"A Little Yellow Bastard Boy": Paternal Rejection, Filial Insistence, and the Triumph of African American Cultural Aesthetics in Langston Hughes's "Mulatto"

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"A Little Yellow Bastard Boy": Paternal Rejection, Filial Insistence, and the Triumph of African American Cultural Aesthetics in Langston Hughes's "Mulatto" Powered By Docstoc
					"A Little Yellow Bastard Boy": P
				
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Description: It opens with "A Note on the Blues," in which Hughes offers his own definition of the term and states that the eight poems of the first section ("Blues") and nine poems of the final section ("And Blues") are "written after the manner of the Negro folk-songs known as Blues"; these, he differentiates from "spirituals" by their "strict poetic pattern: one line repeated and a third line to rhyme with the first two" (1927,13).2The second section ("Railroad Avenue") contains thirteen poems that feature the voices and lives of poor, urban African Americans: hotel employees, prostitutes, cabaret girls, prize fighters, dice players, alcoholics, card players, elevator operators, porters, and night club workers.
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