SOCIAL WORK FIELD PRACTICUM MANUAL by uoy21072

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									SOCIAL WORK FIELD PRACTICUM MANUAL




            Social Work Program

        Division of Arts and Sciences




             Mississippi State University
                  Meridian Campus

                Revised August 2007




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                                                            Table of Contents




Social Work Program .........................................................................................................................3
Mission ...............................................................................................................................................4
Program Objectives ...........................................................................................................................4
Field Practicum Faculty ......................................................................................................................6
Coordinator of Field ...........................................................................................................................6
Field Liaison .......................................................................................................................................7
Field Instructors .................................................................................................................................8
Student Responsibilities.....................................................................................................................9
Assignment of Students to Field Education Sites ..............................................................................9
Practicum Assessment Criteria and Standards ...............................................................................10
Field Practicum Requirements .........................................................................................................12
Course Description ..........................................................................................................................12
Field Practicum Objectives ..............................................................................................................12
Field Practicum Time Line ...............................................................................................................13
Dismissal for Academic and Professional Reasons .........................................................................14
Equal Opportunity Policy ..................................................................................................................15
Mississippi State University Misconduct Policy ................................................................................16
Mississippi State University Sexual Harassment Policy ..................................................................16
Risks in Field Placement..................................................................................................................16
Social Work licensure ......................................................................................................................18
Appendix ..........................................................................................................................................19
Form A: Application for Field Practicum (Resumé) .........................................................................20
Form B: Agency Interview Choices .................................................................................................21
Form C: Choices for Agency Placement .........................................................................................22
Form D: Authorization for Background Screening, Child Abuse and Sex Offender Registries .......23
Form: E: Child Abuse/Neglect Central Registry Check ....................................................................24
Form F: Authorization to Release Non-Public Information ..............................................................25
Form G: Field Practicum Time Sheet ...............................................................................................27
   Instructions on Completing Time Sheets .....................................................................................28
Form H: Original Contact .................................................................................................................29
Form I: Learning Contract ...............................................................................................................30
   Instructions for Learning Goals Preparation ................................................................................32
Form J: Evaluation Field Practicum Student ...................................................................................37
   Practicum Assessment Criteria and Standards ...........................................................................43
Form K: Student Evaluation of Field Practicum Experience ...........................................................45
   Supervision and Consultation Assessment Criteria and Standards .............................................55
Form : Agreement of Understanding Between MSU ........................................................................56
   Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards .........................................................................58
   Functions of Educational Policy and Accreditation ......................................................................59
   Educational Policy........................................................................................................................60
   Accreditation Standards ...............................................................................................................67
   Program Changes ........................................................................................................................72



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Social Work Program
The Social Work Program at Mississippi State University Meridian Campus accreditation was
reaffirmed by the Council on Social Work Education until 2013. The profession of social work
recognizes the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree as the entry level professional degree. The
Program mission is inextricably related to the purpose and mission of the University and the College
of Arts and Sciences. On these foundations the Program seeks to produce students who are
professionally prepared at an entry level to address the diverse needs of individuals, families, small
groups, communities, and organizations. The Program emphasizes preparation of entry level
practitioners for competent and effective practice, provide leadership in the development of service
delivery systems, and develop Social Work knowledge.

In order to achieve this mission, the student=s program of professional education consists of both
classroom and field instruction. The function of the classroom instruction is to provide the student
with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for the development of
practice competence. The field practicum provides the student with the opportunity to link and apply
content from the classroom to the delivery of social services in a practice situation. Students are
admitted into the practicum following the completion of required liberal arts and social work courses.

While the Program has responsibility for the overall function of the practicum, field instruction is a
collaborative educational venture between those in the Program, the social service agencies, and the
student body. Individualization, flexibility, and cooperation in developing relevant educational
experiences are important conditions of this relationship.

Field Practicum and Seminar (SW 4916 and SW 4926) offer the equivalent of 12 semester hours.
These courses are offered as a block semester placement in which a minimum of 450 working hours
are completed in an approved social service agency setting. The seminar sessions meet every other
week for three hours during the semester. The seminar sessions are provided to enhance student
learning through the sharing of individual practicum experiences. The Coordinator of Field Education,
Field Liaison, and current field practicum students attend seminars. Field seminar class hours are
not calculated in the minimum number of practicum hours.




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Mission

Through the teaching of social work knowledge, values, skills, and practice the Social Work Program
at Mississippi State University, Meridian Campus will prepare individuals for competent and effective
practice, provide leadership in the development of service delivery systems, and develop social work
knowledge.

Program Goals

The primary goals of the Baccalaureate Social Work Program are as follows:

1.     Prepare students for beginning generalist professional practice with
       individuals, families, small groups, communities, and organizations;

2.     Prepare students to develop and identify the values and ethics to be
       applied within the social work profession;

3.     Prepare students to intervene effectively with diverse populations while
       promoting social and economic justice;

4.     Prepare students as beginning social work generalists who link social
       research and social service practice;

5.     Prepare students for critical thinking and life-long learning through an
       educational process combining a liberal arts foundation with professional
       social work education; and

6.     Prepare students for graduate education in social work.

Program Objectives

The Social Work Program Objectives further outline the program goals and are consistent with
the premise of the Council on Social Work Education’s Educational Policy.

1.     Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional Social Work practice.

2.      Understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and principles, and
       practice accordingly.

3.     Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skill related to the
       clients’ age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital
       status, national origin, race, religion, sex, or sexual orientation.

4.     Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and apply
       strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and economic justice.

5.     Understand and interpret the history of the Social Work profession and its contemporary
       structures and issues.


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6.     Apply the knowledge and skills of generalist Social Work practice with systems of all
       sizes.

7.     Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand individual
       development and behavior across the life span and the interactions among individuals
       and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities.

8.     Analyze, formulate, and influence social policies.

9.     Evaluate research studies, apply research findings to practice, and evaluate their own
       practice interventions.

10.    Use communication skills differently across client populations, colleagues, and
       communities.

11.    Use supervision and consultation appropriate to Social Work practice.

12.    Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems and seek
       necessary organizational changes.

Field Practicum Agencies

Agencies are selected according to the following criteria:

1.     A commitment to professional social work education as demonstrated by:

       a.      Willingness to provide students with assignments focused toward learning needs
               rather than toward the workload and schedule of the agency;

       b.      Willingness to allow the student to participate in staff meetings, in-service training,
               inter-agency conferences, and other learning opportunities that arise;

       c.      Willingness to provide a qualified staff member to serve as field instruction; and

       d.      Commitment to release the agency employee who serves as the field instructor from
               his/her normal duties for the amount of time necessary to plan the student=s learning
               experiences, supervise the student=s progress, and to attend meetings and seminars
               related to field education.

2.     Commitment to high quality service to the consumer in an atmosphere compatible with the
       ethics and values of the social work profession as stated in the National Association of Social
       Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.

Agencies are evaluated in the following manner:

1.     The Coordinator of Field Education contacts the agency, meets with the appropriate agency
       representative, discusses criteria for selection, and assesses the feasibility of the agency as a
       possible site.

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2.     When a student is placed in an agency, the coordinator and/ or field liaison gathers
       information and monitors the field education course. Information includes the written
       assignments, use of supervision, and mid-term and final evaluations for the course. The
       student completes an evaluation form rating the instructor, agency, the coordinator and/or
       field liaison at the completion of placement. This information allows for ongoing evaluation of
       the placement by the field coordinator. Student evaluation provides the agency history
       collected over time.

3.     Attendance by students at orientation meetings and participation in training sessions provide
       additional information for evaluations of field sites.

4.     Students, the Coordinator of Field, Field Liaison, and agency instructors are expected to
       report concerns regarding the use of an agency for field instruction to the coordinator. The
       coordinator is responsible for appropriately addressing the concerns.

Field Practicum Faculty

Coordinator of Field: The coordinator of field education is appointed by the program director as a
full-time faculty member and is responsible for the overall administration and educational direction of
field education. The roles include the following administrative duties:

1.     Recruit and assess social service agencies as field instruction sites;

2.     Establish and maintain a cooperative relationships between the student, faculty, and the
       agencies;

3.     Maintain current information on agencies that have been approved as field education sites;

4.     Consult with administrative personnel of the agencies on matters involving the provision of
       adequate field instruction, selection and training of field instructors, and maintenance of field
       instruction standards;

5.     Interpret the Program=s philosophy of education, the organization and content of the
       educational curriculum, and field instruction standards to the community agencies and field
       instructors;

6.     Share pertinent information about field education students with field agencies;

7.     Match students to specific agencies following appropriate consultation with students,
       advisors, and field instructors; and

8.     Plan and offer orientation, training, and other staff development experiences for field
       instructors.

The Supervision and Consultation duties of the Coordinator of Field Education include the
following duties:

1.     Provide a clear and consistent understanding of the student’s field practicum responsibilities;

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2.     Provide a clear understanding of all assignments, activities and their link to the student’s
       knowledge and skills development;

3.     Hold regular and structured seminars;

4.     Provide continuous supervision that encompasses all areas of the student’s concern;

5.     Provide an objective appraisal of the student’s work

6.     Support the student’s development of self-awareness by providing psychological and
       interpersonal resources;

7.     Coordinate the student’s learning through interaction with agency instructor and /or field
       liaison;

8.     Reinforce professional identification of ethical standards and principles of NASW Code of
       Ethics;

9.     Continually reinforcing the student’s identification with Social Work purpose, values, and
       ethics; and

10.    Foster integration of both empirical and practice-based knowledge.

Field Liaison: Field Liaisons are adjunct faculty employed by the University. The liaison serves as a
channel of communication between the Social Work program, the student, and the field placement
agency. The role includes the following duties:

1.     Provide a clear and consistent understanding of the student’s field practicum responsibilities;

2.     Provide a clear understanding of all assignments, activities and their link to the student’s
       knowledge and skills development;

3.     Provide continuous supervision that encompasses all areas of the student’s concern;

4.     Facilitate field teaching and student learning;

5.     Over see educational opportunities offered by the agency, monitor student’s progress, and
       foster interchange between the program and agency;

6.     Evaluate field instructor’s efforts and student’s achievements objectively;

7.     Continually reinforce the student’s identification with Social Work purpose, values, and ethics;

8.     Foster integration of both empirical and practice-based knowledge; and

9.     Attend regularly scheduled field instructors’ trainings, participating as requested.




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Field Instructors: Field instructors need to be licensed, or if included in a legal exemption category,
to have a Social Work degree. The field instructor may be licensed in any category, however, if in
the” licensed social worker” category, the instructor must meet the following qualifications:

       1.      A minimum of two years social work experience after graduation with a Social Work
               degree; or

       2.      A minimum of five years social work experience after graduation for those with any
               other bachelor degree

Exceptions to above criteria may be made for social service professionals with 5 years in a social
work setting. In this case, the Coordinator of Field Education works with the field instructor to provide
resource information and assistance regarding Social Work practice. The faculty field liaison works
with the student and the field instructor to monitor the quality of the match.

In some instances, the approved field instructor may assign another agency worker to supplement
day-to-day supervision of the student. In these cases, the approved field instructor agrees to meet at
least every two weeks with the student in addition to the supervisory consultations provided by the
other agency worker.

3.     Motivation for teaching and recognized competence in practice,

4.     Willingness to participate in learning and growth experiences that refine existing skills and
       develop new ones.

