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TIME AND LIFE MANAGEMENT

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TIME AND LIFE MANAGEMENT Powered By Docstoc
					TIME MANAGEMENT:
A Key Survival Skill for Busy Faculty
      TOM E. NORRIS, MD
      Vice Dean for Academic Affairs
      Professor of Family Medicine
      Adjunct Professor Medicine, Medical
            Education, and Health Services
      University of Washington School of Medicine
              Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07         1
                  BASIC GOAL:
VALUE BASED MANAGEMENT




       Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   2
The moving hand has writ,
and having writ moved on. . .
              The Rubiyat of Omar Khayam
              Browning




        Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07             3
The shadow by my finger cast
Divides the future from the past.
Behind its unreturning line,
The vanished hour, no longer thine.

Before it lies the unknown hour,
In darkness and beyond thine power.
One hour alone is in thine hands,
The one on which the shadow stands.

                           Poem inscribed on a sundial at
                           Wellesley College
                  Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07                    4
WHAT IS TIME???


     Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   5
               A FEW DEFINITIONS:

• Newton: Time is absolute--it occurs whether the
  universe is here or not.
• Leibnitz: Time is merely the order of events, not
  an entity itself.
• Einstein: Time has no independent existence,
  apart from the order of events by which we
  measure it.
• Webster’s Dictionary: Time is a continuum in
  which events succeed one another from past
  through present to future
                    Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07            6
       “Dost thou love life? Then do not
       squander time, for that’s the stuff
       life is made of” Benjamin Franklin

If time is a series of events, then controlling
(or managing) your life (i.e. living your values)
 means controlling your time, and controlling
your time means controlling the events in your life.
                    Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07       7
             BASIC APPROACH TO
             TIME MANAGEMENT

        Decide you will CONTROL your time


IDENTIFY, UNDERSTAND, & DEFEAT your TIME ROBBERS


          PLAN: Goals; Priorities; Ideal Day


    START where you are—CREATE an Action Plan
                    Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07      8
        BASIC PRINCIPLE:

You control your life by
controlling your time.




         Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   9
   DO YOU HAVE CONTROL OF
   THE EVENTS IN YOUR LIFE??


NO CONTROL                       TOTAL CONTROL




             Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07              10
             EVENT(rate 1-5--5=total
              control, 1= no control):
•   Time I get out of bed                    _______
•   What I eat                               _______
•   What I wear                              _______
•   Length of my commute to work             _______
•   Meeting with a resident                  _______
•   Lunchtime & with whom                    _______
•   Traffic on the way home                  _______
•   What I do this evening                   _______
                    Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07             11
                                          CONTROL

• There are events we can control
• There are events we can’t control
• There are events we can’t control, but
  believe we can (mostly other people)
• There are events we can control, but believe
  we can’t---------this is often dependent on
  our NEED to control them

                 Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07         12
Branden’s Productivity Tri-Quation

           EVENT CONTROL




                                               PRODUCTIVITY


   SELF-ESTEEM




                        Branden, Nathaniel L.:The Psychology of Self-Esteem
                 Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07                                       13
                         In other words. . .

•As you control the events in your life, you
 feel better about yourself
•As you feel better about yourself, you
are more productive
•The increased productivity gives you more
control—


                 Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07    14
                     Two time fallacies:

• We’re going to have more time at some
  unspecified future date than we do now---
  ‖I’ll do it next week‖, etc
• We can somehow save time---in reality you
  have all that you are going to get




                Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07    15
                                The Twenty Biggest
                                  “Time Robbers”
 •   Management by Crisis                 •   Paperwork
 •   Telephone Interruptions              •   Leaving Tasks Unfinished
 •   Inadequate Planning                  •   Inadequate Staff
 •   Attempting Too Much                  •   Socializing
 •   Drop-in Visitors                     •   Confused Responsibility
 •   Ineffective Delegation                   or Authority
 •   Personal Disorganization             •   Poor Communication
 •   Lack of Self-Discipline              •   Inadequate Controls and
 •   Inability to Say NO                      Progress Reports
 •   Procrastination                      •   Incomplete Information
 •   Meetings                             •   Travel
                             Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07                  16
A.Mackenzie: The Time Trap
     FIVE of the MOST POPULAR
    “TIME ROBBERS” (with cures)
•   Management by Crisis
•   Inadequate Planning
•   Attempting Too Much
•   Drop-In Visitors
•   Procrastination



