Energy Awards and Incentive Program by dwe15197

VIEWS: 17 PAGES: 22

									Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 1
              Alachua County Public Schools
  Energy Awards and Incentive Program


                       CONTENTS

1. Information Flyer                                                3

2. Sample Certificate (Saver’s Award)                               5

3. Website Home Page                                                6

4. Guidelines for Participants                                      7

5. Program Guide                                                     8
     a. Guiding Principles                                           8
     b. Program Requirements                                         9
     c. Award Categories                                             9
     d. Monetary Incentive Program                                   9
     e. Award Submission                                            10
     f. Processing Time Line                                        11
     g. Application to Join                                         13
     h. Application for Award                                       14
     i. Request for Funds                                           15

6. Energy Conservation Actions                                      16

7. Possible Strategies and Approaches                               19

8. Energy Myth Busters                                              21




              Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 2
Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 3
Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 4
Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 5
Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 6
                               The School Board of Alachua County

                          Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
                    GUIDELINES FOR PARTICIPANTS
                                    THREE-STEP PROCESS

Participation in the A&I Program involves three important steps. These steps are important in
order to fairly compensate those who are doing the work and achieving results, validate the
expense of School Board funds, and ensure the long term promotion of energy waste
reduction.

1. Commitment – Join the Program
   In order for schools or departments to qualify for any of the award categories they must join
   the A&I program. This can be accomplished by using the enclosed application form.
   Schools and offices are also asked to do three things:

   a. Designate an Energy program coordinator – The coordinator can be the principal, or
      office manager, or someone else that is a senior member of the organization, such as a
      vice-principal, dean, or other senior staff.
   b. Establish an Energy team – A minimum of at least two people are required for the team,
      including the coordinator. However, to gain the maximum benefit of a team effort, you
      should consider members that represent the broad spectrum of school/office operations.
      The team should meet at least quarterly throughout the year.
   c. Take action – See the Energy Action List for ideas on actions you can take at your
      school or office. It is not necessary to list all proposed or accomplished actions on this
      form. You will want to do that later when applying for awards.

2. Action – Apply for Award
   Schools/offices that want to be considered for any of the award categories will need to
   submit an “Application for Award” no later than April 1st. They will need to list all the
   actions that they have taken to reduce energy waste during that school year. This
   application will be evaluated for an award designation.

3. Performance – Request Award Funds
   Once the total school year energy cost calculations have been completed, typically in
   August, the A&I Program members will be notified and invited to submit a Request for
   Funds. The most important information needed at this time is how your school or office
   plans to use the funds. Use the Request for Funds form to forward this information.
   Monetary awards will be based on actual cost savings achieved by the school and shared
   equally with the school district.




                             Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 7
                             The School Board of Alachua County


         Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
Energy use is receiving increased attention every day. Today, our nation’s energy security is
becoming a more significant issue. The impact that energy use has on earth’s climate is being
recognized by all levels of government, nationally and internationally. The quality of the space
in which we work and learn is also impacted by how we use energy resources.

Employees of the School Board of Alachua County we are expected to use the resources
entrusted to them in a wise and careful manner. An awards and monetary incentive program
is a great management tool for principals, directors, and office managers in their efforts to
develop good energy saving habits within their organizations. What we accomplish through
this program will not only benefit the school district monetarily, it will help us take an important
step toward solving the regional, national, and global problems related to energy use.

The awards and incentives program of Alachua County Schools is based on the Policies
outlined in Attachment A, which lead to the guiding principles below.

Program Goal: Reduce energy waste.
Incentive Focus: reward behaviors that measurably contribute to reducing energy
waste, and share savings when available.

Guiding Principles

• Employees, Office managers, school principals, teachers and staff have a great number of
  challenging tasks for which they are responsible. Like all SBAC employees, they are already
  expected to use energy resources wisely.
• The “Awards and Incentives Program” (A&I) is a tool to help office managers and school
  principals accomplish their energy conservation mission.
• Those who receive awards should be those who contributed to improved building
  performance and energy efficiency.
• The program is voluntary with participation open to all schools and departments.
• Incentive money comes from funds that have already been (or would have been) budgeted
  for energy use. Without this program this money would have otherwise been lost to the
  district.
• Recognition is based on measured energy intensity reductions (kWh/sf) from the baseline
  year. The baseline year will be established prior to program implementation.
• All involved in the savings effort should share in the benefits. With everyone involved in this
  way, greater savings can be realized.
• Student and teacher involvement in A&I activities are aligned to accomplishing curriculum
  objectives (these projects should enrich and reinforce learning in a “real world” setting with
  tangible results).
• Environmental resource conservation efforts are intended to improve the excellence of the
  classroom-learning environment and in no way should they diminish this excellence. The
  physical qualities of an excellent classroom include safety, security, good lighting, comfort,
  and resource efficiency.

