Recommended Best Practices in Reverse Logistics

Document Sample
Recommended Best Practices in Reverse Logistics Powered By Docstoc
					                                    sm




Recommended
Best Practices in
Reverse Logistics



            DR
                               AFT
Prepared for the Membership of NAED
by The Task Forces on SPA Process Efficiency
                                                                                  1
                                                          DRAFT
 
NAED’s Mission

The National Association of Electrical Distributors (NAED) is the voice of
electrical distribution, providing members with the best in tools, information,
and assistance to help them thrive financially and to improve the electrical
distribution channel. This is accomplished through networking, advocacy,
education, and defined standards.
 
 
 
 




11/12/2007
                                                                                                                                    2



Table of Contents 

Scope and Goal of NAED’s Task Force on Reverse Logistics ................................... 3
Dedication ......................................................................................................................... 4
  Thanks to Our Industry Volunteers .......................................................................... 4
    Distributors and Manufacturers Participating on the Task Force .................... 4
    Additional Key Contributors ................................................................................. 4
Recommended Best Practices in Reverse Logistics Introduction ............................. 5
Definitions......................................................................................................................... 6
Recommended Vocabulary ............................................................................................ 7
Recommended Best Practices Which Typically Apply to Most Returns ................. 8
  RMA Process Summary .............................................................................................. 8
  Debiting ......................................................................................................................... 9
  Manufacturer Issuance of Credit ............................................................................. 10
  Packaging and Marking Returns ............................................................................. 11
  Broken Carton Quantities ......................................................................................... 12
  Incomplete/Incorrect RMA ....................................................................................... 13
  Labor Reimbursement for Handling Returns ........................................................ 14
  Typical Distributor Return Processes...................................................................... 15
  Manufacturer Shipping Error Received in Warehouse ........................................ 15
  Manufacturer Shipping Error Direct to Customer................................................ 16
  Distributor/End User Order Error ........................................................................... 17
  Product Warranty/Inoperable Material .................................................................. 18
  Stock Rotation/Balancing .......................................................................................... 19
What You Can Do .......................................................................................................... 20




11/12/2007
                                                                                     3


Scope of This White Paper 
This  white  paper,  “Recommended  Best  Practices  in  Reverse  Logistics,”  is 
designed  to  facilitate  dialogue  between  trading  partners  for  the  purposes  of 
making the process of returning goods more efficient and reducing costs for all 
parties involved. This document is not intended to express any views regarding 
individual  company’s  return  of  goods  policies.  It  is  intended  to  recommend 
methods for reducing costs by showing areas of inefficiencies in current industry 
practices  and  means  of  better  performing  the  necessary  function  of  returning 
goods.  All  distributors  and  manufacturers  will  continue  to  make  their  own 
independent  decisions  regarding  return  of  goods  policies  based  on  their 
individual business circumstances and their relationships with trading partners.  
 

Goal of NAED’s Task Force on Reverse Logistics 
The goal of the Reverse Logistics Task Force is to identify and recommend best 
practices to facilitate the return of electrical products from distributors to 
manufacturers by streamlining the return of goods process and eliminating 
unnecessary costs from the distribution channel.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


11/12/2007
                                                                                             4


Dedication 

Thanks to Our Industry Volunteers 
This white paper is the product of a concerted industry effort. The NAED South 
Central Regional Council empanelled this task force after studying the problem 
of  inefficiencies  in  return  of  goods  from  distributors  to  manufacturers.  It  is  the 
result of hours upon hours of face to face and teleconference foundation laid by 
the  Council  and  the  subsequent  similar  effort  by  the  task  force  members. 
Industry volunteers give freely of their valuable time and talent to help make the 
electrical  distribution  channel  more  efficient.  While  much  of  the  work  was 
completed  via  teleconference,  many  task  force  members  also  flew  to  Chicago, 
Illinois at their own expense to meet face to face to complete their task.  
 
