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Tourism In Parks

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					Tourism In Parks

"Tourism is Australia’s fastest growing industry, recognised as providing economic
and employment opportunities at national, state and local levels with flow-on effects
that benefit the wider community" (Parks Victoria Strategic Directions for Tourism
1998-2001).

A significant proportion of tourists in Victoria will visit the vast network of Parks and
Waterways managed by Parks Victoria.

This study unit should assist students to develop an understanding of the range of
tourist opportunities, the impacts of tourism and some of the management strategies
involved in sustainable development.

While this unit is directed particularly at the course requirements for VCE Geography,
Outdoor and Environmental Studies and Environmental Science, the material could
also be useful in other levels where there is a focus on tourism, human impact on the
environment, recreational activities or public land use.
TOURISM IN PARKS.......................................................................................................................................... 1

UNIT BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................................ 3
    RELATIONSHIP TO VCE CURRICULUM ................................................................................................................ 3
    GEOGRAPHY ....................................................................................................................................................... 3
      Unit 1: Place and Change ............................................................................................................................. 3
      Unit 3: Resources .......................................................................................................................................... 3
    OUTDOOR AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES ......................................................................................................... 3
      Unit 1: Understanding Nature ....................................................................................................................... 3
      Unit 2: Environmental Impacts ..................................................................................................................... 3
      Unit 3: Relationships with Outdoor Environments ........................................................................................ 4
      Unit 4: The Future of Natural Environments ................................................................................................ 4
    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ................................................................................................................................. 4
      Unit 1: The Environment ............................................................................................................................... 4
      Unit 2: Monitoring the Environment ............................................................................................................. 4
BACKGROUND NOTES FOR TEACHERS ..................................................................................................... 5
    TOURISM IN AUSTRALIA ..................................................................................................................................... 5
    TOURISM IN VICTORIA ........................................................................................................................................ 5
    PARKS VICTORIA ................................................................................................................................................ 6
      Parks Victoria Statistics for 1996/1997 Financial Year ................................................................................ 6
      Commercial Tourist Operators in Parks ....................................................................................................... 8
      Other Types of Permits .................................................................................................................................. 8
    RECREATION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................................... 8
    GLOSSARY OF USEFUL TERMS .......................................................................................................................... 12
    PRIORITY TARGET MARKETS (VALUE SEGMENTS) ............................................................................................ 12
ACTIVITIES ....................................................................................................................................................... 14

REFERENCES .................................................................................................................................................... 17
    MANAGEMENT PLANS ....................................................................................................................................... 17
    VISITORS TO NATIONAL PARKS ........................................................................................................................ 17
    VICTORIA'S NATIONAL PARKS - THE RESOURCE TO BE MANAGED.................................................................... 18
    PARK REGULATIONS ......................................................................................................................................... 18
      Protecting This Park For You ..................................................................................................................... 18
    USEFUL PUBLICATIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 19
Unit Background

Relationship to VCE Curriculum
This unit of study could be used to help satisfy the following learning outcomes in a
number of different VCE units. Teachers are advised to check the relevant VCE
subject study designs to determine which key knowledge areas are covered by the
activities and information provided in the unit. VCE teachers and students might also
find useful information in the ‘Parks, People and Outdoor Activities’ unit.
Geography



Unit 1: Place and Change

   Describe and analyse the natural processes and human activities that alter
    places.

   Predict how natural processes and human activities may alter places.

Unit 3: Resources

   Describe and explain the geographic characteristics of resources.

   Evaluate policies designed to manage resource development and use.

   Describe and justify a policy for the future use of a resource, using data collected
    in the field.



Outdoor and Environmental Studies



Unit 1: Understanding Nature

   Describe ways in which humans understand, encounter and respond to nature.

Unit 2: Environmental Impacts

   Explain factors which influence outdoor experiences and their impact on nature.

