AP Biology

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					                                                      AP Biology
                                           Instructor- Jennifer Davis Room 665
                                             Email - davisj2@stjohns.k12.fl.us
                                        Textbook - Biology, 7th Edition by Campbell and Reece

AP Biology Syllabus

Course Overview

My AP Biology course is designed to comply and meet the standards instituted by the College Board for all AP courses
and covers all of the topics in the AP Biology Course Description. The topics include biochemistry, cells, cellular
energetics, heredity, molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, diversity of organisms, structure and function of plants
and animals, and ecology.
My students meet five days each week for 180 days. The class periods are 90 minutes long with a double lab period
once a week. This provides plenty of time for the students to complete all of the 12 AP Labs in the AP Lab Manual for
Students as well as additional lab work. Class time is divided into lecture, class discussion, and lab activities. Lectures
are supported by visuals from Campbell Biology PowerPoint, video, internet, and overhead transparencies.


The textbook for the AP Biology Course is the seventh AP edition of Neil A. Campbell and Jane B. Reece’s Biology.
Students also use the AP Biology Lab Manual for Students.

The AP Biology Course emphasizes and focuses on the eight major themes, (Science as a Process, Evolution, Energy
Transfer, Continuity and Change, Relationship of Structure to Function, Regulation, Interdependence in Nature, and
Science, Technology, and Society) that recur throughout the course material. I emphasize the pervasiveness of the
themes to assist students in organizing concepts and topics into a coherent conceptual framework. The themes are
applied across the entire curriculum and serve to unify the course.

Introduction:
GENERAL INFORMATION: The A.P. Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a typical college
introductory biology course. The guidelines for this course are provided by The College Board organization that polls
colleges and universities as to course expectations. The focus of this course is designed to meet these requirements and
many of the labs and activities are a product of The College Board's polling evaluations. The A.P. Exam, given in mid
May, is a product of the College Board and the participating colleges and universities. A.P. Biology includes topics
regularly covered in an introductory college biology course. This college course in biology requires the use of a college
textbook and differs significantly from high school courses in biology. The range and depth of topics covered, the kind
of laboratory work offered, and the TIME AND EFFORT REQUIRED of the students parallel the typical college
biology course. It cannot be overemphasized that each student needs to understand that this course will require a great
deal of individual effort. Successful completion of this course and an acceptable score on the A.P. exam may assist the
college freshman in several ways. First, many college freshmen are permitted to enroll in upper-level courses in biology
and/or to register for courses that has introductory biology as a prerequisite. Second, this course may fulfill a graduating
requirement for a laboratory-science course for non-biology majors. Third, this course may be used to prepare for an
introductory biology course when biology as a major is pursued. All of these are advantages and A.P. Biology can only
help students with their freshman year. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge,
and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. - from the publication,
Advanced Placement Course Description: Biology by The College Board. [www.collegeboard.org]

A qualified AP Biology student is one that is highly motivated, is academically oriented, has excellent study skills and
reading abilities, and views learning as a journey rather than an obligation. I am confident that AP Biology can help the
student greatly as they continue to develop the academic skills necessary to succeed in college, while providing them
with a realistic notion of what college courses may be like. Despite the rigor of this course, an overwhelming majority of
students enrolled pass the AP exam, and find it very rewarding and enjoyable!

