimsby means there is an absence of a Town
     Square. At the southern end of Ontario Street (at Main Street East) there should be a town
     square. Ontario Street should function as a mini cultural and civic district in Downtown
     Grimsby. The VIA rail station, library, and art gallery strengthen this function for Ontario
     Street.




                                                     A knitting café combines eating and drinking, retail,
                                                     and socializing in a unique setting. The appeal is
                                                     cross generational from younger to older.




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Action Items
Redevelop the post office sorting facility into a town square and road connection to Elm Street.

Strengthen the arts and cultural function of the
street. Loft housing along the street and nearby
areas would also assist in strengthening the
theme.

Retail may include creative industries such as art
galleries, artist supply stores, cafes and bistros,
craft stores, electronics stores, recreational
businesses such as yoga and dance studios,
martial arts, and associated clothing
                                                                      The Buddha Dog Café in Downtown Picton offers a
                                                                      unique eating experience. The connection back to the
                                                                      unique natural landscape is painted on the back wall
                                                                      showing the entire Prince Edward County peninsula and
                                                                      the 800 km of water frontage.



 Bistros where the customers can see the food being prepared in the
            kitchen adds to the experiential aspect the Downtown.




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                                                                            Action Plan
iv.       Main Street East (East End)

East of Elm Street, the retail along Main Street becomes more vehicular dependent with small
plazas and stand-along retailers.




Action Items
> Encourage mixed-use development of vacant parcels that front onto Main Street East.
> Discourage drive-through retailers.
> Discourage direct access to parking from Main Street East but rather encourage
   consolidation of entrances from the side streets.
> Consider redevelopment of the former IGA into non-retail use (residential, community
   cultural centre, etc.).
> Assess if there are partnership opportunities with St. Joseph school located to the north of
   the district.
> Create an extension of the Main Street District retail environment with more focus on
   convenience goods and services and destination goods. There will be a mix of both
   vehicular dependent type retail and pedestrian dependent.




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                                                                                                Action Plan
                                                                 Redevelopment can include a range of buildings, interior
                                                                 courtyards, and different access points.




Redevelopment and mixed-use sites can be more contemporary or traditional/classical in design (or a blend of both).




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                                                                            Action Plan
v.        Historic

Focused to the south of Main Street is a large collection of historic homes some of which have
been converted to retail commercial businesses. Anchored by the Grimsby Museum, the
historic buildings in this area should be preserved as much as possible.




Action Items
> Preserve historic homes.
> Limited retail opportunities except for appointment based retailing (doctors, dentists,
   lawyers, brokers, fine dining, beauty services, etc.) and destination retailers.
> Improve connections with natural environment.
> Better wayfinding programs from Main Street up Mountain Street.




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                                                                            Action Plan
Recommendations – Downtown Grimsby Commercial Composition
     Action Step                                         Time Frame           Responsibility
     Hold regular meetings (two-to-three times a year)   Short-term           Grimsby DIA
     with stakeholders on the status of the commercial
     environment and upcoming changes (e.g. urban
     design, CIP, bylaws, new commercial
     developments, and other changes) with learning
     as a key component.
     Commit to a program of fostering learning for       Short-term           Grimsby DIA
     merchants and property owners through
     education, seminars, sharing demographic
     information, and increased networking.


     Create a property owners, brokers, and developers Short-term             Grimsby DIA
     group as part of the DIA
     Use the existing database as a starting point to    Short-term           Grimsby DIA,
     profile each business.                                                   property owners,
                                                                              property managers,
                                                                              businesses
     Develop a simple retail recruitment package on      Medium-              Grimsby DIA
     why a business should locate in Downtown            term
     Grimsby. When a property becomes vacant,
     Downtown Grimsby will be able to react
     immediately with a list of prospective tenants to
     call upon to market the property successfully.


     Develop a list of retail uses for proposed          Medium-to-           Grimsby DIA
     redevelopable properties.                           long-term


     Review zoning bylaws and regulations on an as       Medium-to-           Grimsby DIA,
     needed basis.                                       long-term            Town, Region




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                                                                            Action Plan
8.3       Programs for Enjoyable Shopping

The following notes complement the work being developed by GSP Partners related to the
urban design guidelines, landscaping plans, and the CIP. These notes are in specific reference
to creating a more enjoyable shopping experience in Downtown Grimsby.



The brand and slogan “Friendly By Nature” should be a starting point and basis for all
beautification projects, including the aspect of enhancing the natural aspects and the ease and
convenience of visiting Downtown Grimsby. For retail this includes:
> Enhancing views from restaurant patios of the natural environment including the
   escarpment, 40 Mile Creek, and Lake Ontario. This may include rooftop patios as well.
> Creating exciting and programmed public gathering spaces for socialization, including both
   hardscaped plazas (e.g., Carnegie Library) and greenscaped parks (e.g., Coronation Park),
   bench locations that encourage socialization, etc.
> Using attractive and interesting wayfinding systems that may include signs or landmark
   buildings.




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                                                                              Action Plan
Clean and Well Maintained
The DIA is not a panacea for everything in Downtown Grimsby. Rather, it is a tool to help the
organization achieve what it set out in an action plan. If the DIA wants to affect the
beautification of streets, landscapes, and facades, then it is suggested that the DIA work
effectively with the Town, the Region, and with property owners to develop a program of
landscaping, hiring maintenance staff (or contracting the services out to a firm), and encourage
programs such as grants to assist in property redevelopment.

It should be understood that DIAs are a funding mechanism, not a specific set of programs,
although many Downtown organizations do focus on “clean and safe” services as part of
beautification. The emphasis on “clean and safe” is due to the following points:
> Making a Downtown clean and safe is basic. Property owners understand that merchants,
     shoppers, other customers, and visitors are unlikely to rent space or visit the Downtown if it
     is (or is perceived to be) unsafe and unkempt.
> Some of the best and most publicized Downtown organizations have concentrated heavily
     on “clean and safe” activities.

A full clean and maintenance program can include:
> Marketing to encourage people to take care of Grimsby by not littering.
> Reminders to businesses when garbage pick up is and what can be disposed of: there should
   be enforcement of penalties if garbage is put out too early, etc.
> Determination of regular garbage pickup at hours when it will not disrupt commercial
   businesses.
> Attractive trash and recycling receptacles kept in good working order
> Pressure washing the streets in the summer. A pressure washer can be purchased by the
   BIA or shared by other districts/downtowns.
> Develop a memorandum of understanding between the Town and the Region by which
   they pay the DIA to carry out the clean and maintenance program for the Downtown
   businesses. The DIA will manage the contract with a private sector contractor.
> Additional services can be supplied by the DIA with contracted help. This can include
   window washing, but businesses would pay a fee for this service.




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                                                                             Action Plan
Parking
The importance of the need for accessible parking in any retail/commercial environment is
undeniable. However, parking is also important from an investment point of view. Retailers
and developers will not only analyze the parking supply nearby, but also the parking turnover.
According to retail studies, a parking space can be worth the equivalent of $40,000 per year to
retailers. Currently, Downtown Grimsby has a system that encourages turnover of spaces along
Main Street by having two-hour free parking as well as offering free longer-term parking in
municipal lots to the north and south of Main Street. In addition, there are ample private sector
lots.

