The Graduate Program in Political Science by gxt64895

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									The Graduate Program
           in
   Political Science

Supplemental Calendar
       2009-10


Version 8 – October 15, 2009
Information Subject to Change
                          GRADUATE PROGRAM IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
                                SUPPLEMENTAL CALENDAR
                                        2009-10

CONTENTS                                                                                                                            PAGE
General Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
        Class Start and End Dates, Reading Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Administrative Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Registration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Graduate Student Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Fields of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Graduate Courses in Political Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
        5000 Level and 6000 Level Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
        Core Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
        Reading Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
        Courses taken 'Out of Program' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Political Science Seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Graduate Diploma in Democratic Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
Degree Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
        The M.A. Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
                 Degree Option I: M.A. by Major Research Paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
                 Degree Option II: M.A. by Designated Research Essay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
                 Degree Option III: M.A. by Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
        The Ph.D. Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
                 Course Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-13
                 Language or Cognate Skill Requirement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
                 The Qualifying Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
                                                                           .
                 The Dissertation Proposal Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
                 The Doctoral Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
                 The Dissertation Supervisory Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
                 The Dissertation Proposal - Program Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
                 Human Participants Research Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-21
                 Progress Evaluation Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
                 Oral Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Residence Regulations and Time Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-24
        Withdrawal from Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
        Incompletes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-24
        Length of Papers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
        Turnaround Time for Papers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Unacademic Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Petition and Appeal Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Intellectual Property Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Graduate Courses 2009-10: Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-47
Graduate Courses 2009-10: Timetable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48-64
GENERAL COMMENTS

This document is a brief introduction to the Graduate Program in Political Science. Its main
purpose is to provide a more detailed description of the graduate course offerings than can be
found in the Faculty of Graduate Studies calendar.

It should be noted that the summaries of regulations for the M.A. and Ph.D. programs in this
supplemental calendar are not meant to replace the general requirements set out in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies calendar at http://www.yorku.ca/grads/calendar/index.htm or
the specific requirements in the Rules and Procedures handbook of the Political Science
Graduate Program. Copies of the Rules and Procedures handbook are available on the table
in S601 Ross Building. Any detailed questions about the M.A. and/or Ph.D. Programs in
Political Science should be answered by referring to the Faculty of Graduate Studies calendar
or Rules and Procedures handbook. Similarly, further information concerning assistantships,
financial assistance and general information on facilities that York University has to offer to
the graduate student may be found on the Faculty of Graduate Studies website
http://www.yorku.ca/grads/.




                            Further information is available at:
                   http://www.arts.yorku.ca/politics/graduate/index.html
                                          and at
                http://www.yorku.ca/grads/programmes/politicalscience.pdf




                            CLASS START AND END DATES
     Activity             Fall Term              Winter Term         Full Year
     Class Start Date     September 9, 2009      January 4, 2010     September 9, 2009
     Class End Date       December 8, 2009       April 5, 2010       April 5, 2010
     Fall Term            October 12–16, 2009
     Reading Week

     Winter Term          February 15–19, 2010
     Reading Week




                                            Page 1
                         ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTORY


YORK UNIVERSITY                            Main University Switchboard     (416) 736-2100

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT               Main Office/Reception         S672 Ross          736-5265

                       GRADUATE PROGRAM ADMINISTRATORS
Graduate Program Director                  Elizabeth Dauphinee           S634 Ross          736-2100
                                           dauphine@yorku.ca                                ext. 22552

M.A. Coordinator                           Heather MacRae                S635 Ross          736-21000
                                           hmacrae@yorku.ca                                 ext. 33964

Graduate Program Assistant (Ph.D.’s)       Marlene Quesenberry           S633 Ross          736-2100
                                           maq@yorku.ca                                     ext. 30485

Graduate Program Assistant (M.A.’s)        Jlenya Sarra-De Meo           S632 Ross          736-2100
                                           jsarra@yorku.ca                                  ext. 88825

Graduate Program Secretary                 Judy Matadial                 S623A Ross         736-5264
                                           matadial@yorku.ca                                736-2100
                                                                                            ext. 21016

GPSSA Liaison                              Emily Merson                  S601C Ross         736-2100
                                           merson@yorku.ca                                  ext. 30086

Democratic Administration                  Elizabeth Dauphinee           S634 Ross          736-2100
Diploma Coordinator                        dauphine@yorku.ca                                ext. 22552

                            DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATORS
Chair                                      George Comninel               S669 Ross          736-2100
                                           comninel@yorku.ca                                ext. 33197

