CH09DOC - Wireless_ Guide to Wireless Communications

Document Sample
CH09DOC - Wireless_ Guide to Wireless Communications Powered By Docstoc
					Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications   9-1




Chapter 9
Wireless Metropolitan Area Networks

At a Glance

Instructor’s Manual Table of Contents
   Overview

   Objectives

   Teaching Tips

   Quick Quizzes

   Class Discussion Topics

   Additional Projects

   Additional Resources

   Key Terms

   Technical Notes for Hands-On Projects
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                   9-2



Lecture Notes

Overview
        Chapter 9 describes wireless metropolitan area networks (WMANs). Students will learn
        why WMANs are needed. They will also see the components and modes of operation of
        a WMAN. Chapter 9 also lists the range of WMAN technologies, including FSO,
        LMDS, MMDS, and 802.16 (WiMAX). In addition, students will learn how WMANs
        function and the security features of WMANs.


Objectives
       Explain why wireless metropolitan area networks (WMANs) are needed
       Describe the components and modes of operation of a WMAN
       List the range of WMAN technologies, including FSO, LMDS, MMDS, and 802.16
        (WiMAX)
       Explain how WMANs function
       Outline the security features of WMANs


Teaching Tips
What is a WMAN?
    1. Define a wireless metropolitan area network (WMAN) as a group of technologies that
       provide wireless connectivity across a substantial geographical area such as a large city.

    2. Describe the primary goals of WMANs, including:
       Extend the reach of wired networks beyond a single location without the expense of
          high-speed cable-based connections
       Extend user mobility throughout a metropolitan area
       Provide high-speed connections to areas not serviced by any other method of
          connectivity

Teaching
                Read more about WMANs at: www.embeddedworks.net/newsite/WMAN/.
Tip

Last Mile Wired Connections

    1. Define a last mile connection as the link between a customer and ISP. Use Figure 9-1 to
       illustrate your explanation. Most last mile connections are based on copper wiring.
       Copper-based digital communications lines require the signal to be regenerated every
       6,000 feet.
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                    9-3

    2. Use Table 9-1 to describe the various connection options for homes and offices that
       require a last mile connection.

    3. Mention that last mile delivery of telephone and data lines has long been a problem for
       the carrier, who must be able to justify the cost of installing wired connections to
       remote areas.

Last Mile Wireless Connection

    1. Explain that microwaves are higher frequency RF waves in the 3 to 30 GHz range of the
       electromagnetic spectrum, known as super high frequency (SHF) band. Microwave
       towers are installed roughly 35 miles (56 kilometers) apart from each other.

    2. Mention that as an alternative to last mile wired connections, many users have turned to
       wireless options. Using wireless as the last mile connection for buildings is known as
       fixed wireless.

Baseband vs. Broadband

    1. Explain the differences between baseband and broadband transmissions, as described in
       this section. Use Figure 9-2 to illustrate your explanation.


Teaching        Read more about baseband and broadband transmissions at:
Tip             www.techweb.com/encyclopedia/defineterm.jhtml?term=baseband.



Land-Based Fixed Broadband Wireless

    1. This section describes the following land-based fixed broadband wireless solutions:
          a. Free Space Optics
          b. Local multipoint distribution service
          c. Multichannel multipoint distribution service

Free Space Optics

    1. Define free space optics (FSO) as an optical, wireless, point-to-point, line-of-sight
       broadband technology. FSO is an excellent alternative to high-speed fiber-optic cable
       since it can transmit up to 1.25 Gbps at a distance of 4 miles (6.4 kilometers) in full-
       duplex mode.

    2. Mention that FSO uses infrared (IR) transmission instead of RF. These transmissions
       are sent by low-powered invisible infrared beams through the open air. Use Figure 9-3
       to show an FSO transceiver.
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                     9-4



Teaching        Learn more about free space optics (FSO) at:
Tip             http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_Space_Optics.