                 Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   17
               Management by Crisis

• ―Crisis of the week‖
• Need for organizational or institutional or
  group goals and planning.
• Need for consistency
• Not always avoidable, but there is always a
  cost


                 Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07         18
                   Inadequate Planning

• Create:
   –   Long-Term Goals
   –   Objectives
   –   Project Plans
   –   Monthly Plans
   –   Daily Plans
• Use ―Planner‖
• ―If you fail to plan, you plan to fail’
                   Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   19
                   Attempting Too Much
• Causes:                        • Cures:
  – Need to Achieve                   – Learn to Delegate
  – Insecurity                        – Learn to say NO to
  – Failure to Delegate                 your boss
  – Unrealistic time                  – Learn to estimate time
    estimates                           requirements of tasks
  – Not knowing how to                  better (conservatively)
    say NO
                                      – Stop attempting more
  – Lack of organization
                                        than you can do
  – Perfectionism

                    Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07                    20
  Drop-In Visitors (Interruptions)

• Types:
  – Unnecessary Interruptions
  – Necessary Interruptions
  – Untimely Interruptions
• Pointed Question: ―What can I do for you
  today?‖
• Schedule one-to-one meetings with those
  who frequently interrupt you
                  Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07     21
                                      Procrastination

• Types:
   – Conscious procrastination--we are aware of our actions
   – Unconscious procrastination--we are unaware
• Strategies:
   – Set a deadline
   – Do the most unpleasant part first
   – Make a game of it
   – Build in rewards
   – Pace yourself
• Other contributors: Over-commitment, Unclear Goals, Fear of
  Failure, Poor Timing, General Disorganization, Apathy
                         Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07                 22
         PLANNING

          Your PLANS
        should come from
              your
           VALUES




Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07     23
   Before PLANNING Ask Yourself:
            What are my VALUES?

Benjamin Franklin’s 13 values

Temperance                   Sincerity
Silence                      Justice
Order                        Moderation
Resolution                   Cleanliness
Frugality                    Tranquillity
Industry                     Chastity

        + Humility
              Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07        24
 YOUR GOVERNING VALUES ARE
THE FOUNDATION OF PERSONAL
              FULFILLMENT

What are the highest priorities
 in my life?

Abraham Maslow: Self-actualization
is a bringing together of what I do &
what I really value.

            Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   25
Common Categories for Personal
                        Values
 SPOUSE                          FINANCIAL SECURITY
 CHILDREN/FAMILY                 PERSONAL HEALTH/FITNESS
 SPIRITUALITY/RELIGION           SENSE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT
 INTEGRITY/HONESTY               OCCUPATIONAL SATISFACTION
 LOVE OF OTHERS/SERVICE EDUCATION/LEARNING
 SELF-RESPECT                    TAKING RESPONSIBILITY
 EXERCISING LEADERSHIP INNER HARMONY
 INDEPENDENCE                    INTELLIGENCE
 UNDERSTANDING                   QUALITY OF LIFE
 HAPPINESS                       PLEASURE
 SELF-CONTROL                    AMBITION
 BEING CAPABLE                   IMAGINATION/CREATIVITY
 FORGIVENESS                     GENEROSITY
 EQUALITY                        FRIENDSHIP
 BEAUTY           Tom E. Norris, COURAGE
                                 MD 3/07               26
WHEN YOUR DAILY ACTIVITIES REFLECT
YOUR GOVERNING VALUES, YOU
EXPERIENCE INNER PEACE
(or Self-Actualization)