                              Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 8
Program Requirements

Participation in the A&I program is voluntary. In order for schools or departments to qualify for
any of the award categories they must join the A&I program. This can be accomplished by
using the attached application form. Schools and offices are also asked to do three things:

   a. Designate an Energy program coordinator.
   b. Establish an Energy team.
   c. Take action.

Fuller descriptions of these three qualifications are provided on the attached application form.

Award Categories

There are three categories of awards established for qualifying schools and departments. To
be considered for any award a school must submit an award request letter, which includes the
name of the school, contact person, and the award(s) for which they wish to be considered.

1. “Member” Designation - Any school or office that has appointed an Energy program
coordinator, has established an Energy Team, and has initiated action toward energy
conservation can be recognized as member of the A&I program. (See attached application
form.)

2. “Achiever” Designation - A qualified school/office that has the greatest percentage of
cumulative reduction from a previous period within their sub-category (elementary, middle,
high school, or office) can compete for this award. There will be 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place
awards for each sub-category.

3. “Energy Saver” Designation– A qualified school/office that has accomplished the most
number of conservation activities during the year can win this award. There are also 4 sub-
categories for this award: elementary, middle, high school, and office. There will be 1st, 2nd,
and 3rd place awards for each sub-category.

Monetary Incentive Program

The monetary incentive aspect of the awards program is based on a grant system, and it’s
available to participants of the A&I program when funds are available. The purpose of this
incentive program is to reward the behavior that contributes to improved building performance
and energy efficiency. Those schools and offices that have taken action to improve building
performance and energy efficiency and are members of the A&I program are invited to apply
for the Energy monetary award grant. All qualifying schools and offices will receive a portion of
the savings that have resulted from the A&I program.

Teachers, students, principals, custodians, maintenance workers, other non-instructional staff
and the Superintendent all benefit by the amount of savings produced in district schools and
offices. Money that becomes available through conservation efforts can be used for student
performance improvement initiatives, additional curriculum materials, new and improved
custodial equipment, new maintenance tools and equipment, resource conservation projects,
or other important district requirements.

                             Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 9
Requirements for the Monetary Award

There are three things that need to be known in order to be considered for a monetary award:

       1. That your school or office is a member of the program
       2. What you did to reduce energy waste
       3. How you will spend the incentive money

Obtaining the answers to these three questions is integrated into the awards processing cycle.
The forms to be used to submit the information are enclosed.

Determination of Award Amount

There are several factors that determine the amount of the incentive award. The focus of this
program is on energy since it is the largest utility resource. However, similar monetary
incentives can be developed on a case-by-case basis (such as for water conservation and
recycling), if there is interest by the school in developing activities in that area. The following
steps show how the amount of savings from the school’s energy use is used to calculate the
incentive award.

1. Actual savings from the school’s energy consumption provides the pool of funds from which
   the district awards are made. The school’s most recently completed energy year will be
   compared to its baseline year. Adjustments will be made for square foot changes and
   major building renovations. If there is no savings, then no monetary incentive can be
   awarded. However the non-monetary awards program will still apply if those criteria are
   met (e.g. “Energy Saver Designation”).

2. If a savings has resulted, then the amount is adjusted based on the kWh portion of that
   school’s energy bill. Conservation efforts will usually only affect the consumption cost of
   the electric bill and not the demand cost. Consumption accounts for about 66% to about
   75% of the total bill.

3. Next, the amount is adjusted based on a determination of operational impact. Awards are
   based on what school personnel and students have done to reduce energy waste in their
   day-to-day operations. Repairs, maintenance, and automatic control changes initiated by
   Maintenance and Facilities staff that reduce energy use are not normally included in the
   monetary incentive awarded to the school.

4. Finally, the resulting energy savings that are calculated in the manner described above will
   be equally shared between the school district and the school or office.

5. The maximum award level may have to be capped, depending on the size of the incentive
   budget approved by the School Board for the school year under consideration so that all
   schools qualifying can receive a monetary award.