The Town’s parking policy should continue to encourage long-term parking on the adjacent lots
through increased marketing and education (e.g., signage indicating where it is). If the Town
and the DIA determine that parking should be not be free along Main Street, then there will
need to be continual enforcement of a two hour maximum. However, there should be
enforcement of the free parking two hour time limit through chalking tires.

In addition, it is important that the Town work cooperatively with the DIA to ensure that
parking is not removed along Main Street/Livingston Avenue without justification. As stated,
each spot is worth significant sales volume to the local businesses.




Parking is extremely important for the overall success of Downtown Grimsby. To develop a
comprehensive parking plan requires an assessment of the aims that parking is to achieve for
the retail businesses and some of the tactics that can be deployed to achieve these aims. Some of
the aims and tactics may include the following:




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                                                                                                   Action Plan




Treat parking lots as the first point of contact with visitors by ensuring they are clean, clear, and well-lit. They can be improved
with landscaping. Parking lots should be screened and feature pedestrian lighting and clear pedestrian pathways.


    The City of Orillia has reduced the parking requirements in their Downtown by half:

     Business Type                         Usual Requirement                        Downtown Requirement
     Retail                                1 space per 30 sq. m.                    1 space per 60 sq. m.
     Restaurant                            1 space per 9 sq. m.                     1 space per 18 sq. m.
     Professional Service                  1 space per 30 sq. m.                    1 space per 60 sq. m.
     Bank                                  1 space per 20 sq. m                     1 space per 40 sq. m.

Aims
> Customers to use parking.
> Viewed as an amenity for retailers.
> Ensure an ample turnover of parking and in
   particular on-street parking. This includes
   dissuading business owners and staff from parking
   on Main Street or near the rear entrances.
> Easy to find and use.
> Safe.
> Customers see value in the parking offered (it is not
   taken for granted).




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                                                                          Action Plan
Tactics
> All stalls should be clearly marked.
> There needs to be constant education and marketing for parking including reminders to
   park off-street for long-term needs, as well as visible parking maps.
> Signage must be clearly visible.
> Alley beautification should be priority to encourage linkages between the parking lots and
   Main Street.
> Market the ideas of “Park once shop as much as you like” in Downtown Grimsby. Although
   this may be difficult for some of the owners of private parking lots.
> There needs to be strong enforcement for violators (e.g., chalking of tires).
> Discuss with other venues such as houses of worship to determine if customers can use their
   parking lots when they are not being used.
> Determine whether Downtown Grimsby parking meters will help the area by offering a
   timely turnover of parking spaces, or be a hindrance by discouraging visitors.
> Ensure that there is minimum two hour parking on Main Street and Livingston Avenue in
   Downtown Grimsby.




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                                                                             Action Plan
Streetscaping and Social Gathering
Downtown Grimsby should complement the “Friendly by Nature” brand by developing
streetscaping plans that encourage social interaction. In addition, the more that the
streetscaping elements blend with the natural environment (e.g., the escarpment, nature trails,
Coronation Park, etc.) the better. This includes the development of plazas for people to gather
(e.g., town square), the placement of benches, and other streetscape elements that encourage
people gathering.

The effect on retailers is that the longer a visitor spends in Downtown the more they will spend.
UMC supports the idea of relocating the post office sorting facility on Main Street East,
connecting Ontario Street to Elm Street, and recreating a town square on the remaining parcel
thereby creating a community space with views of the escarpment.


  Photo to be inserted
                                                                          The benches in Downtown Dundas
                                                                          provide for a socialization setting.
                                                                          There is an events board located
                                                                          near the sidewalk.




                                                                          Investigate and adopt a palette of
                                                                          street furniture that encourages
                                                                          social interaction (i.e., benches
                                                                          should face one another to foster
                                                                          dialogue when sitting). The local
                                                                          artist community can assist with a
                                                                          streetscape master plan. This is the
                                                                          case in Downtown Ithaca.




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                                                       Action Plan
                                         The benches are angled encourage
                                         socialization in this Downtown Cobourg
                                         example. Notice the busker playing.
                                         Spontaneous entertainment should also be
                                         encouraged.




                                         In Quebec City, small urban plazas offer an
                                         opportunity to socialize and relax. Retailers
                                         can use the space for patio seating.




                                         The public bench develops the “Friendly by
                                         Nature” theme through a personal invitation
                                         to visitors to spend longer in the area.




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                                                       Action Plan
                                         Encourage civic spaces including Coronation
                                         Park and a proposed square on the former
                                         postal office sorting facility at Main Street
                                         East and Ontario Street. This is an example
                                         of a public square that connects the green park
                                         area with the main street shopping in
                                         Unionville. Programmed events are held at
                                         the square and it is open to visitors for
                                         inpromtu gatherings.




                                         A mini park has been created in Downtown
                                         Belleville that caps a parking lot located
                                         behind. A similar development could be used
                                         for vacant lots in the interim.




                                         Large chess games and tables for
                                         chess/checkers can add to a fun and social
                                         environment.




Urban Marketing Collaborative   110   Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                 Action Plan



                                The sidewalks in Downtown Hamilton are textured to announce
                                that an intersection is approaching. This helps the mobility and
                                visually impaired. Working with the senior community can
                                ensure that the streetscaping addresses their concerns.




                                The sidewalk treatment in Downtown Vancouver is simple and
                                includes leaf impressions scattered at random at the base of the
                                trees and relates well to the natural environment.




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                                                                           Action Plan

                                                             On Ontario Street, sidewalks can be widened
                                                             based on a sloped-elevated parallel parking
                                                             design that provides for both parking as well
                                                             as pedestrian traffic, planters, and light
                                                             standards.




                                                             Main Street, Unionville, and Downtown
                                                             Kleinburg both utilize a system of slightly
                                                             raised parallel parking that also functions as
                                                             an extended pedestrian sidewalk (as well as
                                                             places for planters and light standards).




Walkways are a unique Grimsby asset, but can be somewhat unwelcoming, particularly after
dusk. Walkways off Main Street East should be improved with lighting affixed to the sides of
buildings, planters, and interpretive plaques. Blank façades are ideal for large-scale
photographs and interpretive materials, as well as murals.




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                                                                                                    Action Plan




It is important to keep the alleyways attractive. The picture on the left is from the Back Alley District in Cincinnati’s art district,
 and the picture on the right is an alleyway in Downtown Spokane, which has been enhanced with painted out detailings, flower
                                                    baskets, and period lighting.




                                                                                      Even a simple sign related to the past
                                                                                      heritage, in this instance “The Dairy Alley”
                                                                                      in Downtown Ithaca can help to enliven
                                                                                      alleyways.




