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Poole _ Bournemouth Strategic Framework

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					Poole and Bournemouth
Strategic Framework and
 Action Plan (2008 – 10)

         Final Report
         March 2008




       TEAM Tourism Consulting


            4 Thorburn Rd,
              Edinburgh
               EH13 0BQ
       info@team-tourism.com

      Phone: +44 131 466 1005
      www.team-tourism.com
Contents

Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................... i

1.       Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

Position Analysis.......................................................................................................................... 3

2.       Overview of tourism in Poole and Bournemouth..............................................................4
3.       Strategic Context...................................................................................................................9
4.       Market segments .................................................................................................................12
5.       The Destination – product and services ...........................................................................24
6.       SWOT and Challenges ........................................................................................................32

The Strategic Framework ......................................................................................................... 35

7.       Overview ...............................................................................................................................36
8.       Strategic Priority 1: Attracting ............................................................................................39
9.       Strategic Priority 2: Welcoming..........................................................................................43
10.      Strategic Priority 3: Sustaining ............................................................................................46
11.      Strategic Priority 4: Partnership ..........................................................................................49
12.      Strategic Priority 5: Intelligence .........................................................................................51
13.      Key Performance Indicators ..............................................................................................53

14.      Action Plan............................................................................................................................54
Executive Summary

This document is a Strategic Framework and Action Plan for 2008 to 2010 for the Poole
and Bournemouth Destination Management Partnership Co-ordinating Group.

Position Analysis

The Strategic Framework provides a detailed Position Analysis looking at the current state
of tourism in Bournemouth and Poole – this looks specifically at:
   The impact of tourism in Bournemouth and Poole – section 2 (page 4)
   The strategic context – section 3 (page 9)
   An overview of the main groups - section 4 (page 12)

   The destination offer - section 5 (page 24).

The current position is summarised in a SWOT analysis – section 6 (page 32). Arising from
this, a number of challenges can be identified for Bournemouth and Poole:
   Diversifying the market – the reliance older demographic groups and the potential
    failure to replace lost markets and markets that are ageing is a real threat. While
    these have been offset to some extent by the development of conference and
    education / language school markets, there is still a need to further diversify the
    market.

   New products and positioning – diversifying the market may also require further
    product development (continuing the process that has included development of the
    BICC, language schools and, latterly, the surf reef). Allied to this some re-positioning
    of the brand may be required.
   Quality of the offer – it would be fair to say that, while the quality of Bournemouth and
    Poole’s overall offer is good in places (e.g. environmental quality and management),
    it is average in others. Bringing the standard of the overall offer up will be a
    necessary pre-cursor to creating a more competitive destination. While progress has
    already begun it will be a significant future challenge.

   Ensuring sustainability – sustaining the tourism industry in Bournemouth and Poole will
    be a key medium to long challenge.
   Support infrastructure – in an atmosphere of increasingly constrained public
    resources, ensuring that the tourism support infrastructure (in terms of marketing and
    promotion, information provision, destination management, etc) is delivering added
    value will be a major challenge. Partnership will be key to this.




                                                                                              i
The Strategic Framework

Reflecting these challenges, three principal strategic priorities (or areas for action) can
be identified:
     Attracting – targeted marketing and development initiatives
     Welcoming – quality of delivery from planning, booking through to the actual visit
     Sustaining - ensuring a green and balanced industry.

Underpinning these are two further areas for action that, while not outputs in their own
right, will be necessary to the successful delivery of the strategic priorities. These are:
     Partnership – ensuring the most appropriate delivery structures are in place
     Intelligence – having the necessary research for effective decision making

Central to the development of these strategic priorities should lie a coherent market
development strategy. The following table summarises, in broad terms, the main market
groups and their developmental priorities and potential.

Market segment          Developmental         Potential
                        priority
Conference              Development – short   Potential growth in corporate markets. In association
(association and        to medium term        markets, the acquisition of new business will be required
corporate markets)                            to maintain the existing volume of business.


Language school /       Maintain market       There are some opportunities to expand the FE and HE
educational markets     share                 courses and industry linked to language courses, but
                                              appropriate accommodation may be a constraint.


Domestic holiday        Market maintenance    This is a major challenge, due to the anticipated long
makers                                        term decline of the current market. The priority is one of
                                              supplementing or replacing traditional holiday market
                                              segments with new domestic holiday market segments.


Domestic short          Development – short   Significant growth potential and potentially high yield.
breaks / water sports   to medium term
Day visits              Market maintenance    This group should also be nurtured, but recognising that
                                              there are issues relating to yield and sustainability (both
                                              economic and environmental).


VFR                     Market maintenance    Growth is likely to be driven by broader economic
Business travel         Market maintenance    factors. Priorities will be on ensuring the quality of
                                              product offer is right.




                                                                                                       ii
Strategic priority 1: Attracting

This priority is concerned with activities that will motivate people to visit - i.e. providing the
right attractors and promoting these to the appropriate audience. Key elements include:
   Branding and positioning - work is required to define the Bournemouth and Poole
    brands and the ways in which they should be developed, particularly in terms of
    attracting new markets.
   Promotional activity – there are a number of areas where the Partnership should
    develop joint promotional activity – e.g. on short breaks and watersports promotion,
    group travel promotion, E-marketing and CRM, PR, and procurement. Additional
    funding to develop BICB into Bournemouth & Poole (International) Conference
    Bureau should also be explored.
   New product development - new product development would facilitate the
    development of new markets and strengthen competitiveness in existing markets
    While potential areas could include watersports related product, further retail
    development), and boutique hotel development, the focus should be on special
    events development.
   Raising the quality of the offer could have a significant impact on appeal, positioning
    and competitiveness. The priority sector for quality improvement is
    accommodation, particularly in Bournemouth but other sectors (such as attractions
    and restaurants, night time economy) could also benefit.

Strategic priority 2: Welcoming

This priority is concerned with the quality of experience for the visitor through different
stages of their “trip” from booking to visit. Key areas for action include:

   Booking procedures – there is a strong logic to integrating, as far as possible,
    integrating information databases, and booking facilities between Bournemouth and
    Poole.
   Improving transport access - The Partnership will have an important role as a
    potential lobbying body – proactively raising the concerns and issues of the industry,
    and providing relevant expertise. There are also areas of access where the DMP can
    have a more direct impact - e.g. the development of transport schemes (such as a
    water bus), development of joint information and service promotion, and co-
    ordinated white-on-brown signing schemes.

   Public realm - areas of potential Partnership work include the development of joint
    policies, and information initiatives (e.g. on seafront byelaws, and the night time
    economy), and looking at common standards and improvements for entry points
    across both towns.
   Disabled Accessibility – core areas for the Partnership will include, e.g. a joint access
    guide and common web standards.




                                                                                                iii
Strategic priority 3: Sustaining

Tourism relies on the integrity of the destination’s environment and it is recognised that
destinations have to be environmentally and socially sustainable. Options for ensuring
sustainable good practice in Bournemouth and Poole include:
   Sustainable businesses –encouraging good business practice through actions that
    make savings and minimise impact (e.g. Actions of the Year), and promoting
    accreditation schemes such as the Green Tourism Business Scheme.
   Visitor stewardship - priorities include promoting Futurefootprint messages (e.g. 'Try
    Local, Buy Local', 'Explore what's on your doorstep'), and developing a sustainable
    tourism charter.
   Future proofing - Climate Change could have a significant potential impact on
    Bournemouth and Poole and a potential role of the DMP is to input into advance or
    contingency planning to address some of these issues.
   Host communities - The host community is a key element of tourism sustainability and
    within Bournemouth and Poole should continue to have involvement in the tourism
    sector through, e.g. citizen’s panels, consultation and specific host community
    research, and activities orientated to both residents and tourists (e.g. events, tourism
    week, special promotions).

Strategic Priority 4: Partnership

To deliver a joint Bournemouth and Poole tourism agenda there is a need for an
appropriate infrastructure and delivery mechanism. This is currently provided by the
Poole and Bournemouth DMP Co-ordinating Group.

The approach to the development of the DMP should be an iterative and incremental
one – i.e. as the need and rationale for a stronger partnership arises (through e.g. the
development of a potential joint brand architecture), the organisation and its scope and
method of delivery be reviewed. Central therefore to the development of the DMP will
be a finite action plan but also regularly auditing / monitoring of its activities.

The Partnership will endeavour to lever in available external funding from, e.g. SWERDA,
and the private sector for particular initiatives. It will also seek to achieve economies of
scale in the utilisation of existing budgets (from the respective tourism offices) for some
joint projects.

Strategic Priority 5: Research and Intelligence

Research and intelligence is key to good decision making and to performance
monitoring, and the Partnership should look at developing a research programme based
around three principal pieces of regular research. These are:



                                                                                               iv
   Industry monitoring research
   Regular visitor surveys
   Host communities research to look at their (changing) views of the tourism industry –

This core programme should be supported by a number of ad-hoc pieces of research
such as further research into perceptions and brands, and gaps and opportunities
among visitors and non-visitors, and conference research.

Key performance indicators

A number of performance indicators should be developed as a mechanism for
monitoring the strategic progress of the DMP (and other organisations it works with) and
associated activity. In many cases the baseline and targets need to be set following
more detailed research. A range of indicators are outlined in section 13 (page 53).

Action plan
Section 14 (page 54) provides a detailed action plan outlining a range of projects for the
partnership – their priority and approximate costs.




                                                                                            v
1.    Introduction

In April 2007, the Poole and Bournemouth Destination Management Partnership Co-
ordinating Group and South West Tourism commissioned TEAM Tourism Consulting to
develop a Strategic Framework and Action Plan for 2008 to 2010.

The purpose of the Strategic Framework is to provide a robust and cohesive joint tourism
action plan that the Partnership can implement in the coming years.



1.1     Background and context

Poole and Bournemouth is one of nine Destination Management areas across the South
West region. Within these nine areas there have been different approaches to
developing co-ordinated Destination Management partnerships or organisations, and
they are at different stages of development.

In Poole and Bournemouth, the Poole and Bournemouth Destination Management
Partnership was formed in June 2006. The Partnership is a ‘virtual’ one and was formed
through the Bournemouth and Poole Tourism Offices’ Tourism Management Boards. The
Partnership Co-ordinating Group is made up of 3 representatives of each Management
Board, plus respective Tourism Officers.

The emphasis of the Partnership is to maximise and exploit joint working opportunities
both where it is more efficient to do so and where it benefits the visitor to the
conurbation, whilst at the same time maintaining the individual brand identities and
competitiveness of Poole and Bournemouth.

The Co-ordinating Group has agreed a set of strategic areas for the Partnership. These
include:


     Raising the quality of the offer
     Co-ordinating investment
     Improving accessibility
     Sustainability
     Strategic marketing /improving market intelligence
     Strategic partnership development
     Community involvement




                                                                                           1
1.2     Terms of reference and approach

Specific objectives of this study were to:
      1. Review the tourism and economic strategies/service plans of Poole and
         Bournemouth.
      2. Undertake a destination audit
      3. Conduct market intelligence work related to market composition, perceived
         product strengths and weaknesses, brand awareness of Bournemouth & Poole,
         influences on the target segments’ decision to visit and competitor analysis
      4. Develop a SWOT
      5. Develop a Strategic Framework and Action Plan, including outline costs and
         potential funding and an assessment of potential risks.

The following study was based on information derived from:
     A review of key policy documents
     Desk research on the destination – its offer, relative performance and markets

     Focus group research among visitors and non-visitors
     A small number of stakeholder interviews
     A review of national market data
     A sustainable tourism workshop held in Bournemouth in September 2007




                                                                                        2
Position Analysis




                    3
2.    Overview of tourism in Poole and Bournemouth


2.1     Volume and value of tourism

Tourism in Bournemouth and Poole generates approximately £612m of direct visitor
expenditure. This supports (directly and indirectly) an estimated 17,500 jobs (about
12,700 in Bournemouth and 4800 in Poole).

The following table highlights the volume and value of tourism to Bournemouth and
Poole. This is broken down by the main purpose (holiday etc), main market group
(domestic overseas etc) and by destination. Figures are shown in terms of trips, nights
and spend as absolutes and percentages.

