Proposal for a Collaborative MScPhD Program in Biostatistics at by mtc13769

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									                       Proposal for a

    Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics

            at the University of Saskatchewan




For submission to the College of Graduate Studies and Research

                       April 23, 2009
                                   Table of Contents
      Executive Summary

1.0   Common Program Information
       1.1 Proposal Identification
       1.2 Type of Change
2.0   Rationale
       2.1 Introduction
       2.2 Background
       2.3 Need for a Graduate Program in Biostatistics
       2.4 Relationship between the Proposed Program and the Strategic
            Directions of the Departments and School
       2.5 Uniqueness of the Program
       2.6 Expertise and Organization of the Departments and School
3.0   Program Characteristics
       3.1 Curriculum Philosophy
       3.2 Defining the Discipline with Respect to the Program
       3.3 Student Learning Objectives
       3.4 Evaluation
       3.5 Admissions Process
                3.5.1 MSc Program
                3.5.2 PhD Program
       3.6 Application Process
       3.7 Draft Calendar Entry
       3.8 Program Requirements
                3.8.1 MSc Program
                3.8.2 PhD Program
                3.8.3 Graduate Seminar in Biostatistics
       3.9 Description of Program of Study
                3.9.1 MSc Program
                3.9.2 PhD Program
       3.10 Residency Requirements
       3.11 Number of Student Admissions
4.0   Resources
       4.1 Core Faculty
       4.2 Program Administration and Support
       4.3 Space and Equipment
       4.4 Library Services
       4.5 Information Technology
5.0   Impact
       5.1 Impact of Program on Department/School Activities
       5.2 Impact of Program on Other Departments/Units and on the University
       5.3 Consultation Process Followed for Development of Program


Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                 2
6.0 Budget
      6.1 Tuition Revenue
      6.2 Student Awards
      6.3 Program Start-Up Costs and Permanent Operating Costs
      6.4 Multi-Year Revenue and Expenditure Projections
7.0 References
8.0 Existing, New, and Revised Courses
9.0 Future Directions of the Program
10.0 Appendices

     Appendix A:     Definition of the Term “Collaborative”
     Appendix B:     Program Calendar
     Appendix C:     Comparison Table of Like Programs in Canada
     Appendix G:     Curriculum Vitae of Faculty Members
     Appendix H:     Letters of Support for Proposed Program
     Appendix J:     Administrative Structure of College/Department/Unit
     Appendix L:     Physical Resource Requirements for New Program
     Appendix M:     Budget Requirements for New Program
     Appendix N:     Information Technology Requirements for New Program
     Appendix P:     Library Requirements for New Program
     Appendix Q:     Consultation with the Registrar
     Appendix R:     Course Descriptions
     Appendix S:     New and Revised Course Forms




Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009            3
Executive Summary
This proposal seeks to establish a collaborative Graduate Program in Biostatistics in the School
of Public Health at the University of Saskatchewan. The proposed program is a joint venture
among three academic units: Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Department
of Mathematics and Statistics, and School of Public Health. It is a unique program intended to
provide students with a broad base of knowledge from which to explore developments in
statistical theory and the application of this theory in medical, biological, and agricultural
research. There is no other program in existence at the University of Saskatchewan for graduate
students who wish to combine their study of theoretical statistics with an investigation of
research problems in the life sciences. The proposed program will offer two graduate degrees,
MSc and PhD.

There are several reasons why this is an opportune and necessary time to implement a Graduate
Program in Biostatistics at the University of Saskatchewan. This program is identified as a key
component of the School of Public Health’s Strategic Plan. In order to become an accredited
School, a goal which it strives to achieve in the next seven to ten years, the School of Public
Health must offer doctoral programs in core areas of public health; one of these areas is
biostatistics. The Department of Community Health and Epidemiology has offered a “special
case” PhD program in Biostatistics for a number of years and wishes to formalize this program
offering. The Department of Mathematics and Statistics seeks to strengthen its graduate training
in applied statistics. Students in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology and
Department of Mathematics and Statistics have expressed a keen interest in graduate training in
biostatistics.

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will enhance the University of Saskatchewan’s
interdisciplinary training and research environment. Existing faculty members from the three
units collaborating to develop and offer this program are strongly placed to provide education
and training in biostatistics and conduct research about new statistical methods and their
application in medical, biological, and agricultural research. Collaborations of core faculty
members and students in biostatistics with researchers in other academic units will be
strengthened as the program develops. Biostatisticians work with scientists to identify and
implement appropriate methods for designing studies and analyzing and interpreting research
results. As science progresses and new ways to measure and collect information become
possible, new statistical techniques must be developed. With the rapid pace of scientific
developments today and the highly competitive nature of the research funding environment, the
skills of biostatisticians are integral to the success of interdisciplinary research teams in the life
sciences.

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will bring new graduate students to the University of
Saskatchewan. Graduate programs in biostatistics at other Canadian universities are attracting a
large number of applicants each year. The great demand for biostatisticians is evident in an
increasing number of job opportunities. For example, on the Statistical Society of Canada’s list
serve there were 42 academic and non-academic job postings for biostatisticians between
January and November 2008.

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To be eligible for admission to the proposed MSc (PhD) program, students must have completed
a four-year BSc or BA (thesis-based MSc) from a recognized university in one of the following:
mathematics, statistics, applied statistics, biostatistics, quantitative psychology, or any discipline
with a strong background in mathematics or statistics with a minimum 75% grade point average.
Students who wish to transfer from the MSc program directly to the PhD program must complete
a minimum of 12 credit units at the MSc level (9 core credit units and 3 elective credit units) and
maintain an 80% average in the coursework.

The proposed MSc program is a two-year full-time program. Students enrolled in the program
will be required to: (i) complete a minimum of 15 credit units of coursework (9 core credit units
and 6 elective credit units; see Table E-1), (ii) participate in a non-credit seminar course and a
non-credit research ethics course, and (iii) complete a thesis. Graduates of the MSc program will
be prepared to: (i) demonstrate proficiency in statistical theory; (ii) apply statistical theory to
problems in the medical, biological, and agricultural sciences; (iii) collaborate on research teams;
(iv) address problems involved in the collection and management of data; and (v) participate
actively in the drawing of conclusions from data analysis and in the presentation and writing of
research reports and papers.

The proposed PhD program is a three-year full-time program. Students enrolled in the program
will be required to: (i) complete 15 credits units of coursework (12 core credit units and 3
elective credit units; see Table E-1), (ii) participate in a non-credit seminar course and a non-
credit research ethics course, (iii) pass qualifying and comprehensive examinations, and (iv)
complete a dissertation based on original research. Graduates of the PhD program will be
prepared to: (i) develop new statistical methods using existing theory or apply existing statistical
methods to address problems in the medical, biological, and agricultural sciences; (ii) collaborate
on research teams; (iii) take a leadership role in study design, data management, statistical
analysis, and interpretation of study results; and (iv) be proficient in both the oral and written
presentation of study results.

The minimum residency requirement at the MSc level is one regular academic session and at the
PhD level it is two regular academic sessions. A regular academic session runs from September
to April. During the residency period students are expected to be located at the University of
Saskatchewan. After fulfilling the residency requirement, students must maintain continuous
registration in their program of study until its completion.

Table E-1. Proposed Core and Elective Courses
Core Courses for MSc Program                                New/               Course Code
                                                            Existing
Epidemiology I                                              Existing           CHEP 800.3
Mathematical Statistics and Inference                       New                STAT 850.3a
Current Biostatistical Methods and Computer                 New                PUBH 842.3
Applications
Core Courses For PhD Program
Applied Statistical Methods for Follow-Up                   Existing           CHEP 806.3
Data
Multivariate Data Analysis                                  Existing           STAT 848.3
Probability Theory                                          Existing           STAT 841.3
Advanced Topics in Clinical Trials                          New                CHEP 810.3
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                     5
OR                                                                                         OR
Advanced Experimental Design                                        New                    STAT 834.3b
Potential Elective Courses for MSc and PhD                          New/                   Course Code
Programs                                                            Existing
Epidemiology II (MSc, PhD)                                          Existing               CHEP 801.3
Applied Statistical Methods for Follow-Up                           Existing
                                                                                           CHEP 806.3
Data (MSc)
Health Promotion (MSc, PhD)                                         Existing               CHEP 803.3
Community Health Issues (MSc, PhD)                                  Existing               CHEP 804.3
Queuing Theory and Modeling Applications                            Existing
                                                                                           CMPT 818.3
(MSc, PhD)
Bioinformatics and Computational Biology                            Existing
                                                                                           CMPT 830.3
(MSc, PhD)
Topics in Modeling and Operations Research                          Existing
                                                                                           CMPT 858.3
(MSc, PhD)
Health Policy and Politics (MSc, PhD                                Existing               PUBH 867.3
Multivariate Statistics (MSc)                                       Existing               PSY 807.3
Multivariate Data Analysis (MSc)                                    Existing               STAT 848.3
Stochastic Processes (MSc, PhD)                                     Existing               STAT 842.3
Special Topics in Probability and Statistics Existing
                                                                                           STAT 847.3
(MSc, PhD)
Linear Models (PhD)                                                 New                    STAT 851.3
Clinical Trial Design and Analysis (MSc)                            Existing               VLAC 881.3
Epizootiology of Infectious Diseases (MSc,                          Existing               VTMC 832.3
PhD)
a
  The existing six credit unit course STAT 844.6 will be removed from the calendar and replaced by this course.
b
  The existing six-credit-unit course STAT 843.6 will be removed from the calendar. It will be replaced by STAT
834.3.