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                                                                            Action Plan
Wayfinding
A program of wayfinding in Downtown Grimsby should be used to help reinforce retailers in
the Downtown. This includes an understanding of where people are coming from and creating
linkages between activities and retailers. Wayfinding points should be located near the library,
nature trails and bike racks, as well as vehicular gateways.




                                                              This hydro pole / utility box in Downtown
                                                              Victoria serves the function of a wayfinding
                                                              map. Anchor retailers can be highlighted on
                                                              the maps.




                                                              The utility boxes in Downtown Calgary also
                                                              serves as public art installations and
                                                              wayfinding systems as they relate back to
                                                              activity centres found elsewhere in the
                                                              Downtown.




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                                                                                                  Action Plan




In Quebec City, replicas of art from museums is used to create interest along the streets. In addition, user friendly maps are
located is easy-to-find passageways.




                                                                                    Develop signage and lighting around
                                                                                    recreational areas. Encourage wayfinding
                                                                                    such as this example in Vienna at bicycle
                                                                                    racks.




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                                                                               Action Plan
Signage
High-quality signage is a key ingredient in the creation of an attractive Downtown. The
potential generalization of corporate and inexpensive-looking signage can greatly diminish the
visual appeal. In general, signage should be appropriate and supportive of the overall vision
with:
> Wood and metal (e.g., wrought iron, bronze, copper) instead of plastic
> Front lighting
> Size balanced with the building façade and scale
> Low height (pylon signage only)

The Town and the DIA must decide on the type of signs they want for each district. There may
be allowances for backlit signs in the west end but not in the historic corridor. The best policy is
to have landlords include signage controls in their leases however various municipalities have
varying controls over signage.

Mobile signage other than sandwich boards should not be allowed on Main Street as it is
inconsistent with the ‘Small Town Main Street’ image. In addition, billboards such as those
adjacent to Patton Street should not be allowed in Downtown Grimsby.




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                                                                                  Action Plan
Develop a Complementary Arts and Culture Centre or Community Centre
The Niagara Region is well known as a centre for arts,
culture, and vintners and culinary tourism. Culture has
become a defining focus that can differentiate Downtowns
from malls and suburban style developments.

Ideas include:
> Expand upon the artist cooperative in the Grimsby Art
   Gallery.
> Develop more art galleries. This is often difficult as
   market rents may be too high for artists to pay.
> Create artist live/work studios.
> Developing an artist school (similar to Dundas Valley
   School of Art in Dundas, Ontario and the Fun School of
   Music on Main Street East). This can be for adults and
   children.
> Developing an artist related supplies store.
> Devoting a certain percentage of all development fees for             19 on the Square in Downtown Stouffville
                                                                        is being redeveloped as an arts related
   public art. Also, ensure that the art reinforces themes              community centre
   related to Grimsby including the escarpment, Beamer
   Falls, Coronation Park, 40 Mile Creek, vintners and
   culinary tourism, natural landscape, etc.
> Developing a community centre that can be used for
   performances, art shows, community events, and film
   showings (e. g., 19 on the Square, Stouffville).
   Partnerships may be developed with local schools to use
   the space for an auditorium.
> Develop a program of outdoor movies in the summer
                                                                        Outdoor movie night in Bangor, Maine
   (free movie but charge for refreshments)
                                                                        draws a crowd
> Support the Grimsby Farmers’ Market (relocation plans,
   co-marketing, partnerships, etc.)




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                                                                              Action Plan
Quality In-Fill Development
Ensure quality infill – the regulations and urban design guidelines will need to address height
and massing, setbacks, materials, retail uses on the ground floor, avoidance of blank facades,
treatment of view termini at T intersections, parking and services access, windows, signage, and
no drive-through restriction.

The parking lots surrounding Downtown Grimsby create the perception of a sea of asphalt
surrounding the commercial areas. It is better where there is attractive residential that abuts
retail; this creates a more multi-dimensional retail district whose activity does not end at 5:00
pm but instead continues throughout the day and throughout the week. While recognizing the
benefit of nearby parking, Grimsby town planners have to be very cognizant of retaining this
parking benefit while still fostering intensification of residential adjacent to the retail areas.




                                                                The medium-density mixed-use development
                                                                includes retail in the main building and a
                                                                restaurant in semi-circle surrounding the
                                                                park on the eastern end.




                                                                Surface parking for the retail portion of the
                                                                mixed-use development is placed at the rear
                                                                and residential parking is accessed from a side
                                                                street.




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                                                                                     Action Plan


                                                                       A mixed-use development in Downtown
                                                                       Kleinburg although it is preferably if the
                                                                       parking is at the rear.




In Picton, the True Value Hardware4 store site was purchased by the adjacent property owner
who redeveloped the site to match the three story historic building. The ground floor was
converted into a home furnishings emporium and a clothing store – the upper levels are higher
end residential units geared to seniors.




Before Redevelopment




4   Note that the True Value did not close due to poor sales but for retirement reasons.

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                                                                               Action Plan




After Redevelopment – Gilbert and Lighthall, Picton


A consistent streetwall creates visual harmony and a pedestrian-friendly environment. It is
especially attractive when combined with a consistent row of trees.

What is not visible is that to accommodate the grade differential between the street and the
retailer, there is a small lift to the right of the door: everything is geared to a more senior
audience.

The large open windows provide permeability between the street pedestrian traffic and the
excellent merchandised retail inside.




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                                                                                                    Action Plan
Windows and Permeability




                          Maintaining sight lines into and out of a store adds visual interest.




                                                                                       Unfortunately, the requirement to maintain a
                                                                                       certain number of windows promulgated by
                                                                                       municipalities is often superseded by the
                                                                                       retailer. Despite the City of Toronto
                                                                                       requiring windows in the development, the
                                                                                       retailer opted to cover them over with signage.
                                                                                       There is no regulation regarding this
                                                                                       unfortunate development except the
                                                                                       landlord’s requirement that a certain
                                                                                       percentage of the windows must be kept clear
                                                                                       and free of obstructions/signs.




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                                                       Action Plan
Patios with Views




                                         Even on streets with limited sidewalk capacity
                                         for patios, the outside can be brought indoors
                                         through the use of accordion doors as in this
                                         example or roller doors.




                                       Rooftop restaurants with views of the
                                       escarpment and Lake Ontario relates to the
                                       natural environment and adds valuable extra
                                       seating in the summer




                                         Modern developments can also include
                                         rooftop patio space in their developments;
                                         however, mixed-use projects are preferred for
                                         Downtown Grimsby.




Urban Marketing Collaborative   122   Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                             Action Plan


                                                               Attractive patio seating and fencing adds to
                                                               the pedestrian experience in Downtown. This
                                                               is a place to see and be seen.