                 Volume and Value of tourism in Bournemouth and Poole
                                     Trips                  Nights               Spend


                              ‘000            %      ‘000             %      £m           %
Overall total                 7004           100     6523            100    612.4        100
By main market group..
Domestic (staying)            1518           22      5149            79     316.3        52
Overseas (staying)            160            2       1374            21     69.3         11
Day trips                     5326           76                             226.8        37
By purpose ...
  Holiday (staying)           1201           17      4613            71     272.5        44
  Business (staying)           207           3       619              9     56.6         9
  VFR (staying)                236           3       929             14      36          6
  Other (staying)               16           0       103              2     12.8         2
  Study (staying)              24            0       276              4      8.5         1
Total staying                 1678           24      6523            100    385.6        63
Day trips                     5326           76                             226.8        37
By destination..
Bournemouth                   4308           62      4572            70     426.1        70
Poole                         2696           38      1951            30     186.3        30
Notes: Data relates to 2005. Source: Cambridge Model / SWT


Key points in relation to the volume and value of tourism are:
     Nearly 76% of tourism related trips are by day visitors – they account for about 37% of
      expenditure.
     Domestic staying visitors account for about 22% of trips and 52% of expenditure
      (making them the most important group).




                                                                                               4
   Overseas visitors, while numerically unimportant in terms of trips (only 2%) account for
    a disproportionate number of nights and spend (about 11% of overall tourism spend –
    reflecting their long average stay of 10.5 nights - compared to 3.6 nights for domestic
    visitors).
   Bournemouth accounts for 70% of all tourism expenditure. It accounts for a higher
    proportion (76%) of staying visitor expenditure.
   Poole accounts for a relatively higher proportion of trips than expenditure (38% of all
    trips compared to 30% of expenditure) reflecting its lower numbers of staying visitors,
    and a lower average spend by staying visitors (reflecting the greater relative
    importance of caravan and friends / relatives in its accommodation mix).
   In terms of purpose, the primary group is holidaymakers – they account for 44% of
    expenditure. The next largest group (aside from day visitors) is business visitors.

It should be noted that statistics relating to the volume and value of tourism to
Bournemouth and Poole do vary according to source. For example, in relation to the
education market information collated by the English UK Office highlights that the market
generates 36,000 trips, 1.3million bednights and an overall spend of £130m. In relation
to the conference and exhibitions market data from the Bournemouth International
Conference Centre suggests 353,000 trips, 371,000 nights, generating an estimated spend
of £123.8m.

Explaining the discrepancy in the datasets is not necessarily straightforward. In the case
of the business tourism data there are three factors that help explain the discrepancies:
     1. The BIC data includes spending by conference organisers – this is would include
        a range of elements and some of this spend would be outside of Bournemouth
        and Poole. The SWT data (in the table) only includes spend by delegates once
        they are in Bournemouth and Poole.
     2. The BIC data includes day visitors. In SWT’s data these are not included in the
        business tourism category (which only relates to staying tourism).
     3. The method used by the Cambridge Model (on which the SWT figures is based)
        for assigning trips across a sub-regional level (in this case Dorset) may sometimes
        cause under (or over) estimations at a local level – this can be a problem where
        there are specific concentrations of activity in an area in certain market groups –
        particularly discretionary business tourism and education markets.

In terms of the education market, there are likely to be similar reasons for the
discrepancy and these include:
     1. Different spend definitions – the data from the English UK Office probably includes
        all spend (including fees and accommodation). The SWT figures will relate to
        spend by visitors once they are in Bournemouth and Poole and would exclude
        any pre-paid expenses.
     2. See point 3 above.

On this basis the data in the table should be regarded as indicative – it provides an
overview of the relative magnitude of direct visitor spend. However, it is likely that the


                                                                                              5
figures are underestimating the importance of certain market groups – particularly
education and discretionary business tourism markets.



2.2        Bedstock and occupancy

There are approximately 700 accommodation units, accounting for an estimated 35,000
bedspaces in Bournemouth and Poole. Estimated accommodation stock is summarised
in the following table.


                       Accommodation stock in Bournemouth and Poole
                         No. of      Bedspaces / Bedspaces1                   % inspected2     Average
Establishment type   establishments units / pitches                                             rating3
Hotel                     161            14463      14463                           53            2.3
Guesthouse / B&B etc      295             5667       5667                           28            3.1
Self catering             224             577        2308                           46              -
Touring
Caravans/tents              2              104        416                          50              5
Static Vans                 2              290       1160                          100             5
Holiday Centres             1             1250       5000                          100             5
Group
Accommodation               1              67         67
Marinas                     6            1502        6008
Total                     692            23920      35089
Sources: Data relating to the number of establishments and their size was provided by South West
Tourism (from the analysis on tourism volume and value undertaken in 2005 – see section 2.1). Data
on levels of inspection was provided by Poole and Bournemouth Councils (from their respective
DMSs)


Notes:
      1.       For self catering, caravans, holiday centres and marinas, 4 bedspaces per unit / pitch
               / berth has been assumed.
      2.       The percent inspected includes properties in both NQAS and the Bournemouth Quality
               Standards Scheme
      3.       The average rating is an average of stars / diamonds for that category of
               accommodation. For this purpose the Bournemouth Inspection Scheme has been
               assigned a value of 1.


Key points in relation to accommodation stock are:
     Operators are typically relatively small. The guesthouse / B&B sector represents the
      largest group of operators (43%), followed by the self-catering sector (32%).
     In terms of bedspaces, the hotel sector is the most significant – accounting for 41%.
      Other significant sectors (or potential sectors include) marinas (17%), the guesthouse
      sector (16%), and Rockley Park (14%).



                                                                                                        6
   Levels of inspection vary from sector to sector. Half of the hotel sector is inspected
    (53%) and about half (46%) of the self-catering sector is – levels of inspection are
    much lower in the guesthouse / B&B sector (an estimated 28%). Overall 38% (i.e. 272
    properties) of properties are inspected (excluding properties in the Bournemouth
    Quality Standards Scheme this equates to 29%) – this compares to 42% (in NAQAS)
    across the SW region
   Hotels that are inspected tend to be mid range – typically 3 star but also commonly 2
    star and the Bournemouth Inspection Scheme. (NB there may be an issue that non-
    inspected branded chain hotels would be more likely to be in the 3 to 4 star range).
    Guest accommodation was more typically in the 4 star / diamond category and
    there were a number of sliver and one gold awarded establishments.
   Only four accommodation properties are in the Green Tourism Business Scheme
    (GTBS) or David Bellamy Scheme.
   The majority of establishments are in Bournemouth (65%) – although bedspaces are
    more evenly spread – 56% are in Bournemouth. However this figure should be treated
    with some caution – a significant proportion of Poole’s bedspaces are in self-catering
    / caravan / marina type accommodation. These in theory provide significant
    bedspaces but in reality tend to operate at relatively low unit / pitch occupancy
    (and even lower bedspace occupancy).
   There are significant differences between the accommodation stocks of
    Bournemouth and Poole:
    o   Bournemouth is dominated by serviced accommodation (particularly hotels in
        terms of bedspaces) with a limited self-catering offer (particularly in terms of
        caravan and camping).
    o   Poole is the opposite with a relatively small serviced sector but significant supply
        in self-catering.

    o   In this respect the two destinations have strong complementarity in their
        accommodation offers.
    o   Levels of inspection are slightly higher in Poole, although this is only noticeably so
        in the guesthouse / B&B sector. Hotel accommodation in Poole, while still
        typically 3 star, tends more to 4 star than 2 star.




                                                                                                 7
The following table summarises key points in relation to hotel occupancy rates.


                               Hotel Occupancy: Key points
Room Occupancy (Bournemouth)                                            65%
Bed Occupancy (Bournemouth)                                             52%
Weekday room occupancy                                                  65%
Busiest month (Bournemouth)                                     August - 82%
Quietest month (Bournemouth)                                   January – 42%
Room occupancy (Poole)                                                  68%
Room occupancy (Dorset)                                                 61%
Source: Dorset Tourism Trends Survey – The Market Research Group 2005


Bournemouth’s room occupancy (at 65%) is about 4% higher than Dorset (61%). Poole is
around 68-69% (albeit this based on a relatively small sample - 5 establishments).

There are significant seasonal variations in Bournemouth’s occupancy (August’s
occupancy is twice January’s).




                                                                                       8
3.    Strategic Context


3.1     The Regional Context

Towards 2015 (The Regional Tourism Strategy) was published in January 2005 and sets out
the strategic vision and priorities for the South West region for the next ten years.

The three main strategic aims of ‘Towards 2015’ are:
     Driving up Quality - South West England is does not want to become, a ‘cheap’
      destination. By driving up quality and the competitiveness of businesses in the region,
      the aim is to increase value and respond to the changing demands of existing and
      new visitors.
     Delivering Truly Sustainable Tourism through meeting the needs of the visitor, industry
      and community, within environmental limits.
     Creating Superior Destination Management Arrangements - For the strategy to be
      effective, the need to rationalise the wide variety of methods and structures involved
      in tourism support and promotion was identified. The visitor experience should
      ultimately be delivered at ‘destination level’ and it is on this experience that visitors
      base their decisions on whether or not they will return.

‘Towards 2015’ proposes the formation of a number of destination management
organisations or partnerships involving, as appropriate, local authorities, the tourism
trade, the host community, Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs), business support
and training organisations, SWT and SWRDA. Nine DMO/DMP areas have now been
agreed.

The DMO Delivery Plan for ‘Towards 2015’ states that delivering stronger destination
management requires DMOs to ensure (through direct action or identified agents) the
co-ordination of the functions that define the destination, such as:
     Strategy and planning/policy (Direct Role)
     Representation of interest (Direct Role)

     Product development (co-ordination and general/public services/quality)
      (Direct/Indirect Role)
     Marketing (Direct Role)
     Skills/Training (Direct and/or indirect role)
     Infrastructure (Indirect/Lobby Role)
     Information (Destination Management Systems/TICs) (Direct Role)
     Research (Direct/Collaborative Role)
     Ensuring true sustainability of the destination and its products (Direct Role)


                                                                                                9
     Business support and advice (Indirect Role)
     Ensuring coherence/communication between the services and within the industry
      (Direct Role)
     Quality (Direct Role)
     Intra-DMO collaboration and with SWT (Direct Role)
     A strong voice (in local and some regional terms - Direct, in some regional and
      national terms – Indirect)

3.2     Dorset and the New Forest Partnership

Under the new DMO/DMP structure for the South West, Poole and Bournemouth is
separate from Dorset and from the adjacent area of the New Forest. There has been a
strong relationship between the three areas in recent years through the Dorset and New
Forest Partnership.

The role of the Partnership is:
     To enhance the quality of the visitor experience
     To improve the viability and performance of tourism enterprises
     To develop, promote and champion the Dorset New Forest brand in appropriate
      markets.

It seeks to co-ordinate activity between the various players, raise awareness of the
importance of tourism and win the maximum amount of funding for the sub-region.

Established in 1996 the Partnership includes the unitary authorities of Bournemouth and
Poole, the county and district councils of Dorset and the New Forest, the regional tourist
boards - Tourism South East and South West Tourism and the various organisations
supporting business development in the area.

3.3     The Poole Context

The primary policy relating to tourism in Poole is ‘A Tourism Strategy for Poole 2006-15’.
This is set in a context of ‘Towards 2015’, as well as local strategies (Cultural Strategy,
Economic Development Strategy, Local plan etc).

The mission statement is that “Poole aims to maximize the positive contribution tourism
makes to the image, environment, and economic development of Poole. Poole is both
dynamic and sensitive in the management, marketing and development of tourism, so
as to sustain and generate employment opportunities, create confidence for inward
investment, stimulate civic pride and enhance the provision of leisure opportunities
for resident and visitor alike.”

There are four core values / strategic aims:



                                                                                              10
     Promoting Wise Growth
     Pursuing Quality
     Involving the Host Community
     Increasing Competitiveness

There are also a number of guiding principles:
     Environment – the strategy needs to embrace the concept of visitor management
      principles to minimise the impact of tourism and disperse spend.
     Host community – residents should be encouraged to support the industry and
      recognise it benefits. Similarly businesses that benefit from tourism should be involved
      in decision making.
     Partnerships – these are core and the most significant is the Poole Tourism Partnership.
     Quality – the last decade has seen significant investment in Poole’s hotel and
      restaurant sectors. Maintaining quality is of paramount importance – use of national
      inspection schemes is an example.
     Accessibility – while improvements to the A31 link and A350 are priorities, incentives
      need to be found to encourage the visitor to adopt public transport more, and traffic
      management solutions need to be found.
     Innovation – in marketing and development activity.
     Targeted promotion with high legacy value.

Poole’s marketing and brand activity focuses on promotion of a “contemporary life-style
brand”. The current slogan is “Surf, Rest and Play”. Marketing activity will focus on
domestic audiences and continue to utilise a range of techniques – e.g. the Poole
Visitors Guide, and pooletourism.com.

Marketing and event development also places an emphasis on:
     Drawing visitors to Poole Quay, where there are more spending opportunities.
     Attracting new cruise liner visits
     Increasing impact in the shoulder months
     Themes like ‘Sheer Indulgence’ and eating out.

