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Propofol and Informed Consent

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Propofol is an intravenous drug used to induce general anesthesia. It has a very rapid onset and short duration of action, and patients awaken alert with minimal depression. For these reasons it is being used with increasing frequency outside of traditional operating rooms and hospitals for short procedures requiring sedation. In these alternate settings it is ordered by physicians who are not anesthesiologists, and it is administered by registered nurses (RNs) who are not certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs). The warning label on the drug cautions that it should be used only by persons trained to administer general anesthesia. Comprehensive analysis of patient safety and informed consent emphasizing the roles of the drug manufacturers, the FDA, physicians, nurses, and the boards of nursing educates those who administer these drugs and those who legally represent them. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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  • pg 1
									Journal of Nursing Law, Volume 12, Number 1, 2008




                         Propofol and Informed Consent
                                      Ronald L. Van Nest, CRNA, MA

         Propofol is an intravenous drug used to induce general anesthesia. It has a very rapid onset and
         short duration of action, and patients awaken alert with minimal depression. For these reasons it
         is being used with increasing frequency outside of traditional operating rooms and hospitals for
         short procedures requiring sedation. In these alternate settings it is ordered by physicians who
         are not anesthesiologists, and it is administered by registered nurses (RNs) who are not certified
         registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs). The warning label on the drug cautions that it
								
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