Administrative Assistant to the Chair      Angie Swartz                  S667 Ross          736-5266
                                           aswartz@yorku.ca

Chair's Secretary                          Carolyn Cross                 S670 Ross          736-2100
                                           ccross@yorku.ca                                  ext. 33197

Associate Chair                            Sabah Alnasseri               S627 Ross          736-2100
                                           alnaseri@yorku.ca                                ext. 30089

Undergraduate Program Director             Martin Breaugh                S638 Ross          736-2100
                                           mbreaugh@yorku.ca                                ext. 88832

Undergraduate Program Assistant            Lissa Chiu                    S641 Ross          736-5267
                                           lchiu@yorku.ca

Interim Course Secretary (Undergraduate)   Cindy Jung                    S672 Ross          736-2100
                                           cindyj@yorku.ca               east side          ext. 88839

Course Secretary (Undergraduate)           Loretta Fiorini               S672 Ross          736-2100
                                           lofi@yorku.ca                 east side          ext. TBA

Interim Receptionist/Faculty Secretary     Alexandra Chirkoff            S672 Ross          736-5265
                                           chirkoff@yorku.ca             west side          ext. 88837



                                               Page 2
REGISTRATION PROCEDURE

Online registration and enrolment for Fall/Winter 2009-10 begins on July 23rd, 2009 at
http://www.yorku.ca/grads/. Incoming Ph.D. students are required to set up an advising
appointment with the Graduate Program Director to discuss their program of study. These
half hour appointments will take place on Thursday, August 6th, Tuesday, August 11th,
Wednesday August 19th and Tuesday, August 25th, 2009. Ph.D. students should contact the
Graduate Program Secretary, Judy Matadial at (416) 736-2100, extension 21016 to book an
appointment. We will be holding drop-in question and answer sessions for the M.A. students
on Thursday, August 27th from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and on Monday, August 31st from
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Verney Seminar Room, S674 Ross Building. An introduction
to the M.A. program as a whole will be provided in the M.A. Colloquium (GS POLS 6000A
3.0) which is a required course for all incoming MA students. Enrolment in reading courses,
or in the International Political Economy and Ecology Summer School require permission
from the Graduate Program. See the Graduate Program offices for forms and applications.

STUDENT ORGANIZATION

GRADUATE POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION (GPSSA)
All students registered in the Graduate Program in Political Science are members of the
Graduate Political Science Student Association (GPSSA). Under the leadership of a
graduate student Liaison Officer, the GPSSA meets on a regular basis to address matters of
concern to the students. In addition, students are entitled to attend the meetings of the
governing body of the program, the Graduate Political Science Council, with voting
privileges. Finally, the GPSSA designates student members of the Executive Committee of
the graduate program and of the various field committees. The GPSSA Liaison for 2009-10
is Emily Merson, merson@yorku.ca The GPSSA office is S601C Ross Building, located in
the Anne Stretch Wing. The telephone number is (416) 736-2100, extension 30086.

YORK UNIVERSITY GRADUATE STUDENTS ’ ASSOCIATION (GSA)
Students are also members of the York University Graduate Students’ Association. The
York University Graduate Students' Association is the fully autonomous student body that
represents more than 4,400 full and part-time graduate students registered at York. One of
the GSA's primary goals is to promote communication between graduate students and the
University administration, as well as the various departments. By representing graduate
students on university committees, the GSA is able to ensure that the interests and collective
voice of York graduate students are heard. The GSA is also responsible for the
administration of the Drug and Dental Insurance Plan. The GSA office is located at 325
Student Centre. They can be reached by telephone at (416) 736-5865, and by e-mail at
info@yugsa.ca. The Health Plan office can be reached at (416) 736-5213, and by e-mail at
health@yugsa.ca.


                            Further information is available at:
                                   http://www.yugsa.ca



                                            Page 3
FIELDS OF STUDY

M.A. and Ph.D. Candidates generally choose their major and minor areas of concentration from
among the five principal fields within the program. With the approval of the graduate program
students may, for purposes of the minor, substitute a specialized field within Political Science or a
field in a related discipline.

C ANADIAN P OLITICS
The Canadian Politics field is especially strong and broadly focused, providing students with
exposure to a number of competing approaches to the study of Canadian politics. Faculty members
have displayed teaching and research excellence in virtually all areas of Canadian politics, including:
political economy, public policy and administration, federalism and intergovernmental relations,
provincial politics, regionalism, public and constitutional law, political communications, ideology,
political culture and political thought, urban politics, the Canadian women’s movement, women and
politics in Canada, and political parties and voting. More generally, the Program has broad strength
in the study of public policy.