3.4     The Bournemouth Context

Bournemouth’s tourism policy context is provided by the Bournemouth Tourism Strategy
(2005 to 2015).

The Vision of this strategy is that “By 2015 Bournemouth will be: Acknowledged as the
UK’s premier resort for leisure, business and educational tourism”.




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The guiding principles for realising this vision will be:


    Environment - protection and enhancement of the resort’s essential character and
     appeal – including creating a safe and enjoyable environment
    Quality – improvement of the quality of visitor experience across all sectors of the
     tourism industry
    Value - working to increase total value to the resort not always increasing volume
    Brand - managing the investment legacy of the Bournemouth brand to secure a
     prosperous tourism industry for the future
    Partnership - recognising the multi-faceted nature of the business through integrated
     partnership working
    Innovation - constantly innovating to maintain competitive advantage for
     Bournemouth in both service development and marketing

Bournemouth Tourism produces an annual business plan and agrees strategic priorities
that are considered and approved by the Bournemouth Tourism Management Board
(see section 5.3), which will be also responsible for delivery and monitoring of the
strategy.



4.   Market segments

The following section provides an overview of the main market groups (or high level
segments) visiting Poole and Bournemouth – these include:

    Meetings and conferences
    Non-discretionary business tourism
    Education and language schools
    Domestic short breaks
    Domestic holidaymakers
    Visiting friends and relatives

    Day visits




                                                                                            12
SEGMENT:                Conferences
IMPACT:                 In overall terms a small volume market (possibly around 1-2% of the
                        total market and around a third of the overall business tourism
                        market to B&P) but more important in value terms (possibly around
                        5% of spend) 1 .

                        Yield per night is very high – considerably higher than other
                        segments.

MOTIVATIONS:            Meetings and conferences
DESCRIPTION:            Key points on B&P’s conference markets:
                            o      The importance of association markets – Bournemouth and
                                   Poole attract a higher proportion of this sector than UK
                                   averages. The predominance of the offer is in Bournemouth
                                   with key venues including the Bournemouth International
                                   Centre and the town is a leading UK conference
                                   destination
                            o      However, in volume terms public sector and corporate
                                   conferences account for a higher relative volume than
                                   associations in B&P.
                            o      Corporate conferences are less important than UK
                                   averages.

                            o      Conference sizes are relatively large in B&P (a function of
                                   the association market) – around 120 delegates cf 53
                                   nationally. The BIC is attracting conferences in excess of
                                   2000 delegates
                            o      The majority of conferences in B&P are overnight (the
                                   opposite to UK averages where most conference/meetings
                                   are day and non-residential). Average length of stay will be
                                   around 2 nights.

COMPETITORS:            In association (and public sector) markets: Edinburgh, Glasgow,
                        Birmingham, Manchester, London, Brighton, Blackpool, Harrogate,
                        Eastbourne, Liverpool, Cardiff and Torquay.

                        In corporate markets – as above + other regional cities and
                        products
PRODUCT
                           Meeting facilities – dependent on conference size but likely to
REQUIREMENTS
                            require a main auditorium and breakout facilities plus fringe
                            venues.


1   Or more – see note on page 5



                                                                                                 13
                          Possibly exhibition space
                          Serviced accommodation (generally 3 star +)
                          Banqueting facilities
                          Evening economy
                          Partner programmes
POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE   In the association market, Bournemouth is a mature product in a
DEVELOPMENT            competitive market place, which suggests a realistic strategy will
                       be broadly on market maintenance not significant growth and on
                       the development of opportunities around smaller conferences.


                       Growth in the Bournemouth and Poole economies represents an
                       opportunity for growth in the corporate conference market.


                       Potential to lead the market with green credentials – ‘sustainable
                       conferencing’
CONSTRAINTS ON         Hotel stock – a relative lack of top end (4 and 5 star)
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT     accommodation.
SYNERGIES / CONFLICT   Conferences are typically outside the main holiday season, and
WITH OTHER SEGMENTS    are midweek – as such, they complement leisure markets well.
                       Conferences may displace some corporate travel at times.


RESEARCH               Priorities include:
REQUIREMENTS
                          A detailed venue survey looking levels of performance, types
                           and sizes of events.
                          Delegate survey – looking at characteristics, spend, secondary
                           activities, partner programmes etc.




                                                                                            14
SEGMENT:               Non discretionary business market
IMPACT:                A small volume market (possibly around 2% of the total market) but
                       more important in value terms (possibly around 4-5% of spend).

                       Yield per night is high – this market more typically stays in hotel
                       accommodation. In relative terms a more important market for
                       Poole.

MOTIVATIONS:           Non discretionary – coming for small meeting etc
DESCRIPTION:           Corporate travellers will be typically:
                          Travelling alone
                          Staying one to two nights
                          Aged 45+

                          Staying in hotel accommodation.

COMPETITORS:           Limited – a non discretionary market. The destination tends to be a
                       given and key decisions are likely to be around which hotel stay in.

PRODUCT                    o   Serviced accommodation (generally 3 star +)
REQUIREMENTS               o   Evening economy

POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE   The market is liable to grow in line with economic growth and in
DEVELOPMENT            totality it is difficult to influence. There may be some potential to
                       increase spend per night but this is only likely to be achieved
                       through hotel and restaurant offers.


                       Develop a greener product and brands as added value offer to
                       visit.
CONSTRAINTS ON         Hotel stock – capacity in top end (4 and 5 star) accommodation
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
SYNERGIES / CONFLICT   A non-seasonal, and midweek segment – it complements leisure
WITH OTHER SEGMENTS    markets. Helps support certain types of hotel offer that benefits the
                       conference offer.


RESEARCH               Possible research into corporate travellers to look at opportunities
REQUIREMENTS           for increased spending and leisure return (but this is probably not a
                       priority compared to other research requirements).




                                                                                               15
SEGMENT:       Education and language school markets
IMPACT:        Estimates of the impact of this market vary (see page 4) but in
               overall terms it may be worth approximately £130m.

               While yield per night is quite low (partly a function of but this is offset
               by the generally long average stay, and some of the qualitative
               impacts of the market.

MOTIVATIONS:   Learning English as a foreign language is the principal motivation
               but there has been growth in English for Business, English for
               Medicine, and academic tourism degrees. The destination offer
               will also be important (nightlife, accommodation, retail etc).

DESCRIPTION:   This market is diverse in its origins – it is primarily Europe, but other
               important areas include South America, South East Asia, and the
               Middle East.

               Approximately 75% of the market is under 25, but the “business”
               marker (e.g. English for Business) tends to over 25.

               The average length of stay is 6.3 weeks for the majority of students
               but approximately a third are staying for 3 weeks. Most (92%) are
               staying with host families but approximately 8% are in commercial
               accommodation (hotels and guesthouses).

               There is a slight summer peak – about a third of business is in the
               summer period, with remaining two-thirds spread across the rest of
               the year.

               Bournemouth and Poole have the biggest single number of schools
               outside Greater London - there are 20 accredited and 14 non-
               accredited schools. Most are in Bournemouth (about 6 schools are
               in Poole) but the benefits are felt across both towns (with about
               (£90m spend in Bournemouth and £40m in Poole).



COMPETITORS:   London, Cambridge, Oxford, Brighton, Eastbourne
PRODUCT           o Academic reputation, accreditation.
REQUIREMENTS      o Good quality residential accommodation for hosting
                     students
                  o Location – safe and clean environment, ease and
                     convenient transport access to schools universities and
                     colleges.


                                                                                           16
                          o   Good leisure infrastructure – attractions, events, public
                              amenities (beaches parks) wide range of places to eat and
                              good evening economy offer.
                          o   Quick and convenient access from local and national
                              airports, and ferry ports.
POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE   Expanding the further and higher education offer. More academic
DEVELOPMENT            purpose courses with Language schools.


                       New territories for students – e.g. Turkey has been a recent growth
                       area.


CONSTRAINTS ON         There are some accommodation shortages in summer, creating a
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT     constraint for future growth.



SYNERGIES / CONFLICT   The market has strong synergies with other market groups (like
WITH OTHER SEGMENTS    certain elements of the domestic holiday market – particularly
                       youth markets – and conference markets) in the sense of sustaining
                       elements of the offer (particularly evening economy) and adding
                       to the vibrancy of the town. This sector also put income direct into
                       local households through payment to host families


RESEARCH               Fairly good research base limited additional research required
REQUIREMENTS




                                                                                         17
SEGMENT:               Domestic short breaks
IMPACT:                Currently a relatively small volume market (possibly around 20% of
                       the holiday market – about 3% of the total market in terms of
                       volume).

                       Yield per night is relatively high (probably higher than the average
                       holiday visitor) but this is offset by the shorter than average length
                       of stay.

MOTIVATIONS:           Motivations will vary – relaxation will be the prime generic
                       motivation but this may manifest itself in a number of activities –
                       events, concerts, shopping, beach, watersports, eating out, visiting
                       the surrounding area.

                       The relative importance of these activities will vary from group to
                       group but within the short break market one activity or attractor is
                       likely to be of primary importance (cf the longer stay holiday
                       market).

DESCRIPTION:           Characteristics of this group will vary and, while generally reflective
                       of the broader holiday market, it is likely that the short break market
                       will be more predominately BC1, adult couples, 50+, from the south
                       east and south west. Specific groups within the short break market
                       place will have more distinctive socio-demographic characteristics
                       – e.g. watersports will be more skewed to younger age groups.

                       Visiting patterns will not be as seasonally pronounced as the main
                       holiday market.

COMPETITORS:           UK towns and cities (e.g. London, Bath, York, Stratford, Canterbury,
                       Bristol).
                       Resorts (e.g. Brighton, Eastbourne, Weymouth, Devon, Cornwall)
                       Rural destinations (e.g. Devon, Cornwall, Cotswolds)
                       European cities (by Eurostar, budget airlines)

PRODUCT                   o   Serviced accommodation
REQUIREMENTS              o   Bars and restaurants
                          o   Shopping
                          o   Attractors – will vary (see motivations above).

POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE   Reasonable – short breaks are still a buoyant market (although
DEVELOPMENT            increasingly competitive) and offer growth potential for B&P.


                       Development of a greener offer (e.g. through promotion of car free



                                                                                            18
                       trips/breaks or negotiated deals with rail providers for discounts on
                       accommodation or attractions) has some potential.
CONSTRAINTS ON         Accommodation stock – undifferentiated offer / few boutique
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT     /themed experience type hotels and Guest Houses.


                       Retail offer – reasonable but needs to be more competitive
                       compared to city destinations and nearby cities (Southampton,
                       Portsmouth).


                       Image – not strongly positioned as a short break destination.
SYNERGIES / CONFLICT   Generally weekends with a reasonable seasonal spread. Good
WITH OTHER SEGMENTS    synergy with most markets although there may be conflict in peak
                       summer periods with main holiday markets.


RESEARCH                  o   Quantitative research into characteristics, activities and
REQUIREMENTS                  motivations of current short break visitors
                          o   Qualitative research into their perceptions and motivations.




                                                                                           19
SEGMENT:       Domestic holidays
IMPACT:        B&P’s most important market in impact terms. Holidays (including
               short breaks) account for around 70% of bednights and 40% of total
               expenditure.

               Yield per night is average but average length of stay is long
               (around 6.5 nights)

MOTIVATIONS:   As with short breaks motivations will vary – relaxation is the prime
               generic motivation but “family beach holiday” is also a key one.

               Influential factors in choosing P&B include – clean well presented
               town, scenic environment, beach/water activities, shopping, plenty
               for adults, and a base for touring.

               Holiday visitors will undertake a number of activities. These will
               include events, concerts, shopping, beach, watersports, eating out,
               visiting the surrounding area.

DESCRIPTION:   About half of the holiday market is coming for a main holiday – the
               rest are on an additional holiday.

               Characteristics of this group vary.
                  The geographic catchment for visitors is relatively wide – a
                   nationwide appeal but the core areas are the western Home
                   Counties and south Midlands.
                  In terms of socio-economic group, the spread is broad but the
                   two biggest (and over UK averages for tourism trips) are C1s
                   and C2s. DEs are a bigger group than ABs.
                  The over 65s are the biggest group (about a third of the
                   market).

                  The 16-34s, 35-54s, and 55-64s (NB a smaller age range) groups
                   are broadly the same size (all around 20% of visitors).
                  Children account for about 10% of the market.