My Philosophy
This is a project- and laboratory-based course where students will be allowed to generate knowledge about biology with
their peers and prepare to take the demanding Advanced Placement Biology Exam. The course includes descriptive and
experimental laboratory exercises that will provide the maximum opportunity for students to learn a variety of skills and
those facts, principles, and concepts of general biology covered in lectures, reading and discussion. The laboratory work
will encourage the development of important skills such as detailed observation, accurate recording, experimental
design, manual manipulation, data interpretation, statistical analysis, and operation of technical equipment. The
laboratory assignments offer the opportunity for students to learn about problem solving, the scientific method, the
techniques of research, and the use of scientific literature. Laboratory investigations also encourage higher-order
thinking, which include evaluating and monitoring progress through an investigation, generating ideas, and formulating
hypotheses. The teacher will be a guide for the journey, a facilitator, an events planner, and a source of information.
Other sources of information will be the textbook, study guide(s), charts and diagrams, videos, and many internet
sources selected by the teacher and by the students. Always remember, the student is the learner here! The student is the
one who needs to actively acquire knowledge. The student is the one preparing for the AP Biology Exam. The AP
Biology teacher will provide students some of the ways and means of acquiring knowledge about the living world but
the student will also actively construct and generate their own knowledge by interaction with each other, written text (
study guide(s),books, magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, internet), graphs and data charts, numbers, drawings yours
and those of others), pictures and movies, sound, microscopes, test tubes, stethoscopes, blood pressure monitors,
computers, specimens, EACH OTHER....and the list goes on...... Who knows where the journey will lead, but by the end
of the journey the student will be richer in knowledge and experience and will be prepared to take the AP Biology
Exam.

Major Themes in Biology:
I.   Science as a Process
II.   Evolution
III.  Energy Transfer
IV.   Continuity and Change
V.     Relationship of Structure to Function
VI.    Regulation
VII.   Interdependence in Nature
VIII. Science, Technology, and Society


Topic Outline:
Topic                                                                                                                                           Percentage of Course
I. Molecules and Cells..................................................................................................... ......................................25%
   A. Chemistry of Life......................................................................................................... .......7%
      Water, Organic molecules of organisms, Free energy changes, Enzymes
   B. Cells............................................................................................................................ ......10%
      Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, Membranes, Subcellular organization
      Cell cycle and its regulation
   C. Cellular Energetics....................................................................................................... .......8%
      Coupled reactions, Fermentation and cellular respiration, Photosynthesis
II. Heredity and Evolution.....................................................................................................25%
   A. Heredity.................................................................................................................. ............8%
      Meiosis and gametogenesis, Eukaryotic chromosomes, Inheritance patterns
   B. Molecular Genetics.............................................................................................................9%
      RNA and DNA structure and function, Gene regulation, Mutation, Viral
      structure and replication, Nucleic acid technology and applications
   C. Evolutionary Biology.........................................................................................................8%
      Early evolution of life, Evidence for evolution, Mechanisms of evolution
III. Organisms and Populations...................................................................................... ......50 %
   A. Diversity of Organisms......................................................................................................8%
      Evolutionary patterns, Survey of the diversity of life, Polygenetic
      classification, Evolutionary relationships
   B. Structure and Function of Plants and Animals........................................................ ......32%
      Reproduction, growth, and development, Structural, physiological, and
      behavioral adaptations, Response to the environment
   C. Ecology............................................................................................................................10%
      Population dynamics, Communities and ecosystems, Global issues

Goals and Objectives:
Conscientiously become more scientifically literate in matters related to the living world as you develop an awareness of
the diversity and complexity of life on earth. Actively ask, find, determine answers related to biology. Carefully
describe, explain, and predict consequences based on knowledge (prior and that to be acquired in this class) of the living
world by developing an understanding of various scientific methods and how they are used and how scientific
hypotheses, laws, principles, and theories are formulated and tested. Critically comment on concepts and topics related
to biology Accurately organize, analyze, and communicate information about the living world. Perceptively discuss
issues related to human interactions with the living world. Diligently develop an understanding of chemical and physical
processes that occur within, affect, or are affected by living organisms. Enthusiastically develop an awareness of the
history of science and the men and women who have contributed to the advancement of biological knowledge.
Persistently prepare for the AP Biology.

Grading:
60% Tests
15% Quizzes, Homework/Classwork, Free-Response Questions
25% Lab Experiments, Lab Reports, Projects
20% Midterm Exam and Final Exam


Independent AP Biology Student Projects
All students who take the AP Biology course are required to do two independent research projects outside of class time.
AP Biology Semester 1 Project - The Demon in the Freezer by Richard Preston, INDEPENDENT RESEARCH
PROJECT, Project due date December 1, 2008. Debate to be held the first week of December. All AP Biology
students are required to design and complete their own scientific investigation outside of class. This will require doing
literary research, planning and executing an experimental procedure, collecting and analyzing data, and preparing a
formal scientific paper and presentation. Guidelines, information, and due dates will be provided on the rubric.
AP Biology Semester 2 Project - Annotated Bibliography on a specific Ecological Problem: Concept approval due
January 22, 2009, Final Project due April 24, 2009. The purpose of this assignment is to develop your ability to think
about ecological problems and how to solve them, and to introduce you to the scientific literature about an ecological
topic of your choice. You will have to identify a scientific problem or issue, research the literature for this topic,
and then give a one-paragraph summary of each of the most relevant papers. Typically, the number of references
will vary between 8 to 12.