C OMPARATIVE P OLITICS
The Comparative Politics field, considered one of the strongest in the country, embraces both a wide
variety of approaches and considerable depth in specific area studies; the field research covers most
parts of the world. Numerous faculty specialize in North American and European studies. In
addition, African, East Asian, and Latin American and Caribbean studies, as well as post-Soviet and
East European studies, can all be pursued with at least two, frequently many more, faculty members.

I NTERNATIONAL R ELATIONS
Teaching and research in the field is concentrated in four main areas: foreign policy analysis,
including both theoretical (decision-making, comparative foreign policy) and empirical (Canadian,
American, Russian, etc.); security studies, encompassing defense policy, the role of force, arms
control, and conflict resolution; international political economy, including various Marxist and non-
Marxist approaches to the study of international economic relations; and international organization
and public law. The general orientation emphasizes both theories of international relations and the
substance of international practice.

P OLITICAL T HEORY
Instruction in the political theory field is designed to provide candidates with a rounded background
in the history and historiography of political thought, and a broad orientation to current trends in
political theory. The Program currently has teaching strengths in particular in early-modern and
modern political thought, in critical and post-modern theory and in many varieties and domains of
Marxian theory.

W OMEN AND P OLITICS
Several faculty members engage in feminist research in various areas of the discipline of political
science, including the study of feminist epistemology and theory, the political economy of gender,
gender and development, gender and international relations, gender and public policy, women’s
electoral behaviour, women and political parties, the women’s movement and women’s organizations.




                                                 Page 4
GRADUATE COURSES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

The Graduate Program in Political Science is a twelve month program, though courses and
seminars are usually offered between September and April. The summer is commonly
devoted to work on research papers, theses and dissertations, or preparing for qualifying
examinations. The summer is also a good time to complete the requirements for language
and cognate skills.

The exception to this rule are those courses offered under the International Political
Economy and Ecology Summer School in June or July, typically over a two week period.
Each year, one half course, (GS POLS 6282 3.0) will be offered as part of the I.P.E.E.
Summer School. York students may enrol in this course in fulfilment of their M.A. or Ph.D.
course work. The focus of this course will differ each year. Previous Summer Schools have
focused on global finance, economic restructuring, the world city and global environmental
problems. The topics depend upon the visiting professors invited to deliver the classes.
Previous visitors have included: Vandana Shiva, Tony Clarke, Alain Lipiets, Elmar Altvater,
Saskia Sassen, Hilary Wainwright, Alfredo Saad-Filho and many others.

5000 LEVEL AND 6000 LEVEL COURSES
Courses at the 5000 level are normally integrated with parallel courses at the 4000 level and
are therefore open to advanced undergraduate students. However, graduate students are
required to undertake more advanced readings and assignments. All 6000 level courses are
open only to graduate students. Those listed as 6.0 are full courses; those as 3.0 are half
courses.

       a)      M.A. students taking Option I, the Major Research Paper option, are allowed
               to take up to one full integrated course (one 6.0 or two 3.0 courses);
       b)      M.A. students taking Option II, the Designated Research Essay option, are
               allowed to take up to one full integrated course (one 6.0 or two 3.0 courses);
       c)      M.A. students taking Option III, the Thesis option, are allowed to take up to
               one half (.03) integrated course;
       d)      Ph.D. students are allowed to take up to one full integrated course (one 6.0 or
               two 3.0 courses).

CORE COURSES
The core courses in the Graduate Program in Political Science holds a special and necessary
place in the overall training of the graduate student. In essence, a compulsory course in both
the major and minor fields of any student, the core course is not supposed to be a course like
any other. Its structure and grading procedures reflect its special status. What defines this
type of course, however, is not its structure but its scope.

The major aim of the core course is to familiarize the student with the major theoretical,
conceptual, methodological, and practical problems for Political Science that arise within
each field. It is similar to a survey course in the comprehensiveness of its scope, but it treats
individual themes or problems in greater depth than a survey course could possibly do. If it
therefore sacrifices some breadth, it does so consciously, in the interest of selectivity. It is


                                             Page 5
for this reason that the core course serves as preparation for the qualifying examination
requirements. The point of such a course, then, is neither to provide one with familiarity
with everything of importance which has been written in a given field, nor to prepare one for
highly specialized research in that field. Please note: core courses are designed for
doctoral students. M.A. students may, in exceptional circumstances, be eligible to take a
core course with the permission of the course director.