Field instructors are expected to do the following:

1.     Hold regular and planned supervisory conferences;

2.     Provide continuous supervision that encompasses all areas of student’s concern;

3.     Provide an objective appraisal of student’s work;

4.     Enhance student’s understanding of Social Work philosophy and agency policy;

5.     Support student’s development of self-awareness by providing psychological and
       interpersonal resources as well a professional competence;

6.     Enhance student’s knowledge of the agency’s and community resources;

7.     Coordinate student’s learning through appropriate case assignment, peer-group interaction,
       and priorities of activities to refine knowledge, values, and skills;

8.     Provide supervision within the established guidelines of NASW Code of Ethics;

9.     Continually reinforce student’s identification with Social Work purpose, values, and ethics;
       and

10.    Foster integration of both empirical and practice-based knowledge.
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Student Responsibilities

The student is encouraged to be as fully involved as possible in the field education process. Students
are to meet with advisor and Coordinator of Field to prepare for decision making and to identify
learning needs and wants. In the preplacement interviews, students are encouraged to exchange
relevant information with the agency field instructor to ensure that both the student and the field
instructor have essential information to decide whether this is an appropriate field placement.

Students are expected to assume the professional role appropriate to their level of development
including the following:

1.     Adhering to the policies, procedures, and regulations of the agency;

2.     Complying with the agency=s practices with respect to the working hours, dress codes, and
       general professional behavior. Absences due to illness or personal emergency are made up if
       the minimum hours are not met;

3.     Availing himself/herself of learning opportunities offered through in-service training, meetings,
       and conferences;

4.     Clearing the use of any confidential information and case material for instructional purpose
       with the field instructor as well as disguising the material to insure confidentiality. The
       University and each student shall comply with all applicable state, federal, and local laws
       regarding the confidentiality of patient information and medical records; and

5.     Conducting himself/herself in ways consistent with the ethics of the profession, including the
       National Association Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.

The student is responsible for maintaining professional liability insurance coverage. Liability and
malpractice insurance coverage is available through NASW.

Automobile insurance is the student=s responsibility. Students are not required by the Program to
transport clients or others in their private automobiles as part of field education responsibilities.
Students should check with their automobile insurance carrier about any limits on coverage for using
personal vehicles in field education.

Assignment of Students to Field Education Sites

The field practicum is an educational experience. Therefore, placement is based upon the
educational needs of the student. The primary concern for the placement of a student is an
environment which offers the best potential to promote the student=s professional development.
Personal factors related to location of placements are considered.

1.     During the semester prior to practicum, student(s) complete two field placement orientation
       classes. The purpose of these classes is to discuss field education and the field placement
       process, to distribute the Field Education Manual, and to review field education information
       forms and the field syllabus. Students complete Form A, Application for Field Practicum,
       located in the Appendix of this manual; complete three preplacement interviews with
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         approved field agencies (Form B); and complete Form C, which ranks the student=s agency
         choice(s).

         In the preplacement interviews, the student and agency field instructor are encouraged to
         explore the placements fully before ranking the choice of agency placement.

2.       Students will submit the completed Forms A, B, and C to the Coordinator of Field Education.
         Information shared by the student pertaining to their learning needs, interests, wants, and
         personal considerations concerning the field placement are discussed with the coordinator in
         an office interview. The decision on agency placement is based on the shared student
         information and agency field instructor interviews. The Coordinator of Field Education has the
         final approval of the field placement agency.

3.       Students will submit the completed Forms D, E, and F to the Coordinator of Field Education.
         Information shared by the student pertaining to their background screening, child abuse and
         neglect central registry check, and non-public information will be shares with the field agency
         where the student completes their placement.

4.       The Coordinator of Field Education will write to the agency, including student field
         information, and will notify the student instructing him/her to contact the agency concerning
         their placement schedules.

5.       Prior to the start of the placement, the Coordinator of Field will provide the field manual,
         appropriate educational policy statement and accreditation standards, syllabus, and
         evaluation forms to the agency field instructor.

6.       Changes in any student=s placement that are made after the field practicum begins must be
         approved by the Program Director.

Practicum Assessment Criteria and Standards

        Your supervisor will use the following criteria and standards when marking your practicum
work. You can use them when planning your learning goals and as a self-check on your own
practicum performance.

Level 4 (A): Quality and Consistent Growth

The Student:

     •   Demonstrates consistent performance and contributes significantly to the practicum setting in
         relation to all eight practice areas;
     •   Is able to establish effective professional relationships with clients, co-workers, and the
         supervisor;
     •   Is able to work both independently and as part of a team;
     •   Is self-directed and able to critically analyze his or her own behavior and set realistic goals to
         work toward;
     •   Uses problem-solving strategies that are effective, creative, and appropriate to the situation;



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   •   Demonstrates a desire to go beyond available information and constantly search out new
       ways to connect and combine information and experiences to strengthen professional
       practice; and
   •   Personalizes knowledge and skill issues and concepts acquired through practice and takes
       advantage of all learning opportunities, taking on challenges and responsibility for his or her
       learning.

Level 3 (B): Growth and Development

The Student:

   •   Is reliable in performance and needs only limited supervision;
   •   Is able to work independently and achieves consistent growth and development in all the
       practice areas;
   •   Collaborates with supervisor and co-workers, sharing ideas, knowledge, and experiences;
   •   Is able to initiate and generate specific plans that further personal learning goals;
   •   Demonstrates consistent self-awareness, self-direction, initiative, and responsibility for his or
       her own learning;
   •   Has a solid understanding of professional values and attitudes and can effectively integrate
       these into practice; and
   •   Quickly addresses issues that arise and takes optimal advantage of learning opportunities in
       both the practicum and course work.

Level 2 (C): Basic Competency

The Student:

   •   Can usually carry out responsibilities as identified in the Practicum Evaluation checklists, with
       occasional supervision, direction, and assistance;
   •   Is generally reliable;
   •   Shows some initiative in all practice areas ;
   •   Is generally able to relate to clients, co-workers, and supervisor;
   •   Demonstrates some understanding of professional values that relate to each of the practice
       areas;
   •   Is able to set goals, but sometimes these are unrealistic, unreasonable, or unattainable; and
   •   Is able to identify problematic issues, but shows only basic skills in addressing these issues
       due to a lack of willingness and/or ability to critically analyze and integrate knowledge thereby
       promoting self-awareness and skill development.

Level 1 (Below C): Failure to Meet Minimum Standards

The Student:

   •   Is in constant need of supervision and direction from the supervisor;
   •   Is unable to carry out the tasks and responsibilities as identified in the Practicum Evaluation
       forms;
   •   Lacks ability to set realistic goals, and if goals are set, is unable to consistently follow through
       on meeting them;

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      •   Has difficulty relating to clients, co-workers, and supervisor;
      •   Lacks understanding of professional values and attitudes as these apply to practice areas
          identified in the Practicum Assessment Checklists; and
      •   Appears unwilling or unable to reflect critically or personally on many aspects of his/her
          practice.


Field Practicum Requirements

Course Description: SW 4916-4926 Social Work Field Practicum/Seminar. (12 hours). The course
provides students opportunities to apply generalist social work practice methods by completing a
minimum of 450 supervised work hours in a variety of social work practical settings, working with
individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Field Practicum Objectives:

1.        Integrate theoretical learning with practice experience using critical thinking skills in a
          generalist social work field experience.

2.        Understand and work under supervision within the structure and function of agency and
          community resource and delivery systems.

3.        Recognize ethical dilemmas and critically analyze agency policy in terms of social work
          values and ethics.

4.        Use generalist practice skills that are sensitive to client systems that are at risk or differ in
          social, cultural, racial, religious, spiritual, and class backgrounds, gender, sexual
          orientation, ability and age and that assist and empower people to increase their
          capacities and enhance their well-being.

5.        Apply communications skills in personal interactions and written tasks.

6.        Apply to practice the strategies and skills of change that advance social and
          economic justice based on an understanding of the forms and mechanisms of
          oppression.

7.        Demonstrate professional use of self as a generalist social worker.

8.        Use supervision to improve one’s practice.

9.        Monitor and evaluate one’s own generalist practice using current social work
          research literature and research methods.

10.       Develop goals and strategies for increasing self-awareness and assessing one’s
          professional growth.

Each student is required to complete the field practicum. No exceptions are made based on prior
work experience. This is consistent with Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accreditation
standard 5.2 Handbook of Accreditation Standards and Procedures (p. 40). Academic credit for life

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experience and previous work experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of the
field practicum or of the courses in the professional foundation areas. Although the program
recognizes the importance of practice wisdom, it is the program's strong belief that a social worker
must possess a conceptualization of practice that is theoretically grounded and must also possess
the knowledge to evaluate one's own practice effectively. This results from the successful completion
of the curriculum.


A student, who is employed in a social service agency, is strongly encouraged to complete field
practicum in another approved agency. It is required that the field practicum agency be approved by
the university and program. In the rare case that a student must remain employed in the agency,
there must be clearly written objectives, the field practicum hours (450) must be completed in
a unit other than their work unit, and a social worker other than the current supervisor must
provide supervision. Both the Coordinator of Field and Program Director must approve such field
practicum arrangements.

Holidays and Leave. The student=s first responsibility is to the client. The faculty understands the
student is in the student role, not an employee role. Therefore, the student is not required to work
during University holidays; however, the agency may request that the student work during University
holidays. The student will work if the nature of the placement and the responsibility to the client
system require it.

It is the student=s responsibility to notify the field instructor of any absence. When possible,
notification should be made in advance. If the absence is due to illness and the student is absent for
three consecutive days, a physician=s excuse is necessary.

Field Practicum Time Line

The following time line is important to follow in planning and completing your field placement.
Students will complete steps 1-8 in the Fall semester prior to their field placement.

           Activity Completed                                  Time Line

1. Application for Field, Form A                           End of Fall semester
2. Agency Interview Choices, Form B                        End of Fall semester
3. Three Agency Interviews, Form C                         End of Fall semester
4. Agency assignment by Coordinator of Field               End of Fall semester
5. Receives of letter of agency intent                     End of Fall semester
6. Authorization for Background Check, Child               End of Fall semester
Abuse and Sex Offender Registries, Form D
7. Secure Child Abuse/Neglect Central                      End of Fall semester
Registry. Form E
8. Permission to Release Non-Public
   Information, Form F

Students complete steps 8-15 in the Spring semester while enrolled in Field
Practicum. These steps are described in detail in SW 4916/4926 course syllabi.

           Activity Completed                                  Time Line


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9. Complete time sheets, Form G                               1st week of placement
10. Complete Original Contract, Form H                        2nd week of placement
11. Initiate Learning Goals, Form I                           2nd week of placement
12. Attend Field Placement seminars                         Dates indicated on course syllabus
13. Initiate Mid-term Evaluation, Form J                    On completion of 225 hours
14. Initiate Final Evaluation, Form J                       On completion of 450 hours
15. Complete Student’s Evaluation, Form K                   On completion of placement


Managing Difficulties in Field Placement

The student and field instructor are encouraged to discuss the problems at the earliest indication.
The difficulty may be identified either by the student, the instructor, or the Field Liaison. If the difficulty
is not resolved in a timely manner, the Coordinator of Field Education is consulted. The coordinator
will confer with the individuals involved and the student’s advisor. All information relevant to the
problem should be as through as possible and provides in writing. A decision is then made by the
coordinator to resolve the difficulty. Recommended intervention should be clearly stated, actions to
be taken by the student, the instructor, and the coordinator should be stated in measurable terms,
and time frame in which actions are to be taken. Changes and results should be recorded in writing.
The decision is sent in memo to each individual involved, as well as other appropriate officials (i.e.,
Program Director).