As Table E-1 reveals, the Graduate Program in Biostatistics will draw on courses already offered
by the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology and Department of Mathematics and
Statistics, although five new courses will be created. Two thesis/dissertation courses (BIOS 994
[MSc] and BIOS 996 [PhD]) will be created for the program, along with a non-credit seminar
course (BIOS 990).

Initially, a maximum of six students will be admitted to the Graduate Program in Biostatistics
each year. There will be no quotas regarding the number of MSc and PhD students.

The MSc and PhD programs in Biostatistics will be overseen by a Programs Committee
composed of representatives from the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology,
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and School of Public Health. The Chair will be drawn
from the membership of the Programs Committee and will rotate among the three units. Initially,
the Chair will be a representative from the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology.
The Chair of the Programs Committee will also be a member of the School of Public Health’s
proposed Thesis Programs Advisory Committee and Academic Programs Committee. Appendix
J provides further information about the proposed governance structure of the School of Public
Health. Clerical and technical support for the program will be provided by the School of Public
Health.

Resources for the Graduate Program in Biostatistics will include a combination of existing and
new resources. Office space for each graduate student will be assigned within the
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                                   6
Department/School of the supervisor. Space and equipment required for conducting the student’s
research will be the responsibility of the supervisor. Existing faculty, space, library, and
information technology resources will support the development and delivery of the program.
However, new funding provided to the School of Public Health for the period from 2008-2012
will provide awards for incoming graduate students. Student awards will help to ensure that the
program can compete against similar programs already in existence or currently being developed
at other Canadian universities.

The Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and
Statistics, and School of Public Health are all integral to the success of this program. Each unit
has faculty with expertise in biostatistics and existing graduate courses in theoretical and/or
applied statistics. There is a common vision among the heads of these units about the need for
this program and its potential to benefit the University of Saskatchewan. The heads of these units
have committed to the development of new graduate courses as well as to offering existing
courses on a regular basis to ensure the success of the Graduate Program in Biostatistics. A core
group of faculty is committed to serving as student supervisors and members of student advisory
and examination committees.

This is an exciting time for the biostatistics discipline nationally and internationally because of
the growth in research that is being undertaken and the increasing number of employment
opportunities that exist for graduates of biostatistics programs. The commitment of the
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
and the School of Public Health to the development of a collaborative Graduate Program in
Biostatistics will help to ensure a strong program at the University of Saskatchewan.




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1.0    Common Program Information
1.1   Proposal Identification

      Title of proposal: Collaborative Graduate Program in Biostatistics
      Degrees: MSc in Biostatistics; PhD in Biostatistics
      Field(s) of Specialization: N/A
      Level(s) of Concentration: N/A
      Option(s): N/A
      Degree College: Graduate Studies and Research
      Home Unit: School of Public Health

      Contact Person(s):
      Dr. Punam Pahwa, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology
      Phone: 966-7952; Fax: 966-7920; e-mail: pup165@mail.usask.ca

      Dr. Mik Bickis, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
      Phone: 966-6088; Fax: 966-6086; e-mail: mik.bickis@usask.ca

      Dr. Lisa Lix, School of Public Health
      Phone: 966-1617; Fax: 966-7920; e-mail: lisa.lix@usask.ca

      Date: April 23, 2009

      Approved by the College of Graduate Studies and Research May 7, 2009

      Proposed date of implementation: September 2009

1.2   Type of Change

      New Degree-Level programs

2.0 Rationale

2.1   Introduction

This proposal seeks to establish a collaborative Graduate Program in Biostatistics in the School
of Public Health at the University of Saskatchewan. Collaborative programs are meant to
“provide an additional multidisciplinary experience for students”1 by providing a broad range of
resources and learning opportunities for students who wish to study in a novel interdisciplinary
area or a subject which spans more than one discipline.1,2 Collaborative programs are intended to
draw on the resources already available through existing departments and colleges and use these
resources to provide a more comprehensive program of study than is currently available.
Appendix A provides a definition of the term "collaborative" and discusses the different ways it
has been used at Canadian universities.

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Biostatistics is the study of statistical techniques applied to medical, biological, and agricultural
data. Applications arise in areas such as public health, clinical medicine, veterinary medicine,
health services, occupational/environmental health, rural health, and ecology.

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics is a collaborative venture of the Department of
Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and School of
Public Health. There is a common vision among the heads/director and faculty of the
departments and School about a graduate program in biostatistics and its potential benefit for the
University of Saskatchewan. All three administrative units have current faculty members,
existing graduate courses, and a commitment to develop new graduate courses, necessary to meet
student learning objectives and ensure the long-term sustainability of the program. Letters of
support from the heads of the Departments and the School critical to the success of this program
are attached in Appendix H.

2.2   Background

There are a number of reasons why this is both an opportune and necessary time to establish a
Graduate Program in Biostatistics at the University of Saskatchewan:
   • This graduate program is identified as a key component of the School of Public Health’s
       Strategic Plan. In order to become an accredited School, a goal which it strives to achieve
       in the next seven to ten years, the School of Public Health must offer doctoral programs
       in three of the five core public health sciences: biostatistics, epidemiology, health policy
       and management, social and behavioral sciences, and environmental health sciences.
   • The Department of Community Health and Epidemiology currently offers a “special
       case” PhD program in Biostatistics. To date, two students have successfully completed
       this program and a third student is currently enrolled in the program. The development of
       a Graduate Program in Biostatistics will help to formalize and standardize the structure
       and content of this “special case” program.
   • The Department of Mathematics and Statistics seeks to strengthen its graduate training in
       applied statistics beyond what is currently available in its probability theory and statistics
       stream.
   • Researchers in the health sciences at the University of Saskatchewan are increasingly
       recognizing the importance of establishing interdisciplinary research teams that include
       biostatisticians in order to be successful in a highly competitive research funding
       environment. Accordingly, there are rich opportunities for graduate students in
       biostatistics to be engaged in collaborative research and training programs.
   • Recent faculty hires in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the School of
       Public Health bring expertise in biostatistics to the University of Saskatchewan.
   • There is increasing demand for biostatistical training among students currently enrolled
       in the participating units; this demand is, in part, a result of excellent job prospects for
       biostatisticians. This increasing demand for biostatisticians is being observed at
       provincial, national, and international levels. Two students who have entered the PhD
       program in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics wish to join the Graduate
       Program in Biostatistics, as have two graduate students enrolled in the Department of
       Community Health and Epidemiology.

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2.3       Need for a Graduate Program in Biostatistics

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will provide an important new training opportunity for
graduate students seeking employment in Saskatchewan as well as nationally and internationally.
A highly competitive job market exists for biostatisticians in academia, government, and
industry.3-5 Students graduating with an MSc or PhD in biostatistics can look forward to excellent
career opportunities in the following areas:

      •    Academia—colleges/faculties of medicine, veterinary medicine, nursing, health sciences,
           agriculture, environmental sciences; schools of public health; departments of statistics,
           mathematics, biostatistics, community health, epidemiology, health psychology, biology.
      •    Government— provincial organizations/agencies such as Saskatchewan Health, Health
           Quality Council, and Saskatchewan Cancer Agency; national organizations/agencies such
           as Statistics Canada, Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Canadian
           Environmental Assessment Agency, Canadian Institute for Health Information;
           international organizations/agencies such as the World Health Organization, and the
           United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.
      •    Industry—pharmaceutical, biotechnology, food science, nutrition, genome data banks,
           agribusiness, biochemical, software, consulting, life insurance, health insurance.

Locally, the School of Public Health and College of Veterinary Medicine are currently recruiting
for a joint position in biostatistics at the Assistant/Associate Professor level. The deadline date
for receipt of applications for this position was March 2, 2009. To date, 27 applications have
been received for this position, which is expected to start on July 1, 2009. This is just one
example of the growing need for biostatisticians in Canada.

The School of Public Health has, in its Strategic Plan, identified the need to hire an additional
faculty member in biostatistics within the next three years: this individual may hold a joint
appointment in one of the other units involved in this proposal.

Nationally, the increased demand for biostatisticians is evident in the many new job
opportunities that are available. For example, on the Statistical Society of Canada’s list serve
there were 42 academic and non-academic job postings for biostatisticians between January and
November 2008.

2.4       Relationship between the Proposed Program and the Strategic Directions of the
          Departments and School

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will help to meet the goals of the Department of
Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and School of
Public Health as identified in their Integrated Plans.

Biostatistics is one of the areas identified in the Integrated Plan 2007-2012 of Department of
Mathematics and Statistics in order to sustain a dynamic environment for research and scholarly
work. The plan specifically identifies the following: ”Support ties between Mathematics and
Statistics and Community Health and Epidemiology through joint graduate program. Increased
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                     10
ties with Community Health and Epidemiology will also provide opportunity for the faculty to be
involved with the School of Public Health.”6

A Graduate Program in Biostatistics is identified as a key component of the School of Public
Health’s Strategic Plan. According to this plan, a PhD program in Biostatistics will be developed
during 2008-09 and will first be offered in 2009-10.7 One of the medium-term (7 to 10 years)
goals of the School of Public Health is to seek accreditation with the U.S. Council on Education
for Public Health (www.ceph.org). Such accreditation requires, among other criteria, that the
School offer doctoral programs in at least three of the five core public health sciences:
epidemiology, biostatistics, health policy and management, social and behavioral sciences, and
environmental health sciences. The present proposal for a Graduate Program in Biostatistics is
one of the three programs that will be initially developed by the School of Public Health.

