Intute Cataloguing Guidelines

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					Intute Cataloguing Guidelines
                                           Version 4 – August 2006

** indicates mandatory fields
* indicates fields subject groups may make mandatory in their own guidelines

Intute Cataloguing Guidelines .................................................................................1
   1. Introduction .....................................................................................................3
   2. **URL/Title check ............................................................................................3
      2.1 If there are no matching records .................................................................3
      2.2 If there are one or more matching records ...................................................3
   3. Specific fields – input screens ..........................................................................4
      3.1 **Handle ....................................................................................................4
      3.2 **Subject group ..........................................................................................4
      3.3 **Subgateway(s) ........................................................................................4
      3.4 **Title ........................................................................................................4
        3.4.1 Diacritics .............................................................................................5
        3.4.2 Transliteration......................................................................................6
      3.5 Alternative titles .........................................................................................6
      3.6 **URL ........................................................................................................6
      3.7 **Language................................................................................................7
      3.8 **Description ..............................................................................................7
        3.8.1 Adding extra content to an existing record ............................................8
      3.9 * Keywords (controlled) ..............................................................................9
      3.10 Keywords (uncontrolled) ...........................................................................9
      3.11 **Resource types .....................................................................................9
      3.12 *Classifications ...................................................................................... 10
      3.13 *Country of origin ................................................................................... 10
      3.14 *Resource creator .................................................................................. 10
      3.15 *Resource publisher ............................................................................... 10
      3.16 Date resource created ............................................................................ 11
      3.17 Rights / copyright statement ................................................................... 11
      3.18 Administrator name ................................................................................ 11
      3.19 * Administrator email .............................................................................. 11
      3.20 Format ................................................................................................... 11
      3.21 Technical requirements .......................................................................... 12
      3.22 ISBN...................................................................................................... 15
      3.23 ISSN...................................................................................................... 15
      3.24 Period (Coverage) .................................................................................. 15
      3.25 Geographic name .................................................................................. 16
      3.26 Latitude ................................................................................................. 16
      3.27 Longitude............................................................................................... 16
      3.28 Audience ............................................................................................... 16
      3.29 Educational level .................................................................................... 17
      3.30 Relationships ......................................................................................... 18
      3.31 Flag ....................................................................................................... 18
      3.32 Record source ....................................................................................... 19
      3.33 Comments ............................................................................................. 19
      3.34 Status .................................................................................................... 19
      3.35 Date record created ............................................................................... 19
      3.36 Record creator ID ................................................................................... 19
      3.37 Date for review ....................................................................................... 20


                                                            1
4. To complete the record .................................................................................. 20
  4.1 From the Add New Record screen ............................................................ 20
     4.1.1 Submit new record ............................................................................. 20
  4.2 From the Edit Record screen ................................................................... 20
     4.2.1 Editor‟s choice ................................................................................... 20
     4.2.2 Status changed date .......................................................................... 20
     4.2.3 Status changed by ID......................................................................... 20
     4.2.4 Date record activated ......................................................................... 21
     4.2.5 Record activated by ........................................................................... 21
     4.2.6 Date last reviewed ............................................................................. 21
     4.2.7 Record reviewer ID ............................................................................ 21
     4.2.8 Redirects ........................................................................................... 21
  Appendix 2. Intute resource types .................................................................. 23
Appendix 2: Style Guide .................................................................................... 31
Intute style guidelines for text in the description field........................................... 31




                                                       2
1. Introduction
This document provides rules and guidelines for creating catalogue records for
Internet resources on Intute. It should be used in conjunction with subject group
specific guidelines, scope notes and evaluation criteria. The guidelines follow best
practice from the RDN hub guidelines, and are based on Dublin Core, RLLOMAP,
AACR2 and the RDA where relevant.

**       indicates a mandatory field (minimum set)
*        indicates fields which subject groups may wish to make mandatory in their
         own more detailed guidelines

Subject group contact details are:

Intute: Arts and Humanities
        Mary Burslem m.burslem@arts.ac.uk
Intute: Health and Life Sciences
        Laurian Williamson Laurian.Williamson@nottingham.ac.uk
Intute: Science, Engineering and Technology
        Lesa Ng L.Ng@hw.ac.uk
Intute: Social Sciences
        Mary Jane Steer Mary-Jane.Steer@bristol.ac.uk


2. **URL/Title check
It is essential to avoid creating duplicate records for the same resource in
Intute.

        Check the URL and/or the title of the resource you intend to catalogue to find
         out whether a record already exists in Intute.
        Type in a full or partial URL/Title. So that you do not miss records that could
         already be catalogued, use the simplest part of a URL.

            e.g. .vam will return all Victoria & Albert Museum web sites in Intute,
         whereas http://www.vam.ac.uk/index.html will not bring up any results, yet
         has been catalogued.

2.1 If there are no matching records
If there are no matching records, click on the Proceed to add record icon and go to
Section 3 of these notes (Specific fields – input screens).

2.2 If there are one or more matching records
Please be aware that the record may have been added by another Subject Group.
Refer to de-duplication guidelines for your Subject Group if necessary.

You may

        Add Classification (see 3.12 below) and Keywords (3.9 and 3.10 below) to an
         existing record.
        Do not amend or alter classification or keywords already entered by another
         group.
        Add extra wording in the Description field (see 3.8 below) to explain
         relevance of the resource to an additional subject group.


                                              3
      Do not amend or alter another group(s)‟ description, without consultation.

If in doubt, always contact the Subject Group who created the record to discuss how
best to proceed. See Section 1 above for contact details.


3. Specific fields – input screens
3.1 **Handle
This is automatically generated. It is the unique identifier for the record.

3.2 **Subject group
This field is populated automatically when a record is created, and cannot be edited.

It records which Intute subject group created the original record.

Do not alter the contents of this field at record creation, or at editing stage.

3.3 **Subgateway(s)
This field lists the subsections for your subject group:

      Click on the subgateway(s) you require.
      If the resource is required to appear in more than one area, hold down the
       <Ctrl> key and click to highlight the extra subgateway(s) required.

3.4 **Title
Subject Groups may wish to add further examples of subject specific types of
material in their own guidelines.

      Enter the full and proper name of the resource in its original language (see
       below for further information on transliteration and/or diacritics including
       ampersands).
      Take the information from the resource itself – not from the bar across the top
       or bottom of the screen.
      Do not copy and paste from the website.
      Do not use in/definite articles as the first word of the title, unless the title does
       not make sense without it. This applies for both English and foreign
       languages.
      If the in/definite article is essential, put it at the end:

                       e.g. Economist, The
                            Miserables, Les

      Use capital letters for the first letter of the first word, proper nouns, and
       organisations only.

       Capitalise organisations as given by the organisation itself:
               e.g. Royal Institute of British Engineers

      Separate title from subtitle with space colon space and start subtitle with
       lower case letter:
              e.g. Cherry picking in Australia : a guide for adventurers



                                             4
       Include acronyms of organisations, where appropriate, in ( ) round brackets
        after the title. Do not add punctuation between the letters:
                e.g. Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), not R.I.B.A.

       Capitalise foreign languages as appropriate for that language.

       Individual lectures may be added, for example:

Celestial sphere : lecture 3 : Formation and evolution of the Solar System : Astronomy 121

       Do not put a full stop at the end of the field.

       For resources with no title, provide a descriptive title enclosed in [ ] square
        brackets.