The student may also use the University Grievance Process. Others parties who have been involved
in the process and remain dissatisfied with the final resolution may confer with the Program Director
to express any continued grievance.

Dismissal for Academic and Professional Reasons

The faculty of the Social Work Program has the professional obligation to assure that its graduates
are not only academically prepared, but emotionally and ethically prepared in the traditional sense,
exhibit behavior consistent with the values and ethics of the profession, and demonstrate emotional
preparedness expected in the profession. A student may be dismissed from the program for failure to
meet these standards. Specific examples of such violations may include, but are not limited to the
following:

1.      Failure to meet or maintain the grade point average stipulated above.

2.      Behavior judged by the program faculty to be in violation of the NASW Code of Ethics and
        the University Honor Code including academic plagiarism, lying, or deception.

3.      Unresolved personal issues and/or psychiatric disturbances that, in the professional judgment
        of the program faculty, may impair the effective and ethical quality of services to future
        consumers.

4.      Evidence of documented chemical abuse and/or dependency occurring during the course of
        study.

5.      Failure to develop the appropriate interpersonal skills necessary for effective and ethical
        social work practice as evaluated and judged by the program faculty.


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6.     Commission of any misdemeanor or felony involving actual or threaten assault or injury to a
       person.

7.     False, incomplete, deceptive, or misleading oral or written statements made during
       application to the program.

Problems identified will be investigated by the Program Director. Faculty, staff and field instructors,
or other students may present alleged problem(s). Identified problem(s) must be presented to the
student and director in writing. All information relevant to the student=s evaluation should be as
thorough as possible, including the specification of the sources providing the information.

In the course of investigating the alleged violations, outside evaluations, assessments, and/or
opinions from University and/or external professionals may be required. If necessary, the program will
secure the written permission of the student to seek relevant information. Failure to grant permission
may result in dismissal from the program.

The Program Director, student, and his/her advisor will evaluate the allegation(s) and, if necessary,
agree on a resolution of the difficulty. Recommendation will be one of the following: (1) the student
will be encouraged to continue in the program; (2) the specific problem will be identified and the
student will be advised concerning a recommendation and/or correction; or (3) the student will be
dismissed. A written plan for correction indefinite and/or temporary withdrawal will be prepared. The
written plan will include a statement of the specific problem, a plan of action, the period of time for
correction of the behavior, the period of time which must expire before the student can apply for
reinstatement, and/or the period of time for the withdrawal before the student can reenter the
program. The student, advisor, and program director must sign the plan.

Students may appeal decisions made by the program director and/or faculty that affect the student=s
ability to pursue or continue in the program through the normal channels and mechanisms specified
by the University. The appeal process varies according to the type of offense. The descriptions
related to each may be found in the Academic Operating Policy and Procedure at the following
address: http://www.msstate.edu/dept/audit/1207.html.

The faculty advisor=s role is to ensure that the student is aware of the process and procedure which
will be followed. The advisor is expected to be present at the various stages of the evaluation and
appeal process providing relevant information as requested. The advisor is a source for the student
to consult as to his/her rights and options.

Equal Opportunity Policy

Mississippi State University is committed to equal opportunity in employment and education and does
not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, or veteran status. The
University complies with applicable nondiscrimination and affirmative action provisions of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246, the Educational Amendments of 1972, the Rehabilitation
Act of 1973, the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, the Age Discrimination
in Employment Act of 1967, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, the Immigration Reform and Control
Act of 1986, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Inquiries concerning this policy may be
directed to Carson C. Cook, Director, Office of Diversity and Equity Programs, 106 McArthur Hall
(Barr Avenue), P. O. Box 6199, Mississippi State, MS 39762, Telephone: (662)-325-2493. E-mail:
ccook@aaeo.msstate.edu.

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Mississippi State University Student Policy

The Social Work program follows the same general academic and disciplinary grievance
procedures for all University students as described in the University Policies Relating to
Students and Student Records at the following address:
http:/www./mstate.edu/web/student_policies.html.




Mississippi State University Sexual Harassment Policy

The sexual harassment policy statement is in the University Policies Relating to Students and
Student Records at the following address: ttp://msstate.edu/web/student_policies.html. Sexual
harassment of any student should be promptly reported to a student advisor or faculty member.

Risks in Field Placement

This section informs you, the student, about potential risks associated with field education courses
SW 4916/4926. You have a right to be informed of risks associated with this aspect of your
educational and professional preparation. Risks can be minimized with proper knowledge and
preparation. It is your responsibility to discuss the policies and procedures of your agency with your
field instructor.

       Limits in practice Student(s) are to be aware of the limits of their knowledge and skills and
       avoid situations that are not within their areas of competence. The field instructor should be
       consulted before action is taken when the student is unsure how to handle a case and
       whether or not intervention is appropriate. This is proper use of supervision.

       Liability insurance: Students must be covered by liability insurance during their field
       practicum. Coverage is available through membership in the National Association of Social
       Workers (NASW). Membership applications should be obtained from the coordinator of field
       the semester prior to placement.

       Automobile liability insurance: If you use your personal vehicle during field placement you
       should consult an insurance agent for a clear understanding of your coverage. Clarify
       coverage should an accident happen while transporting your field instructor and/or a client.
       The faculty recommends that you not use your personal vehicle to transport clients. If clients
       are transported, an agency vehicle should be used.

       Home visits: A variety of social service settings require workers to conduct home visits. Such
       visits could expose you to health and safety risks. Home visits must be made with full
       knowledge of your agency field instructor and supervisor. Your field instructor should know
       the time of your departure and expected time of return. Make the home visit on a full tank of
       gas. You should have written information with you indicating whom to call and what steps to
       take in the event of an accident and/or a vehicle breakdown. It is recommended by the faculty
       that students be accompanied on home visits. Do not conduct a home visit on your own if you
       feel uncomfortable or threatened in the situation. Return to the agency and report your
       experience to your field instructor.

                                            16
Beware of dogs or other household pets that might be a threat. Do not make a visit if you
detect the presence of alcohol. Do not take irresponsible risks.

Angry, hostile, or threatening clients: Discuss agency policies and recommended course
of action for clients who are angry or exhibit threatening behavior. This should be done during
agency orientation with the field instructor. Whenever you feel uncomfortable with a client,
inform your supervisor. Ask your field instructor or another staff person to participate in
interviews and/or accompany you when visiting clients who may pose danger to your health
and safety.


After-hours locations: Some agencies have activities that occur beyond regular eight-to-five
office hours. Be aware of the location and neighborhood by noting street lighting, open
spaces, and shrubs that might impair visibility. Your field instructor or someone else should
accompany you when going to your car after dark. When possible, it is strongly
recommended that you visit locations for evening meetings during the day time in advance of
the meeting.
Sexual misconduct: Situations which could place the student(s) in a compromising position
should be avoided. The student should promptly report any sexual suggestions or overtures
to your field instructor. Proper and prompt action on your part can often prevent false
accusations of sexual improprieties.

Agency required testing: Health care agencies which provide social services may require
drug screening and TB skin tests. Other agencies, particularly those who serve vulnerable
populations such as children and the aged, require security clearances, pre-screening with a
criminal background check, and MDHS Central Registry check.

HIV/AIDS: The risk of exposure to the HIV virus is very low in most social work practice
settings. Students should be knowledgeable about how the virus is transmitted. If your
agency serves persons with HIV, insist on completing the same infectious disease control
training that agency staff receive. Practice the infectious disease policies of the placement
agency. Do not take irresponsible risks.

Home address, home and cell phone numbers: Students are not to give clients their home
address, home phone number, or their cell phone number. Should a client need to contact
you they must go through the social service agency you represent. The only telephone
numbers a student should give the client is the agency telephone number.

Proper use of cell phones: Telephone calls made on cell phones do not ensure
confidentiality. Should you need to speak with a supervisor concerning a client and will need
to share specific identifying information do not use your cell phone. Stop at a pay telephone
and call the supervisor.

The ringing of communication devices is intrusive and disruptive during classroom activities. If
you carry a cellular telephone or pager, please insure that it is turned off when you enter the
classroom. There may be special circumstances in which it is imperative that you be
contacted; please notify the instructor of this before class so arrangements may be made.
Work-related activities are not considered special circumstances.


                                     17
Social Work licensure

Social work students are eligible to take the scheduled licensing examination during their last
semester of course work if their course load does not exceed fifteen (15) semester hours. The Social
Work Program offers an exam review workshop for social work students and graduates prior to the
licensure examination. Applications for licensure may be obtained from the Mississippi Board of
Examiners for Social Workers and Marriage & Family Therapists web page or by contacting the
office. A complete guide of licensing policies and procedures is available through

                               Mississippi Board of Examiners for
                        Social Workers and Marriage & Family Therapists
                                        P. O. Box 4508
                                   Jackson, MS 39236-4508
                                  Telephone: (601) 987-6806
                                     www.msboeswmft.com




                                           18
                                        Appendix


Field Practicum Forms:

      Form A:      Application for Field Practicum

      Form B:      Agency Interview Choices

      Form C:      Choices for Agency Placement

      Form D:      Authorization for Background Check, Child Abuse and Sex Offender
                   Registries

      Form E:      Child Abuse/Neglect Central Registry Check

      Form F:      Authorization to Release Non-Public Information

      Form G:      Time Sheet and Instructions for Completing Time Sheets

      Form H:      Original Contact

      Form I:      Learning Contact and Instructions for Learning Goals

      Form J:      Evaluation of Field Practicum Student and Practicum Assessment Criteria and
                   Standards

      Form K:      Student Evaluation of Field Practicum Experience and Supervision and
                   Consultation Assessment Criteria and Standards

      Form L:      Agreement of Understanding between Mississippi State University Social
                   Work Program and Field Site




                                       19
                         Mississippi State University-Meridian
                                 Social Work Program

Form A: Application for Field Practicum (Résumé

Name
Address
City, State, and Zip Code
Telephone: (area code) number


EDUCATION:

Month and year      Degree you will receive from your present university
                    University or College’s name
                    Address

Month and year      Degree you will receive from your present university
                    University or College’s name
                    Address


                    Honors should be included

EMPLOYMENT:

Month and year      List your present title
                    Agency Name
                    Address

                    Responsibility:



                                          20
Volunteer work



In Case of Emergency:


Name                       , relationship
Address
City, State, and Zip Code
Telephone: (area code) Number
Alternate Telephone number




                           Mississippi State University-Meridian
                                   Social Work Program


Form B: Agency Interview Choices

Student name:


Agencies of choice:

1.     Agency name and address:              Reason:




       Field instructor=s name:



2.     Agency name and address:             Reason:




       Field instructor=s name:


                                        21
3.    Agency name and address:         Reason:




      Field instructor=s name:




                          Mississippi State University-Meridian
                             Social Work Program


Form C: Choices for Agency Placement

Student name:


Agencies of choice:

1.    Agency name and address:          Reason:




      Field instructor=s name:


2.    Agency name and address:          Reason:




                                       22
        Field instructor=s name:


3.      Agency name and address:                Reason:




        Field instructor=s name:



                             Mississippi State University-Meridian
                                Social Work Program

Form D: Authorization for Background Check, Child Abuse and Sex Offender Registries


Date:



I,                                          , authorize the Social Work Program, Mississippi State
University, Meridian Campus to conduct a background screening with law enforcement, the Child
Abuse Central Registry, the Sex Offender Registries, previous employers, and any other persons to
determine my suitability in working with children and families. I understand, this authorization is a part
of the admission process into the Social Work Program and into Field Practicum. I further
understand, this information will only be used in regard to the above application processes.