   Analyse policy and procedures for minimising human impact on natural
    environments.
Unit 3: Relationships with Outdoor Environments

   Analyse how particular perceptions and relationships have influenced an outdoor
    environment.

   Explain the evolution of human-nature relationships and their impact on the
    contemporary outdoor environment.

Unit 4: The Future of Natural Environments

   Evaluate practices and strategies for the sustainable interaction of humans and
    outdoor environments.

   Evaluate processes of decision making which affect the use and sustainability of
    outdoor environments.



Environmental Science


Unit 1: The Environment
   Analyse one human-induced environmental change and the options for
    remediation.
Unit 2: Monitoring the Environment
   Investigate and report on a local example of environmental degredation or an
    environmental issue, using an appropriate monitoring program.
Background Notes for Teachers
This background information has been provided to assist teachers in the preparation
of the unit of study.

Tourism in Australia
      The Bureau of Tourism Research estimated that for the 1995/1996 financial
       year, the tourism industry in Australia contributed about 7.4% of the gross
       domestic product and directly employed more than 694,000 people (about
       8.4% of the workforce).

      Tourism generated export earnings of $16.5 billion from international tourism
       (this is expected to rise to $34 billion by 2006).

      Domestically, tourism generated $41.9 billion.

      The tourism industry now earns more than traditional exports such as coal,
       wheat and wool.

Tourism in Victoria
      In the 1995/1996 financial year tourism contributed approximately 7.4% of the
       state’s gross product. That is $9.4 billion.

      Tourism in Victoria generated about 169,000 jobs, which is 8.2% of the
       workforce.

      An additional 35,000 jobs were indirectly attributed to tourism.

      The Victorian Travel and Tourism Survey in 1995 stated that about 15 million
       visitors travelled to and within Victoria per annum.

      These visitors spent about $3.5 billion.

      Overnight tourism in Victoria was comprised of Victorians travelling within the
       state (70%), visitors from interstate (20%) and international visitors (6%).

      Victorians took 20 million day trips within the state generating a further $827
       million.

      Victoria’s main sources of overseas visitors are the United Kingdom, Europe,
       Asia, North America and New Zealand.

      Asian visitors often visit Melbourne. Other international visitors are more
       inclined to visit regional Victoria.
Parks Victoria

The Victorian Government has established Parks Victoria to manage Victoria's
outstanding range of national and other parks, conservation areas and other
significant assets including Port Phillip Bay and Western Port Bay. Parks Victoria has
assumed the responsibilities of the former National Parks Service and Melbourne
Parks and Waterways.
Parks Victoria's vision is to provide an outstanding park and waterways system,
protected and enhanced for people, forever.

Parks Victoria will extend its strong focus on customer service and best practice in
environmental management across its venues and will seek to provide quality
recreational experiences consistent with environmental values.

To achieve this, four broad goals have been set:

      Environmental Sustainability
       Conserve, protect and enhance environmental assets.

      Visitor Orientation and Responsibility
       Responsibly meet the needs of visitors for quality information, services and
       experiences.

      Park Management Ethos
       Provide excellence and innovation in park management.

      Social and Economic Contribution
       Contribute to the social and economic well-being of Victorians.


Parks Victoria Statistics for 1996/1997 Financial Year
      Parks Victoria managed 3.8 million hectares of public land or approximately 16
       % of Victoria’s area. This makes Parks Victoria the state’s foremost park
       management agency.

      25 million visits to parks were recorded and 5 million visits to Port Phillip and
       Westernport Bays.

      These visits injected $2.1 billion into the state economy.

      There are:

             36 national parks

             3 wilderness parks

             31 state parks

             11 marine and coastal reserves
             83 regional parks

             3,000 crown reserves in Victoria.

      Parks Victoria also manages the recreational and tourism aspects of Port
       Phillip and Westernport Bays.

      As well, Parks Victoria manages:

             The Lower Yarra, Lower Maribyrnong and Patterson Rivers

             42 piers and jetties

             200 historic sites

             Several prestigious heritage properties.