       For very long titles, omit superfluous data indicating with „…‟

       When abbreviating words, only put a full-stop at the end of abbreviations
        where the last letter is not the last letter of the word:
               e.g. add Dr (for Doctor) but Prof. (for Professor)

3.4.1 Diacritics

       Text must be entered in plain text (also known as ASCII).
       Do not copy and paste from a word processor or an Internet browser because
        the text will often contain non-ASCII characters such as 'smart' quotation
        marks, symbols, or accented characters. If you need to add a relatively
        common special character, such as an accented letter or an ampersand, this
        may be entered as an HTML entity (from ISO Latin1 Character Entity
        Reference).
       A full list showing the available characters and their corresponding entities is
        available from the Web Design Group (WDG):
        http://www.htmlhelp.com/reference/html40/entities/
       Less common diacritics (such as macrons) and special characters do not
        have HTML entity reference equivalents. You should use Unicode character
        numerical references to enter such characters. These are expressed in the
        form &#x0000; where '0000' should be replaced by the hexadecimal value of
        the Unicode character as listed on the Unicode website:
        http://www.unicode.org/charts/
       Other useful websites include:

    Character Map

    http://www.xplor.org/charactermap.cfm

    Latin-1 Entities

    http://www.htmlhelp.com/reference/html40/entities/latin1.html

    Unicode Characters as Named and Numeric html entities



                                              5
    http://www.theorem.ca/~mvcorks/code/charsets/auto.html

    The various 'Latin' sets should contain most of the special characters cataloguers
    will require.

3.4.2 Transliteration

       For titles or words written in non-Roman scripts (e.g. Greek, Cyrillic, Hebrew,
        Arabic, Chinese, Thai, etc.), please transliterate into ASCII characters using
        the standard Library of Congress transliteration scheme, which may be found
        at http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html.
       HTML entities may, of course, be used as part of any transliteration scheme.


3.5 Alternative titles
This is a repeatable field.

Use this field for:

                o     Abbreviations
                o     Titles in other languages
                      e.g. if main title is non-English, give English version here
                o     Other translations of main title

Diacritics - Intute can search titles with and without diacritics. There is no need to
add the alternative version here.

Follow guidelines for Title field (3.4 above), including transliteration, diacritics and
punctuation of acronyms and abbreviations.


3.6 **URL
This is a repeatable field.

       The URL is the Internet address of the resource.
       Copy and paste from your browser to ensure accuracy.
       Follow Subject Group guidelines on whether the first (main) URL should
        match the original language version of the resource.
       Always start with the first part of the URL, the protocol - usually http, but https
        or ftp are common alternatives. This tells your browser how to deal with the
        file that it is about to open. Therefore, do not start the URL with www.
       A maximum of 3 URLs can be entered for each record. Additional URLs
        should include an English version if available.
       Enter the simplest form of the URL that calls up the resource you are
        cataloguing. For example, remove the last section of text from the displayed
        URL, back to the next trailing slash character '/', and press return. If the web
        page still loads correctly for the page that you are cataloguing, use this form
        of the address.

        e.g. use http://www.intute.ac.uk/ rather than http://www.intute.ac.uk/index.html

       Include a trailing slash at the end of the URL, unless it is pointing to a specific
        file name e.g. .cfm, .cgi, .htm, .html, .jsp, .pdf, .php, .pl etc.



                                              6
        e.g. http://www.intute.ac.uk/ rather than http://www.intute.ac.uk
                                       BUT
http://www.intute.ac.uk/contact.html rather than http://www.intute.ac.uk/contact.html/


3.7 **Language
The language field matches the URL field, and is also a repeatable field:

      Select the language matching the URL from the drop-down list.
      For multiple languages, hold down the <Ctrl> key and click to highlight the
       extra language(s) required.
      If the language is not on the drop-down menu, enter its 3-letter code from the
       Library of Congress standard in the box provided.
       http://www.loc.gov/standards/iso639-2/langcodes.html

Alternative URLs, and also languages, can be selected by clicking on Add another
URL/Language.


3.8 **Description
This is a description of the resource. It is written in free-text and is a key feature of
the Intute service. It provides added value for the user. The first section of the
description is the most important and should tell the user everything that they need to
know about the resource. The rest of the description should expand upon these
opening lines, and may include subject group specific information.

Refer to de-duplication guidelines, and section 3.8.1 below, for further details on best
practice for describing a resource, which may be relevant to more than one subject
group.

To separate text into paragraphs add code <p> at the beginning of the new
paragraph.

Style Guide for Intute (see Appendix 2 or access from link above free text box on
cataloguing screen) - use for conventions on how to write numbers, dates and
specific words and phrases. If your word or phrase is not covered in the Style Guide,
use an Oxford English Dictionary (OED) spelling. Standard examples commonly
used in the description field include:

               o   Numbers one to ten should be spelt out in words
               o   Numbers 11 onwards should be written as numerals, except when
                   they are used at the beginning of a sentence
               o   Large numbers should be broken up with commas
                       e.g. 1,000 or 1,000,000
               o   Dates in format
                       e.g. 24 June 2007
               o   Centuries in format
                       e.g. 19th century

The description is intended to answer in summary the following questions:

               o   What type of resource is it and what is the resource about?
               o   Who or what has created the resource and made it available?


                                            7
               o   For what purpose, and for whom, is the resource intended?
               o   Does the resource relate to specific geographic areas or time
                   periods, or languages?
               o   Does the resource have any notable features concerning
                   originality, sources on which it is based, form in which it is
                   presented, means by which it can be navigated, ease of use?

   The following information should be included in the description (where
   appropriate and available):

               o   The nature of the resource, e.g. an electronic journal, collection of
                   reports, the website of an organisation etc.
               o   The intended audience of the information
               o   Who is providing the information (author, publisher, funder,
                   organisation)
               o   The subject coverage/content of the resource
               o   Any geographical or temporal limits
               o   Any form or process issues that might affect access or ease of use
                   (charging, registration, need for any special software, etc.)
               o   Availability of the resource in other languages
               o   Any cross referencing notes, for example, "These pages form part
                   of the ... website, which is separately described in …"

When writing the description, please take into account the following:

               o   The description should be written in complete sentences.
               o   The description should be in the range of 50-250 words.
               o   Take information from the resource text where appropriate, but do
                   not copy and paste from the website as this could infringe
                   copyright.
               o   Include direct quotes in “ “, to avoid breaches of copyright.
               o   Abbreviations and acronyms - give the full name followed by the
                   abbreviation or acronym in brackets the first time, and then use the
                   abbreviation or acronym thereafter.
               o   Do not use punctuation when writing acronyms:
                               e.g. AHRC (rather than A.H.R.C.)
               o   Use formal language and avoid abbreviating words. However, if
                   words are abbreviated, put a full-stop only at the end of
                   abbreviations where the last letter is not the last letter of the word:
                               e.g. Dr (for Doctor) but Prof. (for Professor)
               o   Do not include URLs, or HTML code, in the description.
               o   Avoid time-sensitive comments, and information that will go out of
                   date quickly. If it must be included give the rough date that the
                   information was accessed.
                               e.g. In July 2006, this site referenced 3,500 items.
               o   Avoid making reference to other Intute records, as these may not
                   be relevant out of context
               o   Evaluate the website objectively. Use subjective comments with
                   care and avoid using the website‟s own evaluation in the
                   description.

3.8.1 Adding extra content to an existing record

Refer to de-duplication guidelines, and subject group guidelines.



