NAMIBIA: FROM OX-WAGON TO MODERNITY by ProQuest

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Other factors had begun to affect the viability of their way of life: outbreaks of rinderpest at the turn of the century had killed oxen and encouraged the development of rudimentary railways in competition; there had been government restrictions on landholdings and the price of Angolan rubber had fallen. Wolfgang 'Kucki' Kuhhirt, who had previously run a pub in Swakopmund, has trained up his black male staff so that they run and manage the lodge themselves thanks to his faith in their potential and his personal training, from sitting them down, taking their orders and serving their food to give them the experience their previous circumstances had denied. [...] that ox-wagon stands in the Swakopmund museum bearing the baggage of almost the last two centuries of the nation's history: for the descendants of the Boers moving on from British and Portuguese control, a symbol of liberation; for the native majority, perhaps a symbol of enslavement.

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