READING COURSES (GS POLS 6990)
Where a particular area of interest is not adequately covered by an existing course, students
may, with the agreement of faculty members, set up a reading course. Normally, only one
full reading course may be taken for credit. The title of the reading course will be recorded
on the student's transcript. The student and faculty member involved must agree on a plan of
study, covering topic, assignments, and procedure for assessment. This is then submitted on
a reading course form available from the Graduate Program office, to the Graduate Program
Director for approval. Once approved, the Graduate Program office will issue a 'Permission'
on the system. You may then proceed to enrol in the course over the web.

READING COURSE #      TERM (S) OFFERED
GS POLS 6990 3.0      Fall term (half) reading course
GS POLS 6990A 3.0     Fall term (half), for students taking 2nd reading course
GS POLS 6990 3.0      Winter term (half) reading course
GS POLS 6990A 3.0     Winter term (half), for students taking 2nd reading course
GS POLS 6990 6.0      Full year reading course beginning in the Fall term (Fall/Winter)
GS POLS 6990A 6.0     Full year reading course, for students taking 2nd reading course
GS POLS 6990S 6.0     Full year reading course beginning in the Winter term
                      (Winter/Summer)

COURSES TAKEN OUT OF PROGRAM
Students are allowed to take up to one full course in another graduate program at York with
the permission of the Graduate Program Directors in both programs. Forms are available
online at http://www.yorku.ca/grads/forms.htm. Permission from Political Science must
be obtained before approaching the program hosting the course. After obtaining both
signatures, the hosting program will issue a 'permission' on the system which will allow you
to enrol in the course.


POLITICAL SCIENCE SEMINARS
When offered, graduate students are expected to attend and to participate in the Political
Science Seminars, which are held on Monday afternoons from 2:30 - 4:30 p.m., in the
Douglas Verney Seminar Room, S674 Ross Building. The seminars are intended as an
opportunity for members of the program to explore the discipline and gain insight into fields
other than their own. In the past, the seminar has featured presentations by faculty and Ph.D.
students in the Department, other York faculty, as well as numerous academics and
intellectuals from outside York.




                                            Page 6
GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN DEMOCRATIC ADMINISTRATION

This program of study allows students in appropriate graduate programs at York University
to specialize formally in the area of Democratic Administration, and to be awarded a
Graduate Diploma in Democratic Administration. The Diploma is awarded concurrently
with the Master's or Doctoral degree for which the student is registered. For those students
who successfully complete both the Degree and Diploma programs, the Diploma is noted on
the student's transcript and awarded at the subsequent convocation. Students can only
receive the Diploma if they successfully complete the Degree program.

The Diploma program aims to equip students with both the analytical and practical insights
needed to help build more democratic and responsive institutions. The program is geared to
both new and returning students who aspire to leadership positions in popular sector
institutions, from trade unions and non-profitable charities, to state administration and quasi-
governmental organizations.

Each student is exposed to an in-depth analysis of the parameters which constrain collective
institutions and the state, with the goal of ensuring that students are able to both elaborate
and critically evaluate policies across a broad range of social and economic issues. Equally
important, in keeping with the democratic thrust of the program, students explore alternative
methods of policy formation and implementation. Developing techniques for the
empowerment of constituencies, usually relegated to client status or perfunctory
consultation, is an integral part of the practical, administrative dimensions of the program.

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for the Diploma must first be admitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies as
Candidates for a Master's or Doctoral degree in one of the participating graduate programs.
Candidates must formally register for the Diploma program with the Diploma Co-ordinator,
following registration for their degree program, at the time they define their program of
studies.

The Diploma program is an interdisciplinary one, open to students in any relevant graduate
program including, for example, Environmental Studies, Law, Sociology, Administrative
Studies and Political Science.

DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS
Students must complete the program requirements of the degree for which they are
registered. In order to receive a Diploma in Democratic Administration, each student must
also satisfy the following requirements:

a)     For all students except those Master's students registered with the Schulich School of
       Business or the Faculty of Environmental Studies:

       i)      write a Major Research paper, Thesis or Dissertation on a topic related to
               Democratic Administration approved by the Chair of the Executive committee
               of the Diploma Program in Democratic Administration (The Executive


                                             Page 7
               committee will consist of the Graduate Program Director in Political Science
               (ex officio), the Coordinator of the Specialized Honours program in Public
               Policy and Administration (normally the Chair), the course instructor for the
               Democratic Administration core course, plus two other members of the
               Faculty of Graduate Studies appointed annually by the permanent members of
               this committee.); and

      ii)      successfully complete GS POLS 6155 3.0: Democratic Administration (core
               course), the required course for all students registered in the Diploma
               program. This course will be open to students outside of the Political Science
               Graduate Program who are accepted into the Diploma program. This course
               is an additional requirement, over and above regular degree requirements and
               may not be counted towards the course requirement for the Master's or
               Doctoral degrees.

b)    For Master's students registered with the Schulich School of Business or the Faculty
      of Environmental Studies:

      i)       write a research paper beyond the normal degree requirements on a topic
               related to Democratic Administration approved by the Chair of the Executive
               committee of the Diploma Program in Democratic Administration. (The
               Executive committee will consist of the Graduate Program Director in
               Political Science (ex officio), the Coordinator of the Specialized Honours
               Program in Public Policy and Administration (normally the Chair), the course
               instructor for the Democratic Administration core course, plus two other
               members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies appointed annually by the
               permanent members of this committee); and

      ii)      successfully complete GS POLS 6155 3.0: Democratic Administration (core
               course), the required course for all students registered in the Diploma
               Program. This course will be open to students outside of the Political Science
               Graduate Program who are accepted into the Diploma program. This course
               is not an additional requirement over and above regular degree requirements
               for MES and MPA/MBA students.

For more information on the Graduate Diploma in Democratic Administration, contact
Professor Elizabeth Dauphinee, dauphine@yorku.ca, S634 Ross Building, extension 22552,
Jlenya Sarra-De Meo, jsarra@yorku.ca, S632 Ross Building, extension 88825.



                           Further information is available at:
            http://www.yorku.ca/grads/calendar/democraticadministration.pdf




                                           Page 8
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

THE M.A. PROGRAM
Students must choose one of three degree program options, differing with respect to the
number of courses required and other degree requirements. Under all options, students are
required to take courses in at least two of the program's five fields, and they are urged to
consider taking courses in three fields (except perhaps when pursuing the Thesis option).
There is a limit to the number of 'integrated' graduate/undergraduate courses offered at the
5000 level that may be taken for degree credit, depending on the program option chosen.

The M.A. Colloquium is a degree requirement for all program options. This half course
divided between the Fall and Winter terms provides an introduction to the program, and
exposure to the range of work within the discipline, with an emphasis on research methods.
Students do not write major papers; grading is done on a pass/fail basis. All incoming M.A.
students must register in the course, which counts as a 6000 level, graduate-only half course
towards the completion of the course requirement. The M.A. Coordinator is course director
of the Colloquium, which draws upon other faculty members as well.

Up to one full course equivalent may be taken in another Graduate program at York or (upon
petition to the Executive committee) in a graduate program at another university. It is a
requirement of the Faculty of Graduate Studies that, where a student proposes to take a
course at another university, it be demonstrated that the material to be studied is both
academically necessary and unavailable at York.

Where a particular area of interest is not adequately covered by available courses, students
may, with the agreement of a faculty member, set up a reading course. Normally, only one
full year reading course may be taken for credit in a degree program. The title of the reading
course will be recorded on the student's transcript. The student and faculty member involved
must agree on a plan of study, covering topic, assignments, and procedure for assessment,
and submit this in writing to the Program Director at the time of registration.

In addition to the full time program, York offers a part time M.A. program.

Candidates for the M.A., whether full time or part time, must complete all degree
requirements within four years (12 terms) of their initial registration.

DEGREE OPTION I: M.A. BY MAJOR RESEARCH PAPER (MRP)
(The most common option, recommended for those planning to pursue a Ph.D.)

COURSES
Three full course equivalents are required (two and one-half courses in addition to the M.A.
Colloquium). No more than one full course equivalent of these may be 'integrated'
graduate/undergraduate courses offered at the 5000 level.




                                            Page 9
MAJOR RESEARCH PAPER
The Major Research Paper should constitute the sustained exploration of a theoretical or
empirical question. Unlike a Master's Thesis, a Major Research Paper need not contain
original research. Instead, a Major Research Paper may take the form of a review of
literature in a field, the exploration or synthesis of various points of view in a subject area, or
a pilot study for a larger project. Alternatively, it may be a research project which is
narrower in scope, less sophisticated in methodology, or less complete in data gathering and
analysis than would be required for a thesis.