                                            8
To separate text into paragraphs add code <p> at the beginning of the new
paragraph.

As a general rule:
    If you are adding content to an existing description, please do so without
       altering the original description.
    If in doubt, always contact the other subject group(s) to discuss.

3.9 * Keywords (controlled)
If using look-up tables (thesauri) for controlled keywords to describe the content of
the resource:

       Click on Lookup keywords.
       From drop down list choose all required terms.
       At the bottom of the list click on Add keyword(s).
       Punctuation will be added automatically in the displayed record.

Please note that once a controlled keyword has been added from the look-up table in
this field, the record will transfer to the edit screen, and additional fields will appear.

If not using look-up tables (thesauri) for controlled keywords, select the relevant
keywords from the suggested thesauri.

       Use the case and spelling that is used by the relevant thesaurus' preferred
        term.
       Separate terms with semi-colon and a single space:
               e.g. poverty; youth; employment
       Do not use punctuation at end of the field.

If not using look-up tables, use of this field will not transfer the record to the edit
screen.

3.10 Keywords (uncontrolled)
This field is used for free text keywords (terms not included in relevant thesauri), or
for the non-preferred terms, which come from thesauri not available as look-up
tables.

       Thesaurus terms – use the alternative spellings, as given in the relevant
        thesauri non-preferred terms, where appropriate.
       Free text keywords – choose appropriate terminology, and use lower case,
        except for first letter of proper nouns or acronyms e.g. RIBA.
       Separate terms with semi-colon and a single space:
                         e.g. poverty; youth; employment
       Do not use punctuation at end of the field.
       Plural rather than singular form preferred.
       Natural language order can be used.

Use of this field will not transfer the record to the edit screen.

3.11 **Resource types
The resource type should be used to indicate the primary type of the whole resource.
See Appendix 1 for full definitions of the resource types available. Note that your
subject group may not use the full list of resource types.


                                              9
      Select one or more resource type(s) from the list on your cataloguing screen.
      For multiple resource types, hold down the <Ctrl> key and click to highlight
       the extra resource type(s) required.

3.12 *Classifications
This field is used to generate the browse categories on Intute and Subject Groups‟
homepages.

      Click on Find and add classifications(s).
      Browse the hierarchy and tick the relevant heading(s).
      Scroll to the bottom of the list and click on Add classification(s).
      To add additional classification(s) click on Add new classification(s).

Please note that once a classification has been added, the record will transfer to the
edit screen, and additional fields will appear.

3.13 *Country of origin
      Select from the drop-down menu.
      Only one selection can be made. For resources that are derived from more
       than one country, use Multi National.

3.14 *Resource creator
This is a repeatable field. Click on the „+‟ icon to generate entry box. Up to five
entries can be added.

Subject Groups may include additional information on use of authority files/Library of
Congress tables

      Use for the owner(s) of the intellectual property of the resource, usually the
       author(s).
      Take the personal or organisational/corporate information from the resource
       itself or related resources.
      Enter personal names in indirect order in the following format: „family name‟
       comma space „initials or given name‟.
      Do not add space between two initials:
                e.g.    Smith, J.D.
                        Smith, John D.
      Do not include titles e.g. Dr or Prof.

3.15 *Resource publisher
This is a repeatable field. Click on the „+‟ icon to generate entry box. Up to five
entries can be added.

      Use for the host or agent of the resource, which indicates the authority of the
       site (usually, but not always, an organisation rather than a person). Examples
       include the museum putting up an online exhibition, or the academic
       institution hosting a particular research project.
      Take the personal or organisational/corporate information from the resource
       itself or related resources.
      Follow guidelines on entry styles, and use of authority files, as given for 3.14
       above.



                                           10
3.16 Date resource created
      Enter the date that the resource was created, if available.
      Use the International Standard ISO 8601:1988 format i.e. YYYY-MM-DD.
      The following are examples of valid dates: 2003
                                                   2003-01
                                                   2003-01-22

3.17 Rights / copyright statement
      Use this field to include copyright information from the resource itself, if
       required.
      If available, copy and paste the URL of the copyright statement. This is the
       preferred option.
      If URL is not available, copy and paste the statement itself, but be aware that
       this may become out of date quickly.

3.18 Administrator name
      This field allows you to record the name of the person who maintains the
       resource.
      Enter personal names as given in 3.14 above.

3.19 * Administrator email
      This field allows you to enter the email address of the individual responsible
       for maintaining the resource.
      This field is related to, but separate from, field 3.18 above.
      The information should be taken from the resource itself or related resources.
      A contact/feedback form URL may be given if no personal names are
       available.
      If no email address or feedback form is available, write 'Not available' in the
       Administrator email box.

3.20 Format
HTML is the default entry.

      Select one or more of the formats in the drop down menu to indicate the
       formats used in the website being catalogued.
      For multiple formats, hold down the <Ctrl> key and click to highlight the extra
       format(s) required.
      The formats used can often be determined from the URLs.

The following options are available:

           o   html - HyperText Markup Language - the language used to create
               many Web pages
           o   xml - Extensible Markup Language
           o   pdf - Portable Document Format - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader
           o   ppt - Microsoft PowerPoint presentation
           o   doc - Microsoft Word document
           o   php - created using PHP programming language




                                          11
           o   cgi/pl - Common Gateway Interface - an interface between the Web
               and various programs, e.g. used for online forms, commonly used with
               languages such as Perl.
           o   asp - Active Server Pages - dynamically created Web pages
           o   jsp - Java Server Pages - dynamically created Web pages
           o   cfm - ColdFusion Web pages - dynamically created from a database
           o   bmp - Bitmap - a Microsoft Windows image format
           o   gif - Graphic Interface Format (image)
           o   jpg - an image format developed by the Joint Photographic Experts
               Group
           o   tiff - Tagged Image File Format
           o   ps - PostScript
           o   rtf - Rich Text Format
           o   plain text
           o   other

3.21 Technical requirements
      Select one or more of the items from the drop down menu to indicate the
       requirements of the website being catalogued.
      For multiple requirements, hold down the <Ctrl> key and click to highlight the
       extra requirement(s) required.

The following options are available:

           o   Subscription fee

A resource that is not available free of charge for general access, which is available
to subscribers. This charge may be met by a user's institution (for example library
service, faculty or school). Users may be charged a fee to access online content.

Subscription based resources may provide a mixed service supplementing the freely-
available content with additional material from a resource only available to
subscribers.

           o   User registration

A resource that is not available for general access, which usually requires the user to
submit details such as name and email address, but which does not charge a fee.

           o   Ability to view large images

Resources that make available high-resolution images may be slow to download and
require considerable memory and processor power to be used effectively. If the
resource you are describing relies upon images that are almost as large as the
browser screen itself (or larger), you should select this field. Digitised manuscript
pages or maps often constitute large high-resolution image files.

           o   Use of frames

Resources that display information in two or more independent sections, each with a
scroll bar (like a 'window' within the window), are using frames. Frames are
commonly used to display a separate navigation window and content window.
Selecting a category of documents in one frame shows the contents of the category
in another frame.