2.5   Uniqueness of the Program

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics is a unique program at the University of Saskatchewan
because it is based on collaboration among three units to provide students with a broad base of
knowledge from which to explore developments in statistical theory and their applications in
medical, biological, and agricultural research. There is no other program in existence at the
University of Saskatchewan for graduate students who wish to combine their study of theoretical
statistics with the investigation of research problems in the health sciences.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics currently offers a graduate program stream in the
theory of probability and statistics, consistent with the training provided in other statistics
departments nationally and internationally. The Department of Community Health and
Epidemiology provides limited training in biostatistical methods, and focuses primarily on
applications in population health research. It does not have a graduate program stream in
biostatistics.

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will provide opportunities for students to study and
conduct research in areas such as design and analysis of clinical trials, analysis of longitudinal
data, analysis of complex survey data, measurement error, computational statistics, and
multivariate statistics. Core faculty for the program are actively engaged in (i) research about
new statistical methods for the analysis of longitudinal data, complex survey data, and
administrative health databases; and (ii) provincial, national, and international research projects
related to clinical medicine, agricultural health and safety, quality of life of patients with chronic
diseases, and health services research methodology.

While the Graduate Program in Biostatistics is unique at the University of Saskatchewan, similar
programs are in existence at other Canadian and US universities. For example, the University of
Western Ontario introduced a collaborative Graduate Program in Biostatistics in October 2001.
This program trains students at both MSc and PhD levels. It is a collaborative program of two
units: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Department of Statistical and Actuarial
Sciences. Students enter this program by applying to either of the home departments as well as to
the collaborative program. Greater detail about this program is provided in Appendix A.

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Graduate programs in biostatistics are offered at other Canadian universities such as the
University of Toronto, McGill University and the University of Ottawa.

This collaborative program parallels the structure of other interdisciplinary/collaborative
programs at the University of Saskatchewan. For example, the Toxicology Group is an
interdisciplinary body under the umbrella of the College of Graduate Studies and Research. It
consists of faculty members from a number of University departments, as well as scientists from
various research centres on campus. The Toxicology Graduate Program is managed by the
Toxicology Centre, with participation from Toxicology Group members. This graduate program
offers MSc and PhD programs. The Division of Biomedical Engineering fosters interdisciplinary
research linking engineering and the physical sciences with the biological sciences and human
and veterinary medicine. Participating academic units in the Division are from the College of
Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Medicine, College of Kinesiology, School
of Physical Therapy, and Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Finally, the Division of
Environmental Engineering is an interdepartmental and interdisciplinary association of faculty
that is based in the College of Engineering and which provides MSc and PhD students with the
opportunity to work within the College of Engineering and with other Colleges and related
institutions.

2.6   Expertise and Organization of the Departments and School

The Department of Community Health and Epidemiology offers both MSc and PhD programs. It
is currently the only department at the University of Saskatchewan that offers courses in
biostatistics; these courses primarily focus on the application of statistics in population health
research.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers MSc and PhD programs. It is currently the
only department at the University of Saskatchewan that offers courses in the theory of statistics
and probability. It also offers some applied statistics courses but these do not focus specifically
on applications in the medical, agricultural, and biological sciences.

The School of Public Health currently offers the MPH program, as well as MSc and PhD
programs in Vaccinology and Immunotherapeutics. As per the requirements for accreditation, the
School seeks to develop training programs in such areas as epidemiology, health policy and
management, social and behavioral sciences, and biostatistics. Appendix J provides more
detailed information about the organizational structures of each of the departments and School
that are collaborating to develop the Graduate Program in Biostatistics.

3.0 Description of Program Characteristics

3.1   Curriculum Philosophy

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will prepare students through classroom participation,
laboratory sessions, biostatistical consulting opportunities with core faculty members, and
research. Both the MSc and PhD programs are thesis based.

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3.2   Defining the Discipline with Respect to the Program

Biostatistics is a discipline that is concerned with the development and application of statistical
theory and methods for the study of phenomena arising in the life sciences. Biostatistics did not
exist as a discipline prior to the end of World War II;8 it emerged as mathematical statisticians
and statisticians began to bring new perspectives to problems in medicine, biology, and
agriculture. Since that time, the biostatistics discipline has contributed to understanding the
cause, natural history, and treatment of disease in order to improve human and animal health.

In general, the differences between biostatistics graduate programs and statistics graduate
programs are: (i) biostatistics programs focus on training in both theoretical and applied research
while statistics programs focus on theoretical or methodological research, and (ii) biostatistics
programs focus on applications in the life sciences only, whereas statistics programs may include
applications in other areas such as industry (e.g., quality control) and business (e.g., finance).

3.3   Student Learning Objectives

Graduates of the MSc program in biostatistics will be prepared for employment in positions that
require expertise in data management, study design, and statistical modeling, or to continue to
the PhD program to conduct independent research. They will be able to:
    • demonstrate proficiency in statistical theory;
    • apply statistical theory to problems in the medical, biological, and agricultural sciences;
    • collaborate on research teams;
    • address problems involved in the collection and management of data; and
    • participate actively in the drawing of conclusions from data analyses and in the
        development and presentation of oral and written research reports.

PhD graduates will be prepared to assume faculty or other research-oriented positions in
academic institutions or to take leadership positions in organizations that conduct health-related
research. They will be able to:
    • develop new statistical methods using existing theory or apply existing statistical
       methods to address problems in the medical, biological, and agricultural sciences;
    • collaborate on research teams;
    • take a leadership role in study design, data management, statistical analysis, and
       interpretation of study results; and
    • be proficient in both the oral and written presentation of research results.

3.4   Evaluation

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will have evaluation tools for the assessment of students,
the MSc and PhD programs, and core courses.

Each student will have an Advisory Committee that will be responsible for determining the
student’s program, monitoring academic performance, and providing feedback and guidance for
the student’s research. For students enrolled in the MSc program, the Advisory Committee will
consist of at least three members: student’s supervisor, one core faculty member, and the Chair
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                   13
of the Programs Committee. For students enrolled in the PhD program, the Advisory Committee
will consist of at least five members: student’s supervisor, two core faculty members, one
cognate faculty member, and the Chair of the Programs Committee. Core faculty are listed in
section 4.1. Each Advisory Committee will include at least two faculty members from the list in
section 4.1; these individuals must be from different units.


A Programs Committee will be established for the Graduate Program in Biostatistics. This
committee will include the Department Heads/Executive Director (or designates) of the
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
and School of Public Health. The Chair will be selected from the membership of the Programs
Committee. Normally the Chair will rotate on an annual basis among the three units that are
collaborating on this program. Initially the Chair will be the Department Head (or designate) of
the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology and will serve for a period of two
years. This arrangement has been made because of this Department’s previous expertise in
offering a special-case option in biostatistics in its PhD program. Appendix H contains letters of
support that provide details of the contribution of each Department/School to this program.

The Programs Committee will review, evaluate, and make recommendations for admission
regarding all applications to the Graduate Program in Biostatistics and ensure that the objectives,
policies, and procedures of the College of Graduate Studies and Research are followed. The
Programs Committee will assess and evaluate the MSc and PhD programs as well as the core
courses.

A close liaison with the College of Graduate Studies and Research will be established by the
Programs Committee to ensure that policies and procedures are adhered to by all students within
the programs and to ensure that ongoing requirements for evaluation of the students, programs,
and core courses are followed.

The Chair of the Programs Committee will be a member of the School of Public Health’s
proposed Thesis Programs Advisory Committee and Academic Programs Committee. Appendix
J provides further information about the proposed governance structure of the School of Public
Health.

3.5   Admissions Process

Students admitted to the program will be expected to adhere to the regulations of the College of
Graduate Studies and Research. For example, for international applicants whose first language is
not English, English language proficiency must be demonstrated as per the College of Graduate
Studies and Research regulations.

Students will normally be admitted only in the Fall term, although exceptions may be made upon
the approval of the Programs Committee.

Specific admission requirements for each program are described below.

Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                  14
       3.5.1   MSc Program

Students must have completed a four-year BSc or BA degree from a recognized university in one
of the following: mathematics, statistics, applied statistics, biostatistics, quantitative psychology,
or another discipline with a strong background in mathematics or statistics with a minimum 75%
grade point average in the last 60 credit units.. Students must have completed undergraduate
courses in mathematical statistics and statistical inference (STAT 342 and STAT 442, or
equivalents).

Applicants holding a BSc in another discipline with at least an 80% grade point average will be
admitted as probationary MSc students and required to complete qualifying courses before being
considered for admission to the MSc program.

       3.5.2 PhD Program

Students must have completed a thesis-based MSc from a recognized university in one of the
following: mathematics, statistics, applied statistics, biostatistics, quantitative psychology, or
another discipline with a strong background in mathematics or statistics with a minimum 75%
grade point average in the last 2 years of study. In order to be eligible for admission to the PhD
program, a student must have taken the following courses (or equivalents) during his/her MSc
program: CHEP 800.3 (Epidemiology I), STAT 850.3 (Mathematical Statistics and Inference),
and PUBH 842.3 (Current Topics in Biostatistics and Statistical Applications). Students without
these courses will be admitted as probationary students and will be required to complete these
courses with a minimum 80% grade point average before being considered fully qualified in the
PhD program.