Course Schedule

First Semester August 22 –
January 20
AP Biology Topics                                   Weeks of                        Correlation To Biology, Seventh Edition
                                                    Instruction and                 With Chapter Readings
                                                    Percentage of
                                                    AP Biology
                                                    Course
I. Molecules and Cells                              8.5 Weeks –                     Units 1 and 2
                                                    25%
A. Chemistry of Life                                2.5 Weeks -                     Chapters 1-5, 8
                                                    7%
1. Exploring Life                                                                   Concepts 1.1-1.6
2. The Chemical Context of                                                          Concepts 2.1-2.4
Life
3. Water                                             Concepts 3.1-3.3
4. Organic molecules in                              Concepts 4.1-4.3, 5.1-5.5
organisms
5. Free energy changes                               Concepts 8.1, 8.2
6. Enzymes                                           Concepts 8.4, 8.5
B. Cells                             3 Weeks – 10%   Chapters 6,7, 11,12
1. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic                        Concepts 6.1-6.7, 26.3, 26.4, 27.1
cells
2. Membranes`                                        Concepts 6.2, 6.4, 7.1-7.5, 11.1-11.4
3. Subcellular organization                          Concepts 6.2-6.7
4. Cell cycle and its regulation                     Concepts 12.1-12.3
C. Cellular Energetics               3 Weeks – 8%    Chapters 8-10
1. Coupled reactions                                 Concepts 8.3, 9.1-9.4, 10.2
2. Fermentation and cellular                         Concepts 9.2-9.6
respiration
3. Photosynthesis                                    Concepts 10.1-10.4
II. Heredity and Evolution           9.5 Weeks –     Units 3 and 4
                                     25%
A. Heredity                          3 Weeks – 8%    Chapters 13-15
1. Meiosis and gamesomeness                          Concepts 13.1-13.4, 29.2-29.4, 30.1-30.3, 46.4
2. Eukaryotic chromosomes                            Concepts 15.1-15.5
3. Inheritance patterns                              Concepts 14.1-14.4, 15.3-15.5
B. Molecular Genetics                3.5 Weeks –     Chapters 16-20
                                     9%
1. RNA and DNA structure and                         Concepts 16.1, 16.2, 17.1-17.6, 18.3
function
2. Gene regulation                                   Concepts 18.4, 19.1-19.3
3. Mutation                                          Concepts 15.4, 17.7, 18.3, 19.3, 19.5
4. Viral structure and replication                   Concepts 18.1, 18.2
5. Nucleic acid technology and                       Concepts 20.1-20.5
applications
C. Evolutionary Biology              3 Weeks – 8%    Chapters 22-26
1. Early evolution of life                           Concepts 26.1-26.5
2. Evidence for evolution                            Concepts 22.2, 22.3, 25.1-25.5
3. Mechanisms of evolution                           Concepts 22.1-22.3, 23.1-23.4, 24.1-24.3, 25.4, 25.5