    3. Describe the advantages of FSO, including:
          a. Cost
          b. Speed of installation
          c. Transmission rate
          d. Security

    4. Describe the disadvantages of FSO, including:
          a. Atmospheric conditions impact FSO transmissions
          b. To deal with fog, FSO can increase the transmit power of the signal
          c. Signal interference
          d. Tall buildings or towers can sway due to wind or seismic activity, affecting the
              aim of the beam

    5. Define scintillation as the temporal and spatial variations in light intensity caused by
       atmospheric turbulence. FSO overcomes scintillation by sending the data in parallel
       streams from several separate laser transmitters. This solution is called spatial diversity.
       Use Figure 9-4 to better describe spatial diversity.

    6. Describe various FSO applications, including:
          a. Last mile connection
          b. LAN connections
          c. Fiber-optic backup
          d. Backhaul

Local Multipoint Distribution Service (LMDS)

    1. Define local multipoint distribution service (LMDS) as a fixed broadband technology
       that can provide a wide variety of wireless services, including:
           a. High-speed Internet access
           b. Real-time multimedia file transfer
           c. Remote access to local area networks
           d. Interactive video, video-on-demand, video conferencing
           e. Telephone service

    2. Mention that LMDS can transmit from 51 to 155 Mbps downstream and 1.54 Mbps
       upstream over a distance of up to about 5 miles (8 kilometers). Use Figure 9-5 to
       describe LMDS transmissions.


Teaching        Read more about local multipoint distribution service (LMDS) at:
Tip             www.tech-faq.com/lmds-local-multipoint-distribution-service.shtml.


    3. Describe the ranges of frequencies used by LMDS, as explained in this chapter.
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                   9-5

    4. Explain the architecture of LMDS. An LMDS network is composed of cells much like a
       cellular telephone system. The main difference is that LMDS is a fixed wireless
       technology for buildings.

    5. Use Figure 9-6 through Figure 9-8 to describe the factors that determine the cell size,
       including:
           a. Line-of-sight
           b. Antenna height
           c. Overlapping cells
           d. Rainfall

    6. Explain that LMDS signals are broadcast from radio hubs that are deployed throughout
       the carrier’s market, the area in which the LMDS provider has a license to use a certain
       frequency. The Hub connects to the service provider’s central office, which can connect
       to other networks, such as the Internet. Use Figure 9-9 to show the LDMS
       infrastructure.

    7. Use Figure 9-19 to describe the equipment used at the receiving site, such as:
          a. 12- to 15-inch diameter directional antenna
          b. Digital radio modem
          c. Network interface unit

    8. Explain that LMDS systems can use either time division multiple access (TDMA) or
       frequency division multiple access (FDMA). Modulation techniques include quadrature
       phase shift keying (QPSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM).

    9. Describe the main advantages and disadvantages of LMDS, as explained in this chapter.

Multichannel Multipoint Distribution Service (MMDS)

    1. Define MMDS as a fixed broadband wireless technology similar to LMDS, which can
       transmit video, voice, or data signals at 1.5 to 2 Mbps downstream and 320 Kbps
       upstream at distances of up to 35 miles (56 kilometers). MMDS is sometimes called
       wireless cable.


Teaching        Read more about multichannel multipoint distribution service (MMDS) at:
Tip             http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multichannel_Multipoint_Distribution_Service.


    2. Describe the layout of an MMDS network. An MMDS hub is typically located on a
       high point and uses a point-to-multipoint architecture that multiplexes communications
       to multiple users. The tower has a backhaul connection to the carrier’s network. The
       carrier network connects with the Internet.

    3. Explain that since MMDS signals can travel longer distances, they can provide service
       to an entire area with only a few radio transmitters. An MMDS cell size can have a
       radius of up to 35 miles (56 kilometers).
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                   9-6

    4. Use Figure 9-11 and Figure 9-12 to describe the equipment required at the receiving
       side, as explained in this section.