Award Submission

All A&I Schools members will be notified when they are entitled to a monetary award based on
their energy cost savings achievement. Once notified they must complete and return the
Application for Award (attached) and indicate how they plan to spend the award money. This
                              Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 10
is an important step in the recognition process because we want to know the benefits of the
energy cost savings so this important story can be told. These are the tangible benefits of the
program.

Processing Time Line

The energy awards and incentive program year is based on the school year. Awards are
based on what the school or office is able to accomplish during one year.

1. July (1st Program Year and subsequent years)
   Begin Energy Monitoring - Energy consumption data will be gathered each month of the
   school year to compare with the base year usage rate. The program year will be the school
   year.

2. September (1st Program Year and subsequent years)
   Program Start – Schools and offices that will participate in the program submit an
   application to join, which includes an action plan on what actions they will take to reduce
   energy waste (see enclosed “Application to Join”).

3. September (2nd Program Year and subsequent years)
   Notification of Monetary Award – The schools and offices who participated will be notified of
   the actual amount of savings that their site achieved and the monetary award to which they
   are entitled. They are requested to submit their “Request for Monetary Incentive”
   explaining how they will spend the money.

4. October (2nd Program Year and subsequent years)
   Schools/Offices Receive Incentive Money – During October, “Energy Month,” participating
   schools that were able to reduce energy waste to achieve cost savings will receive a
   “check” for the amount of monetary savings awarded to them. This activity coincides with
   October, nationally recognized as “Energy Month.” This gives schools the opportunity to
   showcase the results of their efforts from the previous year and encourage support for the
   coming year’s program.

5. April (1st Program Year and subsequent years)
   Presentation of Achievement Awards – The awards program for achievement in the
   categories outlined above is conducted in April, nationally recognized as “Earth Month.”
   During the first week of April schools and offices participating in the program submit an
   “Application for Award Recognition” explaining the actions they took during the year to
   reduce energy waste. Data from energy monitoring software will also be used to determine
   results. Award results will be posted by mid-April to coincide with Earth Day observances.

6. June (1st Program Year and subsequent years)
   Complete Energy Monitoring - Energy Monitoring will be complete when all June bills have
   been received. This usually occurs by the end of July or mid August. This leaves the
   remaining time up to September to complete the calculations for energy cost savings. By
   using energy intensity, allowances for special conditions are made to modify the baseline
   when justified (e.g. building additions, portable changes) plus adjustments for large
   mechanical repairs, etc.). This process will be completed in time for September when
   schools/offices are notified of their past year’s achievements.

                             Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 11
Potential Incentive Amounts for Schools

                     Average Annual Energy Costs                   % Savings        Potential Award
Elementary School              $70,000                                10%               $2,450
Middle School                 $160,000                                10%               $5,600
High School                   $220,000                                10%               $7,700

The above amounts do not reflect any caps that may have to be placed on the incentive
program due to district budget constraints, but they do give a sense of the range of incentive
funds associated with this program when significant results are achieved.




                             Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 12
                                    The School Board of Alachua County

                        Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
                       APPLICATION TO JOIN
                                [Submit in September or any time after that.]

We hereby make application to join the Energy Award and Incentive program. Reducing
energy waste can save valuable resources for our school district, State, Nation, and world. We
pledge to take action to reduce energy waste commensurate with our roles as administrators,
faculty, and staff.

School/Department:
Principal:
Contact Person/Phone #:
Schools Coordinator:
(The coordinator can be the principal, or
office manager, or someone else that is a
senior member of the organization, such as
a vice-principal, dean, or other senior staff.)

Schools Team:                                            1.

(A minimum of at least two people are                    2.
required for the team, including the
coordinator. However, to gain the maximum
benefit of a team effort, you should consider
                                                         3.
members that represent the broad spectrum
of school/office operations. The team                    4.
should meet at least quarterly throughout the
year.)                                                   5.

Action Plan:                                             1.
(See the Energy Action List for ideas on                 2.
actions you can take at your school or office.
It is not necessary to list all proposed or
accomplished actions on this form. You will              3.
want to do that later when submitting for
award recognition.)                                      4.

                               [This form can be submitted at any time before March.]

_______________________________________                                           ____________________
Signature of Principal/Office Chief                                               Date




                                      Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 13
                                  The School Board of Alachua County

                       Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
               APPLICATION FOR AWARD
                                        [Submitted in April – Earth Month]

We hereby make application to be considered for any applicable awards for the
accomplishments that we have achieved over the past year.

1. School/Department:
2. Principal/Office Chief:
3. Contact Person/Phone #:


The following activities have been accomplished over the past school year to help
reduce energy waste:




                                        [This form must be submitted by April 1st.]