                                          12
Frames have accessibility problems. Some websites offer a "frames" version and a
"no frames" version. Therefore in the description field, 3.8 above, explain any
differences in content or navigation between these versions of the resource.

           o   Use of Cascading Stylesheets

CSS is like a template to provide more control over how different elements will
appear on a Web page, such as headers and links. Browsers that do not support
cascading stylesheets might not display CSS pages clearly or as they were intended.
Style sheets are not fully supported by all Web browsers, although most modern
browsers will function fine with most versions of CSS . Use if:

      The resource states that the Web pages may not display correctly on certain
       browsers due to CSS.
      There are presentational glitches on the site, and CSS is called upon in the
       site's source code. To determine whether a site's source code calls upon
       CSS, right click on the main window displaying the site. Select 'View Source'
       from the drop-down menu that appears (if you have the option). Look through
       the source code page to see if the string "css" appears. It will normally be
       near the beginning, and appear in the context of a command such as type =
       "text/css".

           o   Flash plugin

For use with resources that include movies, animations, or other vector-based
images that are ONLY viewable by the use of this Macromedia plug-in added to a
browser to enable it to interact with this special file type. For example, the
introduction to some websites is only provided in a Flash presentation. Flash
animations will look the same regardless which browser is used. However, Flash
presentations have accessibility problems.

To determine whether a site requires a Flash plug-in, right click on any animated part
of the screen that you believe might use Flash Technology. If the animation uses
Flash, the bottom option on the drop-down menu that appears will be 'About
Macromedia Flash'.

           o   Audio plugin

Use for resources that rely on a plug-in not mentioned above in order to play audio
files.

           o   Video plugin

Use for resources that rely on a plug-in not mentioned above in order to play video
files.

           o   Adobe Acrobat (pdf)

Use for resources that include PDF (Portable Document Format) files, and other
specified versions of almost any kind of document, accessible using this freely-
distributed plug-in (also known as Acrobat Reader) added to a browser to enable it to
interact with this special file type. People viewing a PDF file (or document) with the
Acrobat reader see the document with the layout intended by the author - regardless



                                           13
of the fonts, operating systems, or software programs used to create the original
document. It should be obvious if a resource uses Acrobat .

           o   QuickTime viewer

For use with resources that includes the viewing of interactive images with this
Apple-developed plug-in added to a browser. Images include:

      360-degree virtual reality (VR and VRML) presentations. These could be
       photographic (or rendered) representations of any person, place, or thing. Or
       images that can be rotated, that allow the user to zoom in or out, to look
       around 360 degrees, and navigate from one scene to another.
      Also video; images; sound; animation; graphics; text; music; streaming audio;
       MIDI; and MP3.

To determine whether a site requires QuickTime viewer, right click on the image that
you suspect requires QuickTime viewer, and if the drop-down menu that appears
begins with 'About QuickTime Plug-in', then it does indeed.

           o   Unspecified plugin(s)

Use for resources that require a plug-in that is not mentioned above.

           o   Java-enabled browser

Resources that include the use of the Java programming language are viewable only
with a Java-compatible Web browser. Many browsers allow users to turn Java off,
which can result in problems. Small Java applications ('applets') include animations
and calculators.

To determine whether a resource requires Java, look for the text 'applet' in the
website's source code. To access a site's source code, right click on the main
window displaying the site. Select 'View Source' from the drop-down menu that
appears (if you have the option). Look through, or search (by pressing 'Ctrl' &,'f'), the
source code page to see if the string "applet" appears.

           o   JavaScript-enabled browser

Several resources use this scripting language to enable greater interactivity and
dynamic content, for example to respond to user-initiated events (such as form
input). JavaScript is viewable with recent versions of most browsers, although
Internet Explorer only supports a subset that is called 'Jscript'. Many websites use
small pieces of JavaScript, but will still function fine on browsers that do not support
JavaScript. This should only be needed if a large quantity of JavaScript is used, or
there are important parts of the site that rely on JavaScript.

To determine whether a resource employs Javascript, look for the text 'JavaScript' in
the website's source code. To access a site's source code, right click on the main
window displaying the site. Select 'View Source' from the drop-down menu that
appears (if you have the option). Look through, or search (by pressing 'Ctrl' &,'f'), the
source code page to see if the string "JavaScript" appears.

           o   XML-aware browser


                                           14
Some resources use XML (Extensible Mark-up Language), which is not necessarily
readily viewable in Web browsers, although most modern browsers should work fine.
XML allows Web designers to create their own customised tags that enable the
definition, transmission, validation, and interpretation of data between applications
and between organisations, perhaps for pages emerging from databases and other
applications where parts of the page are standardised and must reappear many
times.

To determine whether a resource requires XML, look for the text 'xml' in the website's
source code. To access a site's source code, right click on the main window
displaying the site. Select 'View Source' from the drop-down menu that appears (if
you have the option). Look through, or search (by pressing 'Ctrl' &,'f'), the source
code page to see if the string "xml" appears.

           o   Extra fonts or character sets

Some resources require the user to download a non-standard font or character set
before the text will display correctly in your browser. If many text characters are not
being displayed properly (often being displayed as rectangles), this is probably
because you do not have the correct font installed.

           o   Shockwave

Use for resources that include Macromedia Director movies and animations,
interactive animations, and additional video formats, viewable with this Macromedia
plug-in added to a browser to enable it to interact with this special file type.

To determine whether a site requires the Shockwave plug-in right click on any
animated part of the screen that you believe might use Shockwave. If the image or
animation uses Shockwave, the bottom option on the drop-down menu that appears
will be 'About Shockwave Player'.

3.22 ISBN
Fields 3.22 and 3.23 will take text and/or multiple entries.
Subject groups may add their own guidelines about these fields.

      Enter the ISBN without spaces.
      If available, use the ISBN-13 code (introduced in 2006):
                       e.g. 9780910608510
      Separate multiple entries with a semi-colon and a space.
      Scope notes can be added in brackets after the code, as for ISSNs below.

3.23 ISSN
      Enter the ISSN with a hyphen (preferred)
      Indicate whether the ISSN refers to print or online format
      Separate multiple entries with a semi-colon and a space.
                     e.g. 1234-5678 (online); 8766-4321 (print)


3.24 Period (Coverage)
      Select one or more period(s) from the drop down menu to indicate a period
       covered by the content of the resource.



                                           15
      For multiple periods, hold down the <Ctrl> key and click to highlight the extra
       period(s) required.


3.25 Geographic name
      If appropriate, enter the geographic coverage covered by the content of the
       resource.
      Use the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN) to select terms.
       http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/vocabularies/tgn/
      Separate terms with semi-colon and a single space:

                              e.g. Africa; Asia

3.26 Latitude
      If a resource is concerned with a specific site or settlement, then the latitude
       of that site or settlement may also be entered:

                              e.g. 38 09 N

      Use the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN) to select terms.
       http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/vocabularies/tgn/

3.27 Longitude
      If a resource is concerned with a specific site or settlement, then the longitude
       of that site or settlement may also be entered:

                              e.g. 023 57 E

      Use the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN) to select terms.
       http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/vocabularies/tgn/

3.28 Audience
This field allows you to indicate for whom the resource is intended or useful.
    Tick the box or boxes as appropriate for this resource.
    The terms include Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE), which
        can be defined as follows:

Higher Education:

       o   DipHE and Foundation Degree (includes and roughly comparable with
           HND, NICAT 5, NVQ4, SVQ4, and SHE Level 2)
       o   Degree (includes and roughly comparable with BA and BSc etc, NICAT 6
           and SHE Level 3)
       o   Honours Degree (includes and roughly comparable with BA hons and BSc
           hons etc, NVQ 5, SVQ 5, and SHE Level H)

