FROM THE COLD WAR TO THE WAR ON TERROR: NEW DIRECTIONS IN SCHOLARSHIP ON UNITED STATES-LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS

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FROM THE COLD WAR TO THE WAR ON TERROR: NEW DIRECTIONS IN SCHOLARSHIP ON UNITED STATES-LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS Powered By Docstoc
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Description: The final three chapters of The Bush Doctrine guide the reader through fundamental issues at the top of the research agenda of United States-Latin American relations in the 21st century. David Alejandro Alvarez Dieppa discusses how Latin American nations and multinational corporations will increasingly compete with each other for control of key "geostrategic resources" (biodiversity, petroleum, water). For her part, Elsa M. Bruzzone discusses the importance of a critical resource-clean drinking water. She concludes that Latin Americans have an important choice ahead of them regarding the use of and access to this resource. There will be two possible scenarios. On the one hand, drinking water can potentially be an important card that Latin America can play to increase its international leverage in world affairs. On the other, however, if international actors have water control, the region will not only lose an opportunity but also increase its vulnerability. Of course, Latin Americans must be careful to tend to their own water needs - and this will become more difficult in the near future. Indeed, by mid-century, global warming and its impact on glaciers and fragile ecosystems will constrict water supplies. And finally, Antonio Elizalde Hevia's concluding essay grapples with some wide-reaching and fundamental themes: globalization, economic integration, environmental degradation, and the long-standing dream-stretching back to Bolivar-of a "Great Homeland" of Latin America in which the different nations of the region can find strength within unity. Hevia urges Latin Americans not to abandon the idea of integration even though some recent integration schemes have benefited mostly the wealthy. Instead, he maintains that in a rapidly globalizing world, Latin Americans must, simply out of self-preservation and in order to maintain control over their destiny, choose some form of integration. The essential issue is, Hevia concludes, that integration should provide a means t
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