Aesop, Aristotle, and Animals: The Role of Fables in Human Life by ProQuest

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[...] the viper defeats the water snake anyway, but is angry with the frogs for singing rather than offering aid. The fables are intended to be cautionary tales, warning of the dangers of being the weaker party, and providing advice on how to behave if one is in a position of weakness.9 The hierarchy and power relations in the fables, it is said, are analogous to those in the human world as it was in Greece at the time.

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									           Aesop, Aristotle, and Animals:
         The Role of Fables in Human Life
                                                          Edward Clayton
                                                                Central Michigan University




    “If someone has considered the study of the other animals to lack
    value, he ought to think the same thing about himself as well.”
                                             —Aristotle, Parts of Animals 645a

In Aesop’s fable of the Wolf and Lamb,1 instead of simply seizing
and devouring a lamb that has wandered from the flock, the wolf
challenges him with a series of false accusations
								
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