Second Semester      January 21                      Second Semester
– June 10
AP Biology Topics                                                Correlation To Biology, Seventh Edition
III. Organisms and                       18 Weeks –              Units 5-9
Populations                              50%
A. Diversity of Organisms                2.5 Weeks –             Chapters 25-34
                                         8%
1. Evolutionary patterns                                         Concepts 29.1, 29.2, 31.1, 32.1-32.3
2. Survey of the diversity of life                               Concepts 26.6, 27.1-27.4, 28.1-28.8, 29.2-29.4, 30.2-
                                                                 30.4, 31.2-31.5, 32.1, 32.4, 33.1-33.8, 34.1-34.8
3. Phylogenetic classification                                   Concepts 25.2, 26.6, 27.1, 27.3, 28.1-28.8, 29.1-29.4,
                                                                 30.1-30.4, 31.1-31.4, 32.1, 32.4, 33.1-33.8, 34.1-34.8
4. Evolutionary relationships                                    Concepts 25.1-25.5
B. Structure and Function of             Plants – 4.5            Chapters 21, 29, 30, 35-39, 40-49, 51
Plants and Animals                       Weeks -12%
                                         Animals – 6.5
                                         Weeks – 20%
1. Reproduction, growth, and                                     Concepts 21.1-21.4, 29.2-29.4, 30.1-30.3, 35.2-35.5,
development (plants)                                             38.1-38.3
2. Reproduction, growth, and                                     Concepts 21.1-21.4, 46.1-46.5, 47.1-47.3
development (animals)
3. Structural, physiological, and                                Concepts 29.1-29.4, 30.1-30.4, 35.1, 36.1-36.5, 37.1-
behavioral adaptations (plants)                                  37.4, 38.1-38.3, 39.1-39.5
4. Structural, physiological, and                                Concepts 40.1-40.5, 41.1-41.5, 42.1-42.7, 43.1-43.3,
behavioral adaptations                                           44.1-44.6, 45.1-45.5, 46.1-46.5, 48.1-48.6, 49.1-49.7,
(animals)                                                        51.2-51.6
5. Response to the environment                                   Concepts 39.1-39.5
(plants)
6. Response to the environment                                   Concepts 40.4, 40.5, 43.1, 43.2, 44.1, 44.2, 45.1-45.5,
animals)                                                         48.1, 49.1-49.4, 51.1, 51.2
C. Ecology                               2.5 Weeks –             Chapters 50, 52-55
                                         10%
1. Population dynamics                                           Concepts 52.1-52.6
2. Communities and ecosystems                                    Concepts 50.2-50.4, 53.1-53.5, 54.1-54.5
3. Global issues                                                 Concepts 50.1, 50.2, 54.5, 55.1-55.4
AP Biology Review of all labs            1 Week
and key themes, topics, and
concepts
AP Biology Exam                                                  May 11 8:00 am



AP Biology: Bioethics Research Paper and Debate – Due December 1, 2008
   CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL,             Bioterrorism: agroterrorism,infectious agents
   AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS               Storage, monitoring, decontamination issues
                                     Scientific freedom vs. national security: Bioterrorism and scientific publishing (DEBATE)


Term paper You will need to purchase and read the book, The Demon in the Freezer: A True Story by Richard Preston. Preston
connects the anthrax attacks of October 2001, to the frightening threat of smallpox in the past and present, humanizing his facts by
discussing researchers, WHO workers, and recent victims; an informative, at times horrific tale. You will be required to prepare an 8-
10 page, typed, double-spaced, essay on the science ethics topic of bioterrorism. The term paper should be in the form of an
argument paper. This type of paper must address a clearly identifiable and defined ethical issue that is presented as a statement.
The paper should present opposing arguments, that is, arguments on both sides of a debate. It should conclude with a statement of
your ethical views regarding the topic and the rationale for your thinking. Below are a list of discussion questions:

     1.   What is public health? What are some of its components?
     2.   Who is responsible for health? When is health the responsibility of individuals? Of private voluntary organizations? Of
          professional organizations? Of government? Has responsibility changed over time?
     3.   Give some examples where ideas about public and private responsibility for health may conflict. Are there some areas that
          you believe are clearly private and some clearly public? Is there some point, over time or by specific issue, that health
          changes from private to a public matter?
     4.   What is the government’s proper role in health matters? Should different levels of government handle different sorts of
          public health?
     5.   What should the US do with the smallpox virus in the CDC freezer?
     6.   What rights should individuals have if they endanger the health of others? How can we balance individual’s rights and
          public health?
     7.   How does early 21st century terrorism impact on public health issues?
     8.   What is variolation? What is smallpox vaccination? How does it differ from variolation? Why was it resisted in the 19th
          century?