Further Education:

       o   16-19 education and training, including HNC, NICAT 4, NVQ4, SVQ4,
           Scottish NQ Higher, and Scottish Higher Education (SHE) Level 1




                                          16
3.29 Educational level
      Select an educational level, appropriate for this resource, from the drop down
       menu.
      Definitions of the 12 UK Educational Levels (UKEL) are as follows:

UK Educational Level 1-3 covers education from entry level through to about 14
years. Includes:

       o   Scottish 5-14 curriculum
       o   Key Stage 1 in the National curriculum (Year 1 and 2 children, aged
           between 5-7 in England and Wales)
       o   Key Stage 2 (Years 3-6 children, aged between 7-11 in England and
           Wales)
       o   Key Stage 3 (Years 7-9 children, aged between 11 and 14 in England and
           Wales), and NICAT Entry, Years 8-10 children, aged between 11 and 14
           in Northern Ireland, and Scottish NQ Access 3)

UK Educational Level 4-5 covers part of the 14-19 curriculum. Includes:

       o   Key Stage 4 in the National curriculum (includes and roughly comparable
           with GCSE D-G, GCSE A-C, SCE Standard Grade, NICAT 1-2, NVQ 1-2,
           SVQ 1-2, Foundation GNVQ, and Intermediate GNVQ)
       o   comparable with some of Humbul's existing "Further Education" suitable
           audience

UK Educational Level 6-7 covers part of the FE curriculum, part of the 14-19
curriculum, and Post 16 education and training, (as well as Foundation degrees in
the HE curriculum). Includes:

       o   AS level (includes and roughly comparable with SCE Higher, NICAT 3,
           NVQ 3, SVQ 3, and Advanced GNVQ)
       o   A level (includes and roughly comparable with HNC, NICAT 4, NVQ4,
           SVQ4, Scottish NQ Higher, and Scottish Higher Education (SHE) Level 1)
       o   comparable with some of Humbul's existing "Further Education" suitable
           audience

UK Educational Level 8-10 covers Foundation degrees and Undergraduate degrees
in the HE curriculum. Includes:

       o   DipHE and Foundation Degree (includes and roughly comparable with
           HND, NICAT 5, NVQ4, SVQ4, and SHE Level 2)
       o   Degree (includes and roughly comparable with BA and BSc etc, NICAT 6
           and SHE Level 3)
       o   Honours Degree (includes and roughly comparable with BA hons and BSc
           hons etc, NVQ 5, SVQ 5, and SHE Level H)

UK Educational Level 11-12 covers Postgraduate degrees in the HE curriculum.
Includes:

       o   PG Dip (includes and roughly comparable with Postgraduate Certificate,
           Postgraduate Diploma, Masters Degree, NICAT 7 and SHE Level M)
       o   Doctoral Degree (includes and roughly comparable with PhD and DPhil,
           NICAT 8 and SHE Level D)



                                         17
3.30 Relationships
Select a value from the following list (those in bold are the most commonly used
values; those in italics underlined are available for use but are used less often):

Is Format Of (described resource is the same intellectual content of the referenced
resource, but presented in another format - alternative URLs, e.g. foreign language
versions which are the primary language)
Has Format (described resource pre-existed referenced resource, which is
essentially the same intellectual content presented in another format - alternative
URLs, e.g. foreign language versions which are not the primary language, mirror
sites; can include multiple-language versions in one field)
Is Part Of (URL of main site, of which this resource is part)
Has Part (referenced resource included within described resource)
References (described resource references or cites referenced resource)
Is Referenced By (described resource is referenced or cited by referenced resource)
Is Version Of (indicate resource of which described resource is a version, edition or
adaptation where there are substantial changes in content)
Has Version (indicate different versions, editions or adaptations of the described
resource)
Replaces (described resource supplants, displaces or supersedes referenced
resource)
Is Replaced By (described resource is supplanted, displaced or superseded by
referenced resource)

Examples:
value=isPartOf text=BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/
value=HasFormat text=French language version: {url}
value=References text=Sister site: http://www.popmatters.com/

Limit to 3 relation fields if possible. When referencing another website, use a colon
and space as in the above examples. Use separate fields for each entry containing a
URL.

3.31 Flag
This field is used by Intute: Science Engineering Technology and Intute: Arts and
Humanities to tag or mark particular records for various reasons.

Tick the relevant term, where appropriate.

The list of terms includes:

       o   Hot topic - used to tag records included in PSIgate and GEsource Hot
           Topics to assist in maintenance of the Hot Topics.
       o   Do not harvest - used to indicate websites that we do not wish the
           harvester to be run on - currently used mainly on PSIgate to indicate
           journal home pages, as we had a complaint from a publisher about being
           harvested.
       o   RDNLTSN - used to indicate records that were exported as part of the
           RDN/LTSN interoperability project.
       o   Space Guide - used to tag records to be displayed in the PSIgate Space
           Guide.
       o   Spotlight - used to tag records on topics particularly related to issues of
           the Spotlight science magazine that were displayed with a Spotlight logo
           on the PSIgate website.


                                           18
        o   Subject Pack - used to tag records included in PSIgate and GEsource
            Subject Packs to assist in maintenance of the Subject Packs.


3.32 Record source
This field is used to indicate that the resource has been harvested from an external
source.

Tick the appropriate term.

Terms include:

AERADE          – Intute: Science Engineering Technology
HONNI           – Intute: Health and Life Sciences
ADAM            – Intute: Arts and Humanities
CEBE            – Intute: Arts and Humanities
Palatine        – Intute: Arts and Humanities

3.33 Comments
This field is used to add any further comments about the resource that are not
covered in the standard cataloguing fields. It is searchable internally, though it is for
internal use only and will never be displayed.

3.34 Status
This field will indicate the status of the record

       Choose the required option from the drop down menu.
       Note: The „live‟ option is only available from the edit screen, and only
        available to certain permission levels.

Status options are:

Live            fully accessible live record
Suggested       public suggestion awaiting evaluation by Intute staff
Draft           record under construction
Complete        record completed, and awaiting quality control
Deleted         deletion reasons may include permanently unavailable, duplicate or
                inappropriate records
Suspended       record is temporarily unavailable e.g. dead link
Vetoed          quality check reveals inappropriate record, which will not be made live

3.35 Date record created
This field is automatically generated.

It records the date the record was added to the database in the format YYYY-MM-DD

Do not alter the contents of this field.

3.36 Record creator ID
This field is automatically generated.

It records the username of the original cataloguer of the resource.



                                             19
Do not alter the contents of this field.

3.37 Date for review
This field value will default to 12 months hence, but can be edited to an alternative
value if required.

Dates should be entered in the International Standard ISO 8601:1988 format, YYYY-
MM-DD. See 3.16 above for examples.


4. To complete the record


4.1 From the Add New Record screen

4.1.1 Submit new record

       Click on Submit button at the end of the „add new record‟ fields.
       Please note that records can only be made live from the Edit Record screen.


4.2 From the Edit Record screen

       If classifications, or controlled keywords, with look-up tables (as for 3.9
        above), have been used while compiling the record, the record will have been
        transferred to the Edit Record screen.
       All fields can be edited from this screen, using the rules given above.
       Additional fields will also be visible from this screen.

    Making a record live
     The record can be made live from this screen (by those with correct
      permissions).
     When a record is made live please ensure that instructions for fields 3.34,
      4.2.2, 4.2.3 and 4.2.4 are all followed.