      Victoria’s public land has been divided into twelve tourism product regions.
       These regions are listed below, together with their visitor numbers for 1994-
       1995.

             Murray 1,750,000 visitors

             Great Ocean Road 2,400,000

             Lakes/Wilderness 700,000

             Phillip Island & Gippsland 1,600,000

             Legends & High Country 1,500,000

             Goulburn Murray 900,000

             Murray Outback 550,000

             Goldfields 450,000

             Grampians 1,800,000

             Macedon 1,050,000

             Bays & Peninsulas 3,900,000

             Yarra Valley & Dandenong Ranges 3,800,000

(Source: Parks Victoria Strategic Directions for Tourism 1998-2001).
Commercial Tourist Operators in Parks

  Many individuals and companies run commercial tourist operations at Parks Victoria
parks. They must apply for a permit to operate their business in a park. The initial
application is made to the local office of Parks Victoria in the area where the activity
is proposed. These applications are then administered centrally by the Environment
and Cultural Assets Division of Parks Victoria. A permit to operate may be issued
when Parks Victoria is satisfied that the proposed activity fulfils all necessary
regulations and safety and environmental considerations.

Other Types of Permits

Permits may also be required for gatherings, sporting events, bushwalking in some
areas, commercial filming, weddings , use of facilities such as airfields, military
activities etc.
Permits may involve the payment of fees. Holders of permits must also comply with
conditions that relate to the safety of participants, the safety and comfort of other
users of the venue and protection of the environment.



Recreation Planning and Management
Until recently, recreation planning for natural resource areas has been largely based
on existing uses and access. However, managers are now expected to provide for a
range of recreation in different settings. They must plan this recreation on the basis
of how well each environment will cope with this use.

Recreation planning today aims to achieve a balance among resource attributes,
community preferences and demands, and management objectives.

Many approaches to recreation planning are used by planners and managers,
including Parks Victoria. One of these is explained below.

The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS)
A useful method for considering the opportunities for recreation in parks is the
Recreation Opportunity Spectrum.

First developed in North America, it involves looking at the various settings for
recreation that result from the characteristics and management of a park. Settings
can be expressed in terms of factors such as degree of vehicle access, amount of
development, use levels and time taken to get to a location.

Visitors to parks seek certain types of settings and experiences. For example, some
might expect to find good barbecue and toilet facilities close to the carpark for a
picnic. Other visitors might seek a remote area where evidence of human change is
absent, and bushwalking in a natural environment is possible.

Both of these settings, and a wide variety in between, are valid expectations by
visitors. In many parks both can be provided so that people can have a variety of
quality recreation experiences. Possible combinations of activities, settings and
experiences can be arranged along a continuum from very natural areas, remote
from vehicle access and development, to intensively managed recreation sites
which cater for large numbers of people in small areas.

This continuum can be divided into the five classes shown below. The actual number
of classes is not as important as the idea that different recreation opportunities
require different settings, and that the widest possible range of settings should be
available to park visitors and the general community.

                     Some Activities Identified by Recreation Planners

camping               trail bike riding   walking                       nature study
dispersed camping     bicycling           resort lodging                cross country skiing
deer hunting          boating (low        collecting natural products   water skiing
sports                powered)            canoeing                      competitive sports
tour boat & ferry     snowplay            picnicking                    sketching & painting
horse riding          bushwalking         swimming                      motorised
four wheel driving    caravanning         downhill skiing               sight seeing
yachting              hunting             rafting                       bird watching
fishing               rock climbing       scuba diving                  orienteering
game hunting          snorkling           wheel chair use               caving
                      flying/gliding                                    photography


Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS)

Class of     Characteristics and possible experiences                                Activities
setting

Class 1      Essentially unmodified environments of large size where                 May include:
Remote       interaction between users is very low and evidence of other
             users is minimal. Evidence of restrictions and controls is
             absent. Motorised access by the public is not permitted. The
             recreation emphasis is on self-reliance, independence,
             closeness to nature and tranquility. Such areas offer a high
             degree of challenge and risk opportunities.