How to prepare a paper for class discussion. The debate-discussion approach grows directly out of an appreciation of the benefits
of active learning, in which the teacher is a facilitator of learning rather than a dispenser of information and the students actively
pursue their education rather than passively receive knowledge. The general goal of this course and this assignment is to focus on
critical thinking, being willing to explore ideas contrary to one’s own beliefs, knowing when information or data are relevant to an
issue and how to seek and find that information and apply it methodologically to the problem at hand. Active discussion, expressing
one’s ideas and getting reactions from other students and the teacher, has been demonstrated to make a big difference in learning,
retention, and use of knowledge. Verbalizing an idea can be one way of getting checks and extensions of it. Here is a suggested
strategy for preparing for your class discussion debate.

                                              1.   Be sure you can restate the key points made by the author as she/he has made
                                                   them (first read). what part of the book is" factual"? opinion?
                                              2.   what ethical dilemmas are raised?
                                              3.   what new insights did you gain from this book?
                                              4.   what points or positions did you disagree with?
                                              5.   what arguments or viewpoints did the author omitted?
                                              6.   what did you think of the writing style?
                                              7.   if you had one question you could ask the author in person, what would it be?
                                              8.   rank the book (1) excellent, worth my time and I gained a lot (2) average book,
                                                   some good points but some weaknesses (3) not a strong book, wish I had gone
                                                   rollerblading instead..


GUIDELINES FOR CLASS DISCUSSION: During the semester, many opinions will be voiced in the class. You may strongly
disagree with some of these, or you may find them amusing. Outbursts can be misinterpreted or counterproductive to meaningful and
thoughtful debate. Therefore, it is important that you exercise self-discipline and self-control, and treat all members of the class with
the courtesy that you are entitled to receive in turn. The key words are: respect and courtesy. Thank you!

Annotated Bibliography Requirement                                                     Project Due Date April 24, 2009.
The purpose of this assignment is to develop your ability to think about ecological problems and how to solve them, and
to introduce you to the scientific literature about an ecological topic of your choice. You will have to identify a scientific
problem or issue, research the literature for this topic, and then give a one-paragraph summary of each of the
most relevant papers. Typically, the number of references will vary between 8 to 12.
For this course, I will accept the following sources as "scientific literature": (1) reputable reportage of the
original peer reviewed scientific literature (e.g., Discover, NY Science Times, Science News, etc), (2) books that
directly reference and report the peer-reviewed literature, (3) the peer-reviewed literature. I will not accept
articles from (1) the general news section of a newspaper, (2) anything from the web that is not validated, (3)
articles from encyclopedias, (4) books that do not include direct citation of the original peer-reviewed literature.
Articles from Time and Newsweek may be acceptable, but they should be used minimally. If you have doubts
about a source, you should clear it with me before you write.

I. CONCEPT APPROVAL (5% of the project grade, due January 22, 2009)
          Submit a title describing the ecological problem that you will study in the scientific literature. Include a brief list of
           possible source literature (two references mandatory) with your topic. The primary purpose of this is to assure
           that you have identified an appropriate ecological question for review. One way to find your topic is to browse
           the chapters and section headings in some of the additional texts in biology or ecology. Note that many topics
           could be in the area of applied ecology as well as evolutionary ecology, but medicine, health, etc. are
           appropriate.
II. ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY (95% of the project grade). One method for organizing your bibliography is to present
it by subject headers. Another method is to present the work chronologically as follows:
      1) Introduce the topic by starting with the oldest references first. Review early work on the subject. Within your
      review of this early work, you should be able to justify the research effort and introduce the central idea or
      hypothesis, which should be reflected in the title of your bibliography.

    2) Use subheadings as necessary in your document as your trace the development of the concepts forward in
    time, or as you introduce major subsections of the reviewed literature.

    3) The summary paragraph about each paper may not be quoted verbatim from the paper or from the
    paper's abstract. It must be written in your own words, and it should identify the most important contributions of
    this paper to the intellectual development of your chosen area of study.