    5. Describe the main advantages and disadvantages of MMDS, as explained in this
       chapter.


Quick Quiz 1
    1. A(n) ____________________ transmission sends multiple signals at different
       frequencies.
       Answer: broadband

    2. ____________________ is defined as the temporal and spatial variations in light
       intensity caused by atmospheric turbulence.
       Answer: Scintillation

    3. ____________________ (LMDS) is a fixed broadband technology that can provide a
       wide variety of wireless services.
       Answer: Local multipoint distribution service

    4. True or False: Multichannel multipoint distribution service (MMDS) is a fixed
       broadband wireless technology that has many similarities to LMDS.
       Answer: True


IEEE 802.16 (WiMAX)
    1. Define 802.16 as a standard for wireless broadband metropolitan area networks. 802.16
       supports enhancements and extensions to the MAC protocols so a base station (BS) can
       communicate with another BS and also directly with subscriber stations (SS).

    1. Mention that the WiMAX Forum promotes the implementation of 802.16 by testing and
       certifying equipment. WiMAX stands for worldwide interoperability for microwave
       access.

Teaching
                For more information about WiMAX, visit: www.wimaxforum.org/home.
Tip

WiMAX Applications

    1. Describe various features of the WiMAX applications, including:
       Suitable for backhaul applications for business
       Last mile delivery applications
       Supports simultaneous voice, video, and data transmission
       Suitable for voice-over-IP (VoIP) connections
       Enables vendors to create customer premises equipment (CPE)
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                   9-7

        Can also be deployed as a point-to-point network to provide broadband access to rural
           and remote areas
        WiMAX CPE devices will support TV (video), telephone (voice), and data on the same
           network

    2. Explain that the WiMAX MAC layer makes it easy for carriers to deploy the network.

    3. Mention that the range of a WiMAX network is measured in miles.

Standards Family Overview

    1. Explain that the 802.16-2001 and 802.16-2004 standards define the interface
       specification for fixed, point-to-multipoint broadband WMANs. 802.16a adds support
       for systems operating in the 2 GHz to 11 GHz band.

    2. Mention that 802.16c provided clarifications related to performance evaluation and
       testing. 802.16e defines specifications for a mobile version of WiMAX.

WiMAX Protocol Stack

    1. Explain that the PHY layer supports multiple frequency bands and several modulation
       techniques. WiMAX MAC layer is connection oriented and includes service-specific
       convergence sublayers that interface to the upper OSI layers.

    2. Use Figure 9-13 to describe the 802.16 protocol stack. WiMAX offers multiple
       simultaneous services through the same link, such as asynchronous transfer mode
       (ATM), IPv4, IPv6, Ethernet, and VLAN.

    3. Explain that there are five variations of the PHY layer in 802.16. The first two are based
       on the modulation of a single carrier signal. When transmitting at a single frequency,
       transmission is half-duplex. Each frame is subdivided into one uplink subframe and one
       downlink subframe. Subframes are further divided into a series of time slots. Burst is a
       data transmission to or from a single device. These two methods use time division
       duplexing (TDD). Use Figure 9-14 to show a WiMAX TDD frame.

    4. Explain that WiMAX also allows the use of two different frequency channels, one for
       downlink and another for uplink. This mechanism is called frequency division
       duplexing.

    5. Describe the two variations of the PHY layer specified in the standard:
          a. WirelessMAN-SC (single carrier)
          b. WirelessMAN-SCa (single-carrier access)

    6. Use Figure 9-15 to describe how the 802.16 standard supports non-line-of-sight (NLOS)
       applications.
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                       9-8

    7. Describe the two additional Physical layer transmission mechanisms used by 802.16 to
       support NLOS applications:
          a. WirelessMAN-OFDM
          b. WirelessMAN-OFDMA

    8. Use Table 9-2 to present a summary of WiMAX specifications.


Teaching        Read more about Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) at:
Tip             www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Computer_Science/2005/OFDMA.asp.


    9. Explain how 802.16 uses forward error correction and automatic repeat requests (ARQ)
       for error correction. In addition, 802.16 dynamically changes the modulation technique
       used when transmitting. Use Table 9-3 and Figure 9-16 to illustrate your explanation.

    10. Mention that 802.16 defines several transmission profiles, which are sets of predefined
        connection parameters. Define system profiles as the combination of the basic profile
        and one of the transmission profiles.

    11. Describe the frequency range and throughput supported by 802.16. Use Table 9-4 to
        illustrate your explanation.