Class 2      Predominantly natural or natural-looking environments of                May include:
             moderate to large size. Interaction between users is low, but
Semi-        there may be evidence of other users. Minimum on-site
remote       controls and restrictions are obvious. Limited vehicle tracks;
             some access by public is permitted. High to moderate
             probability of experiencing isolation from the sights and
             sounds of people, independence, closeness to nature,
             tranquility and self reliance. Such areas offer a moderate
             degree of challenge and risk.

Class 3      Natural-looking environments with moderate evidence of the              May include:
             sights and sounds of people. Interaction between users may
Roaded -     be low to moderate, but evidence of other users is prevalent.
natural      Opportunities for both motorised and non-motorised forms of
             recreation are available with a high degree of interaction with
             the natural environment. Overall, impressions of nature are
             not dominated by modifications and recreation facilities.

Class 4      Substantially modified natural environments. Sights and           May include:
Semi -       sounds of people are readily evident, and interaction between
developed    users is often moderate to high. Includes facilities designed for
             use by large numbers of people and those provided for special
                 activities.

Class 5   Substantially urbanised environments, although the            May include:
Developed background may have natural looking elements. Vegetative
          cover is often exotic and usually heavily managed. Sights and
          sounds of people are predominant and large numbers of users
          can be expected. Opportunities for competitive and spectator
          sports and for passive uses are common.

Table 1:
Number of Tour Licences Issued by Activity on Public Land in Victoria 1994/95.




Table 2:
Growth & Participation in Outdoor Recreation Activities in Victoria 1991-2001.

                                     %             %          No of        No of        %
                               participation participation participants participants increase
Activity                           1991          2001      1991 (000s) 1991 (000s) 1991/2001

Going to picnics, barbecues        5.8           5.7         207.4       228.7        10.2

Visiting parks                     6.2           6           219.7       242.2        10.2

Driving for pleasure               9.8           9.6         346.9       384.6        10.9

Nature sketching, bird             0.2           0.3          8.3         10.4        25.8
watching

Orienteering                       0.4           0.4         13.8         14.3        3.9

Snow sports (incl. cross-          0.4           0.4         13.5         15.1         12
country)

Walking for pleasure               23.6         32.7        1157.1       1313.4       13.5

Jogging, running                   8.1           7.6          287         305         6.3

Climbing, hiking,                  1.3           1.2         47.1         50.1        6.2
bushwalking

Shooting, hunting, fishing          3            2.9         106.4       116.2        9.3
Windsurfing/sailboarding   0.6       0.5        21.3       21.8      2.3

Sailing                    0.4       0.4         13        14.5       11

Swimming/surfing           5.6       5.3        198.9     212.6      6.9

Bicycling                  7.4        7         263.2     281.2      6.8

Horse riding               1.3       1.2        45.2       46.6      3.1

Off road vehicle/4WD       1.3       1.2        46.8       48.6      3.9


Source:


Veal, A.J. (1991) Projections of Leisure Expenditure and Participation 1991-2001.
Australian Leisure Futures. Centre for Leisure and Tourism Studies, University of
Technology, Sydney.

TRIP and DNRE (1996) Victoria's National Parks: A Resource Book for Teachers.
Teacher Release to Industry Program and Department of Natural Resources and
Environment, Victoria.
Glossary of Useful Terms

Term                      Meaning
Tourism                   Tourism is a service based industry comprising a number of
                          tangible and intangible components. The tangible elements
                          include transport, foods and beverages, tours, souvenirs
                          and accommodation, while the intangible elements involve
                          education, culture, adventure or simply escape and
                          relaxation. Tourism in Victoria caters for travellers from
                          Melbourne, regional Victoria, interstate and overseas.