      4) Conclude with the most recent literature, and identify in your summaries the remaining questions to be
      addressed within the area of study. What needs to be done next? Often, there will be a review paper that
      summarizes this for you.
III. BIBLIOGRAPHY GRADING
      Grading of proposal sections will be weighted as follows:
          Historical development (i.e., did you identify the origin of the problem or question?): 10% of the project
          grade
          Relevance of reviewed literature: 30% of the project grade
          Completeness of your review of the topic: 30%
          Clarity and logic of your one-paragraph summaries: 30%
          For an example of an annotated bibliography, please see the instructor.

Some Thoughts on Developing Your
Annotated Bibliography
The most important thing about this assignment is that it be useful and interesting to YOU. Do not write on a topic just
because it is an assignment. Please put some of your own dreams and interests in the assignment. Below are some tips
on how to proceed. Note that we stress scholarship and science, rather than applied ecology or conservation. You must
learn the science behind the web of life before you can solve the many problems of our biosphere. The idea of the next
few comments is to provide some ideas that might be helpful in developing your bibliography projects: how to come up
with topics, how get started in the literature, how to formulate a focused research question that will provide an appropriate
review of the literature.
Step1: Think Broadly Then Narrow the Focus
Come up with a basic idea of the question you would like to work on, or what organisms interest you. Initially, keep the
question broad in scope and simple. After deciding on a general area or organism, then begin to narrow the focus of your
project and consider a list of possible questions within this framework. You might also wish to browse the topic headings
in leading text books on ecology and evolution.
Step 2: Reading and Thinking
Try doing a key word search on the web. Let's say you are interested in bird migration. Do key word search using words
like "birds", "Florida", "migration" and see what comes up. If you get too many references you will need to revise your
keywords to narrow the focus of your search (e.g., by putting two words with "AND" in between). Another alternative is to
do key word searches on some of the literature databases like FirstSesarch, Web of Science, Biological Abstracts,
Current Contents, or Zoological Record. Finally, you may wish to browse through some recent issues of scientific journals
on the shelves at any college media center, such as: Trends in Ecology, Evolution and Systematics; Science; Nature;
Ecology. Note some of these journals are available online.
Step 3: Literature Search and Background Reading
Find out what has been done by other researchers working in the general area of the ecological literature. Is there work
on species related to your study plant or animal? What types of experiments have been done? Is there a need to repeat
an experiment under different conditions? When you do this it is a good idea to write notes on the findings of the different
studies and the citation to the information. Some studies will not be appropriate to include in your bibliography. Try to
focus on the most important ones, especially those that originally defined an ecological concept or problem
Step 4: Write the Bibliography
If you did steps 1-3 correctly, then this should be easy. Remember, each paragraph must be in your own words, and
should contain the most important parts of the paper.

List of Journals Commonly Used
Journal Name
American Naturalist
American Zoologist
Animal Behavior
Applied Animal Ethology
Behavior
BioScience
Biotropica
Copeia
Ecology
Environmental Biology of Fishes
Ethology
Evolution
Florida Naturalist
Florida Scientist
Journal of Animal Ecology
Journal of Ecology
Journal of Field Ornithology
Journal of Natural History
Journal of Tropical Ecology
Nature
Oikos

Oecologia
Trends in Ecology, Evolution and
Systematics
Science
Scientific American

I reserve the right to alter the AP Biology Syllabus (schedule, due dates, tests, labs, etc.) should it be necessary.

Signature Verification: My signature below verifies that I have read and intend to fully comply with all the information in this document.
If I cannot in good faith sign this document for any reason, I will contact the instructor immediately to discuss or clarify its contents.
Please feel free to contact me during the school year if you have any concerns or if I can further help your student succeed.
Outdoor Field Permission:
During the course it will be necessary at times for the students to conduct supervised lab work out in the field. Students will need to dress
accordingly and act accordingly. My signature below verifies that I will allow my student to participate in supervised outdoor field work
and agree to release and discharge the St. Johns County School District, its officers, agents, and employees exercising reasonable care
within their scope of employment, from liability growing out of personal injuries and property damage resulting or occurring during the
above mentioned activity, or in transit to from said activity.
_________________________________________________   ________________________
Student’s signature                                 Date


_________________________________________________   _________________________
Parent’s signature                                  Date

				
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