                  In terms of group composition, the largest markets are adults
                   (couples or adult groups – STB’s research indicates this 80% of
                   the market). Families represent about 12% of holiday visitors. A
                   number of broad holiday market segments (based primarily on
                   lifestage) can be identified – these include:
                   o Independent seniors – key characteristics are: over 60;
                        travelling in couples; high level of repeat visiting; SEG varies
                        but mainly C; staying in hotels. Probably the largest holiday



                                                                                      20
                          o   Organised seniors – similar in their characteristics to the
                              independent seniors but travelling in organised groups
                              (often coaches). A medium sized holiday segment.
                          o   Empty nesters - key characteristics are: 45 – 60; couples; B /
                              C1/C2; accommodation varies. A medium sized holiday
                              segment.
                          o   Families – key characteristics are: aged 25 – 45/50; C1/C2
                              but also DE; Families with school age children (mainly
                              primary but reasonable proportions of secondary); may be
                              travelling as extended families or multiple family groups;
                              main summer season. A medium sized holiday segment.
                          o   Pre school families – key characteristics are: aged 25-35;
                              Pre school children; Predominately C1C2; staying in self
                              catering / holiday. A smaller holiday segment.

COMPETITORS:           Resorts (e.g. Brighton, Eastbourne, Weymouth, Devon, Cornwall)
                       Rural destinations (e.g. Devon, Cornwall, Cotswolds, Cumbria)
                       Overseas coastal destinations

PRODUCT                This is a wide market and product requirements will reflect this. The
REQUIREMENTS           holiday market needs a range of types and budgets of
                       accommodation.

POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE   Realistically the aspiration should be on retention of market share.
DEVELOPMENT            This will however require the acquisition of new markets, probably
                       with different aspirations and product requirements to some current
                       holiday markets.


CONSTRAINTS ON         Constraints are probably more about limited growth in long stay
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT     holiday markets and as they are about the product offer and
                       destination positioning.


SYNERGIES / CONFLICT   Relatively seasonal market coming week round. May conflict with
WITH OTHER SEGMENTS    other segments in terms of potential capacity (e.g. short breaks
                       during peak periods) or mix (e.g. conferences and business visitors –
                       the two sectors have different needs /requirements).


RESEARCH               Research to identify barriers and opportunities for new market
REQUIREMENTS           acquisition to include more segmentation of the new markets.




                                                                                           21
SEGMENT:               Visiting friends and relatives (VFR)

IMPACT:                VFR accounts for approximately 3% of overall trips but about 14% of
                       nights.

                       They are a moderate spending group – spending considerably
                       more per trip than day visitors but less per trip than staying holiday,
                       business visitors, and education markets. Overall they account for
                       about 6% of total spend. It should also be noted that VFR trips do
                       stimulate spend among their hosts (often to the same or greater
                       level than the visitor themselves).

MOTIVATIONS:           Although the primary motivation is visiting friends and relatives,
                       there is often a strong leisure element, particularly among the
                       visiting friends market. The extent of the leisure influence in decision
                       making will vary but, in some cases, the VFR strongly overlaps with
                       holiday markets.

DESCRIPTION:           Characteristics vary significantly for this group – it covers a broad
                       spectrum of the population.

                       In general terms, the visiting friends market is more liable to be
                       under 35 – the visiting family is more skewed to older age groups.

                       Accommodation used will tend to be a friend or relative’s house
                       but there will also be some use of commercial accommodation
                       among this group.
COMPETITORS:           No specific competitors – this is largely (although entirely) a non-
                       discretionary market.

PRODUCT                Similar to day visitor and holiday markets, but it may be hosts that
REQUIREMENTS           source information and make decisions on activities.

POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE   Liable to be in line with broader economic and population
DEVELOPMENT            (including students) growth.

CONSTRAINTS ON         None
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
SYNERGIES / CONFLICT   Conflicts are limited – particularly in terms of demand / capacity
WITH OTHER SEGMENTS    issues around accommodation.
                       The group has synergy with most other market segments
                       (particularly holiday and day visitors) in terms of usage (and
                       support for) similar facilities (e.g. events, restaurants, retail).




                                                                                               22
SEGMENT:               Day visitors
IMPACT:                The largest group in volume terms and the second largest in terms
                       of value.

                       Yield per trip is low.
MOTIVATIONS:           Varied – activities will include an event, concert, meal or night out,
                       attraction, shopping, beach, watersports, etc

DESCRIPTION:           The characteristics and make up of this market will vary enormously.
                       The primary characteristic will be origin, which is generally an hour
                       to hour and a half.
COMPETITORS:           Competition will vary depending on the motivation / experience
                       but will include surrounding destinations – e.g. Southampton,
                       Portsmouth, Weymouth, Winchester, Salisbury, London, New Forest
                       etc.

PRODUCT                Varied depending on activity and motivation but generic ones
REQUIREMENTS           include:
                          Parking
                          Places to eat
POTENTIAL FOR FUTURE   Strategically there will be potential for modest growth in the day
DEVELOPMENT            visitor market (possibly 1% per annum). Tactically opportunities exist
                       to increase visitors for particular activities – e.g. watersports, events
                       etc.


                       Encouraging green travel to include integrated low cost options
                       with rail and bus operators will be a future priority.
CONSTRAINTS ON         Capacity in transport infrastructure and parking at certain times of
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT     year.


SYNERGIES / CONFLICT   Day visitors are a fundamental group that to help support facilities
WITH OTHER SEGMENTS    and activities (such as attractions, speciality retail, restaurants, etc)
                       that in turn are an attractor for staying visits.


                       However, volume of day visitors can, at certain times, create
                       pressures and conflicts.


RESEARCH               Research into certain day visitor groups, segmented by activities
REQUIREMENTS           and motivations, which support a wider marketing strategy. For
                       example, watersports, events.




                                                                                              23
5.     The Destination – product and services

5.1      The tourism product

The sea and associated products (beaches and water sports) are a key defining element
of the appeal of Bournemouth and Poole, particularly for longer stay visitors. However
they are not the only element and other attractors are as important, or more important
for certain groups.

This section outlines the core elements of Bournemouth and Poole’s tourism product:

Beaches are a prime asset for Poole and Bournemouth. Beaches in the destinations
benefit from positive management and eight beach areas along the Bournemouth and
Poole coast have Blue Flag status. Visitor research confirms the importance of the
beaches for visitors. For example, in Bournemouth 71% of staying visitors had gone to the
beach (and 35% planned to)

In Bournemouth, main beach user groups are families and couples (typically older). This
contrasts slightly with the overall visitor appeal which is more typically couples / adults
with no children. Beaches and water based activities were an influential factor on the
decision to visit for three fifths of staying visitors (60%).

Attractions Poole and Bournemouth have approximately 20 attractions covering a range
of themes. These include heritage and culture, museums, gardens and recreational
pursuits, boat tours and “family fun” (probably the principle category).

The majority of these attractions 2 are attracting in the region of a 100,000 visitors (i.e.
medium sized attractions), with a couple (the Poole Pottery Factory Outlet Shop, Tower
Park and Oceanarium) attracting in excess of 250k visits – i.e. large attractions.

Conferences
There are a significant number of conference and meeting venues in Bournemouth and
Poole (www.venuefinder.com lists over 50 of which 34 are members of the Bournemouth
International Conference Bureau, which also has hotels from Poole and the New Forest.).
Venues are primarily hotels but do include the Bournemouth International Centre, which
is the area’s regions principal venue and one of the leading purpose built conference
centres in the UK. It has capacity for approximately 4000 delegates and 4 major arenas.
Core markets are national association conferences, with linked trade exhibitions and
banqueting.



2   NB this is based on relatively dated 2002 data



                                                                                               24
While the majority of venues are located in Bournemouth there are active conference
venues in Poole, and conferences (including Bournemouth based ones) do provide
significant benefits for accommodation operators in Poole.

Water based activities
Bournemouth and Poole offers a significant range of water based activities and this
represents a core strength of the two destinations. There is a good infrastructure of
operators / schools / facilities – notably:

   Surfing – generally in Bournemouth, particularly with the development of the artificial
    reef at Boscombe Pier. Related operators include Bournemouth Surf School,
    Wavefreaks – Kidz Surf Camp.
   Sailing and Powerboating/Jetskiing – Poole / Bournemouth. There are a number of
    operators (e.g. Poole Sailing Ltd, Adrenalin Days, Superhawk Marine Ltd, Spinnaker
    Yachts), seven sailing clubs in Poole, and a boat haven for visiting yachts on Poole
    Quay.
   Wind and kite surfing – Poole, including events (the Animal Poole Windfest), and a
    number of operators / schools (FCwatersports, Surface2air sports, Rockley
    Watersports, Poole Harbour Watersports).
   Sea Kayaking – Bournemouth and Poole operators include Kayaking, FC Watersports
    Academy

   Diving - e.g. Aquatic Scuba Diving
   Angling - Poole – e.g. Poole Sea Angling Centre

Estimating the relative importance of water based activities in the overall tourism mix is
difficult and, it is an area that would benefit from further research. Whatever the numeric
size of these markets (and they are likely to be quite small in tourism terms), they do have
huge potential value in positioning and branding Bournemouth and Poole.

Other outdoor activities
Other activities include
   Golf – there are over 12 golf courses within a 30 minute drive of Bournemouth/Poole.
   Bowling - there are approximately 15 bowling sites in a 30 minute drive of
    Bournemouth.
   Adventure activities include Challenge Leisure (paintballing, clay pigeon shooting,
    quadbiking), Go Ape (high wire adventure activity) Serious Action Sports (archery,
    clay pigeon shooting), and Bournemouth Helicopters. There are a number of
    operators in the vicinity of Bournemouth and Poole offering paintball, quadbiking,
    4x4, mountain biking etc.




                                                                                           25
Events

Both Bournemouth and Poole have strong and established annual event programmes
covering a range of different themes.

Key ones in Poole include: Summer Breeze with Fireworks (14 weeks), Coles Miller Dream
Machines (26 weeks), Rockley Park Quay for my Car (18 weeks), BSO Proms in the Park,
Animal Poole Windfest, Poole Afloat, and up to 100 sailing events in the harbour/Poole
Bay.

Key ones in Bournemouth include: Summer Kids Free Fun Festival, BSO in the Park,
Bournemouth Air Festival, Bournemouth Literary Festival, Bourne Free Pride Festival,
Bournemouth Open Bowls Tournament.

Language Schools, Higher and Further Educational Institutions.
Language schools are a significant, but specialist part, of Bournemouth’s offer. It is the
largest centre for learning English in Britain outside of London – there are over 30
“permanent” language schools operating in the area (most of which are in
Bournemouth). In addition to this there are a number of “summer schools” which usually
operate during the months of June, July and August. An important growing market is
overseas students attending the FE and HE institutions. This market accounts for 2000
students per year who attend Bournemouth University, The Arts Institute and Bournemouth
and Poole College.



Live Entertainment
There are a number of venues in Bournemouth and Poole for live entertainment– these
include:
   Bournemouth International Centre and Pavilion theatre – attracting headline acts like
    Ricky Gervais, Russell Brand, McFly, Manic Street Preachers, and a range of popularist
    acts.
   The Opera House, Bournemouth – headline music acts including Isaac Hayes,
    Alabama 3, Sly and the Family Stone.
   The Pier Theatre – 2007 acts include the Magic of Queen, Freddie Starr, Summer
    Spectacular
   The Lighthouse, Poole – a major arts centre (the South’s largest Arts venue outside of
    London). It is home to the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra

   Brownsea Open Air Theatre – open air Shakespearean theatre

   AFC Bournemouth - football, banqueting, occasional live music

    Others – including Alexander Studio Theatre, Funnybone Comedy Club, Poole
    stadium (includes greyhounds and speedway), Mr Kyps (live music) and also Canford
    Arena at Canford Magna (which can accommodate up to 40,000 people).




                                                                                         26
Retail, eating and evening economy
Retail, eating out and the evening economy can play different roles for visitors. In
general terms they are a fundamental part of a destination role and play an important
supporting role – eating out and shopping are primary activities and areas of
expenditure for most visitors and will have a bearing on levels of satisfaction. For some
visitors (particularly short break markets), these elements are more of a motivation to visit.

In terms of retail, Bournemouth and Poole have a reasonable offer that reflects their
resident populations and importance in a wider Dorset context. They are (Bournemouth
in particular) well represented in terms of most high street brands, as well as some
department stores such as Beales). These are also supported by more boutique shopping
in Westbourne, and out-of-town shopping at Castlepoint.

While the retail offer is reasonable and will form part of the visitor experience, it is unlikely
to be competitive enough to provide the sole motivation to visit for staying visitors.

In terms of eating out, both Poole and Bournemouth offer a wide range and style of
eateries – Lebanese, Italian, Thai, Greek, French, seafood etc. – with a number of quality
restaurants. In Bournemouth and Poole, this forms an important element of the product.
Poole has a particularly strong eating out product especially fresh fish and seafood, with
5 AA rosette awarded restaurants. It is seen as a core element of the destination’s offer
and is featured very prominently in its marketing and promotional activity.