Distributors and Manufacturers Participating on the Task Force 
     •   Tim Schlesser                 Advance Electrical Supply Company 
     •   Maureen Barsema               BJ Electric Supply 
     •   Dave Bucklew                  Eaton Corporation  
     •   Brian Wistey                  Electrical Engineering & Equipment Company 
     •   Paul Davis                    Mayer Electric Supply Company 
     •   Pete Kokousian                Panduit Corporation  
     •   Vince Carter                  Philips Lighting Company 
     •   Jim Lisiki                    Revere Electric Supply Company 
     •   Ted Zanon                     Rockwell Automation 
     •   Marshall McCormick            Siemens Energy and Automation 
     •   Kent Gordon                   WESCO Distribution 
 
Additional Key Contributors 
Derrick Hoskins of K&M Electric Supply, Paul McCool of Revere Electric Supply 
and  Dave  Lichtenauer  of  Van  Meter  Industrial  were  key  contributors  from 
NAED’s  South  Central  Regional  Council.  They  acted  as  Council  liaisons  to  the 
Task Force and participated in many of the Task Force’s conference calls.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


11/12/2007
                                                                                          5


 
 

Recommended Best Practices in Reverse Logistics Introduction 
 
               “Third  Party  Logistics  Providers  see  that  up  to  7%  of  an 
               enterprise’s gross sales are captured by return costs.” 
                          FROM “THE REVERSE SIDE OF LOGISTICS” FORBES.COM 11/3/2005  
 
Clearly every enterprise’s costs and volume of returned goods are different, but 
it  is  just  as  clear  that  return  of  goods  is  a  non‐value  added  cost  which  the 
electrical distribution channel bears. Minimizing the cost is in the mutual interest 
of manufacturers and distributors. How we minimize this cost, however, is often 
a matter of intense debate between trading partners.  
 
Distributors  may  wish  to  simply  scrap  inexpensive  and/or  small  items,  or  to 
prevail  upon  manufacturer  sales  people  to  spend  valuable  selling  time 
processing  returns.  Manufacturers,  conversely,  may  wish  to  conduct  quality 
control inspections or may have safety concerns over the smallest part. They may 
also prefer to maintain very stringent definitions of “salable condition.”  
 
The  NAED  South  Central  Regional  Council  decided  to  address  return  of  goods 
policies  and  procedures  in  2006,  and  has  been  studying  the  issue  ever  since. 
While a task force is not and should never be in the business of dictating policy 
to  an  industry,  the  group  endeavored  to  study  different  methods  for  returning 
goods,  and  to  identify  sensible  and  efficient  policies  in  return  of  goods.  The 
results  are  presented  for  the  industry’s  comment  for  a  period  ending  Dec.  31, 
2007. 




11/12/2007
                                                                                  6


 

Definitions 
 
    Return Goods Authorization (RGA) or Return Material Authorization 
    (RMA) 
    An authorization granted by a manufacturer to a distributor for the purpose 
    of returning product for credit. The terms are used interchangeably 
    depending on the language used in the manufacturer’s published procedures 
    and guidelines. For the purposes of this report, RMA will be used.  
     
    There are 5 types of return goods material authorizations which are defined 
    below: 
     
    1. Manufacturer Shipping Error – Manufacturer ships incorrect product to 
        distributor warehouse or direct to end user. Includes discrepancies such as 
        overages, shortages and duplications. 
     
    2. Distributor/End User Order Error – Distributor orders incorrect product 
        or wrong quantity of correct product. Includes end user returns of non‐
        stock material.  
     
    3. Product Warranty/Inoperable Material – Distributor/end users requests 
        return of warranteed/inoperable product from inventory. 
     
    4. Stock Rotation/Balancing Return – An opportunity for a distributor to 
        return surplus/excess inventory typically done on a quarterly, semi‐
        annual, or annual basis. 
     
    5. Accommodation – Special circumstances sometimes warrant issuing a 
        return that falls outside of the normal return parameters.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



11/12/2007
                                                                                    7


     

Recommended Vocabulary 
 
    •   Return Request Form – A form used by a distributor to request return of 
        material. Includes key information such as invoice number, invoice date, 
        purchase order number, distributor internal reference number (e.g. debit 
        memo, negative purchase order), quantity, and catalogue number.  
 
    •   Restocking Charge – A percentage charged to a distributor for returning 
        goods based on a manufacturer’s published terms and conditions.  
 