    12. Explain the 802.16 MAC layer. Most wireless MAN implementations function in a
        point-to-multipoint basis with one BS and potentially hundreds of SSs. 802.16 MAC
        dynamically allocates bandwidth to individual SSs for the uplink.

    13. Mention that an advanced antenna system (AAS) transmits multiple simultaneous
        signals in different directions to stations that fall within the range. WiMAX can also
        take advantage of multiple in multiple out (MIMO) antenna systems.

    14. Explain that to address a burst to a particular SS, an 802.16 BS uses a 16-bit connection
        identifier (CID). Stations can request additional dedicated bandwidth (for QoS).

    15. Use Figure 9-17 to describe the structure of an 802.16 MAC frame.

WiMAX Coexistence

    1. Explain that one of the main concerns with wireless communications is that as the
       number of transmitters grows, so does interference. WiMAX is not limited to the 2.4
       GHz or the 5 GHz bands. The U-NII band offers 12 channels and about 300 MHz of
       bandwidth, and since WiMAX signals are limited to between 30 and 35 miles,
       interference may not be a serious problem.

    2. Mention that adaptive modulations, variable data rates, signal power levels, and FEC
       also help with interference.
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                  9-9

WMAN Security
    1. Describe the security advantages of using FSO systems. In addition, describe the
       security problems regarding LMDS and MMDS system.

WiMAX Security

    1. Explain that WiMAX standard was initially designed to include very powerful security
       measures. The MAC layer includes a privacy sublayer. The privacy sublayer provides a
       client/server authentication and key management protocol using digital certificates.

    2. Describe the components in the privacy sublayer:
          a. An encapsulation protocol for encrypting packet data
          b. A privacy key management protocol that provides secure key distribution

    3. Define the traffic encryption key (TEK) as a security key used to encrypt the data. SSs
       must renew the keys periodically with the BS. The default TEK lifetime is 12 hours.

    4. Describe the encryption algorithms supported by 802.16, including:
          a. 3-DES
          b. RSA with 1024-bit key
          c. AES with 128-bit key


Quick Quiz 2
    1. A data transmission to or from a single device is called a(n) ____________________ in
       the 802.16 standard.
       Answer: burst

    2. ____________________ is the amount of time delay that it takes a packet to travel from
       source to destination device.
       Answer: Latency

    3. ____________________ is the maximum delay variation between two consecutive
       packets over a period of time.
       Answer: Jitter

    4. ____________________ is an algorithm developed in 1977 by Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir,
       and Leonard Adleman.
       Answer: RSA


Class Discussion Topics
    1. What is free space optics (FSO)?

    2. What are the differences between broadband and baseband transmissions?
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                    9-10


Additional Projects
    1. Ask your students to write a report comparing free space optics (FSO), local multipoint
       distribution service (LMDS), and multichannel multipoint distribution service (MMDS).
       They should compare characteristics such as frequency range, distance, data rate,
       multiplexing techniques, and modulation techniques, among others.

    2. Ask your students to use the Internet to research the security problems faced by the
       802.16 (WiMAX) standards and write a one-page report summarizing the most
       important points.


Additional Resources
    1. Wireless MAN:
       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_MAN

    2. Fixed Wireless:
       http://wi-fiplanet.webopedia.com/TERM/F/fixed_wireless.html

    3. Free Space Optics:
       www.freespaceoptics.org/freespaceoptics/default.cfm

    4. LMDS:
       www.auditmypc.com/acronym/LMDS.asp

    5. What is MMDS?:
       www.tech-faq.com/mmds-multichannel-multipoint-distribution-service.shtml

    6. MMDS:
       www.auditmypc.com/acronym/MMDS.asp

    7. WiMAX:
       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wimax

    8. OFDMA:
       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OFDMA


Key Terms
     advanced antenna system (AAS) — An antenna that can transmit multiple
      simultaneous signals in different directions to stations that fall within the range of each
      of the antennas.
     Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) — The latest encryption standard, developed
      by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to replace the United
      States data encryption standard (see DES).
     backhaul — A company’s internal infrastructure connection.
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                               9-11