In terms of bars and clubs, Bournemouth in particularly is reasonably well served by a
range of bars and clubs – partly a reflection of its student population and language
schools.

Surrounding area
The surrounding area is a key element of the appeal of Bournemouth and Poole
(particularly for longer stay visitors) – the relationship is a two way one. The surrounding
area adds additional product themes and depth for visitors staying in Bournemouth and
Poole. In addition, Bournemouth and Poole offer a destination / day out for visitors
staying in the surrounding area.

Significant tourism destinations within the immediate area of Bournemouth and Poole
include the New Forest, the Jurassic Coast, rural Dorset, towns and cities (e.g. Salisbury,
Portsmouth, Southampton, Winchester), Jersey and Guernsey, and attractions (e.g.
Beaulieu, Monkey World, Bovington Tank Museum and Paulton’s Park).



5.2   Accessibility and public realm

Accessibility and transport




                                                                                               27
In broad terms, Bournemouth and Poole are well connected, with:
   An international airport serving a variety of domestic and European destinations, as
    well as further destinations served by Southampton Airport.
   Direct ferry services to the Channel Islands, Cherbourg and St. Malo (and routes from
    Portsmouth to Brittany and Bilbao).

   Direct train links and a regular service to London and the Midlands
   Regular coach services to London Victoria, Heathrow and Gatwick, and direct
    services to the West and Midlands (and north).

   Continuous motorway (M3) or dual carriageway access from London.
   Coach parking at Kings Park and Queens Road car parks in Bournemouth (plus four
    other drop off points), and Seldown Bridge Coach and Car Park and Poole Stadium
    (as well as drop off points on Poole Quay).
   Car parking is provided by 39 car parks in Poole and 25 in Bournemouth. These car
    parks have 7,088 spaces in Poole (with 166 spaces for disabled use) and 4,856 (with
    82 spaces for disabled use) in Bournemouth. Visitor research (the Bournemouth Visitor
    Survey 2006 - Bournemouth University) suggests that visitors consider the availability of
    car parking in Bournemouth (there is no comparable data for Poole) to be good.


However there are some accessibility and transport issues – including:
   Poor road and rail links to Bristol and the west.
   Car parking charges - the Bournemouth Visitor Survey 2006 highlights that visitors
    rated cost of parking as average (although most surveys highlight parking costs as
    average).

   The Bournemouth Travel Interchange. This site is poorly designed and suffers from a
    lack of a natural exit for the first time visitor. It feels hemmed in by overpasses and
    large buildings. Signing is poor – both from the travel interchange to town, but also
    from the station to buses, (with the bus stop squeezed into a corner of the overall
    site).
   Taxis - an issue is about taxi drivers doing more to promote a positive image of the
    towns to people who visit and use the Taxis. Poole, for example, has developed an
    initiative where the largest taxi company has introduced a visitors charter that gives a
    warm welcome to all visitors to the town, talks up the town and gives a
    complimentary copy of Poole Visitor Guide to each visitor. In Bournemouth, the
    delivery of welcome host training to drivers is also being planned - future plans are
    developing further the use of taxis as tourist information providers with guides, maps
    and other resort information.
   Bournemouth and Poole Borough Councils are committed to improving safer and
    accessible routes for cyclists. Over the years the Boroughs have increased the
    number of cycleways through Parks, the seafront and urban areas. As part of the Big
    Lottery Money, the SUSTRANS bid includes the proposal for a dedicated bridge across



                                                                                              28
   Tourism Signage and related highway signage needs reviewing – there is a lack both
    of welcome signs to the town, and clear consistent signage to attractions and car
    parks.
   Public transport links to Bournemouth beach – rated in the 2005 beach survey as
    average (13% felt it was poor). However more importantly is the need for better
    pedestrian signage to and from the town centre - not just to the seafront but also
    shopping areas, parks, attractions etc. (see below).

Public realm and signing

Quality of the public realm is of key importance – it is something experienced by every
visitor (repeat or first time). Signing, orientation and information is also a key element of
destination management – while of particular importance for orientating visitors
unfamiliar with the destination, it is a tool in helping to manage and spread visitor flows.

In Bournemouth the town centre and seafront have different styles. The town furniture
has a more traditional look in a dark green. The seafront is styled in a more modern style
in blue and yellow, and is benefiting from recent investment in the pier, signing etc

Assessing the standard of the public realm comprehensively is not necessarily an easy
process – standards can be subjective, and vary from location to location, and at
different time periods. The following paragraphs provide an overview from our own
snapshot, qualitative assessment, combined with available visitor research.

Our qualitative assessment of Bournemouth’s public realm is that it is generally of a good
(but not necessarily exceptional) standard. The provision and supply of seating, toilet
facilities and signing is generally adequate (but see below). Cleanliness is generally
good, with a lot of litter bins (particularly in seafront areas), and maintenance of the
public realm is generally good but is not exceptional.

This is largely supported by the available evidence from visitor research. For example,
the Bournemouth Visitor Survey (MRG – 2006) highlights that a number of factors why
Bournemouth met visitor expectations – these included:
   Quality of accommodation
   Shops
   Places to eat
   Places to visit
   Cleanliness of the beaches




                                                                                            29
In addition, the 2005 Beach Survey (conducted by Bournemouth University) highlighted
average to good scores for a number of facilities – e.g. Cleanliness of beach and
seafront area, provision of litter bins, safety and security and provision of beach furniture.

However there are some elements that, in our view, could be improved - these include:

   Maintenance – in the town centre, railings and seating would benefit from a coat of
    paint. Similarly elements of the seafront would benefit from being refreshed – e.g.
    railings (pier), shelters, signs on the pavement/road, and particularly the beach
    chalets.
   Pedestrian signing – orientation around Bournemouth is relatively easier in the sense it
    is compact with well-marked features (the sea front, Central Gardens and Square).
    However signing in the town is mixed – there are a plethora of different sign styles (we
    found at least 5 different styles of tourism related signs – excluding normal road signs)
    and maintenance of these could be improved (some were pointing the wrong way).
    Some of the generic signs for hotels are meaningless. Connectivity between different
    areas is not necessarily maximised – this is particularly the case from the seafront to
    town centre, which feel like completely different destinations – signing from the
    seafront to town is minimal. The connectivity between the town centre and transport
    interchange, and town centre and principle accommodation areas (e.g. west / east
    cliffs) could possibly be improved.

   Road signing is generally fine but would benefit from some maintenance.

In addition, visitor research (albeit the 2002 STB Visitor Survey) did highlight (unprompted)
some areas of dissatisfaction with the public realm – e.g. -
   Litter and bins overflowing (about 0.5%)
   A lack of seating on pier (about 1%)

Similarly the 2005 Beach survey highlighted that visitors rated a number of aspects of
provision as average. For example, toilets (particularly in terms of cleanliness and
standard of building maintenance), provision of dog bins and the pier.

Poole’s public realm is also, from our qualitative assessment, generally good. The town
centre and quayside have traditional style black and gold cast iron furniture. Pedestrian
signs are more modern (white on black) – there is good provision of these, with good
continuity. The street furniture and pedestrian signs are complemented by black and
gold “welcome signs” that include a town map and events information. Maintenance
and provision of these is good.

Elements that could be improved include:
   Cleanliness / maintenance of the town – this is looking tired in places and while not
    creating a negative impression does not create a positive one.




                                                                                            30
     Possibly a stronger white on brown scheme – e.g. signs for the Quayside are
      functional but might benefit from a stronger presence. Similar beach signing could
      benefit from some continuity signs.

Visitor research is more limited in Poole with a beach visitor survey last undertaken in
2002. This highlights that satisfaction was generally good in terms of availability of public
toilets and the provision of seating, average to good in relation to cleanliness of toilets,
signing and information provision. Satisfaction with beach front lighting was low.



5.3     Tourism support infrastructure

Tourism related services are primarily delivered through the respective councils of
Bournemouth and Poole but through a variety of different departments / service units –
e.g. tourism, economic development, transport and planning, and leisure.

Each town has a Tourism Management Board – these are formal bodies with constitutions
and elected representatives from Tourism Trade and Local Authorities. They have a
number of terms of reference including:
     Strengthening public sector/private sector partnership

     Seeking and generating funding to match and complement the Council’s
      investment in tourism.
     Producing guidance and influence on marketing, research, visitor management, skills
      and training initiatives
     Acting as a consultation/discussion forum on tourism issues
     Developing a shared Tourism Strategy

     Providing a unified voice for the industry on local, regional and national tourism issues



In June 2006 Bournemouth and Poole Tourism Offices, through their respective Tourism
Management Boards, formed the Bournemouth and Poole Joint Co-ordinating Group
(BPJCG). This is an Unincorporated Association made up of 3 representatives of each
Management Board, plus respective Tourism Officers. All decisions of the Group are
ratified through the separate Management Boards.

This group is a partnership – it has no dedicated budget, employees or executive
responsibilities. Its approach tends to be that of a steering group with initiatives
undertaken on a collaborative basis and delivered through either or both depending on
competencies of the tourism offices.




                                                                                             31
6.    SWOT and Challenges

6.1     SWOT Analysis

Strengths

     Established tourism reputation and infrastructure
     High quality of beaches and beach management, and generally good standard of
      public realm
     Quality environment and product: resort towns plus seafront, Harbour, nearby
      attractions of New Forest and Dorset
     A significant population (London/SE, Midlands) within a short break and holiday
      catchment
     A loyal core market
     Commitment to managing different needs of markets – e.g. Quality Nights Initiative,
      Townwatch and Pubsafe
     Strong products in some areas: watersports, conferences, language schools, nightlife,
      and a solid offer in others – restaurants, live entertainment and town centres (good
      environments) and retail
     Recent and planned developments e.g. the new Surf Reef, and Poole Park Leisure
      investments
     Diversity of discretionary markets – leisure, business (Bournemouth) and educational /
      foreign language (Bournemouth)
     A mix of market segments that brings year round business, albeit with a summer
      season peak
     Complementarity of accommodation stock between the two areas
     Strong financial commitment from both local authorities to tourism, and a good track
      record in partnership development.

Weaknesses


     Leisure marketing activity is broad brush in its approach, and marketing messages are
      not necessarily matched to targeted visitor groups

     There is a lack of strong differentiators (compelling attractions) and product diversity
      in comparison to competitors – e.g. Devon and Cornwall
     Lack of attractors for future markets, particularly non family
     Connectivity between Bournemouth and Poole is poor
     Lack of joint information infrastructureLimited green business/tourism offer



                                                                                             32
   Transport into and out of the destination from the West, particularly in terms of rail, is
    poor.

Opportunities


   Attract / influence larger funding opportunities through working together as a
    conurbation or via Local Strategic partnerships and Local/Multi Area Agreements
   Increased joint working and cost-effectiveness from joint working

   Niche / special interest market development, e.g. watersports, TEFL, and short break
    development
   Increasing yields and quality rather than volume of tourism
   Working more closely with the surrounding area to deepen the offer especially for
    long stay visitors – Dorset and the New Forest, and possibly Guernsey / Jersey
   Major events development, including assessing potential opportunities arising from
    2012 Olympics
   Development and repositioning of the brand for the conurbation to build fresh
    awareness
   Expansion of Bournemouth Airport and new low cost routes.
   Stronger focus on sustainability, especially environmental and commercial
   Stronger relationships and cross-working with public transport providers



Threats
   Short-term and tactical thinking
   Failure to differentiate Poole and Bournemouth from competitor destinations and
    market on a targeted basis

   Over-reliance on older demographic groups and failing to replace lost markets and
    markets that are ageing
   Failing to make the transition from a mass market to targeted marketing approach
   Lack of match between the nature and quality of the accommodation stock and
    the requirements of future markets
   Problems of destination management - e.g. avoiding potential conflicts / tensions
    such as nightlife versus family friendly
   Increased competition, particularly in short break markets from alternative products
    and destinations (e.g. UK city breaks and short haul destinations opened up by low-
    cost airlines)
   Ensuring a well trained labour force
   Reductions in Local Authority budgets each year.