    • Published Distributor Cost – The manufacturer’s current published 
      distributor cost sheet. 
 
    •   Distributor Into Stock Purchase Cost – The net into stock purchase cost being 
        invoiced by a manufacturer. 
 
    •   Last Published Cost – Commonly referred to as “one price sheet back.” 
 
    •   Distributor Internal Reference Number – Means of tracking RMAs and 
        expected credits.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


11/12/2007
                                                                                       8


Recommended Best Practices Which Typically Apply to Most 
Returns 
 

RMA Process Summary 
 
Current Situation: 
The RMA process is very often a manual process. Distributors in some instances 
make  multiple  contacts  to  the  manufacturer  before  receiving  a  response  to  the 
request for an RMA.  
 
Recommended Best Practices: 
   • Manufacturers  should  provide  to  distributors  clearly  written  returns 
      policies, procedures, terms and conditions. 
   • Distributors  should  be  able  to  generate  RMA  requests  online  using  the 
      manufacturer’s  website  where  available.  Manufacturers  without  online 
      request capability should provide for rapid response to RMA requests.  
   • RMA  should  provide  freight  instructions  and  entry  fields  for  contact 
      information and distributor internal reference number. 
   • Distributors  should  provide  manufacturer  product  numbers  on  RMA 
      requests.  
   • Manufacturers should respond to RMA requests within 10 days. 
   • Distributors should process return within 10 days of receipt of RMA.  
   • Manufacturers  should  provide  a  credit  memo  or  disposition  of  material 
      received in writing within 30 days of receipt of product.  




11/12/2007
                                                                                          9



Debiting 
 
Current Situation:  
Some distributors make it standard procedure to immediately debit their account 
when they receive an RMA from a manufacturer. In fact, certain manufacturers 
request  that  distributors  debit  their  accounts  once  a  return  is  authorized.  This 
practice is thought to improve distributor cash flow, but the costs associated with 
generating  the  additional  paperwork  and  reconciling  the  debits  are  often  not 
accurately known.  
 
Recommended Best Practice: 
Distributors  should  allow  30  days  for  a  manufacturer  to  issue  a  credit  memo 
prior  to  debiting  unless  manufacturer  policy  dictates  an  immediate  debit.  If 
manufacturer policy calls for immediate debiting it should be clearly defined. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




11/12/2007
                                                                                        10


Manufacturer Issuance of Credit 
 
Current Situation:  
Manufacturers  may  not  always  issue  credit  memos  as  distributors  expect.  If  a 
distributor doesn’t receive a credit memo or other notification of a credit as they 
expect – phone calls and follow up cost both parties time and money.   
 
Recommended Best Practices:  
    • Manufacturers  should  issue  credit  memos  in  the  most  efficient  format 
       agreed  on  by  the  distributor  (EDI,  fax,  hard  copy).  The  credit  memo 
       should  include  the  RMA  reference  number  at  a  minimum.  Distributors 
       would  benefit  from  manufacturer  including  distributor’s  internal 
       reference number on the credit memo.  
    • If  manufacturer  deems  product  needs  further  handling  (testing  or 
       repackaging) prior to  issuing credit,  they  should notify  the distributor in 
       writing of the delay and expected time before credit will be issued.  
    • RMA should include the credit amount the distributor can expect for each 
       item.  Distributors  should  check  the  expected  credit  amount  for  accuracy 
       and  resolve  any  discrepancies  prior  to  returning  material.  Cost  basis  for 
       the credit should be clearly defined by the manufacturer published return 
       policy.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




11/12/2007
                                                                                     11


Packaging and Marking Returns 
 
Current Situation: 
Manufacturers insist that returned goods be in “salable condition” upon receipt 
in order for distributors to receive full credit for a return. However, the definition 
of salable condition is very often in the eye of the beholder, or receiver as it were. 
Manufacturers recount stories of material returned in competitor’s packaging, or 
with multiple labels or job names on individual packages. This is not to mention 
the packaging which appears to have been on the muddiest job sites for months 
before being returned. Distributors placing stickers on plastic bags of items such 
as cable ties is a time consuming problem that manufacturers face. None of these 
examples can reasonably be considered “salable condition.” Material returned in 
this  condition  results  in  additional  costs  for  manufacturers  to  repackage  the 
material – or, in extreme cases, simply scrap the material.  
 