Recommendations – Programs for Enjoyable Shopping
     Action Step                                          Time Frame           Responsibility
     Ensure urban design guidelines, landscaping plan,    Immediate            Town, Region, and
     and CIP work towards enhancing linkages                                   Grimsby DIA
     between activity centres and retailers
     Town, Region, and DIA are to determine who is      Immediate              Town, Region, and
     responsible for each program (e.g., should the DIA                        Grimsby DIA
     assume responsibility for Downtown
     maintenance? etc.) and draw up agreements
     Develop partnerships to bring plan into action       Short-Term           Town, Region, and
                                                                               Grimsby DIA




Urban Marketing Collaborative                       123     Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                              Action Plan
8.4       Marketing and Promotions

Strategic Role for Marketing
Marketing should have a broad mandate to build positive programs and images (e.g., safety,
parking, easy access, cleanliness, enjoyable shopping, etc.) as well as the idea of enhancing the
branding of Downtown Grimsby, friendly shopping, and the natural environment.

Images included in the marketing need to relate to:
> Service attributes
> Families
> Fun and exciting
> Profiling local business people (meet the business owners)




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   124          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                 Action Plan
Example imagery includes the following:




Urban Marketing Collaborative             125   Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                              Action Plan
However, marketing should take on a more focused role – one that directly helps retailers to
build sales and/or to locate in the area for the niche target markets. This is an important role
for the DIA and members will see the most value in these initiatives. All marketing efforts
should be justified in terms of a return on investment so that marketing can be paid off in
relation to Downtown Grimsby’s strategic direction.

As a result, the focused marketing plan must be solution driven for the target market consumer.
The marketing should segment the population into select target markets (e.g., seniors, new
residents, frequent visitors, young families, wine tourists, workers, commuters, etc.) and
determine what Downtown Grimsby can offer these target markets.

Examples include:
Target Market                   Wants                         Retailers that Satisfy that Need
Seniors                         > Place to socialize          > Delivery, carry-out services
                                > Replacement spending
                                > Will pay for quality
                                    service and good value
Young families                  >   Something for the         >     Apparel store that sells mother
                                    whole family                    and young children’s clothing
                                >   Efficient shopping              and accessories
                                                              >     Easy parking
                                                              >     Activities for young children
                                                                    while shopping (e.g., Fun
                                                                    School of Music)
Etc.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   126          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                                Action Plan
The following examples are from the Downtown Vancouver Website that targets events, retailer
activities, and other activities for certain target markets. These ones are for the Downtown
office workers including young athletic types and girlfriends out on the town after work.
Clicking on the activities on the right hand side results in all businesses that offer those goods
or services to be displayed (e.g., spin class – all recreational facilities and gyms; need a break for
caffeine – all the coffee shops; etc.)




Urban Marketing Collaborative                    127           Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                             Action Plan
Make Special Events Retailer Friendly
Downtown Grimsby DIA is very active in special events. However, they do not run all the
events but are sponsors and allow others to manage the events. This is an important distinction.
Many Downtown organizations have come to the realization that events are very resource
consuming (time, money, volunteers) with little pay-back to the retailers.

It is important to maintain a full roster of events throughout the calendar year. Most of these do
not have to be large events. They can include:
> Local musicians to perform on the street
> Thursday afternoon summer concerts in Coronation Park
> Friday evening summer outdoor movies
> Art and gift shows
> Eating/food/wine events
> Cause-related programs that help to generate funding for a specific organization (i.e., artist
     organizations, St. Joseph school, neighbourhood food sharing program) while helping to
     build sales. For example, Downtown Grimsby could produce a shopping discount card for
     a specific two-week period. Shoppers can “buy” the card for a donation to a charitable
     organization, where that card then provides them with numerous discounts in Downtown
     Grimsby stores, restaurants, etc. for the specified timeframe.

The goals of the DIA with respect to special events are to:
> Leverage off the success of the special events that are drawing visitors to the Niagara
   Region, area, and Grimsby so that when they arrive at Downtown Grimsby’s doorstep they
   are greeted with quality businesses in a pleasant and easy-to-use environment
> Increase sales for the participating merchants
> Help drive investor interest in the area.

Special events should focus on specific high-priority shopper segments and merchandise
buying seasons, with emphasis on building shopper traffic. Targeting special events to the
Downtown Grimsby’s target markets will ensure that when people come for a performance or
event, they will stay longer and shop more. The DIA should review both produced and
sponsored special events to ensure that they help to increase sales for the DIA businesses. In
effect, the DIA will help to create the linkage from the events to the businesses.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                  128          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                             Action Plan
Hospitality Programs
Concierge programs need to be established as a way of direct marketing to visitors. Offering
discounts to local workers, and Niagara Region hospitality (wineries, hotels, attractions)
workers will help to ensure that they frequent and use Downtown Grimsby businesses. For
local workers, this is a way of saying thank you for keeping your business in Downtown; if they
are recommending a store or restaurant, they will think of Downtown Grimsby businesses first.
For hospitality workers a similar situation is available. Visitors to the area often ask hotel and
attraction staff where to eat and visit. If the hospitality staff is aware of what is available in
Downtown Grimsby and has a good experience he/she is more willing to recommend the
businesses. In addition, an event for all hospitality workers is also a good way to say thank you
for working with Downtown Grimsby.


Residential Relations
As Downtown Grimsby grows, it is important that the DIA develop a strong working
relationship with the local neighbourhood residents within the DIA boundaries. These
residents will be the Downtown’s most ardent supporters who are willing to walk there on a
regular basis. Active listening, coordination, and communication with these residents are
important. This ensures that retail establishments such as restaurants that offer entertainment
do not overly interfere with residential living. Appendix D includes a framework for discussing
neighbourhood noise issues.




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   129         Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
                                                                              Action Plan
Recommendations – Marketing and Promotions
     Action Step                                           Time Frame           Responsibility
     Review all special events with an aim of creating a   Short-term           Grimsby DIA
     link between retail sales activity and the event.
     Develop a full calendar of events both large and      Short-term           Grimsby DIA and
     small and determine whether they should be DIA                             partners
     lead, DIA supported, or encouraged. If lead or
     supported, determine the level of involvement by
     the DIA.
     Work on developing a hospitality program.             Medium-              Grimsby DIA and
                                                           term                 hospitality
                                                                                organizations
     Continue to develop relations with                    Medium-              Grimsby DIA and
     neighbourhood groups.                                 term                 neighbourhood
                                                                                organizations




Urban Marketing Collaborative                   130          Commercial Market Analysis and Action Plan for Grimsby
Appendix A
Consumer Survey Results
Downtown Grimsby Market Analysis
            DRAFT


             March 2009



   Urban Marketing Collaborative
                     Urban Marketing Collaborative

Successful Urban Revitalization Requires

                    Implementation
                      Tools and
                      Programs



                        Strong
                      Leadership
                         and
       Economic      Coordination     Innovative
     Fundamentals                    Urban Design
                    Urban Marketing Collaborative

Consumer Demand – Trade Area Review
>   License plate survey – four different dates
>   Natural, physical, and psychological barriers
>   Accessibility and visibility
>   Population clusters
Urban Marketing Collaborative
Downtown Grimsby Consumer Surveys

           February 2009




    Urban Marketing Collaborative
                   Urban Marketing Collaborative

Sample Size
> Telephone Respondents – Considered
  visitors if they had visited Downtown
  Grimsby in the past six months:
   • 276 Visitors – 92%
   • 24 Non-visitors – not large enough sample
     size
                                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative

   Gender

                                                                   50%

        Female                                                                    54%

                                                             49%
                                                                                         Trade Area
                                                                                         Non-Visitors
                                                                                         Visitors

                                                                   50%

          Male                                   46%

                                                                         51%




                 40%        42%         44%     46%    48%    50%         52%   54%     56%
*Non-visitors encompasses a small sample size
                                                             Urban Marketing Collaborative
  Age                                                                            22%
            65+                                 8%
                                                                          20%

                                                      12%
      55 to 64                                  8%
                                                            14%

                                                              15%
      45 to 54                                         13%
                                                                                                      Trade Area
                                                                               20%                    Non-Visitors
                                                             15%
                                                                                                      Visitors
      35 to 44                                                     17%
                                                                         19%

                                                      12%
      25 to 34                                                                                29%
                                                                  16%

                                                            14%
      16 to 24                                                                          25%
                                                      12%


                  0%             5%             10%         15%          20%           25%    30%   35%
*Non-visitors encompasses a small sample size
                                                         Urban Marketing Collaborative
  Occupation
                                            0%
                          Not Working
                                                 5%


                                                         17%
                               Student
                                                 5%


                                                 4%
                          Homemaker
                                                  5%


                                                               21%
                                Retired                                                             Non-Visitor
                                                                     26%
                                                                                                    Visitors
                                                                                             58%
              Work Outside Grimsby
                                                                                 42%


                                            0%
                     Work in Grimsby
                                                         16%


                                          0%       10%   20%         30%   40%         50%   60%   70%
*Non-visitors encompasses a small sample size
                                                            Urban Marketing Collaborative

  Annual Household Income
                                                                                                 36%
               Over $100,001                                      15%
                                                                        18%

                                                                        18%
       $75,001 to $100,000                           8%                                          Trade Area
                                                                          19%
                                                                                                 Non-Visitors
                                                                                22%              Visitors
         $50,001 to $75,000                                                       23%
                                                                                  23%

                                                                        18%
         $25,001 to $50,000                                                                            39%
                                                                                        28%

                                                          10%
            $25,000 or Under                                      15%
                                                            12%


                                   0%           5%   10%        15%     20%       25%    30%   35%     40%   45%
*Non-visitors encompasses a small sample size
                                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative

  Length of Residency
                                                                                                        33%
            Entire Life
                                                                                      24%


                                                        13%
       16 to 20 Years
                                                8%

                                                                                             Non-Visitors
                                                8%
       11 to 15 Years                                         15%                            Visitors

                                                8%
         6 to 10 Years
                                                                                22%


                                                                            21%
          1 to 5 Years
                                                                                            28%


                                                                    17%
         Under a Year
                                      3%


                          0%               5%    10%      15%             20%         25%     30%           35%
*Non-visitors encompasses a small sample size
                                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative

  Children at Home

                                                                    48%

        No                                                                               67%

                                                                                  61%




                                                                          52%           Trade Area
                                                                                        Non-Visitors
       Yes                                             33%
                                                                                        Visitors
                                                              39%




             0%            10%             20%   30%         40%    50%         60%        70%         80%
*Non-visitors encompasses a small sample size
                                                                 Urban Marketing Collaborative
Primary Reason for Coming to Downtown Grimsby
             Grocery or food shopping                                                                39%

                Retail goods shopping                                        19%

                     Eating or drinking                          11%

                     Personal services                          10%

  Drug store, pharmacy, health related                    5%

                      Passing through                4%

             Library, House of Worship               4%

                Professional business                3%

                       Meeting people           2%

                          Work related          2%

                    Fitness, recreation        1%

  Culture, entertainment, special event        1%

                   Downtown resident       0%

                   Museum, art gallery     0%


                                          0%         5%        10%     15%   20%   25%   30%   35%   40%   45%
                                         Urban Marketing Collaborative
Choice of Parking in Downtown Grimsby
     Specific business
                                                                         62%
         or plaza

       Park on street                            26%




    North parking lot                          22%




    South parking lot                      21%




        Walk, bicycle               9%



    Driven or dropped
                              4%
            off

                         0%        10%   20%         30%   40%   50%   60%     70%
                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative

Visitation Frequency
Two times a week or
                                                           38%
       more



       Once a week                             20%



Two to three times a
                                         16%
       month



              Daily                    13%



      Once a month                9%



   Less than once a
                            4%
        month


                       0%        10%         20%     30%   40%   50%
                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative
Length of Visitation
  Less than 30 minutes               15%


  30 minutes to 1 hour                             39%


          1 to 2 hours                           35%


          2 to 3 hours         5%


          3 to 4 hours    1%


          4 to 5 hours    1%


          5 to 6 hours    1%


     More than 6 hours        3%


                         0%    10%   20%   30%   40%     50%
                                            Urban Marketing Collaborative

Downtown Grimsby Image
                                                                                       % Who Agree
Good, pleasant, fine, fair, nice, okay, clean                                              24%
Convenient, easy, quick, fast, accessible, available, close                                22%
Satisfactory, adequate, average, mediocre, simple, alright, reasonable, acceptable,        14%
decent, not bad, ordinary, sufficient
Enjoyable, excellent, fun, great, happy, wonderful, eventful, fulfilling, leisurely,       10%
love it
Friendly, helpful                                                                           8%
Quaint, cute, unique                                                                        7%
Limited, boring, poor, unpleasant, tedious, dismal, bad, bland, challenging,                6%
dated, useless, not exciting, insufficient
Busy, bad parking, congested, traffic                                                       6%
Diverse, rare                                                                               2%
Cheap                                                                                       1%
Expensive                                                                                  0.4%
Spread out                                                                                 0.4%
Essential                                                                                  0.4%
                                                                     Urban Marketing Collaborative
Downtown Grimsby Improvements
    Better specialty stores                                                              26%


   Better stores in general                                                  20%


  Accessiblity, less traffic                                   11%


       Better larger stores                                    11%


Beautify the shopping area                                10%


            Better parking                               10%


    Better shopping hours                          8%


             More services                    7%


        Better restaurants               5%


             Better prices          3%


                 Friendlier    1%


      Nothing/ don't know                                                                                  37%



                           0%            5%             10%          15%   20%     25%         30%   35%     40%
                                        Urban Marketing Collaborative

Importance vs. Satisfaction Ratings – Visitors
                              9




                                                     4     10
                              8                                         1 Quality of stores and restaurants
                                        12                              2 Selection of stores and restaurants
                                                                    6   3 Price of goods and services
                                                                7
Rating




                                                     14                 4 Safety
                                                 15 8      13           5 People places to socialize
         5.5        6.5           7.5                     8.5
                                                                        6 Excellent service
                                                 3                      7 Cleanliness and overall appearance
                              7                       1
                                                                        8 Availability of parking
                    5                                                   9 Open in the evening
                                                                        10 Friendly atmosphere
                                                                        11 Activities and special events
                                                                                    7
                                             2
               11         9                                             12 Family friendly
                              6                                         13 Clean, up-to-date businesses
                          Importance                                    14 Easy to get to
                                                                        15 Easy to get around
                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative

Importance vs. Satisfaction Ratings – Visitors
                                           Importance   Rating   Gap
 Excellent service                            8.81       7.93    -0.88
 Cleanliness and overall appearance           8.58       7.81    -0.77
 Clean, up-to-date businesses                 8.44       7.56    -0.88
 Friendly atmosphere                          8.39       8.21    -0.18
 Safety                                       8.34       8.23    -0.11
 Easy to get to                               8.32       7.75    -0.57
 Availability of parking                      8.24       7.27    -0.97
 Quality of stores and restaurants            8.23       7.15    -1.08
 Price of goods and services                  8.14       7.24    -0.90
 Easy to get around                           8.13       7.36    -0.77
 Selection of stores and restaurants          7.82       6.43    -1.39
 Family friendly                              7.72       7.89    0.17
 Open in the evening                          6.93       6.33    -0.60
 People places to socialize                   6.42       6.59    0.17
 Activities and special events                5.46       6.13    0.67
                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative
Downtown Grimsby Competitive Positioning
          Downtown Grimsby                                          7.4




        Downtown Beamsville                       5.8




     Downtown St. Catharines                          6.0




      Downtown Stoney Creek                                 6.5




           Downtown Dundas                                        7.1




        Downtown Burlington                                               7.7




Downtown Niagara on the Lake                                                    8.1




                               0   2       4      6                        8          10
                                                    Urban Marketing Collaborative
Special Event Visitation
                                    23%
                            12%
 All the Time              11%
                 2%
                 1%

                                   20%
                                      24%
 Sometimes                           23%                                    Santa Claus Parade
                     3%                                                     Happening in the Park
                     3%
                                                                            Festival on the Forty
                             15%                                            Winter Green
                           12%                                              Blossom Festival
      Rarely                14%
                      5%
                     4%

                                              42%
                                                     52%
       Never                                          53%
                                                                   91%
                                                                    92%


                0%            20%           40%        60%   80%     100%
                                                        Urban Marketing Collaborative
Special Events Improvements
    Better types, kinds, number of events                                                     27%


           Better awareness, advertising                                      17%


      Better accessibility, shuttle service                            12%


                            Better parking                       10%


            Better stores, better services                  9%


                       Beautify downtown               4%


                             Better prices        2%


  Not interested special events in general                                            22%


                                             0%        5%   10%         15%     20%     25%     30%
                                                     Urban Marketing Collaborative
Non-Visitation Reasons
        Other stores are closer to me                                      38%


                 No particular reason                                29%


   Inconvenient to get to, traffic flow                        17%


 Nothing to do there, not enough to do                   13%


             Better stores elsewhere                8%


                 Quality of the stores         4%


              Poor selection of stores         4%


  Inconvenient hours, close too early          4%


                                          0%   5%   10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%
                                               Urban Marketing Collaborative
Non-Visitor Improvement Suggestions
                 Closer location                                     41%


   Better awareness, advertising                       18%


     Better stores, better variety                     18%


               Friendlier people                 12%


                  Better parking                 12%


                   More services          6%


           Better special events          6%


            Nothing, don't know                                     40%


                                     0%    10%         20%   30%   40%     50%
                         Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Grocery and Supermarket
       100                           13%

   80 to 99                    11%


   60 to 79              9%


   40 to 59                                  15%

   20 to 39                           13%

   10 to 19                    11%


     1 to 9         8%


         0                                          20%


          0%   5%        10%               15%     20%    25%
                                      Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Drug and Pharmaceutical
       100                                 17%

   80 to 99          5%


   60 to 79    3%


   40 to 59              7%

   20 to 39                    10%

   10 to 19                   9%


     1 to 9                          14%


         0                                                     35%


          0%        5%        10%    15%    20%   25%   30%   35%    40%
                                             Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Clothing and Shoes
       100         3%

   80 to 99   1%


   60 to 79    2%


   40 to 59             6%

   20 to 39              8%

   10 to 19                      15%


     1 to 9                    13%


         0                                                         53%


          0%             10%           20%      30%   40%    50%         60%
                                      Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Beauty and Barber Services
       100                     16%

   80 to 99    2%


   60 to 79    1%


   40 to 59         4%

   20 to 39          6%

   10 to 19         4%


     1 to 9              8%


         0                                                59%


          0%             10%    20%    30%   40%   50%   60%    70%
                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Gifts
       100     1%

   80 to 99    1%


   60 to 79         3%


   40 to 59              8%

   20 to 39                          16%

   10 to 19                           17%


     1 to 9                    12%


         0                                               40%


          0%             10%               20%   30%   40%     50%
                                     Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Sporting Goods
       100         4%

   80 to 99   1%


   60 to 79   1%


   40 to 59    3%

   20 to 39        4%

   10 to 19             8%


     1 to 9        4%


         0                                                        76%


          0%            10%   20%   30%   40%   50%   60%   70%    80%
                               Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Eating and Drinking
       100     3%

   80 to 99    3%


   60 to 79     4%


   40 to 59                       14%

   20 to 39                             16%

   10 to 19                              17%


     1 to 9                               17%


         0                                                  27%


          0%        5%   10%      15%           20%   25%         30%
                                       Urban Marketing Collaborative
Market Share – Hardware and Home Improvement
       100          4%

   80 to 99    1%


   60 to 79          5%


   40 to 59               9%

   20 to 39                      13%

   10 to 19                     12%


     1 to 9               9%


         0                                                 46%


          0%              10%          20%    30%    40%     50%
Appendix B
Retail Demand Calculations
Retail Merchandise Retailers


                                                        Base       Town of Grimsby       Primary Trade Area      Secondary Trade Area           Total
                                                                  2009        2014       2009         2014        2009         2014      2009           2014
Household Income                                        $79,257   $101,625   $122,603    $93,972     $111,915     $82,452      $96,152
Retail Merchandise Expenditures                          $9,275    $11,893    $14,345    $10,997      $13,094      $9,649      $11,250
% of Income                                              11.7%      11.7%                 11.7%
Households                                                           9,968      11,768    14,015       16,662      21,276       22,779
Retail Merchandise Expenditure Potential ($ millions)               $118.5      $168.8    $154.1       $218.2      $205.3       $256.3    $478.0         $643.2

Downtown Grimsby Market Share                                       19.0%       17.0%      15.0%        13.5%       10.0%        9.0%
Downtown Grimsby Market Share ($ millions)                           $22.5       $28.7      $23.1        $29.5       $20.5       $23.1     $66.2           $81.2

Warranted Space - Sales Per Sq. Ft.                                                                                                         $700         $772.9
Square Footage                                                                                                                            94,530        105,083
Existing Square Footage                                                                                                                   94,050         94,050
                           l      h d
New Square Footage - Retail Merchandise                                                                                                      480         11,033
Food Services