                                                                                             33
6.2     Key challenges

Arising from the SWOT analysis, a number of challenges can be identified for
Bournemouth and Poole. These are:


     Diversifying the market – the reliance older demographic groups and the potential
      failure to replace lost markets and markets that are ageing is a real threat. While
      these have been offset to some extent by the development of conference and
      education / language school markets, there is still a need to further diversify the
      market. This will require attracting new market groups, which may have different
      motivations and activities, aspirations and values, and demographic characteristics
      to current markets. It will also require a carefully targeted approach – the challenge
      of moving from a solely ‘mass’ market focus to a number of heterogeneous markets
      will be a significant one.
     New products and positioning – diversifying the market may also require further
      product development (continuing the process that has included development of the
      BIC, language schools and, latterly, the surf reef). Allied to this some re-positioning of
      the brand may be required.
     Quality of the offer – it would be fair to say that, while the quality of Bournemouth and
      Poole’s overall offer is good in places (e.g. environmental quality and management),
      it is average in others – e.g. accommodation where take up of NAQAS (admittedly
      only one indicator) is relatively low. Bringing the standard of the overall offer up will
      be a necessary pre-cursor to creating a more competitive destination. While
      progress has already begun it will be a significant future challenge.
     Ensuring sustainability – sustaining the tourism industry in Bournemouth and Poole will
      be a key medium to long challenge. Within this overarching challenge there will be
      a number of separate issues to address such as:
              Ensuring the support of the host community (currently ‘tourism friendly’ [to
                 be discussed])
              Economic sustainability through year round, high yield business
              Ensuring the industry is able to attract an appropriate labour force
              Environmental sustainability and making the transition to a greener
                 industry.

     Support infrastructure – in an atmosphere of increasingly constrained public
      resources, ensuring that the tourism support infrastructure (in terms of marketing and
      promotion, information provision, destination management, events programming
      etc) is delivering added value will be a major challenge. A key priority is achieving
      economies of scale and/or scope, and maximising opportunities through partnership.




                                                                                             34
The Strategic Framework




                          35
7.     Overview

7.1     Strategic Priorities

Reflecting the challenges facing Poole and Bournemouth, three principal strategic
priorities (or areas for action) can be identified:
     Attracting – targeted marketing and development initiatives
     Welcoming – quality of delivery through the customer journey from planning, booking
      through to the actual visit
     Sustaining - ensuring a green and balanced industry.

These areas often overlap and influence each other – they should not be regarded as
separate agendas. Underpinning these are two further areas for action that, while not
outputs in their own right, will be necessary to the successful delivery of the strategic
priorities. These are:
     Partnership – ensuring the most appropriate delivery structures are in place
     Intelligence – having the necessary research and intelligence base for effective
      decision making

These strategic priorities can be summarised in the following diagram.


            Attracting                                                    Welcoming

         Marketing and
      development initiatives
                                                                    Quality of experience




                                     Partnership and
                                       Intelligence




                                        Sustaining

                                   A balanced industry

                                                                                            36
7.2     The Market Development Strategy

Central to the development of these strategic priorities should lie a coherent market
development strategy.

An appreciation of the market mix both now, and the desired future mix, is fundamental
to driving all aspects of a strategy – not just marketing and promotional activity but also
product development, visitor management and quality of experience, and sustainability.

Key principles that should drive the market development strategy include:
     Ensuring, as far as possible, all year round business
     Ensuring, as far as possible, synergy between market groups
     Focusing on yield rather than volume
     Ensuring there is a very clear ‘route to market’ for selected segments– i.e. cost-effective
      means of accessing well-defined groups
     Working in markets where there is competitive strength and advantage

     Balancing growing new markets with maintaining existing ones.

The following table summarises, in broad terms, the main market groups and their
developmental priorities and timing of their visits.

Market segment               Developmental priority       Timing
Conference                   Development – short to       Predominantly mid-week (but
(association and             medium term                  with weekend add-on potential
corporate markets)                                        for associations) autumn and
                                                          spring
Language school /            Maintain market share        Year round with increased
educational markets                                       numbers in summer (week
                                                          round)
Domestic holiday             Market maintenance           Predominantly in summer and
makers                                                    shoulder months (week round)
Domestic short breaks        Development – short to       Predominantly weekend spring,
/ water sports               medium term                  summer and autumn
Day visits                   Market maintenance           Year round – peaking at
                                                          weekends / school holidays
VFR                          Market maintenance           Year round – bias to weekends
Business travel              Market maintenance           Year round – midweek

The potential for each may be summarised as follows:




                                                                                            37
   There is significant growth potential relating to short breaks and water sports, which
    have the potential for high yield. There is also growth potential for corporate
    conferences and meetings.
   In the association conference market, the overall market is not likely to grow
    significantly – indeed, it may well decline over time – and Bournemouth will need to
    continue to acquire new business to maintain its exiting volume of business in this
    sector. The market is competitive and daily yield per domestic delegate tends to be
    low; maintaining market size and value is the first requirement.
   The domestic holiday market represents a major challenge, because of the
    anticipated long term decline of the current market. Thus the requirement is to
    identify how the traditional holiday market segments may be supplemented or
    replaced by new domestic holiday market segments.
   Language schools and education markets – there are opportunities to expand the FE
    and HE courses and industry linked to language courses, but this must be carefully
    managed to ensure sufficiently good quality accommodation can be offered to
    students at the same current high level.
   Given the scale and value of day visits to the areas, this business should also be
    nurtured, but recognising that there are issues relating to yield and sustainability (both
    economic and environmental).
   For non-discretionary markets (business and VFR) growth is likely to be driven by
    broader economic factors. Priorities will be on ensuring the quality of product offer is
    right.

Within each of these broad groups, there is a need to identify which more specific
market segments have the greatest potential for Bournemouth and Poole and to
understand well the requirements of each target segment. This should be a key part of
the work programme of the new DMP, with support from SWT.




                                                                                             38
8.    Strategic Priority 1: Attracting

This section covers:
     Brand
     Positioning

     Promotion
     Product development
     Quality of the offer/product

8.1     Vision and rationale

The strategic priority of attracting is a broad one – at its core is the need to provide the
right attractors and promote these to the appropriate audience.

In the case of Bournemouth and Poole, decline or limited growth potential in its main
traditional markets has created the necessity not to only find new visitors but also to
develop new reasons to visit.

The aspiration is of a destination that is:
     Targeting a healthy mix of market groups (see section 7.2)

     Positioned and offering a brand (or brands) that has real resonance with target
      audiences
     Bringing new products on stream to not only attract new visitors but increase
      competitiveness
     Driving up the quality of the offer.



8.2     Development approaches

Within the overall mix of attracting visitors there are various discrete elements that when
taken together provide the stimulus to visit. These will all require developmental activity
in the medium to long term – this section discusses some of the key priorities and options.

Branding and positioning
Focus group research, undertaken during the development of this strategic framework,
suggests that the positioning of Bournemouth and Poole appear to be lacking in clarity
and sometimes in conflict with the reality. Different segments have different perceptions
and there were some negative perceptions that the offer lacked depth (or was too one
dimensional) and not necessarily ‘premier league’. While there are a lot of strengths
and positives to the images of Bournemouth and Poole, it is likely that the brand (or
brands) for the area will require further development and positioning.



                                                                                               39
The scale and difficulty of this should not be underestimated – brands take years
(decades even) and resources to develop or to change. Complicating this is the fact
that different market segments have different images and values of a destination, and, in
the case of Bournemouth and Poole that they are different destinations.

Further work is therefore required to define the Bournemouth and Poole brands and the
ways in which they should be developed. Brands (including business and education
tourism brands) should capture the essence of what Poole and Bournemouth should
promise to its diverse markets. This is not straightforward, in terms of appealing to market
segments with very different motivations and requirements.

It may be appropriate to build a brand architecture identifying different brand promises
for different segments, relating to one overall set of brand values (at least in terms of
leisure markets). The brand architecture will have a synergy with regional branding and
the ‘brand clusters’ developed by SWT.

In terms of developing any brands and positioning to attract new visitors, the priority
should be to appeal first and foremost to short break markets (which require further
research – see section 12); this group of market segments has the best growth potential.
A strong well differentiated positioning and brand(s) for contemporary short breaks
would also have potential to secure business tourism markets, educational markets, and
certain new holiday markets (particularly additional / second holidays).

Promotional activity
Bournemouth and Poole both undertake their own promotional campaigns and there is
merit in these continuing in the short to medium term future – particularly in their existing
and core markets (leisure, education and business ones). However, any future
promotional activity should be shaped by the development of a brand architecture for
the area (see above).

Irrespective of the direction a brand architecture takes (e.g. separate Poole and
Bournemouth brands), there is merit in progressing promotional activity that targets new
audiences on a joint basis. New market acquisition is typically more costly than
maintaining existing business and there will be considerable economies of scale through
joint work.

New joint promotional activity should initially focus on short breaks, and watersports.

Opportunities for joint promotional activity should not necessarily be restricted to “new”
markets and there will be some economies of scale and added value in other areas such
as:
   Group travel promotion
   E-marketing and CRM
   PR activity


                                                                                            40
   Joint procurement - e.g. bespoke computer software, print, photography,
    distribution

   Educational tourism – e.g. continued emphasis and support of International
    Education Forum
   Business tourism – continuation of joint work through BICB but the development and
    potential for additional funding for the BICB to become the Bournemouth & Poole
    (International) Conference Bureau should be explored.

New product development
New product development would facilitate the development of new markets and
strengthen competitiveness in existing markets. Bournemouth and Poole have been
successful in the last two decades in terms of new product development – examples
include the BIC, new Pavilion Gardens, new restaurant developments in Poole, Tower
Park refurbishment, the surf reef at Boscombe and special events development.

However delivering major new product development for a destination can be a difficult
process that requires either long term activity or opportunism, or both. Mechanisms to
foster and facilitate new product development should be supported – e.g. positive
support to specific types of tourism developments in planning policies, joint tourism
development working group(s), involvement in broader regeneration and development
initiatives, development/investment promotional activity towards targeted companies,
etc. Examples of this type of activity include current involvement in the delivery of
Bournemouth town centre master vision that is seeking to attract new retail
development.

New product development should ideally strengthen the appeal and competitiveness of
Bournemouth and Poole in short break markets – priority (and blue sky) areas could
include watersports related product, further retail development (particularly if it is unique
within the region / sub region), boutique hotel development, top end restaurant
development, and further cultural facilities (major museum or gallery development).

A key area of new product development that is more straightforward to implement is
special events – although the issues and resources should not be under-estimated. New
events development offers the potential advantage of supporting high level market
development aims but also addressing periods of spare capacity. Poole and
Bournemouth should look at opportunities for the development of one or more high
profile events that support market positioning (see above) and hit a period of relatively
low demand.

One possibility is the development of a large audience multi-cultural event incorporating
the support of International Education Forum and other agencies.

A key priority in events development is the need to gain greater community and
stakeholder involvement in event organisation – to bring new ideas and stimulus, and
involvement in terms of participation and promotion. Mechanisms to encourage this,



                                                                                           41
which should be explored, could include specialist advice (to help develop capacity
and expertise), and a scheme of financial support for new event development.
However, the potential of these needs to be weighed against some of the legislative
barriers that voluntary organisations come up against when trying to organise events.

Raising the quality of the offer
Maintaining and raising the overall quality of the existing product could have a
significant impact on the appeal and positioning of Bournemouth and Poole, and their
competitiveness. In terms of specific tourism product, the priority sector is
accommodation, particularly in Bournemouth but other sectors (such as attractions and
restaurants, night time economy) could also benefit.

While investment will be largely driven by market forces, there are a number of joint
Bournemouth and Poole initiatives that could be pursued – these include:
     Continued implementation of NAQAS in the accommodation sector and, possibly,
      phasing out of the Bournemouth Hotel inspection scheme in favour of NAQAS to
      exceed regional standards.

     Introduction of a form of ‘quality mark’ for local attractions and restaurants. This
      could be an extension of the Bournemouth Hotel inspection scheme.
     Business development, up-skilling the tourism workforce (e.g. through the
      development of the Hotel Training School or DNFTP), and looking at broader work
      force issues (such as the needs of migrant workers).



8.3     Potential projects

In the short to medium term the following projects should be progressed:
     Further perceptions research and brand development work (building on the existing
      focus group research) to identify an appropriate brand architecture for Poole and
      Bournemouth in current markets and potential new (short break) markets.
     Development of a new joint short break campaign leading from the development of
      the brand architecture.

     Further development of other joint promotional activity – Group travel trade (e.g.
      joint guide), PR, CRM and emarketing
     Development of new cultural festival

     Investigate the potential for provision of specialist event advice and development of
      a scheme of financial assistance.
     Maintain and increase participation of accommodation in NAQAS
     Introduction of a quality mark for attractions and restaurants
     Investigate the specific needs of migrant workers in the industry.




                                                                                             42
9.    Strategic Priority 2: Welcoming

This section covers:
     Booking
     Transport

     Public Realm
     Disabled Accessibility

9.1     Vision and rationale

Attracting the visitor is simply the start of a process. Once a decision to visit has been
made, the visitor will go through various stages of the “customer journey” – these include
in simple terms:
     Booking

     Travelling to the destination
     Experiencing the destination
     Leaving the destination
     Post-holiday CRM

A key differentiator of a successful destination is the quality of experience for the visitor
through these stages – in simple terms how well does the destination “work”.