Students seeking admission to the PhD program are required to prepare a description of the
research project that they propose to pursue in any area of biostatistics. In addition, the student
must have identified a supervisor from amongst the core faculty for the Graduate Program in
Biostatistics (see section 4.1) before applying to the program, and must obtain a letter of support
from this faculty member.

Students who wish to transfer directly from the MSc program to the PhD program in Biostatistics
must (i) complete a minimum of 12 credit units of coursework at the MSc level (9 required credit
units and 3 elective credit units), (ii) maintain an 80% average in this coursework, and (iii) pass
a qualifying examination (see Section 3.9.2.1).


3.6   Application Process

All applications from potential students will be reviewed and recommendations for admission
will be made by the Programs Committee to the College of Graduate Studies and Research. The
specific application requirements are:

      1. A completed application form (GSR 100) available from the College of Graduate
         Studies and Research.
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                    15
      2. Three letters of recommendation accompanied by completed Confidential Letter
         of Recommendation Forms (GSR 101) available from the College of Graduate
         Studies and Research.
      3. A writing sample of 1000 to 1200 words that includes a statement of the student’s
         education and employment history and how it relates to the study of biostatistics, a
         description of the student’s education and career goals, and an assessment of how the
         University of Saskatchewan’s Graduate Program in Biostatistics will help to achieve
         these goals.
      4. A current curriculum vitae.
      5. A non-refundable application fee as set by the College of Graduate Studies and
         Research.
      6. Certified, official transcripts of the student’s academic record from each post-
         secondary institution attended.
      7. Evidence of English proficiency for applicants who have English as a second
         language, as described by the College of Graduate Studies and Research.
      8. A letter of support from the proposed supervisor (for PhD students).
      9. A description of the proposed research (for PhD students) that describes the student’s
         proposed topic of research interest and how it links with the supervisor’s area(s) of
         research expertise. This description will be 1200 to 1500 words in length.

Upon receipt of all the above materials, the Programs Committee may invite the applicant for a
personal interview.

The Programs Committee will forward all recommendations about admissions and related
documentation to the College of Graduate Studies and Research. The College will make the final
decision regarding admission and informs applicants accordingly. More information about the
specific admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies and Research is available at
the College’s website (www.usask.ca/cgsr/).

3.7   Draft Calendar Entry

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics is a collaborative program of the Department of
Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and the
School of Public Health. The Program offers research-intensive training leading to MSc and PhD
degrees. Research focuses on the development and application of statistical techniques for
medical, biological, and agricultural data. Topics for research projects are in such areas as
computational statistics, clinical trials, classification techniques, measurement error, longitudinal
data analysis, analysis of complex survey data, and multivariate statistics. In order to promote
research, core faculty of the program maintain linkages with a number of Departments, Schools,
and Colleges on campus, including the College of Medicine, Department of Computer Science,
College of Arts and Science, College of Nursing, and Western College of Veterinary Medicine.

Individuals interested in pursuing study in the MSc or PhD programs in Biostatistics should
contact the Director of Research and Public Health Research Programs, School of Public Health
to obtain further information about program requirements and policies.


Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                   16
MSc Program: Basic admission requirements are a four-year BSc or BA in a relevant program
with a minimum 75% GPA in the last 60 credit units. Students will complete a minimum of 15
credit units of coursework and a thesis. Participation in a non-credit biostatistics seminar, which
is normally held bi-weekly, is mandatory. The residency requirement is one year.

PhD Program: Basic admission requirements are a thesis-based MSc in a relevant program and a
minimum 75% GPA in the last 2 years. Students will complete a minimum of 15 credit units of
coursework, a qualifying examination to demonstrate knowledge in theoretical and applied
statistics, a comprehensive examination, and a dissertation. Participation in a non-credit
biostatistics seminar, which is normally held bi-weekly, is mandatory. The residency requirement
is two years.

3.8   Program Requirements

       3.8.1   MSc Program

Students will complete a minimum of 15 credit units of coursework, of which 9 credit units are
required courses, in addition to non-credit courses (see Table 1).

Table 1. Required Credit and Non-Credit Courses for MSc Program
                                                    Credit                   Existing   Times Offered
 Course #                     Title                          Term Offered
                                                    Units                    Course     in Last 3 years
CHEP 800       Epidemiology I                         3        Term 1          Yes             3
                 Mathematical Statistics and
STAT 850a                                                3       Term 2          No              --
                 Inference
                 Current Biostatistical Methods and
PUBH 842                                                 3       Term 1          No              --
                 Computer Applications
GSR 960          Introduction to Ethics and Integrity    0     Term 1 or 2      Yes              --
BIOS 990         Seminar in Biostatistics                0    Term 1 and 2       No              --
BIOS 994         Master’s Research: Biostatistics        0    Term 1 and 2       No              --
a
  The existing six-credit-unit course STAT 844.6 will be removed from the calendar and replaced by
STAT 850.3.
Note: See Appendix S for proposals for new and revised graduate courses. See Appendix R for course
descriptions.

Students must also complete a minimum of six credit units of elective courses. The elective
courses will be appropriate to the student’s research and will be chosen in consultation with the
student’s Advisory Committee. A number of potential elective courses are offered by the
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
School of Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Sociology, Department
of Computer Science, and Department of Psychology. Table 2 provides examples of potential
elective courses. Students may also take a suitable course(s) related to their thesis research from
other Departments or Schools within the university. In the absence of a suitable elective course
in any of the Departments or Schools, students may either take a reading course with the
permission of the student’s Advisory Committee or may take a course at another university and


Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                       17
apply to have the course accepted by the College of Graduate Studies and Research as an
equivalent of program course requirements.

Table 2. Potential Elective Credit Courses for MSc Program
                                                  Credit                   Existing   Times Offered
 Course #                    Title                       Term Offered
                                                  Units                    Course     in Last 3 years
CHEP 801      Epidemiology II                       3       Term 2           Yes             3
CHEP 803      Health Promotion                      3       Term 2           Yes             3
              Applied Statistical Methods for
CHEP 806                                              3        Term 2          Yes            3
              Follow-Up Data
              Queuing Theory and Modeling
CMPT 818                                              3      Term 1 or 2       Yes        Unknown
              Applications
              Bioinformatics and Computational
CMPT 830                                              3        Term 2          Yes        Unknown
              Biology
              Topics in Modeling and Operations
CMPT 858                                              3        Term 2          Yes            1
              Research
PUBH 867      Health Policy and Politics              3        Term 2          Yes            3
PSY 807       Multivariate Statistics                 3      Term 1 or 2       Yes            3
STAT 834      Advanced Experimental Design            3      Term 1 or 2       No            N/A
STAT 848      Multivariate Data Analysis              3      Term 1 or 2       Yes            2
STAT 842      Stochastic Processes                    3      Term 1 or 2       Yes            2
STAT 851.3 Linear Models                              3      Term 1 or 2       No            N/A
VLAC 881      Clinical Trial Design and Analysis      3      Term 1 or 2       Yes        Unknown
              Epizootiology of Infectious
VTMC 932                                              3      Term 1 or 2       Yes        Unknown
              Diseases
Note: See Appendix S for proposals for new and revised graduate courses. See Appendix R for course
descriptions.

Table C-1 in Appendix C compares the courses recommended for the proposed MSc program in
biostatistics with the courses required for the MSc program in biostatistics in selected
universities across Canada. The proposed MSc program has one or two fewer required courses
but the same or more elective courses as most other programs. It also has a comparable number
of courses to other MSc programs at the University of Saskatchewan. Table C-2 in Appendix C
gives a list of topics covered in each course offered by selected universities in Canada. The
topics covered under these courses are consistent with the topics in the core courses that will be
offered in the collaborative Graduate Program in Biostatistics.

       3.8.2 PhD Program

Students will complete a minimum of 15 credit units of coursework, of which 12 credit units are
required, in addition to non-credit courses (see Table 3).




Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                   18
Table 3. Required Credit and Non-Credit Courses for PhD Program
                                                     Credit                    Existing    Times Offered
  Course #                    Title                           Term Offered
                                                     Units                     Course      in Last 3 years
               Applied Statistical Methods for                    Term 2
CHEP 806                                               3                          Yes             3
               Follow-Up Data
STAT 848       Multivariate Data Analysis              3       Term 1 or 2        Yes             2

STAT 841       Probability Theory                      3          Term 1          Yes             1
                                                       3                          No              --
CHEP 810       Advanced Topics in Clinical
                                                               Term 1 or 2
               Trials
OR
                                                       3       Term 1 or 2        No              --
STAT 834a      Advanced Experimental Design
                 Introduction to Ethics and                       Term 1 or 2
GSR 960b                                                   0                          Yes          --
                 Integrity
BIOS 990         Seminar in Biostatistics                  0      Term 1 or 2         No           --
BIOS 996         PhD Research: Biostatistics               0      Term 1 or 2         No           --
a
  The existing six-credit-unit course STAT 843.6 will be removed from the calendar. It will be replaced by
STAT 834.3.
b
  This course will be required if the student has not already taken it during his/her MSc program.
Note: See Appendix S for proposals for new and revised graduate courses. See Appendix R for course
descriptions.