Major Research Papers should be between 40 and 50 double-spaced pages in length. The
paper will be supervised by one faculty member in the Political Science Graduate Program.
Normally, students will be encouraged to develop further a paper contemplated for or already
completed in a course and the supervisor will be the director of that course.

Major Research Papers are not to be left to the Summer. Students should approach faculty
members who should make themselves available for consultations concerning MRPs in the
Fall term. The M.A. Colloquium will normally address social science research issues
relevant to the MRP. The M.A. Coordinator will be available to help students in securing
prospective supervisors.

Upon completion, the paper will be read by an additional faculty member from the
Political Science Graduate Program, and the student will be required to defend it orally
before both readers. Normally, the oral examination will be one hour in length and will
center on the paper.

Topics and supervisors are to be identified by January 30 and reported to the program.
First drafts of the Major Research Paper are due no later than the end of June of the
M.A. year and the final draft no later than the end of August.

The student is responsible for producing three copies of the paper: one for the supervisor,
one for the reader, and one for the Candidate. Upon successful completion of the oral, the
reader's copy is to be deposited in the Political Science Library. The paper need not be
bound but it must be typed or printed double-spaced on one side of each page, and must
conform to normal scholarly standards with respect to footnotes, bibliography, etc.

Please note that the final grade for the MRP will not be submitted until the Graduate
Program office is in receipt of this copy. Students accepted into the Ph.D. program directly
from the M.A. program will not normally be permitted to enrol in Ph.D. I unless the MRP
has been submitted. The Faculty of Graduate Studies does not permit a student who has not
completed all requirements for the M.A. degree by the end of the first term to continue
registration in the Ph.D. program.




                                             Page 10
DEGREE OPTION II: M.A. BY DESIGNATED RESEARCH ESSAY

COURSES
Four full course equivalents are required (three and one-half courses in addition to the M.A.
Colloquium). No more than one full course equivalent may be taken in the form of
'integrated' graduate/undergraduate courses offered at the 5000 level.

DESIGNATED RESEARCH ESSAY
The Designated Research Essay, which is expected to be approximately 25-30 pages in
length, is written as part of the requirements for a 6000 level graduate-only course.
(Generally, it will be longer than required by the course assignment.) Students must
designate the essay, whether written or contemplated, no later than the third week of the
Winter term. The Designated Research Essay is subject to revision at the discretion of the
course director, and must be passed by a second faculty member from the program. A copy
of the essay, together with the readers' comments, must be submitted to the program office
and kept on file.

DEGREE OPTION III: M.A. BY THESIS
(This option is not encouraged, save in exceptional circumstances.)

COURSES
Two full course equivalents are required (one and one-half courses in addition to the M.A.
Colloquium). No more than one half course equivalent may be taken in the form of
'integrated' graduate/undergraduate courses offered at the 5000 level.

THESIS AND ORAL EXAMINATION
Candidates must conduct a research study and report the results in appropriate thesis form.
The research and results should demonstrate the Candidate's independence, originality, and
understanding of the area of investigation at an advanced level. There are no precise
requirements for length, but a reasonable guideline would be 100 double-spaced typewritten
pages.

Students choosing this option should consult the Faculty of Graduate Studies calendar
http://www.yorku.ca/grads/calendar/index.htm and the Guidelines for the Preparation of
Theses and Dissertations http://www.yorku.ca/grads/thesis/index.htm to acquaint
themselves with the extensive formal requirements well in advance of completion.

The thesis is written under the supervision of a Thesis Supervisory committee consisting of
three faculty members, including one from outside the program. Upon completion, the thesis
must be defended in an oral examination before a Thesis Examining committee, made up of
two faculty members from the program, one from another program and the Dean's
Representative. Aside from requirements established by the Faculty of Graduate Studies,
theses should follow normal scholarly standards in form. Experience has shown that it is
difficult even for those students for whom this is an appropriate option to complete the thesis
within the first year of study.



                                           Page 11
THE PH .D. PROGRAM
The essential purpose of Ph.D. studies is to assist students to develop the comprehensive
knowledge and the skills necessary to permit them to demonstrate, by the writing of a
dissertation, that they are prepared to make a scholarly, independent and original
contribution to our understanding of politics. The program also aims, in general, to prepare
students to be effective researchers (in a variety of contexts) and university teachers.

COURSE WORK
Ph.D. students must take a minimum of four full graduate courses (or their equivalent),
normally spread over the two years of residence, no more than one of which may be offered
outside the program. Ph.D. students will be required to take:

       (a)     the core course in the major field (a full year course);
       (b)     the core course in the minor field (a full year course).