The vision for Bournemouth and Poole is of a destination that is pre-eminent in these
areas. A destination where booking by web and telephone is simple and
straightforward, transport access is good with great connectivity by different modes of
transport (public and private), and the quality of welcome, customer service and the
public realm is outstanding – orientation is clear and simple.



9.2     Development approaches

There are a number of elements of the destination offer that Bournemouth and Poole
could develop jointly in the short to medium term. Examples include:

Booking procedures
Tourism product (such as accommodation, attractions, activities etc) within
Bournemouth and Poole will often share the same audiences – someone wanting to stay
in Poole may book accommodation in Bournemouth (or vice versa), or someone staying
in Bournemouth will want information on events or attractions in Poole (or beyond). From
both customer and business perspectives, there is a strong logic to integrating




                                                                                                43
information databases, and booking facilities on the Web (and also for telephone
bookings and TIC procedures).

The optimum longer term solution is the integration of DMSs that would bring significant
organisational benefits and economies of scale for Bournemouth and Poole (see section
11). In the short term, the further development and enhancement of joint booking
activity should be pursued – e.g. using Bournemouth’s Activity Booking Service on
pooletourism.com, and integrating TIC booking procedures more closely.

Closer integration of product databases (with possible data sharing), and perhaps a joint
information unit to collect and maintain information and information quality should also
be explored in the short term. A key priority will be ensuring inter-operability of the local
DMSs with EnglandNet. This could include taking on the EnglandNet data stewardship
responsibilities for the conurbation.


Improving transport access

Improving the transport access of the destination will be driven by a range of
environmental and economic factors – tourism will only be one of many considerations in
the decision making process. The DMP will however have an important role as a
potential lobbying body – proactively raising the concerns and issues of the industry
across both Bournemouth and Poole, and providing expertise on the needs of the
industry and its consumers.

In addition, there are areas where the DMP can have a more direct impact. These
include, for example, the development of transport schemes (such as a water bus),
development of joint in–destination information and service promotion (e.g. disabled
access, public transport, car parking, taxi services), and co-ordinated white-on-brown
signing schemes.

Public realm

The majority of public realm improvements probably require implementation on a local
and separate basis as opposed to a joint Bournemouth and Poole basis – e.g.
Bournemouth requires rationalisation and development of its signing, Poole does not.
Similarly the two areas currently have different designs within public realm and signing
and there is a strong rationale to maintain these.

However there are a number of areas of potential joint work – these include:
   The development of joint practices and policies, and shared information initiatives in
    relation to seafront byelaws, and the night time economy
   Investigating entry point (main roads and transport termini) issues and agreeing
    common standards and comprehensive improvements across both towns. The
    potential of working specifically with the respective railway stations should be
    explored.


                                                                                          44
Disabled Accessibility
While disabled accessibility within the wider realm will be dealt with by each Local
Authority according to their respective needs, the partnership has a role to play in terms
of co-ordinating information provision both in terms of access and content – through, for
example:
     A joint access guide (see above)

     Common web standards – in terms of accessibility and presentation of information on
      disabled access

9.3     Potential projects

Potential joint “welcoming” projects include:

     Investigating the opportunities and feasibility for the development of a joint DMS in
      time.
     Setting up Bournemouth’s Activity Booking Service on pooletourism.com.

     Examine the feasibility of product data sharing and co-ordinated data collection
      and management.
     Look at achieving Interoperability of DMSs with EnglandNet.
     Exploring the potential for water taxi/bus between Bournemouth Pier and Poole Quay
      with potential for a stop at Sandbanks.
     Development of joint information print – particularly a joint Access guide, and guide
      to transport in Bournemouth and Poole.
     Examine the feasibility of shared white on brown signage policy / approach.
     Exploring the potential for a joint Taxi Promotion through greater shared working with
      taxi operators in conurbation.
     Sharing information/initiatives from respective town centre pub-watch schemes.
     Development of joint beach Management Practises and shared approaches
      towards things such as cycling, dogs, signage, road train route, commercial
      opportunities.




                                                                                              45
10. Strategic Priority 3: Sustaining


10.1 Rationale

Tourism relies on the integrity of the destination’s environment and it is recognised that
destinations have to be environmentally and socially sustainable. Tourists themselves are
more discerning and aware of the impacts that they create and to remain competitive
and attractive to visitors, destinations must embrace and act upon the principles of
sustainability. This is encapsulated in the VICE model that stresses the importance and
inter-relationships between Visitors, Industry and the Community within environmental
limits. It is both a priority and a key theme in the South West regional strategy “Towards
2015”, and a key element of Bournemouth and Poole’s tourism (and other) strategies

The vision for Bournemouth and Poole is one of a destination that is not only able to
attract visitors but to manage them appropriately to bring maximum economic benefits
without impacting adversely on the local and global environment or host community.
The community and the environment (not just Bournemouth and Poole’s but the wider
environment) should be at the forefront of decision making.

10.2 Development approaches

There are a number of options for ensuring sustainable good practice in Bournemouth
and Poole.

Sustainable businesses
The Davos Declaration (outcome of the recent UNWTO on Climate Change and
Tourism), and the Tourism Sustainability Report requires action from the tourism sector to:
   Mitigate its Greenhouse Gas GHG emissions, derived especially from transport and
    accommodation activities
   Adapt tourism businesses and destinations to changing climate conditions
   Apply existing and new technology to improve energy efficiency, and
   Secure financial resources to help poor regions and countries.

There are several contributions towards sustainability that businesses can make, from
recycling their waste, to increasing their energy and water efficiency, and
communications with their visitors. Such good practice can be encouraged through
actions that make savings and minimise impact (e.g. Actions of the Year) and
recognised through accreditation such as the Green Tourism Business Scheme, the David
Bellamy Conservation Awards (aimed at members of the British Holiday and Home, Park
Association) and the potential new VisitBritain scheme. Take up of these schemes is
limited in Bournemouth and Poole, and the DMP, in partnership with SWT, should continue
to promote these schemes.



                                                                                          46
Visitor stewardship
Tourists are increasingly willing to participate in the stewardship of the places they visit.
There are several areas where visitors to Bournemouth and Poole could be encouraged
to make a contribution towards the sustainability of the destination, through payback
schemes and awareness campaigns, building on the South West Future Footprints
messages – i.e.:
   'Try Local, Buy Local' – For example, investigate and encourage the promotion of
    local/regional food and drink in bars and restaurants, and promote local foods
    through eating guides and other tourism media to encourage visitors to purchase of
    local food, drink and goods.
   'Explore what's on your doorstep' – encouraging car-free tourism. There is strong
    potential to encourage the use of car-free alternatives as part of the visitor’s
    experience within Bournemouth and Poole through promotion and development of
    initiatives like water taxis/buses, cycling routes (e.g. Poole’s Heritage Cycling Route),
    car free itineraries, developed offers with transport providers) beach land trains etc.
    and scheme like the New Forest’s Car Free Tourism initiative (which Bournemouth and
    Poole could build on).
   'Look for Businesses that care’ – encouraging visitors to look for places to stay visit eat
    and shop who are caring for the local area and environment, for example those who
    are accredited and are displaying the GTBS logo.

Again the DMP, in conjunction with SWT, should promote Futurefootprint messages to
visitors and potential visitors through a range of media, and through developing a
sustainable tourism charter. This would be a locally defined, community developed
vision of sustainable tourism. The charter should outline key issues for Bournemouth and
Poole and encourage and support visitors and tourism businesses to move towards
sustainability at a pace that is within their capability. A key concept would be that of
continual improvement.

Future proofing
Sustainable businesses and visitor stewardship schemes are of key importance if
Bournemouth and Poole’s visitor economy is to contribute to the Climate Change
agenda. However, more fundamental measures may need to be considered – e.g.
issues of waste disposal, energy and water supply and costs, the relative attractiveness
(or unattractiveness) of certain target audiences from a carbon emissions perspective.
Similarly, climate change could have a significant potential impact on Bournemouth and
Poole in terms of, for example, sea levels and erosion, weather patterns, temperature
levels. These are all elements that in the longer term could have a profound impact on
the management of the destination.

A potential role of the DMP is to input into advance or contingency planning to address
some of these issues. This could possibly be progressed through working with key
partnerships (e.g. transport, education, training, Town Centre management, recycling,
climate change, and the SW Climate Change Impacts Partnership).


                                                                                            47
Host communities
The host community is a key element of tourism sustainability. Within Bournemouth and
Poole there is generally community support for the tourism industry and the benefits it
brings. However, this should not be taken for granted, and the host community should
continue to have involvement in the tourism sector through, e.g. citizen’s panels,
consultation and specific host community research (see section 12), and activities
orientated to both residents and tourists (e.g. events, tourism week, special promotions).

10.3 Potential projects

The following projects should be progressed:
   Encourage businesses to become more resource efficient (e.g. Action of the Year)
    and participate in the GTBS and David Bellamy Awards, and encourage visitors to
    choose these businesses by promoting the accreditation schemes and businesses in
    publications and on websites.
   Develop a sustainable tourism charter for consumers and the industry linking into
    Future Footprints.
   Promotion of the use and consumption of local/regional food, drink products and
    services.

   Development of future proofing and advance contingency planning linking into
    local work on climate change and risk management.
   Better and improved promotion of alternative transport services with clearer
    messages, and better access to integrated information, and car free itineraries.
   Continued consultation with host communities.
   Dedicated resources required to deliver the projects and financial funding to start up
    projects.




                                                                                         48
11. Strategic Priority 4: Partnership


11.1 Rationale

To deliver a joint Bournemouth and Poole tourism agenda there is a need for an
appropriate infrastructure and delivery mechanism. This is currently provided by the
Poole and Bournemouth DMP Co-ordinating Group.

There is a strong logic, in terms of co-ordination and potential economies of scale, to joint
partnership working both between the public and private sectors, and between
Bournemouth and Poole. This is already recognised in Bournemouth and Poole, with
strong existing partnerships through, e.g. the management boards, and DMP Co-
ordinating Group. There is also a strong logic for partnerships beyond Bournemouth and
Poole, particularly with Dorset and the New Forest.

11.2 Development approaches

A key issue in partnership development and working will be the extent to which the
Bournemouth and Poole DMP will need to develop – i.e. whether it should stay as a co-
ordinating group for a series of joint projects with the separate Management Boards
delivering the bulk of initiatives, or whether joint working should be developed further.

There are a number of models that could be pursued. These range from the current
arrangements, through the development of a partnership with more specific
responsibilities and budget (and possibly staff - e.g. a project officer or secondee), to the
development of a stand-alone organisation that is the primary vehicle for the delivery of
destination management services for Bournemouth and Poole (and possibly beyond).
The different models each have advantages and disadvantages.

The approach to partnership and the development of the DMP should be an iterative
and incremental one – i.e. as the need and rationale for a stronger partnership arises
(through e.g. the development of a potential joint brand architecture), the organisation
and its scope and method of delivery be reviewed. Central therefore to the
development of the DMP will be a finite action plan (see section 14) but also regularly
auditing / monitoring of its activities.

A second (and linked) key issue for the development of the partnership will be resources
– both staff and budgetary – that are available. At present the partnership had no
dedicated resources and again these will need to be developed on incremental basis.
The partnership will endeavour to lever in available external funding from, e.g. SWERDA,
and the private sector for particular initiatives – something it is probably better placed to
do than the individual tourism offices. It will also seek to achieve economies of scale in
the utilisation of existing budgets from the respective tourism offices for some joint
projects.


                                                                                            49
In terms of staff, initial activity should focus on staff familiarisation (in terms of a greater
understanding on not only destinations but also what each tourism office does and how
they work), and identifying and developing complementary specialisms.

The Bournemouth and Poole DMP will look to work in with other partnerships, particularly
the Dorset and New Forest Tourism Partnership and emerging Dorset DMP, and look at
the development of multi area agreements.



11.3 Potential projects


   Development of an annual DMP action plan
   Undertake a regular audit / monitoring the work of the DMP
   Review the role and scope of the DMP
   Staff familiarisation programme
   Staff training and development via TSN, DP:UK or destination manager ‘coaching’
    sessions
   Share regional best practice via regional DMO Forum meetings




                                                                                               50
12. Strategic Priority 5: Intelligence


12.1 Rationale

Research and intelligence is key to good decision making and to performance
monitoring. While some tourism related research has been undertaken in Bournemouth
and Poole, this has tended to be relatively patchy and ad-hoc. For example, research
on Poole is limited, and across both destinations there is no programme of regular
research, which makes any identification of trends or change difficult. The cost of
research, and the synergy between the requirements of Bournemouth and Poole means
there is a strong rationale for the development of a joint programme, or joint
commissioning of work through partner organisations (e.g. DNFTP, Bournemouth
University, SWT).