Tourists                  Tourists are defined as people who travel away from home
                          for a range of purposes including travelling for pleasure,
                          entertainment or cultural experiences, for business, to visit
                          friends or family or to attend meetings or conferences.
Overnight       Tourist/ One person spending one night away from home.
Visitor
Visitor Day               One person spending one day at a venue.
Park                      An area of public land largely used for recreation or
                          education.




Priority Target Markets (Value segments)
Tourism Victoria has identified ten types of tourist groups which are often referred to
in tourism plans and strategies. These segments were developed by Colin Benjamin
in conjunction with the Roy Morgan Research Centre. A brief description of each
segment is given below from Tourism Victoria’s Business Plan 1997-2001. The whole
document can be purchased from Tourism Victoria or it is available on Tourism
Victoria’s website.

      Socially Aware
       Social issues oriented, politically/community active, arts and culture, top jobs,
       wealth managers.

      Visible Achievement
       Success and career driven, recognition and status seekers, good family living,
       the wealth creators.

      Young Optimism
       Young and progressive, experiential lifestyle, seek new and different things,
       trend setters.
      Look at Me
       Young fun seekers, fashion followers, live for today, very active.

      Real Conservatism
       Observers of life, traditional/ religious, adverse to change, hoarders.

      Something Better
       Upward mobile couples, career and lifestyle driven, financially stressed.

      Conventional Family Life
       Middle Australia, family and home focus, mortgage belt, small savers.

      Traditional Family Life
       Retired middle Australia, family focused lives, cautious of new things, passive
       income investors.

      Fairer Deal
       Get a raw deal out of life, blue collar, cynical and pessimistic, very dissatisfied.

      Basic Needs
       Widows and pensioners, survival lifestyle, seek protection.

To see the Education Program general glossary, click on Glossary here.
Activities

1. Gather as much historic information as you can about a particular park. This is
easiest if you choose one nearby so that access to local libraries, historical societies
and newspaper archives is available. Use the information you have gathered to
construct a timeline showing significant dates and developments. The timeline could
start well before the area was declared a park.

2. Use the ’Victoria’s National Parks’ leaflet (available at any Parks Victoria office or
use the Adobe PDF format file supplied) or the ’Guide to Victoria's National Parks’ to
make a graph showing the number of parks less than 50 km from Melbourne, 50-100
km, 100-150 km, 150-200 km etc. Note any trends on the graph and attempt to
explain them.


dd1.htmdd1.htm

3. Many parks have peak visitation periods. Make a line graph of the monthly visitor
figures from the Grampians for at least 3 different years from the ’Grampians National
Park Visitor Numbers’ table. Attempt to find reasons for any patterns of visitation
shown by the graphs.


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4. The ’Visitation to Victorian National Parks with Vehicle Counter’ table shows
visitation figures for those parks with vehicle counters from 1989 -1997. Note the
years of highest and lowest visitation for each park and try to suggest reasons (hint:
newspapers from those years may provide clues to economic fluctuations, market
trends or advertising campaigns).


dd3.htmdd3.htm

5. Decide on some categories of visitors who you think might visit a particular park
that you could visit. Suitable categories could include families with children under
school age, families with school age children, older couples, groups of young people
without children, etc. Watch the entrance or carpark of your chosen park for a set
time and record the number of visitors that you see in each category. Compare your
results with observations made at a different time or place by other members of your
class and discuss the differences.


dd4.htmdd4.htm

6. Visit a park where there are opportunities for a number of different activities.
Record all the different activities that you observe and estimate the proportion of
visitors that indulge in each activity. Also try to record the approximate age and
gender of participants. Try to repeat your observation at least once more, preferably
at a different time of day or a different day of the week.

Construct a table or graph to compare your results. Ideal location - any area of
parkland where a variety of activities can be observed from one point or where a
number of observers can co-operate in collecting data.


7. Focus on seasonal changes by observing an area in the same way as in activity 6,
at different seasons. Ideal location - a site where there are marked differences
between seasonal activities such as areas with water or snow activities.