Recommended Best Practices: 
Obviously, specific manufacturers will dictate their own policies. The task force 
identified  the  following  minimum  expectations  which  are  common  to  many 
manufacturers:  
    • No  outer  or  inner  markings  or  labels  on  original  packaging  or  product, 
        including interior packing material. Packages which have been opened or 
        must  be  repackaged  by  manufacturer  are  subject  to  a  repackaging  or 
        restocking fee. 
    • Distributors should include a copy of the RMA as the packing slip 
    • Shipments should be clearly marked with RMA number on return label – 
        many manufacturers will refuse shipments without an RMA or impose a 
        significant restocking fee 
    • Bill of Lading should reference RMA number  
    • Damage during shipment is shipper’s responsibility to file freight claim  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


11/12/2007
                                                                                       12


Broken Carton Quantities 
 
Current Situation: 
Manufacturers nearly universally expect returns in the same carton quantities in 
which the product was originally sold. Distributors nearly universally expect to 
be able to return broken carton quantities. Broken carton quantities are difficult 
for  manufacturers  to  sell  and  track  in  inventory;  where  distributors,  as  “bulk 
breakers,” may have a better chance at selling the material in smaller quantities.  
 
Recommended Best Practice: 
Manufacturers should make provisions for accepting broken carton quantities of 
current  stock  merchandise.  Distributors  should  be  aware  that  repackaging  fees 
may differ from standard restocking fees. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


11/12/2007
                                                                                          13


Incomplete/Incorrect RMA 
 
Current situation: 
Many  manufacturers  find  that  distributors  will  request  an  RMA  for  a  given 
quantity  of  material.  For  example:  5  widgets,  3  whoosits  and  2  whatsits.  Upon 
receipt  of  the  material,  the  manufacturer  finds  an  RMA  with  the  correct  list  of 
returned goods, but upon physically checking in the material, the pallet actually 
contains 3 widgets, 4 whoosits and no whatsits.  
 
Many  manufacturers  require  RMA  to  be  received  in  full  (no  more/no  less)  in 
order  for  an  RMA  to  be  “closed.”  Only  after  closing  the  RMA  can  the 
manufacturer  issue  credit.  This  seems  to  be  the  cause  of  a  lot  of  the  delays 
distributors encounter in waiting for credits.  
 
In  the  case  of  the  first  and  last  items,  where  fewer  widgets  and  whatsits  were 
returned, the manufacturer is generally happy to have the distributor return less 
material than was authorized. It is the case of the 4 whoosits coming back when 
only 3 were authorized which causes excessive heartburn for the manufacturer. 
This problem occurs on most periodic stock rotations.  
 
Finally, manufacturers suspect that certain returns coming from the field are not 
adequately  inspected  by  distributor  personnel  prior  to  being  returned  to  the 
manufacturer thus resulting in inaccurate RMA being submitted. 
 
Recommended Best Practices:  
     • If  distributors  sell  portions  of  an  authorized  return,  they  should  adjust 
        their  paperwork  accompanying  the  return  to  indicate  that  the 
        manufacturer should not expect additional material to arrive on this RMA 
        and that it is complete.  
     • Distributors  should  check  in  material  coming  back  from  customers  to 
        make certain they are requesting accurate return authorizations.  
     • Manufacturers  should  notify  distributors  of  discrepancies  in  RMA  and 
        received goods within 48 hours of material receipt. 




11/12/2007
                                                                                         14


 

Labor Reimbursement for Handling Returns 
 
Current Situation:  
Handling  returns  is  a  cost  of  doing  business  for  both  distributors  and 
manufacturers.  In  cases  where  manufacturer  error  causes  distributors  to  incur 
additional  labor  costs,  distributors  often  feel  entitled  to  reimbursement  for  the 
labor costs.  
 