The vision is for the development of a joint research programme that provides
appropriate intelligence for decision making across a range of areas, and provides a
mechanism for monitoring progress through time.



12.2 Development approaches

Research and intelligence can be categorised into two broad groups – exploratory and
monitoring. Exploratory research will often be undertaken on an ad-hoc basis –
monitoring research will be undertaken on a regular basis. However, the two elements
do often overlap and can sometimes be delivered through the same surveys.

Central to the development of a research programme for Bournemouth and Poole
should be three principal pieces of regular research. These are:
   Industry monitoring research – primarily occupancy related research. This is currently
    undertaken for the serviced sector. Short to medium term priorities should be to
    boost the serviced sample size, and also possibly extend the research to cover the
    non-serviced sector.
   Undertake regular visitor surveys – in the past surveys have been undertaken for
    Bournemouth (whole destination and two beach user surveys), and Poole (beach
    users only). Some data is provided on Bournemouth from the Dorset wide research
    project. However, there is a need to implement a specific survey for both
    Bournemouth and Poole to explore the characteristics of visitors and also assess their
    satisfaction with different aspects of the destination offer (public realm etc). To
    enable on-going monitoring this should be undertaken on a regular basis (say every
    three years).
   Undertake research into the attitudes of the host communities to look at their
    (changing) views of the tourism industry – the benefits and problems it brings. For on-




                                                                                         51
This core programme should be supported by a number of ad-hoc pieces of research.
These should include, in the short to medium term:
   Further research into perceptions and brands, and gaps and opportunities among
    visitors and non-visitors.

   Conference research – looking at venue performance (possibly through the British
    Conference Venue Survey) and delegate characteristics, activities and spend.

The potential of trying to run the Bournemouth Tourism Barometer across both areas
should also be investigated.

12.3 Potential projects


   Undertake further perceptions research (see section 8).
   Work with hoteliers to boost participation in current occupancy surveys.
   Undertake a destination wide survey of visitors – linked to SWT research and visitor
    survey.

   Undertake research into conference venues and delegates.
   Look at the potential of the Bournemouth Tourism Barometer.




                                                                                           52
13. Key Performance Indicators

While the DMP will be subject to regular auditing (see section 11.2), performance
indicators should be developed as a mechanism for monitoring the strategic progress of
the DMP (and other organisations it works with) and associated activity. In many cases
the baseline and targets need to be set following more detailed research (see section
12). Potential performance indicators could include:

Attracting
   Total visitor spend
   Number of jobs supported by tourism spend
   Average spend per visit
   Seasonality of visits
   Room occupancy rates

   Percentage of inspected to known accommodation
   Percentage of inspected attractions and restaurants

Welcoming


   Levels of visitor satisfaction (with different aspects of the destination)

Sustaining
   Number of green accredited businesses
   % journeys made without the car (to and within destination)
   General community satisfaction (i.e. acceptance of tourists and tourism as an
    industry)




                                                                                    53
14. Action Plan

The following section outlines an indicative action plan of some of the key activities that the partnership will seek to progress over the
next three years.

This is presented in a tabular format and a number of headings are used. These include:

Priority – priority of the project:
   A = highest priority
   B = medium priority

   C= lower priority – desirable but not essential

Year – year of the project. Year one represents 2008/09 etc.

Lead –the area that will take a lead on a project.

Cost – costs are order of magnitude and are presented on a broad scale, which is as follows:
   H= £20k+ project
   M= £10-20k project
   L= up to £10k
   N/a = no direct budget cost although there would be staff time implications

Source – potential source of funding. External funding means funding will be sourced from an outside organisation or organisations.
Existing funding means that funding from one or both Management Boards will be utilised.




                                                                                                                                         54
                                                              Year                 Cost
                                                      Prio-
Project              Description                              1       2   3   4+   Cost   Source       Notes
                                                      rity

Attracting
Brand                Further perceptions research     A           ●                H/M    External     £20k of funding secured from
development          and brand development work                                                        SWERDA /SWT
                     to identify an appropriate
                     brand architecture

Short break          Development of a new joint       A               ●   ●   ●    H      External /   Some use of existing
campaign             short break campaign                                                 existing     marketing spend and
                                                                                                       contribution from tourism
                                                                                                       trade.

Water sports         Development of a new joint       A       ●       ●   ●   ●    H      External     Cost will depend on format of
campaign             watersports campaign                                                 /existing    the campaign – it could be,
                                                                                                       e.g. largely PR based. Again
                                                                                                       use of existing PR resources
                                                                                                       and industry partner funding

Joint group travel   Joint guide and exhibition /     B               ●   ●   ●    H      Existing
promotion            promotion activity

Joint PR activity    PR where there common            B       ●       ●   ●   ●    L      Existing
                     messages / audiences

CRM / emarketing     Development of joint CRM         B                   ●   ●    H      External     Funding for feasibility and
                     infrastructure. Integration of                                       /existing    interoperability of systems
                     DMS




                                                                                                                                       55
                                                                Year                Cost
                                                        Prio-
Project             Description                                 1      2   3   4+   Cost      Source       Notes
                                                        rity

B & PCB.            Development and funding of          B       ●      ●   ○   ○    L/M       Existing     Developing the BICB service
                    joint Conference and meeting                                              and          to a wider geographical
                    venue finding and related                                                 external     membership, with additional
                    delegate services for wider                                                            set-up funding from SWRDA,
                    connurbation eg. entire BH                                                             Poole Tourism and new
                    postcode areas.                                                                        income streams from trade.

Development of      Joint Poole / Bournemouth           B                  ●   ●        M     External /   Sector support (e.g.
cultural festival   festival                                                                  existing     education sector) required
                                                                                                           and start up funding. There is
                                                                                                           some existing sponsorship

Event               Investigate the potential for       C              ●   ○   ○        H     External /   Investigation of potential of
development         provision of specialist event                                             existing     scheme likely to only have
scheme              advice and development of a                                                            staff time implications.
                    scheme of financial assistance

NAQAS               Maintain and increase               A       ●      ●   ●   ●        N/a   Existing     Agreement required for the
                    participation of                                                                       delivery of NAQAS at a local
                    accommodation in NAQAS                                                                 level and self funded by a
                                                                                                           local operation.

Other QA            Introduction of a quality mark      B              ●   ●   ●    L
                    for attractions and restaurants


Migrant workers     Investigate the specific needs of   C              ●   ●            L/
                    migrant workers in the industry                                     n/a

Welcoming




                                                                                                                                            56
                                                                Year                Cost
                                                        Prio-
Project            Description                                  1      2   3   4+   Cost      Source       Notes
                                                        rity

DMS                Investigating the opportunities      B              ●   ●        L         Existing /   Support costs from SWT plus
                   and feasibility for the                                                    external     existing providers. Extended
                   development of a joint DMS in                                                           contract with Tiscover to look
                   time.                                                                                   at opportunities 09/09
Activity booking   Setting up Bournemouth’s             B       ●                   L         Existing     Pages need to be integrated
                   Activity Booking Service on                                                             in to Poole site. Sales to Poole
                   pooletourism.com                                                                        base operations.
Data sharing       Examine the feasibility of           B              ●            L         Existing /   Integrated into the
                   product data sharing and co-                                               External     development of the joint DMS
                   ordinated data collection and
                   management.


EnglandNet         Look at achieving                    A       ●                   L         External     SWT funding support for Poole
                   Interoperability of DMSs with                                                           website
                   EnglandNet
Water taxi         Exploring the potential for water    B       ●      ●            L         Existing     Proposal to put the idea out
                   taxi/bus between Bournemouth                                                            the market place
                   Pier and Poole Quay with
                   potential for a stop at
                   Sandbanks.


Join info. print   Development of joint                 B              ●   ●   ●        N/a   Existing     Opportunities examined every
                   information print – particularly a                                                      year for both print and
                   joint Access guide, and guide                                                           marketing activity.
                   to transport in Bournemouth
                   and Poole




                                                                                                                                              57
                                                                   Year                Cost
                                                           Prio-
Project              Description                                   1      2   3   4+   Cost    Source     Notes
                                                           rity

WoB signing policy   Examine the feasibility of shared     B              ●                L   Existing
                     white on brown signage policy /
                     approach
Taxi promotion       Exploring the potential for a joint   B              ●                L   Existing   Developing the Poole Tourism
                     Taxi Promotion through greater                                            and        concept to extend to
                     shared working with taxi                                                  external   Bournemouth – sponsor to
                     operators in conurbation.                                                            brand up taxi’s
Pub watch            Sharing information/initiatives       C              ●                    Existing
                     from respective town centre
                     pub-watch schemes.


Beach Practices      Development of joint beach            B              ●   ●   ●            Existing   Commitment in Bournemouth
                     Management Practises and                                                             Seafront Strategy
                     shared approaches towards
                     things such as cycling, dogs,
                     signage, road train route,
                     commercial opportunities.


Sustaining
Green businesses     Encourage businesses to               C              ●   ●   ●    L       Existing   Does require dedicated
                     become more resource                                                                 champion(s) - not resourced
                     efficient (e.g. Action of the
                     Year) and participate in the
                     GTBS and David Bellamy
                     Awards




                                                                                                                                         58
                                                                  Year                Cost
                                                          Prio-
Project               Description                                 1      2   3   4+   Cost   Source       Notes
                                                          rity

Green visitors        Encourage visitors to choose        B                  ●   ●    L      Existing     Need to increase number of
                      these businesses by promoting                                                       businesses currently
                      the accreditation schemes and                                                       accredited
                      businesses in publications and
                      on websites.


Sustainable Tourism   Develop a sustainable tourism       A       ●                          Existing     Needs active promotion in the
Charter               charter for consumers and the                                                       community with champion (s)
                      industry linking into Future
                      Footprints
Local produce         Promotion of the use and            B              ●                   Existing
                      consumption of local/regional
                      food, drink products and
                      services.


Alternative           Better and improved promotion       A              ●   ●   ●    L      Existing /   May be able to link into green
transport             of alternative transport services                                      external     agenda funding to increase
                      with clearer messages, better                                                       promotional budgets.
                      access to integrated
                      information, and car free
                      itineraries.


Host communities      Continued consultation with         A       ●      ●   ●   ●    L      Existing
                      host communities.




                                                                                                                                           59
                                                                   Year                Cost
                                                           Prio-
Project                 Description                                1      2   3   4+   Cost   Source      Notes
                                                           rity

Resources               Dedicated resources required       A       ●      ●   ●   ●    M      External
                        to deliver the projects and
                        financial funding to start up
                        projects.


Future proofing         Development of future proofing     B              ●   ●   ●    L      Existing
                        and advance contingency                                               /external
                        planning linking into local work
                        on climate change and risk
                        management




Partnership
Action plan             Development of an annual DMP       A       ●      ●   ●   ●    n/a    Existing
                        action plan
DMP audit               Undertake a regular audit /        A       ●      ●   ●   ●    n/a    Existing
                        monitoring the work of the DMP


                        Review the role and scope of       A              ●       ●    n/a    Existing
                        the DMP


Staff familiarisation   Staff familiarisation programme    A       ●      ●   ●   ●    n/a    Existing




                                                                                                                  60
                                                               Year                Cost
                                                       Prio-
Project             Description                                1      2   3   4+   Cost      Source       Notes
                                                       rity

Staff training      Staff training and development     A              ●   ●   ●    L         Existing /
                    via TSN, DP:UK or destination                                            external
                    manager ‘coaching’ sessions


                    Share regional best practice via   B       ●      ●   ●   ●    n/a       Existing
                    regional DMO Forum meetings


Intelligence
Perceptions         Undertake further perceptions      A       ●                       M     External     Potential source SWT
research            research
Occupancy survey    Work with hoteliers to boost       A       ●      ●   ●   ●        n/a   Existing /   Joint working with MRG and
                    participation in current                                                 external     SWT working to boost
                    occupancy surveys.                                                                    participation

Visitor survey      Undertake a destination wide       A       ●          ●             L    Existing     Linked to work of MRG
                    survey of visitors – link to SWT                                         (DNFTP)
                    research and visitor survey
Conference          Undertake research into            C              ●   ●   ●         L    External
research            conference venues and                                                    funding
                    delegates, and the education
                    market
Tourism Barometer   Look at the potential of the       B       ●                        L    Existing     Current barriers in the difficulty
                    Bournemouth Tourism                                                                   of getting access to key
                    Barometer                                                                             information




                                                                                                                                               61

				
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