Student Signature:                                                    Date:


Witness:

Date:


Witness:

Date:



                                              23
                            Mississippi State University-Meridian
                               Social Work Program

Form: E: Child Abuse/Neglect Central Registry Check

To:            Child Abuse/Neglect Central Registry
               P.O. Box 352
               Jackson, MS 39205

From:          Sandra Vaughn, Director
               Social Work Program
               Mississippi State University, Meridian
               1000 Hwy 19 North
               Meridian, MS 39307

Date:

Please check the central registry for the following applicants:
□ Foster parents
□ Adoptive parents
□ Employee of residential child care facility
□ Child placing agency
□ Day care center
I understand that this information must be kept confidential by Mississippi State University,
Meridian and my field practicum agency. I have on file a signed authorization from the above
applicant(s) for this information.

To be completed by Department of Public Welfare Staff

Findings:

                                            24
□ No information found in the central registry
□ The following information was found in the central registry




Signature and Title:

Date:




                            Mississippi State University – Meridian
                                    Social Work Program


Form F: Authorization to Release Non-Public Information

The Family and Education Rights Act of 1974 provides that the release of educational records (or
personally identifiable information therein, except for public directory information) without the written
consent of the student will not be made.

In order that MSU-Meridian may comply with the law, please provide the information requested below
and sign the request form.

Name:
               Last                                  First                        Middle

Address:

                                                         Student ID #:
        Street Address    Apartment Number


City           State           ZIP

Information to be released:




Name and Title of person(s) to receive information:

                                             25
                       Name        Title




                       Name        Title




Student’s signature:

Date:




                              26
                                 Mississippi State University-Meridian Social Work Program
Form G: Field Practicum Time Sheet

Student Name:                                                 Agency:
Semester and Year:                                            Field Instructor:
Week of:                                                      Previous hours:

         Activity       Monday            Tuesday         Wednesday           Thursday       Friday   Sat/Sunday

 I. Client Contact(s)
 A. Office Visit(s)

 B. Home Visit(s)

 C. Telephone Call(s)

 D. Referral(s)

 E. Recording(s)

 F. Court

 II. Professional
 Development
 A. Conferences

 III. Activities
 A. Orientation

 B. Agency & In-
 service

 C. Observation(s)

 D. Evaluation(s)

 E.
 Research/Resources
 and Development

 IV. Other (identity)

 TOTAL(S)

                                         27
                             Instructions on Completing Time Sheets


Students are responsible for keeping a weekly time sheet. Time sheets are to be turned in during
biweekly field seminar.

The hour column should be completed in no less than 15 minutes intervals. Write "1" for one (1)
hour, "15" for 15 minutes, "30" for 30 minutes, "45" for 45 minutes. Ex. 1 hour and 30 minutes
should be recorded 1-30.

The first time sheet completed will reflect 0 for previous hours worked. The total field hours
worked during the first week of placement should be entered on the line by previous hours. Each
week there- after the previous hours worked the week before will be added to the hours worked
the current week. The last time sheet completed for placement should reflect the total hours
worked for the semester.

Hours not included in the total field placement hours worked are field seminar hours,
transportation time to and from field seminars, as well as transportation time to and from the
agency. Overtime hours required by specific case assignments and special after meetings are
included in field placement hours and should be recorded on the time sheet.

Activities Defined - The activities fall into three broad areas: Client contacts, professional
development, and other.

1.     Client contacts include office visits, home visits, and telephone conversation with or on
       behalf of a client, referrals, court appearances, and records (documentation).

2.     Professional development includes one-on-one instructional conferences, in-service and
       staff development training, orientation, field practicum evaluations, observation,
       community resource development and research activities, professional reading, and
       professional conferences.

3.     Other includes any other activity not described above. Please specify the activity if listed
       under this category.

Please keep a copy of your time sheet for your records, bring one copy to field seminar, and
provide one to the field instructor.




                                            28
                          Mississippi State University-Meridian
                               Social Work Program

Form H: Original Contract

Date:

Student name:

Field practicum agency:

Field instructor:

Student's placement title:

Beginning date:                        Ending date:

Hours per week:


Student's responsibilities, duties, and activities:




Signatures:


Student:                                              Date:


Field Instructor                                      Date:



Coordinator of Field and/or Field Liaison             Date:




                                            29
                         Mississippi State University-Meridian
                              Social Work Program

Form I: Learning Contract

Student:

Agency:

Address:

Field Instructor:

Agency Phone Number:

Student=s Placement Title:


NOTE:           Learning Goals are treated separately in this planning form although it is
                realized that all the goals are basically related and form a whole. See the
                attached instruction sheet for assistance in completing this form.

Agency Learning Goals:                           Tasks or Strategies
                                                  (State 2-3 ways you plan to achieve each goal)




                                          30
Personal Learning Goals:                   Tasks or Strategies
                                       (State 2-3 ways you plan to achieve each goal)




Professional Learning Goals:           Tasks or Strategies
                                       (State 2-3 ways you plan to achieve each goal)




SIGNATURES:


Student                             Date


Field Instructor                    Date


Coordinator of Field                Date



                               31
Instructions for Learning Goals Preparation

There are three parts to preparing for the Learning Goal conference:

       (1) Scheduling the conference
       (2) Preparing the Learning Contract form
       (3) Participating in the conference

1.     Scheduling the Learning Goal Conference

       The conference usually takes place at the field practicum agency. Participants are the
       field practicum instructor, the student, and the faculty instructor. Allow one hour for the
       conference and confirm with the faculty instructor the date, time, and place.

       The student is responsible for setting up a date and time that is agreeable to all
       participants in the conference. If it is necessary to use time outside of regularly
       scheduled field practicum hours, the student will receive credit on time sheets for
       conference time.

2.     Preparing the Learning Contract Form

       The intention of the form is to set up "learning and doing" objectives for the field
       practicum that are individualized for each student, are feasible in the agency, and are
       attainable within the field practicum. The student is responsible for the preparation, and
       the field practicum instructor is expected to be involved to the extent that is mutually
       agreeable. The student is expected to initiate working on the preparation with the field
       practicum instructor. The form should be typed in triplicate and handed in to the
       Coordinator of Field Education three days before the conference time.

       The headings of sections labeled agency, personal, and professional are intended to
       offer a focus for broad coverage. There may be overlapping of goals under these
       headings, and this is acceptable. The main idea of the divisions is to encourage the
       student to develop goals in each of these three broad areas, all considered being
       important to social work professional training. Please note that within each section, the
       student is expected to list goals and ways to achieve them. The goal is the individualized
       objective, and the way of meeting the goal is the task or strategy.

       Agency Learning Goals pertain to the unique nature of the field practicum agency that
       the student wishes to learn about and/or contribute to. Consideration should be given to
       the following areas when deciding on your learning goals:

       # Services and programs the agency provides

       # Agency history, philosophy, funding, and organizational structure

       # Client population served

       # Agency response(s) to social and economic justice



                                           32
        # Agency policies, procedures, and decision-making processes

        # Planning and conducting of agency-based research


Examples of goals and ways to achieve them:

Agency Learning Goals:                                        Tasks or Strategies

1.      To understand the foster care placement       1.      (a)Go on home visits/shelter
        process from home study assessment                    visit process
        to disposition leaving.
                                                              (b)Read agency manual

                                                              (c)Discuss process with social
                                                              worker

                                                              (d)Attend foster care Review
                                                              Board orientation

2.      To become familiar with Safe Haven's          2.       (a)Ask field instructor
        agency-based research.
                                                              (b)Determine      its   goals   and
                                                              purposes

                                                              (c)Ascertain staff view and usage
                                                              of research

                                                              (d)Determine     if   research
                                                              addresses social and economic
                                                              issues

Personal Learning Goals pertain to your own uniqueness as an individual and the changes you
want to make within yourself and in your behavior that would help you in your role as a practicing
social work student. This may involve building on your strengths and skills, working on
minimizing weaknesses, vulnerabilities, etc. and expanding sensitivities, self-awareness, etc.
Consideration should also be given to the following when deciding on your learning goals:

        # Differences between personal and professional tasks

        # Personal barriers which may affect social work practice

        # Understanding and awareness of individuals’ cultural, lifestyle, minority groups,
           women's issues, in relation to human diversity.

        # Personal values that help or interfere with effective social work practice




                                            33
Examples of goals and ways to achieve them:

Personal Learning Goals:                                      Tasks or Strategies:

1.     To become more assertive                               1. (a) Speak at least 2 times in the
                                                              first group session, 4 times in the
                                                              second, and 6 times in group
                                                              sessions thereafter

                                                              (b) Ask for feedback from co-
                                                              leader of group

                                                              (c) Report my progress in weekly
                                                              instructional sessions

2.     To increase my awareness and understanding             2. (a) Read 3 articles on Native
       of the Native American population served               Americans.
       by my agency.
                                                              (b) Discuss the issues raised in
                                                              the articles and in my contact with
                                                              clients with a Native American
                                                              social worker in the agency

Professional Learning Goals pertain to theory, methods, and skills common to the work of a
professional social worker that you can learn in your agency and that would be applicable in
other social work agencies as well. Consideration should be given to the following areas when
deciding on your learning goals:

       # General social work practice methods (establishing relationships, collecting data,
         making assessments, interventions, evaluation, and termination)

       # Integrating and applying academic knowledge and theory to actual social work
         situations, values, and ethics

       # Accountability to client systems (e.g., maintaining client confidentiality, keeping
         appointments, following through on plans, etc.)

       # Teamwork with other agency staff in identification of client concerns/problems

       # Communication and interviewing skills

       # Problem-solving process

       # Diversity (e.g., cultural, ethnic, racial, social and economic justice)

       # Making referrals and community resources



                                           34
Examples of goals and ways to achieve them:

Professional Learning Skills:                         Tasks or Strategies:

1.      To develop skills in understanding group      1.       (a) Observe instructor's skill
                                                               process and working with groups
                                                               in parenting classes 2-3 sessions

                                                               (b) Co-facilitate the group
                                                               beginning in January and through
                                                               May

                                                               (c). Ask for feedback from
                                                               supervisor after each session

2.      To learn about national, state, and local  2.          (a) Survey community services
        resources available for handicapped children
                                                               (b) Obtain and familiarize self with
                                                               printed materials.

                                                               (c) Visit agencies that provide
                                                               services

 Participating in the Conference

The conference allows parties to confirm, clarify, expand, or modify goals and ways to
accomplish them. This is done through sharing, questioning, and feedback. The Learning
Contract form is a working paper that is the basis for the conference. Some goal, task, and/or
strategy revisions may be indicated as a result of the conference. The student, the field
instructor, and the Coordinator of Field Education are expected to offer input during the
conference. The Coordinator of Field Education may use the opportunity to learn more about the
specifics of field practicum assignments.

The coordinator retains the finished form signed by student, field instructor, and Coordinator of
Field Education. Copies are provided for the student and the field instructor file. The Learning
Contract becomes part of the framework for training at the agency. The Learning Goals become
the basis for future evaluation of the student. Final evaluation of the field practicum takes place
just before completion of the required number of hours.

Revision of the Learning Contract Form may be necessary following the Learning Goal
conference. If revision is necessary, the student is expected to amend the form and return it to
the Coordinator of Field Education within three (3) days after the conference.

The evaluation process between field instructor and student is ongoing through the practicum.
Feedback opportunities are important for growth for the student and the field instructor. The
more formal evaluations, mid-term and final, are to be initiated by the student.