4.2.1 Editor’s choice
This field can be used to identify a small selection (usually about half a dozen) of key
websites chosen by Section Editors for that subject. They are used to help the user
identify the most important websites in their area. They may also be websites that
might perhaps be included in a subject booklet guide. These records will appear at
the top of the browse hit list, as well as in alphabetical order within the list.

       Tick in the check box to include the resource as Editor‟s choice.

4.2.2 Status changed date
Use this field to record the date on which the record status is changed in any way.
Dates should be entered in the International Standard ISO 8601:1988 format, YYYY-
MM-DD.

4.2.3 Status changed by ID
Use this field to record the ID of the person changing the record status.




                                           20
4.2.4 Date record activated
Designated people can change the record status to „live‟. This field is used to record
the date that change is made. Please ensure this field is filled in when required, so
that the records will be picked up by RSS feeds of new resources, and New
Resources lists.

4.2.5 Record activated by
Use this field to record the ID of the person making the record live.

4.2.6 Date last reviewed
This field is used to record the date the record was last reviewed.
The field may be edited, adding the new date in International Standard ISO
8601:1988 format as above.

4.2.7 Record reviewer ID
Use this field to record the ID of the person who last reviewed the record.

4.2.8 Redirects
This field records the number times the website has been accessed i.e.
„clickthroughs‟. It is automatically populated when the website is searched, and
cannot be edited.




                                           21
22
Appendix 2. Intute resource types

Intute standard Resource Types, with scope notes and definitions – Version 2

RDN / DCMI                Proposed standard Intute term       Definition, scope and use (RDN/DCMI)

(data entry form)         (form for use on web site)

JournalFullText           Journals - full-text                Use for online, full-text serials, from refereed journals to newsletters. There needs to be access to nearly
                                                              all of the printed content of a journal for the site to be classified as "full-text". Access to the text of e-
                                                              journals, not otherwise published in print form, can also be included here. Access should be free of
                                                              charge, though; if access is by subscription, then use Journals – contents and abstracts. Exclude
                                                              newspapers - see News.

JournalAbstractContents   Journals - contents and abstracts   Use for information on individual or lists of serial titles, where the full-text of the articles is not available.
                                                              Includes all serial types, from refereed journals to newsletters (except newspapers - see News). Include
                                                              titles where the full-text of articles is only available via a subscription and/or partial access to full text
                                                              articles (perhaps a "sample" such as indexes to subscription-only full text journals or to items not
                                                              available electronically).

GovernmentPublication     Government publications             Use for online documents, databases, maps, image collections and other resources published by
                                                              government bodies. May include individual documents or collections. Excludes actual legislation – see
                                                              Legislation.

Legislation               Legislation                         Use for online texts and collections of primary and secondary legislation, including acts, ordinances,
                                                              statutes, constitutions, rules, regulations, orders and statutory instruments proposed and passed by
                                                              parliaments around the world.

Document                  Blogs                               General definition for Document: use for full-text documents. A text is a resource in which the content
                                                              is primarily words for reading. For example - books, letters, dissertations, poems, articles, reviews, blogs.
dcmitype:Text             Conference papers                   Note that facsimiles or images of texts are still part of the genre called „document‟. Exactly what appears
                                                              under this heading will be a matter of context; humanities documents might be very different from social
                          Contracts and procurement           science documents, for example.

                          Digests                             Blogs: use for Web pages that are produced in a journal or diary format. Usually updated frequently,
                                                              blogs typically reflect current events and often contain hyperlinks, reflections and can include comments
                                                              from readers. Also known as Web log.
                          E-books
                                                              Conference papers: use for the collection of academic papers that are published in the context of an




                                                                                  23
Law reports                    academic conference. These could include panel discussions, roundtables on various issues, workshops
                               and presentation.
Papers/reports/articles
(individual)                   Contracts and procurement: use for a resource that deals with the procedures and legislation involved
Papers/reports/articles        in procurement.
(collections)
                               Digests: use for online indexes and compilations of case law and/ or legislation summaries with
Patents                        commentary and subject guidance.

Patient information leaflets   E-books: use for an electronic (or digital) equivalent of a conventional printed book.

Position statements            Law reports: use for online texts and collections of case reports, judicial decisions, opinions and
                               judgments from law courts or tribunals.
Practice guidelines
                               Papers/reports/articles (individual): use for an individual paper, article or report – for e.g. a single full-
Primary source                 text article from a journal or a single conference paper, as above.

Product information            Papers/reports/articles (collections): use for a set of papers, articles or reports – for e.g. a collection of
                               monographs or a collection of articles taken from a journal. Please note, though, that if the resource is a
Reviews                        journal, with sample articles, then Journal – contents and abstracts should be assigned to the resource; if
                               it is a full-text journal, then Journals – full-text should be assigned. Collections of conference papers can
                               be assigned here, if the Subject Group does not have Conference papers as a separate Resource Type.
Secondary source
                               Patents: use for patenting institutions, companies offering good patents delivery services, databases of
Standards
                               patents and downloadable non-free patents, full text patents.
Subject guides
                               Patient information leaflets: use for an online leaflet that contains information about medical conditions,
                               available services, and treatments.
Systematic reviews
                               Position statements: use for a document / paper that outlines the position of a professional association /
Texts                          body – for e.g. the official position of the British Veterinary Association on tail docking. This is very
                               different to a clinical or practice guideline.
Theses
                               Practice guidelines: use for a clinical guideline / protocol that aims to guide decisions and criteria in
Treaties                       specific areas of clinical practice and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of clinical care.

                               Primary sources: use for original texts or artefacts. Use secondary source for the analysis of a primary
                               source. Examples of primary sources would include the text of a Charles Dickens novel, a digitised
                               manuscript, or an image of Roman amphora.




                                                   24
                                   Product information: use for a product data sheet, technical specification, white paper or detailed
                                   articles about a product or its technology. Note: most of the company sites included will have some kind
                                   of product information, it is important that the product information in the site is of a high quality before
                                   assigning this resource type.

                                   Reviews: use for an evaluation of a publication, work or performance, such as a book, film, work of art,
                                   musical composition or performance.

                                   Secondary sources: use for critical texts that analyse primary sources. Use primary source for original
                                   texts or artefacts.

                                   Standards: use for institutions issuing standards, companies offering good standards delivery services,
                                   databases of standards and downloadable non-free standards.

                                   Subject guides: use for a resource that does not easily fit into other categories and are principally „about‟
                                   a particular subject. Use for enthusiasts‟ sites, not relating to a particular person.

                                   Systematic reviews: use for a document that states that a systematic search has been undertaken of
                                   the literature relating to a particular topic. This involves a critical appraisal of individual studies.

                                   Texts: use for a resource that consists of texts or collections of texts not covered by other resource types,
                                   e.g. transcriptions or facsimiles of printed books; letters; poems; transcriptions or facsimiles of print and/or
                                   historical newspapers, periodicals, or magazines, or articles contained therein; transcriptions of
                                   manuscripts, etc. Use 'News' for contemporary online news sources.

                                   Theses: use for a document that presents the author's research and findings and is submitted in support
                                   of candidature for a degree or professional qualification. Also known as a dissertation.

                                   Treaties: use for online texts and collections of bilateral and multilateral treaties and international
                                   agreements between nation states, and agreements relating to inter-governmental and international
                                   organisations.

Organisation   Associations        General definition for Organisation: use for a resource that provides information about organisations,
                                   companies, associations (societies), professional organisations, non-profit organisations (charities) or
               Companies           government bodies.