                                                  Base       Town of Grimsby       Primary Trade Area      Secondary Trade Area            Total
                                                            2009         2014      2009         2014        2009         2014       2009           2014
Household Income                                  $79,257   $101,625    $122,603   $93,972     $111,915     $82,452      $96,152
Food Service Expenditures                          $3,200     $4,103      $4,904    $3,794       $4,477      $3,329       $3,846
% of Income                                         4.0%       4.0%                  4.0%
Households                                                     9,968      11,768    14,015       16,662       21,276      22,779
Food Service Expenditure Potential ($ millions)                $40.9       $57.7     $53.2        $74.6        $70.8       $87.6     $164.9         $219.9

Downtown Grimsby Market Share                                 23.0%       22.0%      20.0%        18.0%       14.0%        13.0%
Downtown Grimsby Market Share ($ millions)                      $9.4       $12.7      $10.6        $13.4        $9.9        $11.4     $30.0          $37.5

Warranted Space - Sales Per Sq. Ft.                                                                                                    $700         $772.9
Square Footage                                                                                                                       42,797         48,537
Existing Square Footage                                                                                                              40,800         40,800
                         d
New Square Footage - Food Service                                                                                                     1,997          7,737
Convenience Retail


                                                        Base       Town of Grimsby       Primary Trade Area      Secondary Trade Area            Total
                                                                  2009        2014       2009         2014        2009         2014       2009           2014
Household Income                                        $79,257   $101,625    $122,603   $93,972     $111,915     $82,452      $96,152
Convenience Retail Expenditures                          $3,200     $4,103      $4,904    $3,794       $4,477      $3,329       $3,846
% of Income                                               4.0%       4.0%                  4.0%
Households                                                           9,968      11,768    14,015       16,662       21,276      22,779
Convenience Retail Expenditure Potential ($ millions)                $40.9       $57.7     $53.2        $74.6        $70.8       $87.6     $164.9         $219.9

Downtown Grimsby Market Share                                       50.0%       48.0%      35.0%        30.0%       20.0%        15.0%
Downtown Grimsby Market Share ($ millions)                           $20.4       $27.7      $18.6        $22.4       $14.2        $13.1     $53.2          $63.2

Warranted Space - Sales Per Sq. Ft.                                                                                                          $800         $883.3
Square Footage                                                                                                                             66,533         71,575
Existing Square Footage                                                                                                                    65,800         65,800
N     S
New Square FFootage - C
                      Convenience R il
                             i      Retail                                                                                                    733          5 775
                                                                                                                                                           5,775
Appendix C
Management Agreement
                         MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT 
This Agreement is made and entered into this ___ day of ____________ 2000, by and between the 
Downtown Development Authority, (hereinafter known as DDA), and the Downtown Shreveport 
Unlimited, (hereinafter known as DSU) and provides as follows: 

RECITALS 

A.      DSU is a private, non­private corporation charged with developing Downtown by  operating 
certain ongoing programs, among them being: 

       1.     Downtown festivals and special events; 
       2.     Legislative affairs; 
       3.     Quarterly speaker’s program and awards; 
       4.     Periodic newsletters; 
       5.     Other programs mutually agreed upon by the DDA and Board of 
              Directors of DSU, including the following specifically contracted services:

              ·      Advocacy and promotion of the west end of downtown Shreveport as an 
                     Arts & Antiques District.   $

              ·      New retail recruitment and existing retail support    $

              ·      Downtown Marketing             $

              ·      Holiday Lighting               $ 



B.     The DSU desires to use the staff personnel and office resources of the DDA to 
       implement and oversee the day­to­day operations of the above mentioned programs. 

C.     The DDA recognizes the importance of these programs in the development of 
       Downtown Shreveport and wishes to provide staff  and office resources to the DSU for 
       the purpose of the continued operation of each program. 

D.     The DDA recognizes the need to engage downtown businesses and entrepreneurs in the 
       business of downtown and recognizes the potential of engaging these interests through the 
       membership of DSU via contract services.
NOW, THEREFORE for and in consideration of the foregoing premises and mutual covenants and 
benefits herein contained, the parties hereto agree as follows: 

             I.      Scope of Services 

             A.  The DDA shall make available to the DSU solely for the operation of the 
             aforementioned programs, the staff personnel and office resources of the DDA, 
             subject to and in accordance with the provisions of this agreement, and in express 
             reliance on the warranty of the DSU that said staff and resources will be used for the 
             performance of duties and services directly related to the operation of the 
             aforementioned programs within the Downtown Development District. 

             B.  For payroll and other employee management and benefits purposes, the DDA 
             shall act as common paymaster for DSU.  The DDA Executive Director shall be 
             responsible for DSU employee management. 

             C. It is expressly understood that the Board of Directors of DSU may want to take 
             actions contrary to the stated position of DDA.  In this circumstance, the DDA may 
             withhold DDA staff services regarding the action in question. 


             II. Term of Agreement 
             This agreement shall commence on January 1, 2000, and run for the period of one 
             year, and may be terminated by either party hereto upon the giving of 30 days 
             written notice to the other party or be amended by mutual written consent of the 
             parties hereto involved. 


             III.    Cost of Service 

             DSU and DDA mutually agree that DSU shall, for administrative expenses 
             associated with the core DSU program of work, pay to DDA $ plus appropriate 
             expenses particular to DSU as approved in advance by the DSU Board. 

             DSU and DDA mutually agree that DDA shall, for program expenses associated 
             with the contracted services listed in A5 above, pay to DSU  $   It is expressly 
             agreed that expenses associated with the contract programs shall be paid directly by 
             the DDA. 

             Services provided in excess of this figure are considered a donation of DDA 
             resources in recognition that the DSU scope of work is considered to be beneficial to 
             the development of Downtown Shreveport. 


             Adjustments to amend the maximum cost may be made periodically by mutual 
             consent of both parties
             IV.    Retention of Records 

             All DDA records related to the billing of DDA services on behalf of DSU for the 
             aforementioned programs shall be retained for a period of three (3) years, said period 
             to run from the final disposition of each case of the operation of each program. 

             V.     Existing Contracts and Agreements 

             The DSU shall conduct operations of the aforementioned programs in accordance 
             with the related contracts and/or agreements which currently exist or as may be 
             amended. 

             VI.    Payments for Services 

             The DDA shall on an annual basis invoice the DSU for the total amount as agreed. 
             DSU shall pay the agreed amount prior to December 31, 2000. 




IN WITNESS WHEREOF,  the DDA and the DSU have entered into this agreement as of the date 
first above written. 