8. Visit a popular site in a park such as a picnic area, campground or walking track.
Note carefully any signs of human impact on the area and divide the impacts into two
lists - one of positive impacts and one of negative ones. As a group, discuss how you
would reduce the negative influences. This activity is a good one for extended walks
as it helps students to understand track construction and management as well as
their own possible impact on the environment.

9. Obtain a copy of an activity code pamphlet (Parks Victoria offices and information
centres have these for activities such as bushwalking, camping, mountain bike riding
and four wheel driving, and some codes have been included in the teacher
background notes in the Level 5-6 Unit – Parks, People and Outdoor Activities).

These codes have a two-fold purpose - safety and enjoyment for participants and
protection of the environment. Imagine that it is your job to prepare a similar
pamphlet for another activity such as hang-gliding, hot-air ballooning, rockclimbing
etc. Investigate your chosen activity and its likely impact on the environment and
prepare a code of practice for it.


10. Some areas are more easily damaged by human activity than others. Make a list
of features that might need special protection, eg. a group of rare plants near a
walking track. Suggest ways of dealing with each.

11. Some areas have features that might pose a risk to visitors. Make a list of
features that might be dangerous for visitors and design a warning sign that could be
easily understood by visitors who may not be able to read English easily.

12. Make a list of recreational activities that might be undertaken by visitors to a
particular area. Park Notes, Management Plans (both in Adobe PDF format), and
tourist newspapers are good places to look for ideas. Decide what some of the main
environmental impacts of each activity might be. Now try to place the activities in
order from those with least impact on the environment to those with most impact.

dd5.htmdd5.htm



13. Is it necessary to stop certain recreation activities at some places? Find some
examples from Park Notes (in Adobe PDF format) or notice boards and suggest
reasons for each (e.g. in some parks cycling is not permitted on seasonally closed
tracks because the slippery nature of the tracks in winter makes them dangerous for
cycling).


dd6.htmdd6.htm

14. Watch newspapers for articles about the use of natural areas where there is a
conflict that might affect tourism interests. Suitable examples could include new
developments, resource use such as logging or mining, native title claims, feral
animal control etc. Try to collect articles, editorials or letters that support each side of
the controversy and combine these with factual material that you have collected and
hold a class debate on the subject.

15. Tourism, like any other subject, has its own special vocabulary. A glossary of
terms has been started for you in this unit. As you come across other new words
related to tourism, add them to a list for reference.

16. Many parks have other uses of their resources that may conflict with tourism, e.g.
bee-keeping, grazing, water catchment, conservation of flora or fauna etc. Choose a
site that demonstrates this type of conflict and suggest ways of resolving or reducing
the problem.

17. Follow a designated walking track in a natural area. Draw, describe or
photograph all the man-made structures along it, such as drains, steps, bridges,
lookouts, seats, signs, guard rails, board walks etc. Are the structures successful?
(For success structures should be safe, efficient, aesthetically pleasing and cost-
effective). What changes might you make if it was your job to manage this track?

18. Along a designated walking track, make a list of all the materials used in man-
made structures. Try to classify them into groups according to their main purpose -
safety, visitor comfort, environment protection. Some structures may fit into more
than one group. Invent other groups if you do not think a structure fits into any of
these.

19. Make a list of careers that are directly related to tourism and check the V.T.A.C.
guide to list suitable tertiary courses that would assist you to succeed in several of
these careers that interest you.

20. Any park has many users, not all of them human. A group activity called ’The
Needs Auction’ illustrates the management challenges of satisfying as many users as
possible. It is a game that can be adapted to many environments. The example given
relates to the Grampians National Park.




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References

Management Plans
Approved and draft management plans [go to Ref.Materials Mgt Plans add links
below] are available for downloading on the Parks Victoria website. Many of these
management plans can also be purchased from the NRE Outdoor Information
Centre, Ph: (03) 9637 8080.