                                             35
The student must submit the following forms to the Coordinator of Field Education prior to any
grade being given:

       1.   Original Contract
       2.   Field Learning Contract
       3.   Time Sheets
       4.   Weekly Logs
       5.   Mid-Term Evaluation of Student
       6.   Final Evaluation of Student
       7.   Student Evaluation of Field Practicum




                                           36
                       Mississippi State University-Meridian
                               Social Work Program



Form J: Evaluation of Field Practicum Student



Instructor: These evaluations facilitate student and field instructor feedback regarding
the student’s field experience for the Coordinator of Field Education. This evaluation is
instructor’s the mid-term and final assessment of the field student application of
classroom learning in an agency set. The evaluation of the student should be a shared
process in that the instructor and the student discuss variations and similarities in the
assessment.



Student:                                           Phone:

Agency:                                            Phone:

Address:



Field
Instructor:                                        Phone:




□ Mid- Term        Beginning Date:                   Ending Date:
□ Final            Beginning Date:                   Ending Date:




                                           37
Quality of work: The field instructor should refer to the learning objectives for SW
4916/4926 for definitions of items to be evaluated.



Evaluation of student performance is based on the following scale:

                        Level 4          =       Quality and Consistent Growth
                        Level 3          =       Growth and Development
                        Level 2          =       Basic Competency
                        Level 1          =       Failure to Meet Minimum Standards




I.    PERFORMANCE IN THE LEARING ROLE

A. Actively utilizes and appropriately seeks supervision                      1   2   3   4
B. Participates in developing/updating the learning contract                  1   2   3   4
C. Identifies and discusses strengths and limitations in knowledge, skills,   1   2   3   4
   and learning needs
D. Demonstrates an openness to learning and feedback for own                  1   2   3   4
   professional development and growth
E. Seeks direction as needed, without excessive reliance                      1   2   3   4
F. Displays the appropriate use of learning opportunities (training,          1   2   3   4
   reading, tapes, etc.)
G. Demonstrates an ability to analyze and apply learning from practice        1   2   3   4
   experience and supervisory feedback
H. Demonstrates the increasing ability to link theory with practice           1   2   3   4
I. Applies critical thinking skills to practice experience                    1   2   3   4




II.   PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIORS, VALUES, AND ETHICS

A. Demonstrates a commitment to social work values and ethics                 1   2   3   4
B. Understands the history of social work and current issues                  1   2   3   4
C. Demonstrates compliance with professional expectations of the              1   2   3   4
   agency, Social Work Program, and NASW Code of Ethics
D. Demonstrates the ability to address and resolve professional ethical       1   2   3   4
   dilemmas
E. Protects the client’s right to confidentiality                             1   2   3   4
F. Protects the client’s right to self-determination                          1   2   3   4
G. Understands the concepts of oppression and discrimination                  1   2   3   4
H. Understands and practices culturally competent practice by                 1   2   3   4
   recognizing client differences based on values, ethnic, sexual, and
   cultural identities
I. Prevents personal values and biases from interfering with practice         1   2   3   4
   decisions in the best interest of the client



                                               38
J. Forms and sustains appropriate and effective professional                 1   2   3   4
   relationships
K. Demonstrates “teamwork” behavior with colleagues                          1   2   3   4
L. Demonstrates professional behavior through appropriate work attire,       1   2   3   4
   language, attendance, punctuality, and presentation of self

III. KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS FOR GENERALIST PRACTICE

A. Understands agency policy and procedures, organizational structure,       1   2   3   4
    and the channels of communication
B. Applies relevant policies and procedures to practice                      1   2   3   4
C. Understands the strategies and skills for change related to social and    1   2   3   4
    economic justice
D. Identifies the diverse needs of clients related to race, age, gender,     1   2   3   4
    ethnicity, sexual orientation, and other cultural identities
E. Identifies issues related to organizational change on behalf of clients   1   2   3   4
F. Identifies the range of resources available in the community to the       1   2   3   4
    client population served
G. Actively participates (when asked by supervisor) in agency functions,     1   2   3   4
    committees, meetings, etc.
H. Utilizes problem solving skills to identify problems and barriers in      1   2   3   4
    accessing services
I. Develops and/or updates service information and/or agency’s               1   2   3   4
    resource directory
J. Understands how agency relates to local, state, federal, and other        1   2   3   4
    regulatory authorities
K. Demonstrates an ability to identify an appropriate plan of action for     1   2   3   4
    the client
L. Demonstrates an understanding of the political environment with an        1   2   3   4
    organization that may affect service delivery
M. Understands how social policies impact client systems                     1   2   3   4




IV. COMMUNICATION SKILLS

A.   Displays an understanding of the client-worker relationship             1   2   3   4
B.   Appears comfortable interacting with clients                            1   2   3   4
C.   Demonstrates an ability to build rapport with clients                   1   2   3   4
D.   Demonstrates empathic responses toward client                           1   2   3   4
E.   Demonstrates an understanding of and skills with verbal and             1   2   3   4
      non-verbal communication
F.    Demonstrates sensitivity to cultural differences                       1   2   3   4
G.    Demonstrates sensitivity to gender differences                         1   2   3   4
H.   Demonstrates sensitivity to people with disabilities                    1   2   3   4
I.   Maintains focus in an individual and/or group session                   1   2   3   4
J.   Recognizes and elicits underlying feelings from a client                1   2   3   4
K.   Adequately summarizes for the client                                    1   2   3   4
L.   Demonstrates an ability to handle client reactions to intern and/or     1   2   3   4
     agency
M.   Appears comfortable communicating with a variety of client              1   2   3   4
     populations, colleagues, and members of the community
N.   Performs all written documentation in a professional and timely         1   2   3   4
     manner



                                                39
V.    ASSESSMENT SKILLS

A. Demonstrates the ability to identify and obtain the necessary data          1   2   3   4
   required from clients
B. Demonstrates the ability to formulate a comprehensive ecological            1   2   3   4
   assessment
C. Considers individual differences with regard to emotional, economic,        1   2   3   4
   and social considerations
D. Demonstrates knowledge and ability to apply the principles                  1   2   3   4
   involved in assessing interpersonal violence
E. Demonstrates knowledge and ability to apply the principles involved         1   2   3   4
   in suicide assessment
F. Uses knowledge of group dynamics to facilitate group interactions           1   2   3   4
   and group culture
G. Identifies sources of strength and stress in the client’s life              1   2   3   4
H. Demonstrates overall competence in risk assessment                          1   2   3   4




VI.   INTERVENTION SKILLS

A.    Demonstrates the ability to develop a social work plan based on the      1   2   3   4
       ecological assessment
B.    Demonstrates the ability to identify and select appropriate helping      1   2   3   4
      strategies consistent with theoretical frameworks
C.     Demonstrates the ability to describe and analyze the different          1   2   3   4
       phases of the helping process
D.     Demonstrates the ability to put treatment plan into practice            1   2   3   4
E.    Demonstrates the ability to set realistic priorities for interventions   1   2   3   4
F.    Demonstrates the ability to assist clients in goal settings              1   2   3   4
G.    Sets appropriate target dates for client goals                           1   2   3   4
H.    Utilizes client strengths in intervention plans                          1   2   3   4
I.    Utilizes resources from appropriate agencies to meet client needs        1   2   3   4
J.    Demonstrates crisis intervention skills                                  1   2   3   4
K.    Recognizes and manages client resistance                                 1   2   3   4
L.    Demonstrates the “use of self” to effect client change                   1   2   3   4
M.    Demonstrates skill in client advocacy                                    1   2   3   4
N.    Demonstrates an understanding of the termination process                 1   2   3   4
O.    Demonstrates the ability to effectively terminate with clients           1   2   3   4
P.    Demonstrates the ability to develop plans for the appropriate            1   2   3   4
      follow-up of referrals
Q.    Demonstrates strategies for affecting social change that advance         1   2   3   4
      social and economic justice




                                                 40
VII. EVALUATION SKILLS

A.   Demonstrates an understanding of the evaluation process              1   2    3   4
B.   Articulates and demonstrates skills in selecting appropriate         1   2    3   4
     measures
C.   Reviews cases and confers with colleagues to evaluate intervention   1   2    3   4
     effectiveness
D.   Demonstrates an ability to evaluate effectiveness of interventions   1   2    3   4



Evaluation of student performance is based on the following scale:

                       Level 4         =       Quality and Consistent Growth
                       Level 3         =       Growth and Development
                       Level 2         =       Basic Competency
                       Level 1         =       Failure to Meet Minimum Standards




Summary comments:

       (1) Describe student’s performance, strengths, and areas for improvement.
       (2) Address all items scored “1” or “2”.
       (3) Discuss goals for next half of placement, if applicable.

PLEASE NOTE: A SATISFACTORY GRADE CAN ONLY BE ASSIGNED IF THERE ARE
NO ITEMS SCORED AT “1” OR “2”. PLEASE CONSULT WITH THE COORDINATOR OF
FIELD EDUCATION REGARDING THESE ISSUES.

Use an additional sheet of paper if necessary.




                                             41
Evaluation of student performance is based on the following scale:

                        Level 4     =       Quality and Consistent Growth
                        Level 3     =       Growth and Development
                        Level 2     =       Basic Competency
                        Level 1     =       Failure to Meet Minimum Standards



Overall Assessment Level:


SIGNATURES


Student:

Agency Instructor:

Coordinator of Field:

Date:




                                          42
Practicum Assessment Criteria and Standards

        Your supervisor will use the following criteria and standards when marking your
practicum work. You can use them when planning your learning goals and as a self-check
on your own practicum performance.

Level 4 (A): Quality and Consistent Growth

The Student:

   •   Demonstrates consistent performance and contributes significantly to the practicum
       setting in relation to all eight practice areas
   •   Is able to establish effective professional relationships with clients, co-workers, and
       the supervisor
   •   Is able to work both independently and as part of a team
   •   Is self-directed and able to critically analyze his or her own behavior and set realistic
       goals to work toward
   •   Uses problem-solving strategies that are effective, creative, and appropriate to the
       situation
   •   Demonstrates a desire to go beyond available information and constantly search out
       new ways to connect and combine information and experiences to strengthen
       professional practice
   •   Personalizes knowledge and skill issues and concepts acquired through practice and
       takes advantage of all learning opportunities, taking on challenges and responsibility
       for his or her learning

Level 3 (B): Growth and Development

The Student:

   •   Is reliable in performance and needs only limited supervision
   •   Is able to work independently and achieves consistent growth and development in all
       the practice areas
   •   Collaborates with supervisor and co-workers, sharing ideas, knowledge, and
       experiences
   •   Is able to initiate and generate specific plans that further personal learning goals
   •   Demonstrates consistent self-awareness, self-direction, initiative, and responsibility
       for his or her own learning
   •   Has a solid understanding of professional values and attitudes and can effectively
       integrate these into practice
   •   Quickly addresses issues that arise and takes optimal advantage of learning
       opportunities in both the practicum and course work




                                           43
Level 2 (C): Basic Competency

The Student:

   •   Can usually carry out responsibilities as identified in the Practicum Evaluation
       Checklists, with occasional supervision, direction, and assistance
   •   Is generally reliable
   •   Shows some initiative in all practice areas
   •   Is generally able to relate to clients, co-workers, and supervisor
   •   Demonstrates some understanding of professional values that relate to each of the
       practice areas
   •   Is able to set goals, but sometimes these are unrealistic, unreasonable, or
       unattainable
   •   Is able to identify problematic issues, but shows only basic skills in addressing these
       issues due to a lack of willingness and/or ability to critically analyze and integrate
       knowledge thereby promoting self-awareness and skill development

Level 1 (Below C): Failure to Meet Minimum Standards

The Student:

   •   Is in constant need of supervision and direction from the supervisor
   •   Is unable to carry out the tasks and responsibilities as identified in the Practicum
       Evaluation forms
   •   Lacks ability to set realistic goals, and if goals are set, is unable to consistently follow
       through on meeting them
   •   Has difficulty relating to clients, co-workers, and supervisor
   •   Lacks understanding of professional values and attitudes as these apply to practice
       areas identified in the Practicum Assessment Checklists
   •   Appears unwilling or unable to reflect critically or personally on many aspects of
       his/her practice




                                            44
                   Mississippi State University-Meridian
                           Social Work Program




Form K: Student Evaluation of Field Practicum Experience



Student:                                    Phone:

Agency:                                     Phone:

Address:



Field
Instructor:                                 Phone:




□ Final         Beginning Date:               Ending Date:




                                     45
I.   AGENCY LEARNING ENVIRONMENT



A. Orientation and Training Procedures


     1. Did you receive an agency orientation?                      Yes   □ No □
     2. Check those topics that were covered in the orientation and training period:


         □ Introduction to staff
         □ Individual staff responsibilities
         □ Tour of agency/physical layout
         □ Your physical workspace
         □ Agency structure
         □ Agency policies and procedures
         □ Agency goals, objectives and philosophy
         □ Agency programs and services
         □ Agency client demographics
         □ Characteristics of community served
         □ Community resources
         □ Your roles and responsibilities as an intern
         □ Observation of staff
         □ Discussion of supervision process
         □ In-service training sessions
     3. Evaluate the extent to which the orientation process was helpful, including
        recommendation for change.