Students must also complete a minimum of three credit units as an elective course. This course
will be appropriate to the student’s thesis research and will be chosen in consultation with the
student’s Advisory Committee. A number of potential elective courses are offered by the
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
School of Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Sociology, Department
of Computer Science, and Department of Psychology (see Table 4). Students may also take a
suitable course(s) related to their thesis research from other Departments or Schools within the
university. In the absence of a suitable elective course in any of the Departments or Schools,
students may either take a readings course with the permission of the student’s Advisory
Committee or may also take a course at another university and apply to have the course accepted
by the College of Graduate Studies and Research as an equivalent of program course
requirements.

Table 4. Potential Elective Courses for the PhD Program
                                                     Credit                    Existing    Times Offered
  Course #                    Title                           Term Offered
                                                     Units                     Course      in Last 3 years
CHEP 801       Epidemiology II                         3          Term 2         Yes              3
CHEP 803       Health Promotion                        3          Term 2         Yes              3
CHEP 804       Community Health Issues                 3          Term 1         Yes              3
               Queuing Theory and Modeling
CMPT 818                                               3          Term 2          Yes         Unknown
               Applications
               Bioinformatics and
CMPT 830                                               3          Term 2          Yes         Unknown
               Computational Biology
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                        19
               Topics in Modeling and
CMPT 858                                            3        Term 2          Yes            1
               Operations Research
PUBH 867       Health Policy and Politics           3         Term 2         Yes            3

STAT 842       Stochastic Processes                 3      Term 1 or 2       Yes          N/A
               Special Topics in Probability and           Term 1 or 2
STAT 846                                            3                        Yes          N/A
               Statistics
 STAT 851      Linear Models                        3      Term 1 or 2       No           N/A
             Epizootiology of Infectious                   Term 1 or 2
VTMC 832                                            3                        Yes        Unknown
             Diseases
Note: See Appendix R for course descriptions.

Table C-1 in Appendix C compares the courses recommended for the proposed PhD program in
biostatistics with courses required by the PhD program in biostatistics in selected universities
across Canada. The proposed PhD program in biostatistics has the same or slightly fewer
required and elective courses, but there is substantial variability in current program offerings.
The proposed program has a comparable number of courses to other PhD programs at the
University of Saskatchewan. Table C-2 in Appendix C gives a brief course outline for the
courses offered by selected universities in Canada. The topics covered under these courses are
consistent with the topics in the core courses that will be offered in the Graduate Program in
Biostatistics.

Students who wish to transfer from the MSc program directly into the PhD program in
Biostatistics must (i) complete a minimum of 12 credit units of coursework at the MSc level (9
core credit units and 3 elective credit units), (ii) maintain an 80% average in this coursework, and
(iii) pass a qualifying examination.

       3.8.3   Graduate Seminar in Biostatistics

A non-credit seminar course, BIOS 990, is a requirement for all MSc and PhD students.
Graduate students must attend a minimum of 75% of the seminar sessions each academic year
and are expected to present in one or more sessions. MSc students will normally be expected to
present one seminar session in the second year of their program and PhD students will normally
be expected to present one seminar in each of the second and third years of their program. The
Programs Committee will oversee the seminar course, as delegated by the Executive Director of
the School of Public Health.

3.9   Description of Program of Study

       3.9.1   MSc Program

The MSc program requires the completion of a written thesis in addition to coursework.
Appendix B provides the recommended timeline for program completion.



Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                  20
The thesis topic will be selected in consultation with the candidate's supervisor. The proposal for
the thesis research will be approved by the Advisory Committee. The thesis proposal may be
submitted to the Advisory Committee at any time after admission to the program, but preferably
prior to the end of the student's first year or at the beginning of the second year in the program.
The student will be required to undergo an oral examination of his/her thesis. All regulations of
the College of Graduate Studies and Research regarding the requirements for the thesis and its
examination will be adhered to in the Graduate Program in Biostatistics.

       3.9.2 PhD Program

The PhD program involves course work, successful completion of qualifying and comprehensive
examinations, and the preparation of a dissertation. Appendix B provides the recommended
timeline for program completion.

               3.9.2.1 Qualifying Examination

Each student in the PhD program will be required to successfully pass a qualifying examination.
The qualifying examination will be administered by an Examination Committee after completion
of core course work and will normally be scheduled before students begin their second academic
year. Students will be tested on basic statistical theory. The Examination Committee will be
composed of members of the student’s Advisory Committee and will be appointed by the
Programs Committee. Students with a Masters degree (with thesis) in statistics or biostatistics
from a recognized university may have the qualifying examination waived by the Programs
Committee on a recommendation from the Advisory Committee.

               3.9.2.2 Comprehensive Examination

Each student in the PhD program is required to write a comprehensive examination once he/she
has completed all course requirements. The comprehensive examination is normally composed
of both an oral and written component. Both components will test the student on theoretical and
applied statistical concepts. The examination will be developed and evaluated by the student’s
Advisory Committee.

Following successful completion of the comprehensive examination, the student will develop a
dissertation research proposal and, upon its approval by the Advisory Committee, proceed to
conduct the research and prepare a written dissertation.

               3.9.2.3 Dissertation

The dissertation, based upon original investigation, must demonstrate mature scholarship and
critical judgment on the part of the candidate, as well as familiarity with tools and methods of
research in the candidate's field. The dissertation topic will be selected in advance of the
student’s admission to the program and the research will be supervised by the PhD supervisor
and Advisory Committee. All regulations of the College of Graduate Studies and Research
regarding the requirements for the dissertation and its examination will be adhered to in the
Graduate Program in Biostatistics.
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                    21
3.10 Residency Requirements

The minimum residency requirement for the MSc program is one regular academic session and
at the PhD level the minimum residency requirement is two regular academic sessions. A regular
academic session runs from September to April. Students are normally expected to complete all
course work requirements during the residency period. During the residency period students are
expected to be on-site at the University of Saskatchewan. After fulfilling the residency
requirement, students must maintain continuous registration until completion of their program of
study.

3.11 Number of Student Admissions

Initially, a maximum of six students will be admitted to the Graduate Program in Biostatistics
each year. There will be no quotas regarding the number of MSc and PhD students. The number
of admissions will be reviewed annually by the Programs Committee and modified as resources
permit.

Table 5 provides information about student intake and total enrollment for the first four years of
the program. The assumptions in preparing this table are: (i) the maximum number of admissions
are made each year, (ii) there will be four MSc students and two PhD students admitted each
year, (iii) students will complete their studies in the expected time of two years for the MSc
program and three years for the PhD program.

Table 5. Graduate Program in Biostatistics: Expected Student Intake/Total Enrollment
                2009-10            2010-11            2011-12            2012-13
 MSc            4/4                4/8                4/8                4/8
 PhD            2/2                2/4                2/6                2/6
 Total          6/6                6/12               6/14               6/14

4.0 Resources

4.1   Core Faculty

Core faculty for the Graduate Program in Biostatistics are identified below. Curriculum vitae for
all core faculty are provided in Appendix G.

Hyun Lim, Associate Professor, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology
  • Research interests: Statistical methods for longitudinal data, recurrent event modeling in
      survival analysis, design and analysis of clinical trials, epidemiologic studies, and
      HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention studies.
  • Director, Clinical Research Support Unit: Provides biostatistical consulting services to
      faculty in the College of Medicine as well as in other colleges.

Punam Pahwa, Associate Professor, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology


Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                22
      •    Research interests: applications of longitudinal data analysis techniques to various
           diseases/health conditions (focus on respiratory diseases, cancer, and farm injuries)
           related to rural occupational and environmental exposures; analysis of longitudinal
           complex survey data analysis; missing data; analysis of quality of life data.

Miķelis G. Bickis, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
  • Research interests: biostatistics and bioinformatics; causal inference; experimental
       design; sequential methods; visualization.

William Laverty, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
   • Research interests: multivariate statistics; time series analysis; experimental and sampling
      design; spatial statistics; computer security.

Longhai Li, Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
   • Research interests: classification and regression with high-dimensional measurements;
     detecting differential variables from high-throughput data; classification and regression
     with high-order interactions; and modelling DNA sequences.

Juxin Liu, Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
   • Research interests: model misspecification; measurement error and misclassification;
       interaction models; Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms; missing data in longitudinal
       analysis, interplay between Bayesian and frequentist theories.

Chris Soteros, Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
   • Research interests: statistical mechanics; computer simulation; combinatorics and
       bioinformatics.

Raj Srinivasan, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics
   • Research interests: applied probability; queueing theory; queueing networks.

Lisa Lix, Associate Professor and Centennial Research Chair, School of Public Health
   • Research interests: Analysis of longitudinal/repeated measures data; robust statistics;
       multivariate statistics; measurement error; data quality

4.2       Program Administration and Support

The administrative home of the program will be the School of Public Health. Administration of
the program will be the responsibility of the Executive Director of the School of Public Health.

Clerical and technical support will be provided by the School of Public Health (see Appendix H
for letter of support from the School of Public Health). Tasks of clerical and technical staff will
include maintenance of student files and applications, class and room scheduling, website
updates, and office support for the Chair. It is anticipated that 0.45 FTE clerical support will be
required during the first two years of the program as it is established, while 0.20 FTE will be
required thereafter.

Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                    23
4.3 Space and Equipment

Office space for each graduate student will be assigned within the Department/School of the
supervisor. Space and equipment required for conducting the student’s research will be the
responsibility of the supervisor. The nature of the research project will determine the type and
amount of space and equipment required by the student.