               Government bodies   Associations: use for the website of an organised body of people that has an interest, activity or purpose
                                   in common; a society, guild, artists‟ collective or user group.




                                                       25
                             Non-profit organisations         Companies: use for the website of an organisation that undertakes commercial business – for e.g. an
                                                              architectural practice, a commercial gallery, a consultancy firm, or a software company.
                             Other organisations
                                                              Government bodies: use for the website of a government department, office or administration or for an
                             Professional organisations       organisation that is funded by a government department, office or administration to deliver the
                                                              government‟s strategy or policy within a given sector.
                             Publishers
                                                              Non-profit organisations: use for the website of an organisation whose primary objective is to support
                             Recruitment agencies             some issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes.

                                                              Other organisations: use for any other type of organisation that is not included within this list of
                                                              organisations.

                                                              Professional organisations: use for the website of an organisation that is made up of professional
                                                              persons for the advancement of their profession.

                                                              Publishers: use for the website of an organisation within the industry that is concerned with the
                                                              production and dissemination of literature or information, for public view.

                                                              Recruitment agencies: use for the website of a company or organisation that engages in recruiting
                                                              individuals to fill jobs or positions within any group such as a corporation, company or organisation.

LearningMaterialCourseware   Case studies                     General definition for Learning Materials: use for online materials intended for teaching purposes or for
                                                              direct use by students. They include tutorials, lecture notes, experiments, examination papers, field
                             Field studies and field guides   studies and guides, quizzes, Java applets, material from conventional University lecture courses or
                                                              purpose-designed online courses, worksheets/activity sheets. They are digital aids to learning that are
                             Lab experiments                  primarily intended to be used in a learning environment.

                             Learning materials               Case studies: use for a resource that collects data, analyses information and reports on an individual
                                                              unit (such as a person or community) or a single instance or event.
                             Lecture notes
                                                              Field studies and field guides: use for a resource that is concerned with the characteristics and features
                                                              of particular geographical landscapes or sites.
                             Other educational materials
                                                              Lab experiments: use for a resource that provides instructions for performing experimental work in a
                             Tutorials
                                                              science laboratory or that disseminates the results of experiments conducted under laboratory conditions,
                                                              or directly concerned with such experiments – for e.g. psycholinguistic experiments.




                                                                                 26
                                                          Learning materials: use for online materials intended for teaching purposes or for direct use by students.

                                                          Lecture notes: use for freely available lecture notes that have been created to augment teaching and
                                                          learning.

                                                          Other educational materials: use for any other type of learning material that has not been included
                                                          within this list of learning materials.

                                                          Tutorials: use for a document, software, or other media that has been created for the purpose of
                                                          instruction for any of a wide variety of tasks.

MailingList         Mailing    lists   and   discussion   Use for the home page of a mailing list or discussion group with subscription details and preferably online
                    groups                                archives. These would include electronic newsgroups, discussion forums, and mailing list archives. Do
                                                          not include mailing lists without an online presence.

News                News                                  Use for online news services – for e.g. newspaper websites (including archives), television channels and
                                                          specialist electronic newsvendors.
                    Product news

EventAnnouncement   Events                                Use for permanent conference homepages and lists of conferences/events, exhibitions, Web-casts,
                                                          performances, conference workshops, open-days, festivals.
dcmitype:Event

Project             Projects                              Use for the resource of a non- research project (although there may be some overlap with research
                                                          projects) – for e.g. an arts project or an online exhibition. Use Events for actual exhibitions. Use Research
                                                          Centres and Projects for research projects.

Database            Bibliographic databases               General definition for Database: primary data held on online databases. Will probably include
                                                          subscription-only services if they are useful, or easily available within the FE/HE community.
dcmitype:Dataset    Datasets
                                                          Bibliographic databases: use for a database that contains details of books, journal articles, conference
                    Non- bibliographic databases          papers, patents etc. May include subscription-only services if they are useful, or easily available within the
                                                          FE/HE.
                    Sequence databases                    Datasets: use for a website that provides access to primary or secondary data which users can
                                                          download.
                    Specimen databases
                                                          Non-bibliographic databases: use for a database that contains scientific and other data, e.g. chemicals,
                                                          minerals, fossils. May include subscription-only services if they are useful, or easily available within the
                                                          FE/HE community.




                                                                             27
                                                    Sequence databases: use for a large collection of DNA, protein, or other sequences stored in a
                                                    searchable database.
                                                    Specimen databases: use for a collection of data on biological specimens stored in a searchable
                                                    database.

Reference        FAQs                               FAQs: use for a resource that is primarily made up of questions and answers, otherwise known as
                                                    „Frequently Asked Questions‟ or „FAQs‟.
                 Reference sources
                                                    Reference sources: use for useful material, such as glossaries, encyclopædias, directories etc. This is
                                                    the electronic equivalent of the Reference section of a bookshop or library.

Resource Guide   Resource guides and directories    Use for a large directory of relevant resources, offering similar services to those of the Subject groups
                                                    and/or gateways. Also includes links to other quality-specialised websites.

Academic         Administration related resources   General definition for Academic: use for the website of an academic institution, such as university,
                                                    college, institute or art school, or for an academic department within a university and other academic
                 FE institutions and departments    institution, or for other related bodies. Don't use for an academic work; depending on what type of
                                                    resource it is, use a specific Resource Type from the Document section or „Research centres and
                 HE institutions and departments    projects‟ for a research project.

                 Research related resources         Administration related resources: use for the website of a department within an academic institution
                                                    that is responsible for the maintenance or supervision of the institution – for e.g. research administration,
                                                    which includes grants and contract administration, and institutional compliance with government
                 Schools
                                                    regulations. Do not use for the website of faculties or academic departments.

                                                    FE institutions and departments: use for the website of an educational institution in which post-
                                                    secondary, post compulsory education is undertaken, or for an academic department within such an
                                                    institution. This includes work-based, adult or community learning and teaching. This term is mainly used
                                                    in connection with education in the United Kingdom; the American equivalent is a community college.

                                                    HE institutions and departments: use for the website of an educational institution, such as a university
                                                    or art college that awards academic degrees or foundation degrees, or for an academic department within
                                                    such an institution. Higher education includes learning, teaching and research activities of universities,
                                                    and, within the realm of teaching, it includes undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate levels. This term
                                                    is mainly used in connection with education in the United Kingdom; the American equivalents are known
                                                    as tertiary education, or graduate schools.

                                                    Research related resources: use for a resource that is primarily intended for use by a researcher.




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                                                          Schools: use for the website of an institution in which pre-university, compulsory education is
                                                          undertaken. This would include a primary or secondary school. This definition of this term refers to
                                                          education undertaken in the United Kingdom; please note that the term „school‟ in North America has a
                                                          broader definition: it can refer to any institute of education, at any level, including a university or graduate
                                                          school. For American schools at those levels, please use HE institutions and departments.

Collections               Collections                     Use for a group of resources that may be navigated separately but are described in a single record as a
                                                          collection. The separate resources may also be described individually in certain cases. Many large library
                                                          and museum websites host collections of resources. [DCMI definition is "An aggregation of items. The
                                                          term collection means that the resource is described as a group; its parts may be separately described
                                                          and navigated.”

ResearchCentres           Research centres and projects   Use for the website of a university-based, government-run or private research institute or research centre,
                                                          or for the dissemination of research results.