_______________________________________                                           ____________________
Signature of Principal/Office Chief                                               Date


                                      Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 14
                                  The School Board of Alachua County

                       Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
                       REQUEST FOR FUNDS
                                              [Submitted in September]

We have been notified that we are entitled to receive Energy Incentive Program funds in the
amount shown below as a result of our energy cost saving efforts. Request that this money be
forwarded to our organizational account.

1. School/Department:
2. Principal/Office Chief:
3. Contact Person/Phone #:


4. Monetary Award Request for:
                                                                    $_________________
We have been notified that we are entitled to receive this monetary award for the energy
cost savings that we have helped the district achieve over the past year.

This money will be used for the following:




                                 [This form must be submitted by September 30th.]



_______________________________________                                           ____________________
Signature of Principal/Office Chief                                               Date




                                      Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 15
                             The School Board of Alachua County

                    Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
     ENERGY CONSERVATION ACTIONS
There are a number of actions that can be taken to conserve energy that range from simply
raising awareness of the need to conserve to the controlling of energy loads (lights, air-
conditioning, computers, etc.). Below is a list of actions that can be taken to reduce energy
waste and improve building performance and energy efficiency.
For Principals
                 Appoint an Energy Coordinator for your school/office (Dean, Asst.
                 Principal, Office Manager etc.)

                 Present energy awards to awardees.

For Program Coordinators
                 Establish an Energy Team for your campus/office.

                 Make sure room temperatures are consistent with the school district’s
                 policy on seasonal settings.

                 Blinds or drapes on windows that receive direct sunlight should be
                 closed when air conditioning systems are on and at night during the
                 winter.

                 Do not use assembly areas, such as the auditorium or gymnasium for
                 small groups that can comfortably meet in smaller areas.

                 Schedule the use of classrooms and other spaces wisely to reduce
                 energy consumption. Resist using vacant classrooms. Use the fewest
                 number of rooms necessary for summer and night programs.

                 Schedule classes to maximize the utilization of classroom space in the
                 buildings.

                 Implement a lighting procedure. Keep lights off when space is unused.
                 Identify common areas and appoint someone to be responsible for
                 checking the lights.

                 Keep doors and windows closed as much as possible during the heating
                 and cooling seasons.

                 Establish a resource center for energy education in your school.

                 Solicit feedback from students and staff on energy conservation.

                             Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 16
               Inform the public, parents and other groups about your school’s energy
               conservation efforts.

               Promote opportunities for teachers and students to display their class
               work related to energy conservation.

               Establish checklists for key personnel to ensure that energy loads are
               controlled after hours.


For Teachers

               Consider using service-learning projects for the energy curriculum to get
               students involved in awareness and monitoring activities, such as,
               morning announcements (science, language arts, math), meter reading
               (science and math), and energy patrols (science and math).

               Do not block classroom air supply and return grills with furniture or
               displays.

               Keep classroom doors and windows shut during heating or air-
               conditioning seasons.

               Close all windows and doors when leaving the classroom at the end of
               the day and turn off all equipment and lights.

               Close blinds at the end of the day and especially before weekends,
               holidays, and vacation periods. Keep blinds open during the day for
               maximum use of daylighting (but, avoid glare).

               Do not cover or block thermostats.

               Set back thermostats when leaving at the end of the day and especially
               just before weekends and holidays.

               Report faulty thermostats and other equipment that may be
               malfunctioning.

               Wear warmer clothes in cold weather and encourage students to do the
               same.

               Wear cooler clothes in hot weather.

               Turn off computers when not being used. Do not leave on overnight.

               Turn off lights when leaving the class room.




                            Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 17
For Custodians

             Check for proper thermostat settings and functions when finished with
             class room cleaning.

             Check for overheated and over cooled areas and adjust thermostats
             accordingly.

             Turn off power ventilators and exhaust systems when not needed.

             Turn off lights in unused spaces.

             Disconnect all unused electrical equipment.

             Turn off how water heaters when not being used.

             Follow shut-down procedures during weekends and vacation periods.


For Maintenance Technicians

             Check all building insulation, caulking and weather-stripping. Repair
             caulking and weather-stripping as necessary.

             Inspect heating and air conditioning equipment periodically (filters, fan
             belts, coils).

             Replace worn seals, fittings, traps, etc., check ducts for leakage.

             Inspect drinking fountains for proper operation and leaks.

             Check all plumbing for leaks.