Appendix L provides specific details regarding space and equipment requirements for the
delivery of the Graduate Program in Biostatistics.

4.4   Library Services

Adequate library resources are currently available at the University of Saskatchewan for the
Graduate Program in Biostatistics. Appendix P provides specific details regarding library
resource requirements. There is an elective cost identified in Appendix P, but the resources
associated with this cost are not essential to offer the program.

4.5 Information Technology

Adequate Information Technology resources are currently available at the University of
Saskatchewan for the Graduate Program in Biostatistics. Appendix N provides specific details
regarding Information Technology requirements.

5.0 Impact

5.1   Impact of Program on Departments/School Activities

The creation of a Graduate Program in Biostatistics at the University of Saskatchewan will have
positive impact on the academic units involved in this collaborative venture. The proposed
program does not conflict with the existing graduate programs of the Department of Community
Health and Epidemiology, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and School of Public
Health. The existing graduate program of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has three
streams: applied mathematics, pure mathematics, and probability and statistics. The probability
and statistics stream emphasizes research in theoretical statistics, while the proposed Graduate
Program in Biostatistics emphasizes a combination of theoretical and applied statistics with a
specific focus on applications in medicine, biology, and agriculture. Moreover, the Graduate
Program in Biostatistics will increase the number of students taking graduate courses in the
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, which will enhance the student learning environment.

The Department of Community Health and Epidemiology does not have a stream in biostatistics.
However the department has offered a special-case option in biostatistics as part of its PhD
program for a number of years. This option will no longer be available to students with the
introduction of the PhD program in Biostatistics.

Historically, graduate students in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics in the probability
and statistics stream have taken biostatistics courses offered by the Department of Community
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                    24
Health and Epidemiology. The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will help to formalize and
strengthen the relationship between two departments.

The School of Public Health will benefit from establishment of the Graduate Program in
Biostatistics as it seeks to attract graduate students and applies for accreditation. The proposed
Collaborative Graduate Program in Biostatistics is a natural fit with the Centennial Research
Chair held by Dr. Lisa Lix (also a CIHR New Investigator) in the School of Public Health and
the newly established joint faculty position in biostatistics in the School of Public Health and
Western College of Veterinary Medicine, to be filled by July 1, 2009. Graduate students enrolled
in the new program will benefit greatly from exposure to Dr. Lix’s current CIHR funded research
projects and her collaborations with researchers from across Canada.

5.2   Impact of Program on Other Departments/Units and on the University

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will have a positive impact on other departments,
colleges, and schools at the University of Saskatchewan. Collaborations of core faculty members
and graduate students in biostatistics with researchers in other academic units and departments
will be strengthened. Specifically, collaborations with such units as the College of Medicine,
Western College of Veterinary Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Dentistry, College of
Pharmacy and Nutrition, and Department of Sociology will (i) help to promote interdisciplinary
research, (ii) lead to opportunities to seek research funding from the Canadian Institutes of
Health Research (CIHR), Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada
(SSHRC), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), and (iii)
provide opportunities for high quality research in the field of biostatistics.

The Graduate Program in Biostatistics will attract new graduate students to the University of
Saskatchewan. This will add to the diversity of the student population. Graduate students will
have the opportunity to work with their advisors on collaborative research teams which will help
strengthen their overall training experiences.

Some graduate students will choose to remain within the province upon completion of their
programs. They will find employment opportunities within the University of Saskatchewan or
University of Regina as well as within government and industry.

5.3   Consultation Process Followed for Development of Program

The proposal for the collaborative Graduate Program in Biostatistics was developed by a
working group chaired by Dr. Punam Pahwa of the Department of Community Health and
Epidemiology and consisting of the following members: Dr. Hyun Lim, Department of
Community Health and Epidemiology; Dr. Mik Bickis, Department of Mathematics and
Statistics, Dr. Lisa Lix, School of Public Health. The working group has regularly consulted with
the heads/directors of the three units involved in the Program as well as with the Graduate Chairs
of these units.

The proposal for the Graduate Program in Biostatistics has been approved in principle by the
Faculty Councils of the three participating units.
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                25
6.0 Budget

6.1   Tuition Revenue

Students enrolled in the MSc or PhD programs will pay the tuition fee of $1,000 each term (three
terms per academic year). Therefore, tuition costs would be $6,000 for completing the MSc in
the proposed time of two years and $9,000 for completing the PhD in the proposed time of three
years.

6.2   Student Awards

The goal of the Graduate Program in Biostatistics with respect to student awards is to ensure that
all students in the MSc program are fully funded with a minimum award of $15,000 per year for
two years, and all students in the PhD program are fully funded with a minimum award of
$18,000 per year for three years. In addition, limited travel funds should be available to support
student attendance at conferences and workshops.

The School of Public Health has received from the College of Graduate Studies and Research
(CGSR) a one-time allocation of graduate student funding in the amount of $280,000 over the
period 2008-2012 to support accelerated development of the programs by the School (Table 6
below). This funding will be used to provide scholarships to students enrolled in the Master of
Public Health (MPH), Biostatistics (MSc and PhD), and Epidemiology (PhD) programs on a
competitive basis. On March 13, 2009 the Faculty Council of the School of Public Health
decided to divide this CGSR funding equally between the MPH and the proposed new
Biostatistics and Epidemiology programs. The principle guiding this decision is that the
professional and thesis-based programs of the School are equally valued and faculty wish to use
the scholarships to attract the brightest and best students to each program. It was decided that
each scholarship will be worth approximately one-half a standard CGSR masters ($15,000) or
PhD ($18,000) scholarship. In addition, each CGSR scholarship recipient will be eligible to
receive matching funding through the research supervisor’s grants. Students will be required to
apply to outside agencies, such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, for scholarships to
supplement available funding.




Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                 26
Table 6. Distribution of one-time allocation of graduate student funding from the College of
Graduate Studies and Research (CGSR) of $280,000 for the period 2008-2012 to support
accelerated development of the programs in the School of Public Health.

                           CGSR start-up funding for graduate student
                                          scholarships
                                                             Total to
                          2008-                    2011-
                                 2009-10 2010-11              program
                            09                       12
                                                            2008-2012
Program type

Master of                  35,00
                                       35,000       35,000      35,000           $140,000
Public Health                  0

MSc and PhD in
Biostatistics
and                                    46,667       46,667      46,666           $140,000
PhD in
Epidemiology

                           $35,0                                $81,66
Total                                $81,667      $81,667                        $280,000
                              00                                     6

Table 7 shows the projected student enrolment for the Biostatistics and Epidemiology programs
over the three-year period from 2009-10 to 2011-12 and the proposed allocation of the $140,000
of CGSR funding by program and academic year. This funding will provide scholarships of
$7,500 (MSc students) or $9,320 (PhD students) per year on a competitive basis for one in three
of the students enrolled in the Epidemiology and Biostatistics thesis-based programs.

In addition, eligible students will be assisted to apply for non-devolved scholarship funding from
the CGSR, the Dean’s Scholarship fund through the CGSR, and external funding from CIHR and
other funding agencies. Students’ research supervisors will be encouraged to include graduate
student stipends in their research grant applications.

At the end of the 2011-12 academic year, the School of Public Health will apply for Devolved
Scholarship Funding. It is expected that the School of Public Health will have a sufficient cohort
of graduate students at the end of this three-year period to be eligible for devolved funding from
the College of Graduate Studies and Research.




Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                 27
Table 7. Proposed allocation of graduate student funding from CGSR based on $7,500 per
MSc student and $9,320 per PhD student for the period 2009-10 to 2011-12.

                  2009-10          2010-11          2011-12
                                                                Total
               New              New              New
                       Total            Total            Total  Funds
             student          student          student
                       funds            funds            funds Allocat
Program type    s/               s/               s/
                       to be            to be            to be ed for
              Total            Total            Total
                      allocat          allocat          allocat Each
             student          student          student
                         ed               ed               ed  Program
                 s                s                s

MSc
                                                           $15,00                    $15,00
Biostatistic            4/4       $7,500         4/8                      4/8               $37,500
                                                              0                         0
s
PhD
                                                                                     $18,64
Biostatistic            2/2       $9,320         2/4       $9,320         2/6               $37,280
                                                                                        0
s
Total
                                  $16,82                   $24,32                    $33,64
Biostatistic              6                       12                       14               $74,780
                                     0                        0                         0
s

PhD                                                        $18,64                    $37,26
                        3/3       $9,320         4/7                      5/12              $65,220
Epidemiology                                                  0                         0

Total for
new thesis-                       $26,14                   $42,96                    $70,90 $140,00
                          9                       19                       26
based                                0                        0                         0      0
programs


6.3    Program Start-Up Costs and Permanent Operating Costs

Costs associated with the start-up of the Graduate Program in Biostatistics are primarily for
administrative support to the Programs Committee. Activities associated with program start-up
include developing and revising application forms and procedures and policies, developing
promotional materials, developing student orientation materials, establishing processes for
maintenance of student records, and supporting the Chair of the Programs Committee.

Permanent operating costs associated with the program are for: (i) administrative support:
estimated to be 0.25 FTE; (ii) general operating expenses: includes materials, supplies,
telephone/fax, postage/courier, printing and publicity, advertising, and other related expenses;
(ii) special events: student orientation, seminars; and (iv) registration and travel: registration fees
and travel costs for faculty and students to attend seminars, workshops, or conferences.