Core courses and their qualifying examinations should ideally both be taken in Ph.D. I,
leaving electives to Ph.D. II.

In the minor field only, students may have the core course requirement waived upon
successful petition to the Graduate Executive committee, documenting the attainment of
comparable breadth and integration in previous (i.e. M.A.) experience. (Waiver of the core
course requirement in the minor field does not reduce the overall course and residence
requirements).

Alternatively, with the approval of and the Graduate Program Director, students may
substitute a specialized minor. If the field proposed in such a petition should be outside the
Political Science Program, it must meet the following stipulations to qualify as a specialized
minor:

       (i)            it must fall within a field recognized in the graduate regulations of the
                      discipline in which the minor is to be taken;
       (ii)           there must be an adequate selection of courses offered in the field by
                      the program concerned;
       (iii)          a faculty member who is qualified to teach in his/her own graduate
                      program must be prepared to supervise and examine the Candidate in
                      the specialized minor field.

       (c)     at least one half course in a field different from the major and minor (unless
               satisfied at the M.A. level).

No more than one full course equivalent may be taken in the form of 'integrated'
graduate/undergraduate seminars.




                                            Page 12
Up to one full course equivalent may be taken in another Graduate program at York or (upon
petition to the Executive committee) in a graduate program at another university. It is a
requirement of the Faculty of Graduate Studies that, where a student proposes to take a
course at another university, it be demonstrated that the material to be studied is both
academically necessary and unavailable at York.

Where a particular area of interest is not adequately covered by available courses, students
may, with the agreement of a faculty member, set up a reading course. Normally, only one
full year reading course may be taken for credit in a degree program. The title of the reading
course will be recorded on the student's transcript. The student and faculty member involved
must agree on a plan of study, covering topic, assignments, and procedure for assessment,
and submit this in writing to the Program Director at the time of registration.

Students must maintain at least a B average in their graduate courses. Failure to do so will
result in a review of status.

LANGUAGE OR COGNATE SKILL REQUIREMENT
While completing the course work, students should also be preparing to meet the program's
requirement to demonstrate skill in a language (other than English) or a cognate area (such as
statistics). In selecting a skill, students should be seeking to equip themselves for their
proposed area of dissertation research. At the same time, they should meet any stipulations
of their major field of study. For instance, students majoring in Canadian Politics must select
French, demonstrating at least a reading knowledge. Comparative Politics majors who have
an area of specialization must demonstrate at least a reading knowledge of a language (other
than English) relevant to their area. (Non-area specialists may offer a cognate skill.) In
making their selection, students should consult closely with their supervisor.

The language or cognate skill requirements may be fulfilled by formal course work or by
special examination arranged with a member of the Political Science graduate faculty. With
respect to course work, the program will consider as strong evidence the completion of a
course at the second-year undergraduate level or above with a grade of B+ or better.
However, approval of such course is not automatic. In the case of skill in a language, a
student may also offer evidence that proficiency was successfully demonstrated in an
accredited graduate program elsewhere, or may offer the Graduate Foreign Language Test of
the Educational Testing Service. In the special examination, the student will be asked to read
a text in Political Science of no more than ten pages in length; to prepare a translation into
English of a designated paragraph from the text; and to discuss the text as a whole with the
examiner, in English or in the language of the text, at the option of the student. The student
may bring dictionaries and similar aids to the examination. The examination will extend for
a maximum of three hours.

Courses taken to fulfil the language or cognate skills requirements may not be used to fulfil
other requirements.




                                           Page 13
THE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS          N
In conjunction with meeting the core course requirements, all Ph.D. students must at the first
scheduled sitting in late May or early June, write qualifying examinations in their major and
minor fields. In extraordinary circumstances, some students may be permitted to write a
qualifying examination during the Fall term.

GENERAL PROVISIONS
     1.    The major examination will be on one of the fields offered by the program,
           chosen by the Candidate and designated as the Candidate's major field. The
           five fields are: Political Theory, International Relations, Comparative
           Politics, Canadian Politics, and Women and Politics.

       2.      The minor examination will also be on one of the above fields unless a
               petition from the Candidate for a specialized minor has been approved by the
               Executive committee. The format of the examination will be identical to the
               options offered to Candidates with 'standard' minors. Students will be
               expected to demonstrate levels of breadth and integration comparable to those
               expected of 'standard' minors.