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY                     DOWNTOWN SHREVEPORT UNLIMITED 



By:_____________________________                   By:_______________________________ 
David Alexander, Chairman                          Johnie Wise, Chairman 



Attest:___________________________                 Attest:_____________________________
Appendix D
Downtown Resident Relations
                                                                             SAN DIEGO CITY OF VILLAGES
                                                          CREATING SAFE AND VIBRANT PLACES TO SOCIALIZE


                                                                                                                                                                             September 12,
            Draft
                                                                                                                                                                                 2002

                                                                                        QUALITY OF LIFE
           TRANSIT                            ENTERTAINMENT                                 CONVERSATION                            BUSINESS ACTIVITY                                  VENDORS
  Bus          Train         Car              Live              Recorded            Patio         Parking        Smokers      Deliveries       Trash        Equipment        Entertainers            Products
Mixed use districts with higher concentration of residential units in retail and business districts precipitates a growth in dining and entertainment businesses for people seeking places to socialize. A number
   of factors combine to impact public health and safety and quality of life. One indicator of emerging conflicts is noise. Noise is simply the intersection between sound and the ears of someone who is
                     disturbed by the sound. When there is no sound, there is no noise. When there is no person, there is no noise. When the sound is not disturbing there is no noise.
 There are many variables as to when sound becomes noise – sound level, quality and quantity. Among the sources are transit vehicles, entertainment, conversation, business activity or street vendors or
   entertainers. Noise can be increased or decreased through various means including the movement of people to their vehicles, the path vehicles move, crowd location and size, proximity of the noise
                  generating activity to people who may be disturbed, construction of the structure and schedule of activity. Often age of people or intoxication can be contributing factors.


                                                                                             VARIABLES
          PEDESTRIANS                                   PEOPLE                                  PROXIMITY                                 STRUCTURE                                   SCHEDULE
          Pedestrian Flow                            Outdoor Seating                              Residents                               Sound proofing                            Hours of business
            Parking Area                          Crowd Management                              Outlet Density                               Windows                                  Entertainment
              Signage                                 Entrance Lines                             Outlet Type                                  Entrance                                  Deliveries
             Taxi Stands                                Promotions                               Other Retail                                 Storage                                Trash Removal
                                                        Intoxication                               Parking                                Access (trucks)
                                                     Underage drinking
                                                                                    CONFLICT
                                                                                   RESOLUTION
 Conflict resolution is the process of reducing or eliminating the sound, redefining the sound as to its source and purpose, or removing the person who is disturbed from the source of the
                  sound. This is accomplished through communication, planning to reduce potential sources of noise or proximity of people to the noise generating activity.


                                     QUANTITATIVE                                                                                    QUALITATIVE
The following are summaries of strategies used, typically through an ordinance, to regulate    The following are summaries of strategies used to
noise issues:
                                                                                                  1. Parking: Special arrangements are made to limit parking in residential areas to
   1. Entertainment Overlay: A district is designated as an entertainment district or                permit parking to prevent establishment patrons from parking close to residences.
      “overlay” for the purpose of concentrating the number of establishments for the
                                                                                                  2. Pedestrians: Pedestrian flow is regulated, especially during late hours, to keep
      convenience of those visiting the area. Modifications are made to noise, parking,
                                                                                                     people away from residential areas as much as possible.
      schedules and other zoning requirements to accommodate crowds and reduce
      impact on public health, safety and quality of life.                                        3. Traffic: Automobile traffic is routed through commercial areas rather than residential
                                                                                                     neighborhoods during closing hours.
   2. Density: The number of establishments providing entertainment or licensed to serve
      alcoholic beverages are limited based upon population or restricted by distance             4. Promotions: Businesses are discouraged from advertising or using promotions that
      between such establishments.                                                                   may increase the rate of intoxication of patrons.
           a. Consideration: Using a “seating” basis rather than “outlet” basis for               5. Communication: Regular meetings held with club owners and managers, law
              calculating density may provide more control over the number and types of              enforcement, business district and residents to anticipate problems from special
              businesses. A club with an occupancy capacity of 1,000 would have a                    events, increased traffic or other sources of noise.
              greater potential impact on a neighborhood than 10 businesses with                  6. Enforcement: Active enforcement of ordinances.
              occupancy of 100.
                                                                                                  7. Education: Organization of educational events for businesses to inform them of
   3. Proximity: Businesses seeking to provide amplified music or use outdoor speakers               emerging issues or concerns and provide access to resources.
      (i.e. drive-up windows) are not permitted within a specified distance from a
      residential unit.                                                                           8. Mediation: A formal process to resolve conflicts between residents and businesses
                                                                                                     either through working with the business to take corrective action, clarify
   4. Noise Levels: The most common strategy is to regulate the level of decibels of                 misunderstanding of each individuals rights and responsibilities or agreement to a
      amplified music an establishment can provide. Some cities allow a higher decibel               mutually agreed upon settlement prior to further legal remedies.
      level in a designated entertainment zone or “overlay” while others set a uniform
      standard when there are residential units in close proximity. Some focus on the more        9. Disclosure: A formal process of placing on notice residents, businesses, or
      problematic bass or low frequency noise as a standard.                                         developers of special conditions and responsibilities.
           a. Challenge: Enforcement can be difficult if measurements are not taken at
              the actual time the person notices the noise or when noise levels in the area
                surrounding the establishment from traffic or other sources is higher than
                coming from the club.
   5. Building Codes: New and existing buildings can be required to limit noise through
      the use of noise proofing materials, location of bedrooms relative to street and/or
      entertainment business, location of entertainment source in an establishment,
      location of outdoor seating and placement of speakers, use of sound walls and
      barriers, location of entrance and exit doors, use of double doors, restrictions on
      doors being opened during certain hours.
   6. Schedule: Schedules can be regulated for entertainment, deliveries, trash removal,
      parking areas,

                                                                                       STRATEGY
        STAKEHOLDERS                    ASSESSMENT                  RECOMMENDATIONS                   INTEGRATION                      EDUCATION                      MEDIATION


Alcohol Beverage Control        Current Codes:                  Revise Current Ordinances      Develop a final reading with    Organize information into a    Develop a systematic
                                                                                               all key stakeholders to         concise resource directory     process for mediating
BID’s                           Other Cities:                   Create New Ordinances
                                                                                               properly integrate focus,       for businesses, residents      conflicts between residents
City Attorney                   Community Forum: Issues         Develop Alternate Strategies   standards, enforcement,         and developers.                and businesses or between
                                and Trends                                                     jurisdiction, and resolution.                                  businesses.
Code Compliance                                                                                                                Include resource directory
                                    ! Gaslamp                                                                                  with disclosure agreements     Develop a process for
Developers
                                    ! Lajolla                                                                                                                 remedial assistance for
Development Services                                                                                                           Incorporate information into
                                                                                                                                                              businesses engaged in
                                    ! North Park                                                                               Hospitality Business
Environmental Services                                                                                                                                        practices causing conflicts or
                                                                                                                               Orientation
                                    ! Hillcrest                                                                                                               violations of ordinances.
Fire Department                                                                                                                Organize annual Hospitality
                                    ! Little Italy                                                                             Roundtables to review status
Health Department
                                    ! Pacific Beach                                                                            of compliance and areas
Hospitality associations                                                                                                       needed for improvement
                                    ! Ocean Beach
Planning Department
                                    ! East Village
Police Department
Public Works
Residential organizations

								
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