             Maintain hot water temperatures at 120 degrees F except in food
             preparation areas.

             Replace ceiling tiles when dislodged, broken, or missing.

             Keep door closer in good working condition.

             Repair damaged windows and doors immediately.

             Adjust timers to coincide with changes in Eastern Standard Time and
             Daylight Savings Time.




                          Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 18
                            The School Board of Alachua County

                   Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
ENERGY CONSERVATION STRATEGIES
For Faculty & Staff

Staff cooperation in support of energy management practices starts with effective
communication. Most school-based personnel are not aware of energy costs in the operation
of their school. One obvious way to develop staff awareness of energy waste is to regularly
communicate energy costs.

How these costs are communicated can make a big difference between staff being mildly
interested in saving energy or highly motivated to take an active role in the conservation of
energy. The impact of energy waste becomes real when energy costs are expressed in terms
of numbers of teaching positions or textbooks instead of just dollars. If a conservation program
is to work, the staff at each school site must understand and support it. Here are some
suggestions for communicating the high price of energy to staff and faculty.

• At faculty & staff meetings, discuss energy costs and practical ways to reduce waste.
• Use the energy cue cards for adding interesting energy factoids to staff and faculty meetings.
• Advertise the use of energy in visible places, such as bulletin boards, front lobbies,
  newsletters, websites, etc.
• Conduct periodic energy contests on school energy use. There are a number of methods to
  bring about competition in saving energy among teachers and students.
• Involve School Advisory Councils, PTO’s and other community groups in an effort to gain
  support for energy conservation.

When staff is made aware of the impact that energy costs have on the school’s budget and are
motivated to reduce energy consumption, there are several opportunities that can be used to
make them a part of the solution. These are some suggested strategies:

• Take advantage of free labor in the form of student assistants or parent/community
  volunteers to accomplish various observation and administrative tasks.
• Organize a student energy patrol (elementary or middle school) or a student energy
  commission (middle or high school) to help monitor school energy use.
• Involve custodial and maintenance staff on the Energy Schools team, as well as, other non-
  instructional staff and teachers.


For Students

Student involvement in energy conservation activities requires special care. Today’s
curriculum objectives leave little time to pursue special programs no matter how beneficial they
may be. Anything that comes to the classroom must support the curriculum objectives that
teachers already have. Fortunately, students already have to learn about energy and human
impacts on the environment. The following approaches focus on adding resources and not
requirements for the classroom.
                            Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 19
How does student participation actually help reduce energy waste? Students may not have
their hands on the switches that turn things off when not needed, but they can help to create
an organizational climate or culture for sustainability. Here are some ideas that could be used
to involve students and enrich curriculum at the same time.

• Ask students to chart and organize school energy data that in turn can support the overall
  conservation effort. This important service helps to overcome one of the key obstacles to
  energy conservation – not knowing the significance or magnitude of energy consumption and
  costs.
• Students can become involved with other energy conservation activities in various ways
  outside the classroom – announcing energy saving tips on morning announcements,
  participating in after school clubs and activities that lend themselves to energy conservation
  projects, and accomplishing specific tasks as student aids.
• Display of student work has always been an important feature of the educational process.
  Make areas available around the school (cafeteria, media center, front office, etc.) where
  student work on energy subjects can be displayed.
• Conduct a Switch plate poster contest for reminder prompts (for turning off lights and A/C).
• Science teachers should keep on file a list of science fair project ideas and resources related
  to energy, energy consumption, energy efficiency, and alternative energy.
• Science teachers should also take advantage of free information and lesson plans available
  from the state and federal government, such as ENERGY STAR®. Several national
  organizations maintain a wealth of curriculum materials relating to energy available for
  downloading from their website.




                             Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 20
                                  The School Board of Alachua County

                       Awards & Incentives (A&I) Program
                     ENERGY MYTH BUSTERS
        Energy myths have persisted over the decades. Here are a few myths that are busted!


Myth #1 - Turning lights off-and-on uses as much or more energy than it saves!
Depending on the frequency of switching, this may have been true 15 or 20 years ago, but not today. It is true that
there is a temporary spike in the power use at the moment that the light switch is turned on. However, with today's
electrical metering technology that extremely short spike is barely noticeable and has nearly no discernable affect
on consumption, demand, or the resulting cost of electricity. The savings from turning off the lights far out-weighs
the negligible amount of increased power.