                  DAILY
                  TASKS

             INTERMEDIATE
               GOALS

          LONG-RANGE GOALS


         GOVERNING VALUES

             Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   27
             The PLANNING Process
• Discern your VALUES
• Set Long-Term Goals & Objectives linked to
  them
• Establish PRIORITIES among these goals &
  Objectives—Base prioritization on values
• Learn your personal energy cycle and create your
  IDEAL DAY
• Create a plan for each day—WRITE IT DOWN

                   Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07            28
            Common Goal Categories

•   Physical Well-Being
•   Family/Spouse
•   Spiritual/Humanitarian
•   Financial
•   Professional/Career
•   Professional/Strategic
•   Community/Political
•   Educational/Personal Development
                   Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   29
ESTABLISHING PRIORITIES


CREATING A “RANK ORDER”
FOR YOUR PERSONAL GOALS




        Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   30
             ESTABLISHING BALANCE

  •   What is the long-range priority of this project?
  •   For whom & by when must this be completed?
  •   What can I delegate and to whom?
  •   Is this project more important than another?
  •   What will happen if I wait on this task?
  •   Have I included time for myself and my family?
  •   Are any of these tasks infringing on my values?

What matters most is that life should
not be at the mercy of less important things!
                          Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07         31
            Daily planning leverages time
                 through increased focus

• Five Common Excuses:
  – I don’t have time to plan.
  – I already know what I have to do, why take
    time to plan?
  – Planning doesn’t work for me--I have too many
    interruptions.
  – I feel ―tied down‖ when I have a long list of
    things to do.
  – I don’t know how to plan properly.
                  Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07        32
                        Daily Planning:
                  FIND 15 MINUTES!!!

• Find a place relatively free of distractions.
• Review the long range objectives.
• Make sure the number of tasks and the
  amount of time required by each is well
  within the time available in your day.
• Set specific daily goals for tasks.
• Anticipate obstacles.
• Plan your tasks.
                  Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07          33
                       The “IDEAL DAY”
• What are your ―regular‖ significant tasks?
• Who decides when you do these things?
• What is your personal energy cycle?
   – When are you at your best?
   – Are you a morning or evening person?
   – When are your dips
• Schedule your key tasks for your best working
  times, and work on those at the same time daily

                     Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07         34
         Prioritized Daily Task Lists

• Step 1: Make a list of everything you would
  like to accomplish today, including non-
  urgent tasks.
• Give a value to each item on the list.
  – A = must be done
  – B = important
  – C = relatively trivial
• Give a numerical value to each item on the
  list. (A-1, B-3, etc.)Norris, MD 3/07
                   Tom E.                    35
               Using a Planning Tool
                          Effectively
• 1. Take your Day Planner (Electronic
  [PDA] or Paper) with you ALWAYS!!
• 2. Use only one calendar (your secretary
  can have a copy if needed)
• 3. COMMIT to planning every day.
• 4. Use a good reference system.
• 5. Use a master task list.
• 6. Use a monthly index.
                 Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07      36
                                            Summary

1. You control your life by controlling your time—
   make a commitment to control it.
2. Rid yourself of ―time robbers‖.
3. Your governing values are the foundation of
   personal fulfillment.
4. When your daily activities reflect your governing
   values, you experience inner peace---set goals &
   objectives & prioritize them.
5. Daily planning leverages time through focus.

                   Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07         37
                                           References

• Books:
  – The Time Trap—Alec Mackenzie
  – The 10 Natural Laws of Successful Time and
    Life Management--Hyrum W. Smith
  – Time Management—Marshall Cook
  – First Things First Every Day--Steven R. Covey
  – Manage Your Time—Tim Hindle


                  Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07            38
                              Planning Systems
• Paper Systems
  –   Calendar Sheets & Books
  –   Day Timer
  –   Franklin Day Planner
  –   Others
• Electronic Systems
  – Microsoft Schedule Plus
  – Personal Digital Assistants (PDA’s)
  – Others
                     Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07   39
“Time is but the stream I go
               a-fishing in.”

                  Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862}




       Tom E. Norris, MD 3/07                 40

				
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