Recommended Best Practices: 
   • Distributors  and  manufacturers  should  document  instances  where  they 
       have incurred additional costs due to the error of a channel partner. This 
       will  allow  them  to  accurately  assess  the  true  cost  of  trading  with  a 
       particular partner.  
   • NAED’s  supply  chain  scorecard  offers  partners  an  objective  means  of 
       tracking  these  costs.  Distributors  can  use  “shipping  accuracy”  measure 
       and manufacturers can use the “purchase order accuracy” and “return of 
       authorized goods cycle time.” 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



11/12/2007
                                                                                     15


Typical Distributor Return Processes 
 

Manufacturer Shipping Error Received in Warehouse 
 
Current Situation: 
When  distributors  receive  shipments  from  manufacturers,  packing  slips  or 
advance  shipping  notifications  (EDI  856)  are  useful  in  putting  away  material. 
However, when the packing slips do not agree with physical count, distributors 
encounter  wasted  time  and  valuable  warehouse  space  in  staging  or  storing  the 
material  until  it  can  be  returned.  Some  obviously  incorrect  shipments  may  be 
refused,  but  simple  overages  must  be  received  to  use  the  needed,  ordered 
quantity.  
 
Recommended Best Practices: 
This  situation  largely  depends  on  what  material  was  shipped  in  error  and  in 
what quantities.  
   • Fast  moving  items  can  be  accepted  by  the  distributor  and  future  order 
        quantities adjusted.  
   • Manufacturers should be responsible for return freight. The manufacturer 
        should provide a shipping account number to pay for return shipping up 
        front, avoiding unnecessary paperwork for reimbursing the distributor.  




11/12/2007
                                                                                             16



Manufacturer Shipping Error Direct to Customer 
 
Current Situation: 
Getting  the  correct  material  expedited  to  customer  is  critical  in  this  instance. 
There  is  general  agreement  that  if  a  manufacturer  error  has  occurred,  the 
manufacturer  should  be  responsible  for  the  cost  of  expediting  the  correct 
material  to  a  customer  as  well  as  for  the  cost  of  shipping  the  incorrect  material 
back. However, disagreements often arise over costs distributors incur in picking 
up incorrect material from job sites and for the additional handling costs.  
 
Recommended Best Practices:  
In  addition  to  recommended  best  practices  for  labeling  and  debiting,  the 
following best practices are suggested for returning material shipped direct to a 
distributor’s customer in error.  
    • Regardless how material is returned, the top priority in this case should be 
       accurately fulfilling the customer’s order as soon as possible with the costs 
       borne by the manufacturer. 
    • Where  common  carriers  are  used  for  return  shipping,  manufacturers 
       should  permit  distributors  to  send  the  material  back  freight  collect  or 
       using  the  manufacturer’s  shipping  account  to  limit  credits  and  improve 
       distributor cash flow.  
    • In  situations  where  product  cannot  easily  be  returned  or  exceptional 
       handling is involved, distributors should engage manufacturer’s problem 
       resolution process immediately.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



11/12/2007
                                                                                   17


Distributor/End User Order Error 
 
Current Situation:  
Distributors generally understand that when returning goods due to errors they 
made, they are responsible for reasonable restocking fees. Distributors also agree 
that they should be responsible for freight costs for returning goods they ordered 
in error. The questions arise when we ask if distributors should have these order 
errors “count” towards their return allowance when periodically balancing their 
inventories.  
 
Recommended Best Practices: 
    • Distributor has the option to hold this material for a regularly scheduled 
       stock rotation or to return material outside the return allowance.  
    • Non‐stock  or  specially  made  items  should  still  be  returnable;  however, 
       distributors should expect to pay a higher restocking fee than they pay for 
       standard items.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




11/12/2007
                                                                                           18


Product Warranty/Inoperable Material 
 
Current Situation: 
Both  manufacturers  and  distributors  share  the  common  desire  to  replace 
inoperable  material  for  customers  as  quickly  as  possible.  Returning  inoperable 
material  is  a  non‐value  added  activity  for  all  partners  involved,  and  all  parties 
should do their part in these cases.   
 