Myth #2 - Turning lights off and on shortens the life of the bulb!
Technically, this may be true, however, bulb life is not the real issue. The real issue is how soon you have to
replace the bulb. A light that is left on 24/7 will have a longer burn time than one that is turned off when not
needed. But, because the light is being turned off, the burn time is spread out over a longer period. Which means
that the replacement time is greatly extended.

Myth #3 - In the larger scheme of energy conservation one person can't make that much of a difference!
As with many other myths this one too has some truth to it. If you look at how much you can save as one
individual in your office or classroom it may not add up to one dollar per day. However, if every one also did that
little amount, by time you multiply it by the total number of employees, or number of offices/classrooms, and by
the number of operating days in a year, you will be easily into the tens of thousands of dollars saved annually.

Myth #4 - If saving energy was going to produce that much revenue, then everyone would already be
doing it!
There are a number of reasons why this is not true in spite of the fact that a systematic energy management
program can produce significant operational cost reductions.
a. It's a matter of "perspective." Most building operators and maintainers are trained to focus on customer
satisfaction. Since they work in a backlog environment, there is little time to act on perceived "nice to have" things
like efficiency. As long as there is money in the budget to pay the electric bill, then there is no pressure to worry
about it.
b. The largest savings can be attained in the very beginning when the building is designed. However, there is
pressure to keep "first costs" to a minimum resulting in the elimination of some technologies that could
significantly reduce future operating costs (technologies with 2 to 8 year paybacks).
c. Some buildings where we work or study do not make it easy to conserve. In some cases light switches require
special keys, no options for partial lighting, or the temperature setting for the room is not controllable by
occupants.
d. For most people conservation is a work ethic or habit. They just don't think about it, especially when no body
else seems to care (even the boss). Habits are hard to adopt or change.
e. Very few people ever know how much their organization or school actually spends on energy because they
never get to see the bill. In most organizations it is an overhead cost not attributable to any department or office.
Neither the building operators, the occupants, or the administrators know how much they are spending on energy
or how much of a difference conservation initiatives will make.




                                   Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 21
Myth #5 - Energy conservation means I'm going to be uncomfortable!
Many people have the idea that energy conservation means doing without. They're going to be cold in the winter,
hot in the summer, and have to squint to read in a dimly lit office or classroom. Unfortunately this belief has been
reinforced by experience over the years in ill-conceived practices to reduce energy cost. However, a more
thoughtful approach focuses on reducing energy waste. Industry experts estimate that as much as 10-15% of
energy used in a facility is wasted. A good energy management plan focuses on optimizing energy use when it is
needed and eliminating wasteful practices. This can be done through retrofitting to better technology and
operating the systems more effectively. There is a lot to be saved just by reducing waste behind the scenes
without having to make people uncomfortable.

Myth #6 - Turning computers off-and-on shortens the life of the computer!
When you think about it, the "life of a computer" has nothing to do with how long it will operate. It has to do with
when it becomes obsolete. How many old computers do you see that still work, but nobody will use them because
they don't run the programs we need them to run. What if switching the computer on-and-off will reduce the
operational life of a computer from 12 years to 10 years? How many people are even able to use a computer
today that is 10 years old? The answer to Myth #2 applies here as well. Turning off computers at the end of the
day vs. leaving them on 24/7 will actually extend the time when replacement will be operationally required (10
years of "on" time spread out over 15 years or more).

Myth #7 - The lower you set the thermostat the faster it will cool! Or, the higher you set the thermostat the
faster it will heat!
In spite of this popular practice heating and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment works at the same rate regardless
of the setting. All it sees is "on." The problem with this practice is that over-cooling or over-heating will occur until
the extreme temperature setting is satisfied. The best practice is to set it at the desired temperature for the space
and activity. It will cool down or heat up just as fast as if you set it to the extremes, relieving you of the need to
readjust later.

Myth #8 - You can dehumidify a room by turning down the air-conditioning to 60 degrees!
Unfortunately this is also true, but, the moisture in the air will be deposited as condensation on your office
equipment, walls, windows, and anywhere else in the room that has reached the dew point. This sometimes
happens in hot and humid climates where wet carpet cleaning is occurring. The water from the cleaning
evaporates into the air increasing the humidity in the room. If the room temperature is set above the dew point of
the air in the room (usually 72 degrees or higher), then the condensation will occur in the HVAC equipment and
drain to the outdoors. Otherwise, it occurs on the walls, computers, desks, etc., leaving a huge mess and potential
for microbial growth if left unattended.




                                    Energy Awards and Incentive Program – 2008 – page 22

								
To top