        Comments:




                                            46
B. Physical Setting

   1. Check as many of the following as apply. I had:
        □ A place to store my materials
        □ A permanent desk at which to work
        □ An office of my own
        □ An office with other people
        □ Access to a phone
        □ Access to get supplies as I needed them
        □ A place to conduct confidential business
   2. Comment on the following: To what extent did you feel physically and
      psychologically part of the agency staff, including availability of other staff
      for providing assistance to you?




C. Learning Opportunities and Responsibilities



            Not at all relevant/       1        2       3        4     Very relevant/
               appropriate                                              appropriate


A. Were cases, groups, or projects relevant to your learning needs           1     2    3   4
   available for assignment?
B. Did the assignments call for a level of skill appropriate to your         1     2    3   4
   development?

1. Discuss what proportion of your time was spent in direct work with individuals, families,
   groups, or community groups.




                                               47
2. To what extent were you able to integrate and apply the academic knowledge you learned
in the classroom with actual social work situations?




II.    AGENCY FIELD INSTRUCTOR


      1. How often were regular, planned supervisory conferences held?

         □ Every week
         □ Every two weeks
         □ Every month
         □ Other; Specify:
         Specify the duration of the conferences:

      2. Evaluate the extent, to which the supervisory conferences were helpful,
         including recommendations for change:




                                            48
3. Please rate your field instructor with the following scale:


            Exceptional     Very Good      Satisfactory     Unsatisfactory   NA
                4                3              2                 1           0


A. Facilitated the process of integration into the agency system    4    3   2    1   0
B. Encouraged and supported responsible decision-making             4    3   2    1   0
    concerning attendance at staff meetings, seminars, and
    conferences
C. Encouraged critical assessment, appraisal and evaluation of my   4    3   2    1   0
    work with clients and understanding and use of agency policy
    and procedures
D. Facilitated learning of specific practice skills                 4    3   2    1   0
E. Encouraged identification with professional values and           4    3   2    1   0
    encouraged professional behavior consistent with those values
F. Was clear and consistent about the expectations of this          4    3   2    1   0
    placement
G. Encouraged and engaged in mutual assessments of learning         4    3   2    1   0
    needs, expectations and progress on an on-going basis
H. Was aware of academic content and helped the integration of      4    3   2    1   0
    class and field experience
 I. Provided clear, understandable feedback on an on-going basis    4    3   2    1   0
J. Was accessible to answer my questions and concerns               4    3   2    1   0




III.     COORDINATOR OF FIELD EDUCATION


       1. How often were regular, planned field seminars held?

          □ Every other week
          □ Every two weeks
          □ Every month
          □ Other; Specify:
          Specify the duration of the seminars:




                                             49
      2. Evaluate the extent to which the field seminars were helpful and include
         recommendations for change:




3. Please rate your Coordinator of Field Education using the following scale:


            Exceptional     Very Good       Satisfactory      Unsatisfactory     NA
                4               3                2                 1              0


A. Was clear and consistent about expectations of field practicum    4     3     2    1   0
B. Was accessible to students in addition to field seminar           4     3     2    1   0
C. Facilitated integration of class and field experience             4     3     2    1   0
D. Provided clear, understandable feedback                           4     3     2    1   0
E. Encouraged and engaged in mutual assessment of learning           4     3     2    1   0
   needs, expectations, and progress on an on-going basis
F. Reinforced professional identification of values and ethics       4     3     2    1   0



IV.     FIELD LIAISON


      1. How many times did you confer with your liaison at the field setting?


      2. How many times did you meet with your liaison at other places?
         (Please specify the location(s) where you met)




      3. How many extended telephone conferences did you have with your
         liaison?


                                              50
   4. Did you have the opportunity to spend sufficient time with your liaison?
       Yes    □   No   □ (Please comment)



   5. Did your liaison clearly express his/her role, availability, and interest in
      working with you?
       Yes    □   No   □    (Please comment)




   6. What were the things you most valued about your liaison?




   7. In order to strengthen the field experience, what if anything would you want the
        liaison to do differently?




   8. Any other comments about your field liaison or the field liaison role?




   9. Overall, how satisfied were you with your field liaison?



Exceptional                Very Good           Satisfactory           Unsatisfactory   NA
     4                          3                    2                        1         0




                                            51
V.     STUDENT’S LEARNING


1. Briefly list the main things you believe you have learned through this
   placement. Include areas you feel you have grown both professionally
   and personally as a result of this placement experience.




     2. What do you believe are your greatest strengths, both personal and
         professional?




     3. What do you consider to be the areas in which you need further growth?




     4. What important factors regarding professional work environments and your
        professional needs will you consider in searching for employment?




                                          52
COMMENTS: Please make any comments or give examples which would further clarify or
expand on your ratings (e.g., teaching methods, areas of strengths and weaknesses,
suggestions for change, etc.)




Would you recommend that students be placed in this agency in the future? Why or why
not?




VI.   FIELD INSTRUCTOR COMMENTS




                                        53
SIGNATURES



Student:

Field Instructor:

Faculty Field Liaison:

Coordinator of Field Education:

Date:




                                  54
Supervision and Consultation Assessment Criteria and Standards

You are to use the following criteria and standards when evaluating your field practicum experience.

Supervision:

Agency Field Instructor:

●       Held regular and planned supervisory conferences
●       Provided continuous supervision that encompassed all areas of my concern
●       Provided an objective appraisal of my work
●       Enhanced my understanding of Social Work philosophy and agency
        policy
●       Supported my development of self-awareness by providing psychological and interpersonal
        resources as well as professional competence
●       Enhanced my knowledge of the agency’s and community’s resources
●       Coordinated my learning through appropriate case assignment, peer-group interaction, and
        priorities of activities to refine knowledge, values, and skills
●       Provided supervision within the established guidelines of NASW Code of Ethics
●       Continually reinforced my identification with Social Work purpose, values, and ethnics
●       Fostered integration of both empirical and practice-based knowledge

Coordinator of Field Education:

●       Provided a clear and consistent understanding of my field practicum responsibilities
●       Provided a clear understanding of all assignments, activities and their link to
        my knowledge and skills development
●       Held regular and structured seminars
●       Provided continuous supervision that encompassed all areas of my concern
●       Provided an objective appraisal of my work
●       Supported my development of self-awareness by providing psychological and interpersonal
        resources
●       Coordinated my learning through interaction with agency instructor and/or field liaison
●       Reinforced professional identification of ethical standards and principles of NASW Code of
        Ethics
●       Continually reinforced my identification with Social Work purpose, values, and ethnics
●       Fostered integration of both empirical and practice-based knowledge

Field Liaison:

●       Provide a clear and consistent understanding of my field practicum
        responsibilities
●       Provided a clear understanding of all assignments, activities and their link to
        my knowledge and skills development
●       Provided continuous supervision that encompassed all areas of my concern
●       Facilitated field teaching and my learning
●       Over saw educational opportunities offered by the agency, monitored my progress, and
        fostered interchange between program and agency
●       Evaluated field instructors efforts and student’s achievements objectively
●       Continually reinforced my identification with Social Work purpose, values, and ethnics
●       Fostered integration of both empirical and practice-based knowledge




                                               55
Form L


                  AGREEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN
                 Mississippi State University Social Work Program
                                        and



This agreement of understanding is made this the        day of                        ,
20     , between Mississippi State University Social Work Program and
                              .    . T his agreement will begin on                           ,
20      , and will terminate on                    , 20    .

Both parties to the agreement, prior to the date of termination, may renew this agreement for
an additional year.

WHEREAS, Mississippi State University Social Work Program provides the course of study
for the Bachelor of Social Work degree to students enrolled in undergraduate social work
courses; and

WHEREAS, Mississippi State University Social Work Program desires said students to have
field practicum experiences; and

WHEREAS,                                       is agreeable to provide the necessary
instructions and accommodations for said field practicum experience, it is agreed as follows:

I. The Mississippi State University Social Work Program Agrees To:

         1.   Provide a faculty member to provide consultation to the student and field
              practicum instructor.

         2.   Non-discriminatory practices against any employee or applicant for
              employment or registration in a course of study because of race, creed, sex, or
              national origin.

         3.   Abide by all existing rules and regulations of                                     .

         4.   Initiate conferences with the field instructors for feedback on the student's
              performance and objectives of the social work field practicum.

         5.   Provide training of field instructors by planning meetings specific to field
              instruction.

         6.   Provide copies of relevant course materials and/or student educational
              learning expectations.

         7.   Assume responsibility for submitting the student's final grade.


                                           56
        8.     Inform the student of University and Program’s requirement to obtain
               professional liability insurance in the amount of $2,000,000.00 or more.
        9.      Clear the use of any confidential information and case material for
               instructional purpose with the field instructor as well as disguising the
               material to insure confidentiality. The University and each student shall
               comply with all applicable state, federal, and local laws regarding the
               confidentiality of patient information and medical records.

II.                                                       Agrees To:

        1.     Provide adequate orientation of said agency to the student.

        2.     Relate to the field coordinator any agency changes in polices and procedures,
               relative to the student's field practicum.

        3.     Provide weekly instructional conferences to the student and daily instructions
               to the student within the agency.

        4.     Attend field instructors’ meetings as often as possible.

        5.     Provide the student with resources necessary for fulfilling responsibilities
               within the agency. i.e., phone, desk, office supplies, etc.