Recommended Best Practices:  
   • If  material  must  be  returned,  manufacturer  should  involve  field  sales  in 
      inspection  and  engage  manufacturer’s  problem  resolution  process 
      immediately.  
   • Material  must  be  suitably  packaged  for  return  to  prevent  additional 
      damage during shipping. 
   • Distributors  should  request  returns  in  a  timely  manner  for 
      inoperable/warranty  product  to  ensure  resolution  of  issue  and  timely 
      response for manufacturer quality control efforts.  
   • In  all  cases,  the  manufacturer  should  advise  return  freight  policy  and 
      process.   
   • Distributors should receive full credit for returned inoperable material.  
   • Manufacturers  should  notify  distributors  of  disputes  on  returned 
      warranty  or  inoperable  material  within  48  hours  of  receipt  of  returned 
      goods.  
   • If manufacturer does not require return of material distributor should be 
      provided  disposition  instructions  (which  may  include  field  scrapping 
      material  and  percentage  of  net  sales  inoperable  material  allowance)  and 
      issuance of credit. 
   • If  manufacturer  is  contacted  directly  by  end  user,  manufacturer  should 
      immediately engage distributor in the process.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


11/12/2007
                                                                                           19


Stock Rotation/Balancing 
 
Current Situation: 
Distributors  periodically  need  to  balance  inventories.  Manufacturers 
accommodate  this  need  by  offering  periodic  stock  rotations  –  allowing 
distributors to return slower moving items and replace them with material they 
deem more suitable. Typically, these rotations are limited to a certain percentage 
of distributor purchases. An area of disagreement in this area is in the “shelf life” 
of  products  which  may  be  returned.  Manufacturers  rightly  argue  that  material 
from years ago which happens to “turn up” in a distributor’s warehouse is not a 
fair candidate for return. Agreeing on a “shelf life” of a product is difficult, as  
different  products  have  different  life  cycles  and  some  may  be  more  frequently 
updated  than  others.  Distributors  are  reminded  to  take  care  to  return  only  the 
products and quantities listed on the RMA (see Incomplete/Incorrect RMAs) as this 
appears to be a very serious problem in stock rotations.   
 
Recommended Best Practices: 
    • It  is  recommended  that  rotations  be  performed  on  a  quarterly,  semi‐
        annual,  or  annual  basis  to  keep  distributors  in  an  optimally  competitive 
        position. Manufacturers typically limit total stock returns to a percentage 
        of  the  prior  year’s  stock  purchases.  The  allowance  value  should  be 
        communicated to distributors.  
    • Many manufacturers do not charge a restocking fee for regular stock items 
        within  the  defined  allowance.  Returns  above  the  allowance  are  typically 
        subject to the manufacturer’s standard restocking fee.  
    • Distributors  should  have  at  least  90  days  notice  for  an  item  to  be 
        discontinued  so  they  can  make  appropriate  adjustments  to  their 
        inventories.   
    • Regarding the shelf life of products for returning, while we stipulate that 
        different  products  have  different  life  cycles  –  a  good  rule  of  thumb  for 
        returns  is  that  material  distributors  have  purchased  within  18  months 
        should  be  returnable.  Again,  many  factors  go  into  this  decision,  and 
        trading  partners  will  need  to  examine  this  time  period  on  a  case  by  case 
        basis.   
 
 
 
 
 


11/12/2007
                                                                                            20


Guaranteed Sale/New Product Launch 
 
Current Situation:  
New products  are a very effective  means  for trading  partners to  grow business 
with the customer. However, distributors can sometimes be reluctant to be on the 
“bleeding edge” when it comes to adding a new product to their inventory. As a 
result, manufacturers entice distributors to take on the new line by guaranteeing 
that  if  the  distributor  finds  the  new  product  does  not  sell  as  well  as  the 
manufacturer has anticipated, they can return the material.  
 
Recommended Best Practice: 
Trading  partners  should  agree  to  terms  of  bringing  in  new  product  in  writing 
prior to sale. Terms should specify period of time for eligible returns, restocking 
fees,  freight  costs,  definition  of  salable  condition,  and  cost  basis  for  return  and 
other conditions such as acceptable return packaging.  
 
 
 
 
 

WHAT YOU CAN DO 
Provide  your  feedback!  Email  suggestions  to  customerservice@naed.org  by 
December 31, 2007. Call Edward Orlet at (888)791‐2512 with questions.  




11/12/2007