Services                  Services                        Use for an online resource that provides one or more functions of value to the end-user – for e.g. one of
                                                          the many JISC funded data services to the academic community – like the subject centres of the AHDS
                                                          (Arts and Humanities Data Service); a metadata creator; an authentication service; a Z39.50 or Web
                                                          server; or a helpdesk.

Image                     Images                          Use for an online resource that is primarily symbolic visual representation other than text – for e.g. images
                                                          and photographs of physical objects, paintings, prints, drawings, graphics, stills from a film, diagrams,
                                                          musical notation, photomicrographs (for e.g. crystals, microstructures). Note that image may include both
                                                          electronic and physical representations. Limit to sizeable collections of image materials - 'more image
                                                          than text'.

InteractiveResource       Interactive resources           Use for a resource that requires interaction from the user to be understood, executed, or experienced –
                                                          for e.g. forms on Web pages, applets, multimedia learning objects, chat services, virtual reality.

MovingImage               Moving images                   Use for a series of visual representations that, when shown in succession, impart an impression of
                                                          motion. Examples of moving images are: animations, movies, television programs, videos, zoetropes, or
                                                          visual output from a simulation.

Sound                     Sound                           Use for a resource in which the content is primarily intended to be rendered as audio – for e.g. a music
                                                          playback file format, an audio compact disc, and recorded speech or sounds.

Bibliographic resources   Bibliographic material          Use for information, location and citations that are about primary and secondary sources, preferably
                                                          annotated.




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Biographical resources      Biographical material              Use for sites containing biographical material about a particular individual or group of individuals. It may
                                                               include scholarly home pages with significant autobiographical content.

Botanical garden            Botanical gardens                  Use for a resource that is about a botanical garden, which is primarily outdoor areas where a variety of
                                                               plants are grown and displayed for scientific, educational, or artistic purposes.

Maps                        Maps                               Use for a resource that is primarily a map, which refers to graphic or photogrammetric representations of
                                                               the Earth, Moon or a planet's surface or a part of it, including physical features and political boundaries,
                                                               where each point corresponds to a geographical or celestial position according to a definite scale or
                                                               projection. Historical maps, although often drawn to a rather inaccurate scale, may also be included here.

Software                    Software                           Use for a computer program, in source or compiled form that may be available for installation non-
                                                               transiently on another machine. For software, which exists only to create an interactive environment, use
                                                               interactive instead. (DCMI)

Statistical data            Statistics                         Use for a website that includes meaningful statistics, statistical data or collections of statistics, whether
                                                               relating to human affairs or to natural phenomena – for e.g. production statistics, usage statistics. Not to
                                                               be used for websites about statistics.


References:
       RDN Resource Types http://www.rdn.ac.uk/publications/cat-guide/types/ now available at
        http://www.webarchive.org.uk/pan/14883/20060912/www.rdn.ac.uk/publications/cat-guide/types/index.html
       DCMI Type Vocabulary http://dublincore.org/documents/dcmi-type-vocabulary/
       Allinson, J. Comparison of resource types used across the RDN completed for the RDN IRC Software Evaluation exercise March 2005. All Hubs were examined for
        the purposes of this comparison.
       Input from RDN Hub staff during October and November 2005 and Intute Subject Group staff from September to November 2006.

    Jayne Burgess, February 2006. Resource Types reviewed by the Intute Collections and Cataloguing Management Working Group and edited in this document by Mary
    Burslem, November 2006




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Appendix 2: Style Guide

Intute style guidelines for text in the description field
academic (lower case)
ASCII
Association football (as opposed to just football)
bookmarks (lower case initial, unless referring to menu title when should be
Bookmarks)
Boolean (not boolean)
breastfeeding (not breast feeding)
checklist (no hyphen)
college (lower case)
Communications and Information Technologies C&IT
cooperation
coordination
database (not data base)
department (not dept)
digitised (not digitized)
disc (a CD-ROM)
disk (a floppy disk)
domain name (lower case)
DNS (upper case)
ebook (no hyphen or space)
ejournal (no hyphen or space)
ecotourism (no hyphen)
eLearning
email (no hyphen; lower case unless at start of line)
encyclopaedia (not encyclopedia)
end-user (hyphen)
e.g. (no punctuation)
fact sheet (not factsheet)
FAQs (upper case with lower case pural)
food service (not foodservice)
FTP (upper case)
File Transfer Protocol (upper case initials)
full-text (hyphen)
gateway (lower case)
handheld (no hyphen)
hands-on (lower case, hyphen)
health care (two words and no hyphen)
HE (upper case)
higher education (lower case initials)
home page (two words, no hyphen)
HTML (upper case)
HyperText Transfer Protocol (upper case initials)
HTTP (upper case)
hypertext, hypermedia, hyperspace (compounds, no hyphen)
HyperText Markup Language (upper case initials)
i.e. (no punctuation)
Inc (not Incorporated)
Information and Communication Technology (ICT)


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institution (lower case)
Internet (upper case initial)
Internet Explorer (upper case initials)
Internet Protocol (upper case initials)
international
intranet (lower case)
Intute (upper case I)
Intute: Arts and Humanities (upper case initials, use "and" not &)
Intute: Further Education (upper case initials)
Intute: Health and Life Sciences (upper case initials, use "and" not &)
Intute: Science Engineering and Technology (upper case initials, use "and" not &)
Intute: Social Sciences (upper case initials)
Intute: Virtual Training Suite (upper case initials)
IP (upper case)
iPIX
Java
JavaScript
Ltd (instead of Limited)
log in/on (no hyphen two words)
log off/out (no hypen two words)
Lynx (upper case initial)
mailing list (lower case)
markup (a language), to mark up (the action (marked-up (a text prepared using
markup) but "he marked up the text".
metadata (lower case)
multimedia (no hyphen)
national
Netscape (upper case initial)
Netizen (upper case initial)
netiquette (lower case initial)
network(s) (lower case)
newsgroups (lower case, one word)
non alcoholic drinks (no hyphen)
Olympic games (capital O)
Olympic summer games (capital O)
Olympic winter games (capital O)
online (no hyphen)
online tutorial (lower case)
organisation (lower case, s not z)
Paralympic games (capital P)
PDF (not pdf or .pdf)
peer review (no hyphen)
PLC (not Plc)
plug-in (lower case)
podcast (lower case)
PowerPoint
program (software)
programme (a schedule, an educational plan)
QuickTime
RealPlayer
Resource Description Framework
reinforce (no hyphen)
RDF
scroll bar (no hyphen two words)
search engine (lower case)


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search tool (lower case)
SGML (upper case)
Shockwave
SMS
soccer (as opposed to just football)
social science (lower case)
social scientists (lower case)
step-by-step (hyphenated)
subject-based gateway (lower case with hyphen)
sub-section
Telnet (upper case initial)
Uniform Resource Locator (upper case initials)
URL (upper case)
URLs (upper case with lower case plural)
universities (lower case)
university (lower case, except where referring to a specific institution, e.g. University
of Bristol)
Virtual Society (upper case initials)
virtual library (lower case)
voice mail (two words)
Web not web
webcam (one word lower case)
webcast (one word lower case)
website (lower case one word)
World Wide Web (or WWW; not World-Wide Web)
worldwide (no hyphen)
XML (Extensible Markup Language)
X-ray

Please note:
1. Academic subjects (eg Psychology, Sociology) have upper case initials where
referred to as subject headings, but otherwise they are lower case.
2. Use ise rather than ize (eg visualise and not visualize)




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