     baseband — A transmission technique that treats the entire transmission medium as
      only one channel.
     base station (BS) — The transmitter connected to the carrier network or to the Internet.
     broadband — A transmission technique that sends multiple signals at different
      frequencies.
     burst — A transmission containing data to or from a single SS or a broadcast
      transmission from the BS.
     carriers — Telephone, cable TV, and other communication providers who own the
      wires and transmission towers that carry voice and data traffic.
     customer premises equipment (CPE) — The WiMAX devices that are installed in a
      customer’s office or home.
     Data Encryption Standard (DES) — The encryption standard used in the United
      States until the adoption of AES (see AES).
     digital certificates — A special message signed by a certification authority, used for
      security and authentication.
     fixed wireless — A wireless last mile connection.
     free space optics (FSO) — An optical, wireless, point-to-point, line-of-sight broadband
      technology.
     frequency division duplexing (FDD) — A mechanism that uses one frequency for
      uplink and another for downlink (see also TDD).
     IEEE 802.16 — The IEEE standard for wireless broadband metropolitan area networks.
     jitter — The maximum delay variation between two consecutive packets over a period
      of time.
     last mile connection — The link between the customer’s premises and the telephone
      company, cable TV company, or an ISP.
     latency — The amount of time delay that it takes a packet to travel from source to
      destination device.
     local multipoint distribution service (LMDS) — A fixed broadband technology that
      can provide a wide variety of wireless services.
     microwaves — Part of the spectrum from 3 to 30 GHz.
     multichannel multipoint distribution service (MMDS) — A fixed broadband
      wireless technology that transmits at 1.5 Mbps over distances of 35 miles (56
      kilometers).
     network interface unit (NIU) — A device that connects an LMDS modem to an LAN
      or telephone system.
     non-line-of-sight (NLOS) — When the transmitter antenna cannot be seen from the
      receiver end, or vice-versa.
     orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) — A multiple access
      technique, based on OFDM, that divides the frequency channel into 1,536 data
      subcarriers.
     pizza box antenna — A small antenna used for MMDS systems.
     profiles — Sets of predefined WiMAX connection parameters that include the
      frequency channel, bandwidth of the channel, and transmission mechanism (OFDM,
      OFDMA, etc.).
     RSA — An encryption algorithm developed in 1977 by Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and
      Leonard Adleman.
     scintillation — The temporal and spatial variations in light intensity caused by
      atmospheric turbulence.
Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications                                                 9-12

     spatial diversity — The sending of parallel beams during free space optical
      transmissions.
     subscriber station (SS) — In a WiMAX network, either a CPE device that attaches to
      an LAN or a laptop computer.
     super high frequency (SHF) — Part of the frequency spectrum from 3 to 30 GHz.
     system profile — A combination of the basic WiMAX profile and one of the
      transmission profiles.
     time division duplexing (TDD) — A mechanism that divides a single transmission into
      two parts, an uplink part and a downlink part (see also FDD).
     traffic encryption key (TEK) — The security key used to encrypt the data in a
      WiMAX network.
     triple-play — The support of transmission of video, voice, and data on the same
      network.
     truck-rolls — Support technician visits to a site.
     WiMAX — Worldwide interoperability for microwave access.
     WiMAX Forum — An industry organization dedicated to promoting the
      implementation of 802.16 by testing and certifying equipment for compatibility and
      interoperability.
     wireless high-speed unlicensed metro area network (WirelessHUMAN) — A
      WiMAX specification based on OFDM, specifically designed for use in the 5 GHz U-
      NII band.
     WirelessMAN-SC (single carrier) — A WiMAX specification that uses a single
      carrier and is intended for point-to-point connections in the 10 to 66 GHz bands.
     WirelessMAN-SCa (single-carrier access) — A WiMAX specification that uses a
      single carrier and is intended for point-to-point connections in the 2 to 11 GHz bands.
     wireless metropolitan area networks (WMANs) — A group of technologies that
      provide wireless connectivity across a substantial geographical area such as a large city.


Technical Notes for Hands-On Projects
Project 9-1: This project requires a Web browser and an Internet connection.

Project 9-2: This project requires a Web browser and an Internet connection.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:211
posted:5/24/2010
language:English
pages:12