6.4 Multi-Year Revenue and Expenditure Projections
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                      28
Table M-1 in Appendix M shows the costs associated with the program. All figures are in
constant dollars. In terms of funding, the resources needed to initiate and develop the program
are, for the most part, already in place in the operating budget of the School of Public Health.

Table M-2 in Appendix M shows the projected tuition revenue associated with the Graduate
Program in Biostatistics. The projections are made assuming that four (4) MSc and two (2) PhD
students are admitted each year to the program. The figures are provided for the five-year period
beginning with the 2009-10 academic year. All figures are in constant dollars. The admission
statistics are realistic given current demand that has been identified from “special case”
biostatistics graduate students currently enrolled in the Department of Community Health and
Epidemiology and current graduate students in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics
who wish to transfer into this program.

7.0 References
1. http://ocgs.cou.on.ca/content/objects/WorkingGroupReportOnCollaborativePrograms
   June211.doc. Accessed on Nov. 7, 2008
2. http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/oise/UserFiles/File/CIDE_EGIE_WEB%20BRO_FINAL.pdf
3. DeMets DL, Storm G, Boehnke M, Louis TA, Taylor J an dDixon D (2006). Training of the
   next generation of biostatisticians: A call to action in the U.S. Statistics in Medicine. 25:
   3415-3429
4. www.bu.edu/today/node/949 Accessed on October 15, 2008
5. Dixon D, Legler J. (2003). Careers in Biostatistics: High demand and rewarding work.
   STATS 37, Spring ASA
6. Department of Mathematics and Statistics Integrated Planning 2007-2012: Departmental
   Contributions to College Theme - Executive Summary
7. School of Public Health Proposal to University Council. May 9, 2007
8. Chiang CL and Zelen M. What is biostatistics? Biometrics 1985; 41:771-775


8.0 Existing, New and Revised Courses
Appendix R contains descriptions of all proposed core and elective courses for the Graduate
Program in Biostatistics. Appendix S contains proposal forms for all new and revised core
courses.

9.0 Future Directions of the Program
New courses will be developed as the program matures and new biostatistics faculty are hired in
the School of Public Health. The working group for this program recommends that the existing
course, CHEP 806.3 (Applied Statistical Methods for Follow-Up Data) be replaced with two
courses: (i) Survival Analysis, and (ii) Design and Analysis of Longitudinal Studies. The
Programs Committee will be responsible for overseeing the development of new courses and
their integration into the program, as well as the revision of existing courses to ensure they
contribute to the achievement of student learning objectives.
Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009                                29
10.0 Appendices
Appendix A:     Definitions of the Term “Collaborative”
Appendix B:     Program Calendar
Appendix C:     Comparison Table of Like Programs in Canada
Appendix D:     <not relevant to this proposal>
Appendix E:     <not relevant to this proposal>
Appendix F:     <not relevant to this proposal>
Appendix G:     Curriculum Vitae of Faculty Members
Appendix H:     Letters of Support for Proposed Program
Appendix I:     <not relevant to this proposal>
Appendix J:     Administrative Structure of College/Department/Unit
Appendix K:     <not relevant to this proposal>
Appendix L:     Physical Resource Requirements for New Program
Appendix M:     Budget Requirements for New Program
Appendix N:     Information Technology Requirements for New Program
Appendix O:     <not relevant to this proposal>
Appendix P:     Library Requirements for New Program
Appendix Q:     Consultation with the Registrar
Appendix R:     Course Descriptions
Appendix S:     New and Revised Course Forms




Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009       30
                                      Appendices




Collaborative MSc/PhD Program in Biostatistics – April 23, 2009   31
Administrative and Governance
 Structures and processes 2.0
            School of Public Health




                              2008
         Authored by: Ad hoc subcommittee on Governance
                                                                             ADMINISTRATIVE AND GOVERNANCE STRUCTURES
                                                                                         AND PROCESSES 2.0
                                                                                                                                 School of Public Health




                                                                         Administrative Structures

                                                                           Organizational Design
                                                                         The School of Public Health shall be administered by the Executive Director of the School. Reporting to the Executive Director shall be a

                                                                              •     Director of Professional Programs who will serve as Graduate chair for all non-thesis academic programs of the School,
                                                                              •      Director of Research and Thesis-based programs who will serve as Graduate chair for all thesis-based academic programs of the School
                                                                              •     And a Director of Service and Outreach (to be appointed when the School grows large enough)

                                                                         These five individuals will also serve as the School of Public Health Executive Committee..

                                                                           Graduate Chair
                                                                         As a non-departmentalised college, the School of Public Health should have one Director who will serve as the Graduate Chair and will be the
Administrative and Governance Structures and processes 2.0 | 10/9/2008




                                                                         primary liaison between the School and the College of Graduate Studies and Research. While the decision making and administration of various
                                                                         academic programs will fall under the jurisdiction of a program chair, the flow of paper between the School and the CGSR will flow through the
                                                                         office of the Graduate Chair.

                                                                           Administrative Organizational Chart
                                                                         The Administrative structure of the School is reflected in Figure 1.




                            1
Figure 1




                                                                                                                                                  Administrative and Governance Structures and processes 2.0 | 10/9/2008
  Linkages between administrative and governance
Each of the Directors will chair an advisory committee drawn from the Academic Programs Committee except the Director of Service and Outreach
who will chair an advisory committee drawn from members of Faculty Council. The Thesis Programs Committee will have management sub-
committees for each o f the programs. The Biostatistics Management Committee is not properly an organ of the School of Public Health, but is
mandated by an agreement between the School of Public Health, the Department of Epidemiology and the Department of Mathematics and
Statistics. Although collegial committees are part of the administrative structure, they are shown in Figure 2, SPH Collegial Structures, since
they are composed of members of Faculty Council.

  Statutory committees: Collegial Processes
While ultimate authority for these decisions remains with the Executive Director, the administration of some decisions will be delegated to
standing committees. These committees will include all committees required by the terms of the Collective Agreement between the University and
the Faculty Association. At the time of publication of this report, that would include:

     •     Search Committees (Article 13.5.1 and others)
     •     Appointments Committees (Article 13.5.2 and others)
     •     SPH Review Committee (Article 15.10.3 and others)
     •     SPH Renewals and Tenure Committee (Article 15.10.2 and others)
     •     SPH Promotions Committee (Article 16.3.2 and others)
     •     SPH Salary Committee (Article 17.2.2, 17.3.2 and others)




                                                                                                                                                           2
                                                                         Governance Structures

                                                                             Faculty Council
                                                                         The Faculty Council will consist of

                                                                                 •     All faculty members who hold a primary appointment in the School or a secondary appointment in the School with a 0.25 FTE or
                                                                                       more time commitment to the School.
                                                                                 •     Two clinical community-based faculty members who have been elected by the community-based members 1 of the School to represent the
                                                                                       range of public health practice. At least one of these will be based outside of the Saskatoon Health Region.

                                                                         In addition, Faculty Council will include as members all positions listed in Part Three, V.1. A. of the University Council Bylaws. At the time of
                                                                         publication of this report, that included:

                                                                                 a.    The President of the University

                                                                                 b.    The Provost and Vice-Presidents

                                                                                 c.    The Vice-Provost

                                                                                 d.    The Associate Vice-President (Student and Enrolment Services)

                                                                                 e.    The Associate Vice-President (Information and Communications Technology)

                                                                                 f.    The Dean of the College, and, in the case of a School, the Director
Administrative and Governance Structures and processes 2.0 | 10/9/2008




                                                                                 g.    The Dean of Graduate Studies and Research

                                                                                 h.    The Dean, University Library

                                                                                 i.    The University Secretary

                                                                                 j.    The Director of Academic Services and Financial Assistance and Registrar

                                                                                 k.    Those Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors, Extension Specialists, and full-time lecturers, who are members of
                                                                                       departments which, for administrative purposes, are assigned to the Dean of that College or the Director of that School. The Faculty of
                                                                                       Arts and Science shall include members of those, and only those, professional departments for which no professional college exists.

                                                                                 l.    Instructors and special lecturers

                                                                                 m. Such other persons as Council may, from time to time, appoint.

                                                                         The duties of Faculty Council shall be consistent with the provisions of the University Council Bylaws, Part Three.2. As the time of publication
                                                                         of this document, these duties include:

                                                                                 a.    To make recommendations to the Council concerning the requirements for admission; the courses of study; the conditions for
                                                                                       graduation; the nature of the degrees to be conferred.

                                                                                 b.    To establish rules and methods for the advancement and graduation of students and their suspension for neglect of studies, or defective
                                                                                       scholarship.


                                                                         1
                                                                             Still to be defined.

                            3
     c.    To approve candidates for degrees in course and candidates for scholarships, prizes, etc.

     d.    To report to the Council any cases of misconduct which call for investigation by that body.

     e.    To recommend to Council when deemed advisable, in exceptional cases, that a student be required to withdraw when, in the opinion of
           the faculty of the college, it is manifest that the student is incompetent.

     f.    To recommend to the Bylaws Committee of Council when deemed advisable that a student be required to withdraw when, in the
           opinion of the faculty of the college the student is unsuitable to continue a course or to graduate; provided that this power shall vest in
           only the faculty or faculties as from time to time designated by the Council.
           Cases of minor discipline and misconduct which occur wholly within one College may be considered and determined by the Faculty of
           the College in which the offence occurred. In any case of discipline, the student concerned shall have the right of appeal to the
           University Council.