        6.     Inform the field coordinator immediately of any inappropriate conduct of the
               student.

        7.     Provide input for the student's learning contract.

        8.     Complete mid-term and final evaluations of the student.

APPROVED BY:

 Mississippi State University:                     Agency:



Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs     Administrator

 MSU-Meridian Campus
                                                   Social Service Director

Dean
                                                   Social Work Supervisor

Chair, Division of Arts and Sciences
                                                   Date

Social Work Program Director




                                             57
Date



2. Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards

Preamble

Social work practice promotes human well-being by strengthening opportunities, resources, and
capacities of people in their environments and by creating policies and services to correct
conditions that limit human rights and the quality of life. The social work profession works to
eliminate poverty, discrimination, and oppression. Guided by a person-in-environment
perspective and respect for human diversity, the profession works to effect social and economic
justice worldwide.
       Social work education combines scientific inquiry with the teaching of professional skills
to provide effective and ethical social work services. Social work educators reflect their
identification with the profession through their teaching, scholarship, and service. Social work
education, from baccalaureate to doctoral levels, employs educational, practice, scholarly,
interprofessional, and service delivery models to orient and shape the profession’s future in the
context of expanding knowledge, changing technologies, and complex human and social
concerns.
       The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Educational Policy and Accreditation
Standards (EPAS) promotes academic excellence in baccalaureate and master’s social work
education. The EPAS specifies the curricular content and educational context to prepare
students for professional social work practice. The EPAS sets forth basic requirements for these
purposes. Beyond these basic requirements of EPAS, individual programs focus on areas
relevant to their institutional and program mission, goals, and objectives.
       The EPAS permits programs to use time-tested and new models of program design,
implementation, and evaluation. It does so by balancing requirements that promote comparability
across programs with a level of flexibility that encourages programs to respond to changing
human, professional, and institutional needs.
       The EPAS focuses on assessing the results of a program’s development and its
continuous improvement. While accreditation is ultimately evaluative, in social work education it
is based on a consultative and collaborative process that determines whether a program meets
the requirements of the EPAS.




                                            58
Functions of Educational Policy and Accreditation

1. Educational Policy

       The Educational Policy promotes excellence, creativity, and innovation in social work
education and practice. It sets forth required content areas that relate to each other and to the
purposes, knowledge, and values of the profession. Programs of social work education are
offered at the baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral levels. Baccalaureate and master’s
programs are accredited by CSWE. This document supersedes all prior statements of curriculum
policy for baccalaureate and master’s program levels.

2. Accreditation

       Accreditation ensures that the quality of professional programs merits public confidence.
The Accreditation Standards establish basic requirements for baccalaureate and master’s levels.
Accreditation Standards pertain to the following program elements:
• Mission, goals, and objectives
• Curriculum
• Governance, structure, and resources
• Faculty
• Student professional development
• Nondiscrimination and human diversity
• Program renewal
• Program assessment and continuous improvement

3. Relationship of Educational Policy to Accreditation

       CSWE uses the EPAS for the accreditation of social work programs. The Educational
Policy and the Accreditation Standards are conceptually integrated. Programs use Educational
Policy, Section 1 as one important basis for developing program mission, goals, and objectives.
Programs use Educational Policy, Section 3 to develop program objectives and Educational
Policy, Sections 4 and 5 to develop content for demonstrating attainment of the objectives. The
accreditation process reviews the program’s self-study document, site team report, and program
response to determine compliance with the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards.




                                            59
Educational Policy

1. Purposes

1.0 Purposes of the Social Work Profession

       The social work profession receives its sanction from public and private auspices and is
the primary profession in the development, provision, and evaluation of social services.
Professional social workers are leaders in a variety of organizational settings and service
delivery systems within a global context.
       The profession of social work is based on the values of service, social and economic
justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, and integrity and
competence in practice. With these values as defining principles, the purposes of social work
are:
•      To enhance human well-being and alleviate poverty, oppression, and other forms of
       social injustice.

•      To enhance the social functioning and interactions of individuals, families, groups,
       organizations, and communities by involving them in accomplishing goals, developing
       resources, and preventing and alleviating distress.

•      To formulate and implement social policies, services, and programs that meet basic
       human needs and support the development of human capacities.

•      To pursue policies, services, and resources through advocacy and social or political
       actions that promotes social and economic justice.

•      To develop and use research, knowledge, and skills that advance social work practice.

•      To develop and apply practice in the context of diverse cultures.

1.1 Purposes of Social Work Education

       The purposes of social work education are to prepare competent and effective
professionals, to develop social work knowledge, and to provide leadership in the development
of service delivery systems. Social work education is grounded in the profession’s history,
purposes, and philosophy and is based on a body of knowledge, values, and skills. Social work
education enables students to integrate the knowledge, values, and skills of the social work
profession for competent practice.




                                            60
1.2 Achievement of Purposes

       Among its programs, which vary in design, structure, and objectives, social work
education achieves these purposes through such means as:
•     Providing curricula and teaching practices at the forefront of the new and changing
      knowledge base of social work and related disciplines.

•     Providing curricula that build on a liberal arts perspective to promote breadth of
      knowledge, critical thinking, and communication skills. Accredited programs meet all
      standards.

•      Developing knowledge.

•      Developing and applying instructional and practice-relevant technology.

•     Maintaining reciprocal relationships with social work practitioners, groups, organizations,
      and communities.

•      Promoting continual professional development of students, faculty, and practitioners.

•      Promoting interprofessional and interdisciplinary collaboration.

•      Preparing social workers to engage in prevention activities that promote well-being.

•     Preparing social workers to practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and
      communities.

•      Preparing social workers to evaluate the processes and effectiveness of practice.

•     Preparing social workers to practice without discrimination, with respect, and with
      knowledge and skills related to clients’ age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity,
      family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual
      orientation.

•      Preparing social workers to alleviate poverty, oppression, and other forms of social
      injustice.

•      Preparing social workers to recognize the global context of social work practice.

•     Preparing social workers to formulate and influence social policies and social work
      services in diverse political contexts.




                                           61
2. Structure of Social Work Education

2.0 Structure

       Baccalaureate and graduate social work education programs operate under the
auspices of accredited colleges and universities. These educational institutions vary by
auspices, emphasis, and size. With diverse strengths, missions, and resources, social
work education programs share a common commitment to educate competent, ethical
social workers.
       The baccalaureate and master’s levels of social work education are anchored in
the purposes of the social work profession and promote the knowledge, values, and
skills of the profession. Baccalaureate social work education programs prepare
graduates for generalist professional practice. Master’s social work education programs
prepare graduates for advanced professional practice in an area of concentration. The
baccalaureate and master’s levels of educational preparation are differentiated
according to (a) conceptualization and design, (b) content, (c) program objectives,
and (d) depth, breadth, and specificity of knowledge and skills. Frameworks and
perspectives for concentration include fields of practice, problem areas, intervention
methods, and practice contexts and perspectives.
       Programs develop their mission and goals within the purposes of the
profession, the purposes of social work education, and their institutional context.
Programs also recognize academic content and professional experiences that students
bring to the educational program. A conceptual framework, built upon relevant theories
and knowledge, shapes the breadth and depth of knowledge and practice skills to be
acquired.

2.1 Program Renewal

       Social work education remains vital, relevant, and progressive by pursuing
exchanges with the practice community and program stakeholders and by developing
and assessing new knowledge and technology.




                                           62
3. Program Objectives

        Social work education is grounded in the liberal arts and contains a coherent,
integrated professional foundation in social work. The graduate advanced curriculum is
built from the professional foundation. Graduates of baccalaureate and master’s social
work programs demonstrate the capacity to meet the foundation objectives and
objectives unique to the program. Graduates of master’s social work programs also
demonstrate the capacity to meet advanced program objectives.

3.0 Foundation Program Objectives

        The professional foundation, which is essential to the practice of any social
worker, includes, but is not limited to, the following program objectives. Graduates
demonstrate the ability to:

1.      Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional social work practice.

2.     Understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and principles,
       and practice accordingly.

3       Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related to clients’
       age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status,
       national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.

4.     Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and apply
       strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and economic justice.

5.     Understand and interpret the history of the social work profession and its contemporary
       structures and issues.

B6.    Apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice with systems of all
       sizes.1

M6.    Apply the knowledge and skills of a generalist social work perspective to practice with
       systems of all sizes.

7.     Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand individual
       development and behavior across the life span and the interactions among individuals
       and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities.

8.      Analyze, formulate, and influence social policies.

9.      Evaluate research studies, apply research findings to practice, and evaluate their own



                                             63
       practice interventions.

10.    Use communication skills differentially across client populations, colleagues, and
       communities.

11.     Use supervision and consultation appropriate to social work practice.

12.    Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems and seek
       necessary organizational change.

3.1 Concentration Objectives

        Graduates of a master’s social work program are advanced practitioners who
apply the knowledge and skills of advanced social work practice in an area of
concentration. They analyze, intervene, and evaluate in ways that are highly
differentiated, discriminating, and self-critical. Graduates synthesize and apply a broad
range of knowledge and skills with a high degree of autonomy and proficiency. They
refine and advance the quality of their practice and that of the larger social work
profession.

3.2 Additional Program Objectives

        A program may develop additional objectives to cover the required content in
relation to its particular mission, goals, and educational level.


4. Foundation Curriculum Content

        All social work programs provide foundation content in the areas specified

below. Content areas may be combined and delivered with a variety of instructional

technologies. Content is relevant to the mission, goals, and objectives of the program

and to the purposes, values, and ethics of the social work profession.

4.0 Values and Ethics

        Social work education programs integrate content about values and principles
of ethical decision making as presented in the National Association of Social Workers
Code of Ethics. The educational experience provides students with the opportunity to
be aware of personal values; develop, demonstrate, and promote the values of the
profession; and analyze ethical dilemmas and the ways in which these affect practice,
services, and clients.



                                             64
4.1 Diversity

        Social work programs integrate content that promotes understanding,
affirmation, and respect for people from diverse backgrounds. The content emphasizes
the interlocking and complex nature of culture and personal identity. It ensures that
social services meet the needs of groups served and are culturally relevant. Programs
educate students to recognize diversity within and between groups that may influence
assessment, planning, intervention, and research. Students learn how to define,
design, and implement strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse
backgrounds.

4.2 Populations-at-Risk and Social and Economic Justice

        Social work education programs integrate content on populations-at-risk,
examining the factors that contribute to and constitute being at risk. Programs educate
students to identify how group membership influences access to resources, and
present content on the dynamics of such risk factors and responsive and productive
strategies to redress them.
        Programs integrate social and economic justice content grounded in an
understanding of distributive justice, human and civil rights, and the global
interconnections of oppression. Programs provide content related to implementing
strategies to combat discrimination, oppression, and economic deprivation and to
promote social and economic justice. Programs prepare students to advocate
for nondiscriminatory social and economic systems.

4.3 Human Behavior and the Social Environment

        Social work education programs provide content on the reciprocal relationships
between human behavior and social environments. Content includes empirically based
theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between and among individuals,
groups, societies, and economic systems. It includes theories and knowledge of
biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development across the life
span; the range of social systems in which people live (individual, family, group,
organizational, and community); and the ways social systems promote or deter people



                                            65
in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.




4.4 Social Welfare Policy and Services

        Programs provide content about the history of social work, the history and
current structures of social welfare services, and the role of policy in service delivery,
social work practice, and attainment of individual and social well-being. Course content
provides students with knowledge and skills to understand major policies that form the
foundation of social welfare; analyze organizational, local, state, national, and
international issues in social welfare policy and social service delivery; analyze and
apply the results of policy research relevant to social service delivery; understand
and demonstrate policy practice skills in regard to economic, political, and
organizational systems, and use them to influence, formulate, and advocate for policy
consistent with social work values; and identify financial, organizational, administrative,
and planning processes required to deliver social services.