Approved management plans [http://www.parkweb.vic.gov.au/finfo/finfo_19.htm]
Draft management plans[http://www.parkweb.vic.gov.au/finfo/finfo_05.htm]
Plans for metropolitan parks and areas[http://www.parkweb.vic.gov.au/finfo/finfo_05.htm]




Visitors to National Parks
Comparison of visitor numbers between 1980-1995 for National and other parks
managed by the National Parks Service

  Year       Visitor     Camper         Total visitor        No of
              days       nights            days              parks
                                       (nearest 100)       included

1980-81 4,489,000         567,000        5,056,000             55

1981-82 5,878,000         613,000        6,491,000             58

1982-83 6,407,000         589,400        6,996,000             60

1983-84 5,735,000         613,600        6,349,000             61

1984-85 6,896,000         835,100        7,731,000             64

1985-86 6,992,000         865,700        7,858,000             64

1986-87 7,200,000         915,000        8,115,000             64

1987-88 7,502,000         852,000        8,354,000             73

1988-89 7,862,200         968,700        8,831,000             79

1989-90 8,229,600         919,700        9,149,000             79

1990-91 8,826,700         873,100        9,699,800             73
1991-92 9,228,500        708,400       9,936,900             76

1992-93 9,352,100        907,300       10,259,400            80

1993-94 9,892,500        796,400       10,688,900            82

1994-95 11,533,100       961,700       12,494,900            77

1995-96 12,153,600       812,500       12,966,100            88

Source: Annual Reports on the National Parks Act.

Note: ’Visitor days’ represents the total number of people visiting the park each day.
If you stay in a lodge in Wilsons Promotory National Park for a week, it counts as
seven visitor days.



Victoria's National Parks - the Resource to be Managed
The development of the National Parks concept in Victoria can be traced back to the
original proponents of parks who were active last century. The following account is a
brief history of the events that led to the establishment of Victoria's outstanding
system of parks. It is taken from the following publication:

Land Conservation Council (1993) Parks and Forests Services Study:
Information, Issues and Options.

For the complete document, download the Adobe PDF file (54Kb).

Note that this article was written before the establishment of Parks Victoria in 1996.



Park Regulations
Protecting This Park For You
Welcome to this park, a part of Victoria’s magnificent system of national, state and
other parks. Please help us to protect it by observing the regulations set out below.
They are designed to protect native plants and animals and park features, while
allowing you and other visitors to enjoy and experience the park.

The regulations apply to all national and state parks in Victoria but there may be
local variations for aspects such as dogs and fires. If you are unsure, check with the
local park office or ask a ranger - they’ll be happy to help.

For the complete Park Regulations, download the Adobe PDF document (22Kb).
Useful Publications
Management Plans and Park Notes are available from many parks or from NRE’s
Outdoor Information Centre, Ph: (03) 9637 8080. The following useful publications
are also available:

   TRIP and DNRE (1996) Victoria's National Parks: A Resource Book for Teachers.
    Teacher Release to Industry Program and Department of Natural Resources and
    Environment, Victoria.

   Beeton, S. (1998) Ecotourism: A Practical Guide for Rural Communities. CSIRO
    Landlinks.

Tourism Victoria Business Plan 1997-2001.
This can be purchased from Tourism Victoria or it is available on the Tourism Victoria
Website http://www.tourism.vic.gov.au in the research section.

Discover Victoria ‘Jigsaw’ books.
There is one for each of the 12 Tourist Product Regions - available from local tourist
information centres or by phoning 1800 637763.

Developing Tourism - Projects in Profile.
Office of National Tourism Online Bookshop. Download from
http://www.tourism.gov.au. Click on Bookshop and scroll down approx 2/3 of the
page.

Projecting Success: Visitor Management Projects for Sustainable Tourism Growth.
Office of National Tourism Online Bookshop. Download from
http://www.tourism.gov.au. Click on Bookshop and scroll down approx 2/3 of the
page.

				
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