  Committees of Faculty Council
 Governance committees
There will be several standing committees of Faculty Council. These will include:

     •     The Academic Programs Committee
                o This committee will be charged with
                           advising the three Program Directors on academic issues related to the curricula and business of the academic
                               offerings of the School
                o Standing Sub-committees of the Academic Programs Committee will include the
                           Academic Integrity Committee which will be charged with hearing cases of discipline involving students.




                                                                                                                                                         Administrative and Governance Structures and processes 2.0 | 10/9/2008
                           The Academic Appeals Committee which will adjudicate appeals of students questioning Faculty Actions (such as
                               decisions regarding requirement to withdraw) or special requests such as requests for special deferred exams,
                               supplemental exams, late withdrawal from classes without academic penalty.)
                           An Advisory committee for each of the Administrative program Areas, i.e. professional thesis-based and V & I
                               programs
     •     The Community Advisory and Outreach Committee
     •     The Research Committee
     •     As needed, ad hoc committees will be struck with associated terms of reference and sunset dates.



The governance structure of the School of Public Health is illustrated in Figure 2.




                                                                                                                                                                  4
Administrative and Governance Structures and processes 2.0 | 10/9/2008




                                                                         Figure 2



                                                                         Issues still to be discussed
                                                                         Providing the structures described in this report are adopted by the
                                                                         faculty, there would still be a number of outstanding issues that we will
                                                                         need to discuss and resolve. They include:

                                                                              •     Student participation on committees
                                                                              •     Bylaws for the SPH
                                                                              •     Do we need a committee on accreditation?
                                                                              •     Terms of Reference for each committee



                            5
                                                                                                                                                     Figure 3
•   Do we need formal org structures to deal with Rural / aboriginal, infectious disease, veterinary public health, vaccinology
•   Do we need formal org structures for the any or all of the disciplinary areas of Public Health? (See Figure 3)
        o Environmental Health Sciences
        o Health policy & Management
        o Social & Behavioural Sciences
        o Epidemiology
        o Biostatistics
        o Do we need formal org structures for the cross cutting competency areas of Public Health (See Figure 3)
        o Communications and Informatics
        o Diversity & Culture
        o Leadership
        o Professionalism
        o Program Planning
        o Public health Biology
        o Systems thinking




                                                                                                                                  Administrative and Governance Structures and processes 2.0 | 10/9/2008




                                                                                                                                           6
                           Appendix R: Course Descriptions

1. Description of Required Credit Courses for MSc Program

CHEP 800.3 Epidemiology I
An introduction to the basic epidemiologic methods used to evaluate the distribution and
determinants of disease. Format will include both lectures and interactive seminars to provide
students with practical experience in epidemiological problem-solving. Examples will be
drawn from the fields of both communicable and non-communicable disease.

STAT 850.3 Mathematical Statistics and Inference
An overview of mathematical methods used in theoretical statistics with particular emphasis
on inference. This course will cover general probability distributions, generating functions,
limit theorems, likelihood concepts, exponential families, decision theory, Bayesian and
frequentist paradigms for estimation and testing, and asymptotic theory.

PUBH 842.3 Current Biostatistics Methods and Computer Applications
This course will introduce statistical methods commonly used by biostatisticians and their
application in current research problems. The emphasis will be on the analysis of discrete
outcomes and time-to-event data in observational and experimental designs. Class
participants will develop skills in applying statistical models using existing software
packages such as SAS and R.

2. Description of Required Credit Courses for PhD Program

CHEP 806.3 Applied Statistical Methods for Follow-Up Data
Statistical methods for longitudinal data analysis based on generalized estimating equations
and maximum likelihood theories, and survival analysis methods for follow-up studies will
be covered. This course focuses on the application of these statistical methods using SPSS
and SAS on life science data.

STAT 848.3 Multivariate Data Analysis
A survey of methods for analyzing discrete and continuous multivariate data. Includes: log-
linear models, logistic regression, canonical correlation, discriminant analysis, cluster
analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and factor analysis.

STAT 841.3 Probability Theory
Probability spaces and random variables. Distribution functions. Convergence of random
variables. Characteristic functions. Fundamental limit theorems. Conditional expectations.

CHEP 810.3 Advanced Topics in Clinical Trials
Explore methods and issues in the design, conduct and analysis of clinical trials, focusing on
Phase II and III trials. Topics covered include: patient selection, treatment allocation,
randomization techniques, endpoint definition, protocol development, sample size
calculation, p-values, quality data collection, intent-to-treat analysis, analysis of compliance
data, equivalency testing, surrogate endpoints, multiple comparisons, sequential testing,
interim analysis, data analysis procedures and interpretation of results.




                                                1
STAT 834.3 Advanced Experimental Design
Review of the linear model; Randomization theory; Randomized blocks and Latin Squares;
Factorial treatment structure; Calculus of factors; Incomplete block designs; Fractional
factorials; Response surface designs; Optimal designs.

3. Description of Potential Elective Credit Courses for MSc and PhD
   Programs

CHEP 801.3 Epidemiology II (MSc, PhD)
Advanced epidemiologic theory and methods. Advanced techniques will be applied to a
series of epidemiologic problems from the fields of communicable and non-communicable
disease.

CHEP 806.3 Applied Statistical Methods for Follow-Up Data (MSc)
Statistical methods for longitudinal data analysis based on generalized estimating equations
and maximum likelihood theories, and survival analysis methods for follow-up studies will
be covered. This course focuses on the application of these statistical methods using SPSS
and SAS on life science data.

CHEP 803.3 Health Promotion (MSc, PhD)
An introduction to health promotion practice, theory, and research. Topics include: power
and empowerment, change in individuals, small group development, community
development, healthy public policy, coalition-building and advocacy, linking research and
action.

CHEP 804.3 Community Health Issues (MSc, PhD)
Overview of the field of community health, including health determinants, health status,
health care organization, health information systems, and specific health topics, such as
native health, maternal and child health issues, and cardiovascular and cancer diseases.

CMPT 818.3 Queuing Theory and Modeling Applications (MSc, PhD)
Markov and queuing processes in maintenance, inventory and traffic problems. The analysis
of queues. Transient and steady state solutions.

CMPT 830.3 Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (MSc, PhD)
Provides an in-depth algorithms-based introduction to major concepts and techniques in
bioinformatics. Topics include algorithms for structure prediction and similarity, sequence
similarity and alignment, metabolic and regulatory pathways, sequence assembly,
comparative genomics, expression analysis, database searching, artificial life and biological
computation.

CMPT 858.3 Topics in Modeling and Operations Research (MSc, PhD)
In-depth coverage of recent research areas from operations research, and applications to
system modeling. Advanced topics from mathematical programming, queuing theory,
inventory control, simulation, Markov modeling, and simulation.

PUBH 867.3 Health Policy and Politics (MSc, PhD)
Deals with program and service planning for health care at the institutional, community,
regional and provincial, national and international levels. The course takes a macro approach


                                              2
to broad health policy and planning goals and follows these policies through to the level of
institutional implementation. Policy analysis is an important component and much class time
is spent analysing real life policy documents.

PSY 807.3 Multivariate Statistics (MSc)
The course objective is for graduate students to gain some knowledge of and experience with
using multivariate statistics that are frequently used by psychologists dealing with non-
experimental or quasi-experimental data. The course will cover multiple regression, factor
analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and structural equation modeling.

STAT 834.3 Advanced Experimental Design (MSc)
Review of the linear model; Randomization theory; Randomized blocks and Latin Squares;
Factorial treatment structure; Calculus of factors; Incomplete block designs; Fractional
factorials; Response surface designs; Optimal designs.

STAT 848.3 Multivariate Data Analysis (MSc)
A survey of methods for analyzing discrete and continuous multivariate data, Includes; log-
linear models, logistic regression, canonical correlation, discriminant analysis, cluster
analysis, MANOVA, factor analysis.

STAT 842.3 Stochastic Processes (MSc, PhD)
Stochastic processes and random functions. Random walks, Markov property, and
Martingales. Stationary processes and ergodic theorems. Invariance principles and strong
approximation.

STAT 847.3 Special Topics in Probability and Statistics (MSc, PhD)
Topics will be related to recent developments in statistics and probability (multivariate
statistics, time series, experimental design, non-parametric statistics, etc.) of interest to the
instructor and students.

STAT 851.3 Linear Models (MSc, PhD)
A rigorous development of the general linear model using vector space theory. Topics to be
covered include generalized inverses, orthogonal projections, quadratic forms, Gauss-Markov
theorem, and estimability. Students may not receive credit for both STAT 443 and STAT
851.

VLAC 881.3 Clinical Trial Design and Analysis (MSc)
A course for veterinary graduate students who need an understanding of clinical trial design,
statistics and clinical epidemiology in order to carry out their research and to evaluate
themselves as clinicians. The course will cover areas of clinical trial design, applied medical
statistics, diagnostic test evaluation and writing research grants.

VTMC 832.3 Epizootiology of Infectious Diseases (MSc, PhD)
Lectures, seminars and exercises will be given on the epizootiology and control of infectious
diseases of animal populations, with emphasis given to: techniques of collection of data and
sampling; application of modern microbiological laboratory methods; analysis of data; and
interpretation of results, as applied to epizootiological investigations.




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