4.5 Social Work Practice

        Social work practice content is anchored in the purposes of the social work
profession and focuses on strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems in
relation to their broader environments. Students learn practice content that
encompasses knowledge and skills to work with individuals, families, groups,
organizations, and communities. This content includes engaging clients in an
appropriate working relationship, identifying issues, problems, needs, resources, and
assets; collecting and assessing information; and planning for service delivery. It
includes using communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Practice content
also includes identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions
designed to achieve client goals; applying empirical knowledge and technological
advances; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; developing,
analyzing, advocating, and providing leadership for policies and services; and
promoting social and economic justice.

4.6 Research

        Qualitative and quantitative research content provides understanding of a



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scientific, analytic, and ethical approach to building knowledge for practice. The content
prepares students to develop, use, and effectively communicate empirically based
knowledge, including evidence-based interventions. Research knowledge is used by


students to provide high-quality services; to initiate change; to improve practice, policy,
and social service delivery; and to evaluate their own practice.

4.7 Field Education

        Field education is an integral component of social work education anchored in
the mission, goals, and educational level of the program. It occurs in settings that
reinforce students’ identification with the purposes, values, and ethics of the profession;
fosters the integration of empirical and practice-based knowledge; and promotes the
development of professional competence. Field education is systematically designed,
supervised, coordinated, and evaluated on the basis of criteria by which students
demonstrate the achievement of program objectives.

5. Advanced Curriculum Content

        The master’s curriculum prepares graduates for advanced social work practice
in an area of concentration. Using a conceptual framework to identify advanced
knowledge and skills, programs build an advanced curriculum from the foundation
content. In the advanced curriculum, the foundation content areas (Section 4, 4.0–4.7)
are addressed in greater depth, breadth, and specificity and support the program’s
conception of advanced practice.


Accreditation Standards

1. Program Mission, Goals, and Objectives

1.0    The social work program has a mission appropriate to professional social work
       education as defined in Educational Policy, Section 1.1. The program’s mission is
       appropriate to the level or levels for which it is preparing students for practice and is
       consistent with the institution’s mission.

1.1    The program has goals derived from its mission. These goals reflect the purposes of the
       Educational Policy, Section 1.1. Program goals are not limited to these purposes.

1.2    The program has objectives that are derived from the program goals. These objectives
       are consistent with Educational Policy, Section 3. Program objectives are reflected in
       program implementation and continuous assessment (see Accreditation Standard 8).


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1.3   The program makes its constituencies aware of its mission, goals, and objectives.




2. Curriculum

2.0   The curriculum is developed and organized as a coherent and integrated whole
      consistentwith program goals and objectives. Social work education is grounded in the
      liberal arts and contains a coherent, integrated professional foundation in social work
      practice from which an advanced practice curriculum is built at the graduate level.
      B2.0.1 The program defines its conception of generalist social work practice, describes
             its coverage of the professional foundation curriculum identified in Educational
             Policy, Section 4, and demonstrates how its conception of generalist practice is
             implemented in all components of the professional curriculum.

      M2.0.1The program describes its coverage of the foundation and advanced curriculum
            content, identified in Educational Policy, Sections 4 and 5. The program defines
            its conception of advanced practice and explains how the advanced curriculum is
            built from the professional foundation. The master’s program has a concentration
            curriculum that includes (a) concentration objectives, (b) a conceptual framework
            built on relevant theories, (c) curriculum design and content, and (d) field
            education that
            supports the advanced curriculum. The program demonstrates how the depth,
            breadth, and specificity of the advanced curriculum are addressed
            in relation to the professional foundation.

2.1   The social work program administers field education (Educational Policy, Section 4.7
      and Section 5) consistent with program goals and objectives that:

      2.1.1 Provides for a minimum of 400 hours of field education for baccalaureate
            programs and 900 hours for master’s programs.

      2.1.2 Admits only those students who have met the program’s specified criteria for field
            education.

      2.1.3 Specifies policies, criteria, and procedures for selecting agencies and field
            instructors; placing and monitoring students; maintaining field liaison contacts
            with agencies; and evaluating student learning and agency effectiveness in
            providing field instruction.

      2.1.4 Specifies that field instructors for baccalaureate students hold a CSWE-
            accredited baccalaureate or master’s social work degree.2 Field instructors for
            master’s students hold a CSWE-accredited master’s social work degree. In
            programs where a field instructor does not hold a CSWE-accredited
            baccalaureate or master’s social work degree, the program assumes



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                responsibility for reinforcing a social work perspective.

         2.1.5 Provides orientation, field instruction training, and continuing dialog with agencies
               and field instructors.


         2.1.6 Develops policies regarding field placements in an agency in which the student is
               also employed. Student assignments and field education supervision differ from
               those associated with the student’s employment.

3. Program Governance, Administrative Structure, and Resources

3.0      The social work program has the necessary autonomy and administrative
         structure to achieve its goals and objectives.
         3.0.1 The social work faculty defines program curriculum consistent with the
               Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards and the institution’s policies.

         3.0.2 The administration and faculty of the social work program participate in
               formulating and implementing policies related to the recruitment, hiring, retention,
               promotion, and tenure of program personnel.

         3.0.3 The chief administrator of the social work program has either a CSWE-accredited
               master’s social work degree, with a doctoral degree preferred, or a professional
               degree in social work from a CSWE-accredited program and a doctoral degree.
               The chief administrator also has demonstrated leadership ability through
               teaching, scholarship, curriculum development, administrative experience, and
               other academic and professional activities in the field of social work.

         3.0.4 The chief administrator of the social work program has a full-time appointment to
               the program and sufficient assigned time (at least 25% for baccalaureate
               programs and 50% for master’s programs) to provide educational and
               administrative leadership. Combined programs designate a social work faculty
               member and assign this person sufficient time to administer the baccalaureate
               social work program.

         3.0.5 The field education director has a master’s degree in social work from a CSWE
               accredited program and at least two years post–baccalaureate or post–master’s
               social work degree practice experience.

         3.0.6 The field education director has a full-time appointment to the program and
               sufficient assigned time (at least 25% for baccalaureate programs and 50% for
               master’s programs) to provide educational and administrative leadership for field
               education.

      3.1 The social work program has sufficient resources to achieve program goals and
         objectives.
         3.1.1 The program has sufficient support staff, other personnel, and technological
               resources to support program functioning.



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       3.1.2 The program has sufficient and stable financial supports that permit program
             planning and achievement of program goals and objectives. These include a
             budgetary allocation and procedures for budget development and administration.



       3.1.3 The program has comprehensive library holdings and electronic access, as well
             as other informational and educational resources necessary for achieving the
             program’s goals and objectives.

       3.1.4 The program has sufficient office and classroom space, computer-mediated
             access, or both to achieve the program’s goals and objectives.

       3.1.5 The program has access to assistive technology, including materials in alternative
             formats (such as Braille, large print, books on tape, assistive learning systems).

4. Faculty

4.0    The program has full-time faculty, which may be augmented by part-time
       faculty, with the qualifications, competence, and range of expertise in social
       work education and practice to achieve its goals and objectives. The program
       has a sufficient full-time equivalent faculty-to-student ratio (usually 1:25 for
       baccalaureate programs and 1:12 for master’s programs) to carry out ongoing
       functions of the program.
4.1    The program demonstrates how the use of part-time faculty assists in the
       achievement of the program’s goals and objectives.
4.2    Faculty size is commensurate with the number and type of curricular offerings in
       class and field; class size; number of students; and the faculty’s teaching,
       scholarly, and service responsibilities.
              B4.2.1 The baccalaureate social work program has a minimum of two full-time
                     faculty with master’s social work degrees from a CSWE-accredited
                     program, with full-time appointment in social work, and whose principal
                     assignment is to the baccalaureate program. It is preferred that faculty
                     have a doctoral degree.

              M4.2.1 The master’s social work program has a minimum of six full-time faculty
                     with master’s social work degrees from a CSWE-accredited program and
                     whose principal assignment is to the master’s program. The majority of
                     the full-time master’s social work program faculty have a master’s degree
                     in social work and a doctoral degree.

4.3    Faculty who teach required practice courses have a master’s social work
       degree from a CSWE accredited program and at least two years post
       baccalaureate or post–master’s social work degree practice experience.



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4.4   The program has a faculty workload policy that supports the achievement of
      institutional priorities and the program’s goals and objectives.




5. Student Professional Development

5.0   The program has admissions criteria and procedures that reflect the program’s
      goals and objectives.
      M5.1 Only candidates who have earned a bachelor’s degree are admitted to the
           master’s social work degree program.

5.2   The program has a written policy indicating that it does not grant social work
      course credit for life experience or previous work experience.
5.3   In those foundation curriculum areas where students demonstrate required
      knowledge and skills, the program describes how it ensures that students do
      not repeat that content.
      5.3.1 The program has written policies and procedures concerning the transfer of
            credits.

      M5.3.2 Advanced standing status is only awarded to graduates of baccalaureate social
            work programs accredited by CSWE.

5.4   The program has academic and professional advising policies and procedures
      that are consistent with the program’s goals and objectives. Professional
      advising is provided by social work program faculty, staff, or both.
5.5   The program has policies and procedures specifying students’ rights and

      responsibilities to participate in formulating and modifying policies affecting

      academic and student affairs. It provides opportunities and encourages

      students to organize in their interests.

5.6   The program informs students of its criteria for evaluating their academic and
      professional performance.
5.7   The program has policies and procedures for terminating a student’s enrollment
      in the social work program for reasons of academic and professional
      performance.

6. Nondiscrimination and Human Diversity




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6.0   The program makes specific and continuous efforts to provide a learning
      context in which respect for all persons and understanding of diversity (including
      age, class, color, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status,
      national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation) are practiced. Social
      work education builds upon professional purposes and values; therefore, the
      program provides a learning context that is nondiscriminatory and reflects the
      profession’s fundamental tenets. The program describes how its learning
      context and educational program (including faculty, staff, and student
      composition; selection of agencies and their clientele as field education
      settings; composition of program advisory or field committees; resource
      allocation; program leadership; speakers series, seminars, and special
      programs; research and other initiatives) and its curriculum model
      understanding of and respect for diversity.

7. Program Renewal

7.0   The program has ongoing exchanges with external constituencies that may
      include social work practitioners, social service recipients, advocacy groups,
      social service agencies, professional associations, regulatory agencies, the
      academic community, and the community at large.
7.1   The program’s faculty engages in the development and dissemination of
      research, scholarship, or other creative activities relevant to the profession.
7.2   The program seeks opportunities for innovation and provides leadership within
      the profession and the academic community.

8. Program Assessment and Continuous Improvement

8.0   The program has an assessment plan and procedures for evaluating the
      outcome of each program objective. The plan specifies the measurement
      procedures and methods used to evaluate the outcome of each program
      objective.
8.1   The program implements its plan to evaluate the outcome of each program
      objective and shows evidence that the analysis is used continuously to affirm
      and improve the educational program.

Program Changes



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        The EPAS supports change necessary to improve the educational quality of a
program in relation to its goals and objectives. The EPAS recognizes that such change
is ongoing. When a program is granted initial accreditation or its accreditation is
reaffirmed, the program is, by that action, accredited only at the level or levels and for
the components that existed and were reviewed at the time of that action. Prior to the
next scheduled accreditation review, changes may take place within the program.
Although it is not necessary to report minor changes, programs notify the
Commission on Accreditation (COA) of such changes as new leadership, governance,
structure, off-campus programs, etc. Depending on the nature of the change, the COA
may request additional information. Prior to the implementation of a substantive change
the program submits a proposal and receives approval. Substantive changes are
defined as those that require a waiver of one or more aspects of EPAS.




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