       3.      Qualifying examinations will be drawn directly from the core courses as the
               course was offered in the year in which the examination is being written. This
               will mean that the Spring and then Fall exams at the end of this academic year
               (the Spring and Fall 2010 exams), will draw from the core courses offered in
               this (2009-10) academic year.

       4.      The examinations will be sit-down examinations, for which students will
               receive questions via e-mail 24 hours beforehand. Students will not be able to
               bring notes or other reference materials to the examination itself. Students
               will be given the option of writing the exams by hand or by using a computer.
               For students who choose to write their qualifying examinations on computer,
               these will be written in the departmental computer lab or other spaces as
               directed by the Graduate Program Director. The graduate program is unable
               to accommodate special requests to write in private offices. The sole
               exception to this will be in the case of students with documented disabilities
               who are registered with the Office for Persons with Disabilities, which will in
               turn make arrangements for the writing of the exam.

       5.      Majors and minors will select two questions from a set of questions dealing
               with general issues in the field and based exclusively upon materials
               examined in the respective core course. They will have four hours to prepare
               their answers.




                                           Page 14
       6.      In addition, majors will have two hours to answer one question selected from
               a set of questions dealing with issues and materials discussed in other courses
               which they have taken in the major field.

       7.      Each field's qualifying examination will be drawn up by an Examination
               committee comprising the Field Coordinator and two other faculty members,
               to be chosen in consultation with the Graduate Program Director. In the case
               of a specialized minor, a two-member Examination committee will be
               constituted by the Graduate Program Director. With respect to the extra set of
               questions for major students, the directors of elective courses in the major
               field will be asked to submit potential examination questions. A director of
               one of these courses, selected after consultation with the student, will join the
               Examination committee in designing and assessing this set of questions.

       8.      Spring examinations will be administered during late May and early June.
               The Graduate Program Director may also authorize an examination in the
               Fall, normally held in November.

       9.      The Examination committee will subsequently meet to discuss and assess
               each examination and will provide a written assessment to the student.

       10.     Oral examinations will be held by the Examination committee when the
               committee deems it appropriate.

       11.     All Candidates will have the opportunity to sit each written examination
               twice, if necessary. Candidates who fail a written examination a second time
               will be withdrawn from the program.

THE DISSERTATION PROPOSAL WORKSHOP
Candidates for the Ph.D. will be required to attend the Ph.D. Dissertation Proposal Workshop
no later than their seventh term in the Ph.D. program (normally the Fall Term of their third
year). The proposal workshop consists of 3 three-hour sessions offered on a monthly basis
during the Fall term of the academic year. Students will receive a passing grade by attending
all three sessions, including preparation, circulation and presentation of a draft of the
proposal by the third session. The first two sessions will be led by the Graduate Program
Director and will review the format and expectations for the proposal, the proposal ‘meeting’
and the ethics review. The third session will be organized by field co-ordinators and will
provide students with an opportunity to present preliminary drafts of their proposals in a
conference setting, and to receive feedback from faculty and peers. In any given year, if
numbers warrant, some fields may choose to combine their final workshop session into a
single session, to allow for wider feedback. Candidates who anticipate that they will be
unavailable to attend the workshop in the Fall term of their third year/seventh term are
responsible for making arrangements to participate in the workshop at an earlier offering (i.e.
in years one or two of their programs).




                                            Page 15
THE DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
The dissertation is expected to be a report of a major piece of independent research which
makes a significant contribution to the study of politics. It should be able to withstand
rigorous scrutiny of its methods, sources, internal logic and presentation, in terms of the
highest standards of the field in which it is intended to make a contribution.

At this stage of his/her career, the Candidate works in close collaboration with a Dissertation
Supervisory committee. The composition of this committee, along with the dissertation
proposal, must however be approved by the Dean in the name of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.

It is a requirement of the Senate of York University that a Supervisory committee must be
formed no later than the beginning of the third year in the Ph.D. program. Committee
members and even Supervisors may be changed subsequently, but students are advised to
consider the direction of their work carefully and to consult with faculty members from the
program during the Winter term of Ph.D. II. The dissertation proposal must be submitted for
approval within six months of the student successfully completing the qualifying
examinations, normally by the beginning of the Winter term of Ph.D. III.

THE DISSERTATION SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
The committee normally consists of at least three members of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, at least two of whom, including the Supervisor, must belong to the Graduate
Program in Political Science. In exceptional circumstances, with the approval of the Dean, a
third or additional member of the committee may be appointed who is not from York
University, or otherwise not a member of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. A listing of all
faculty members who are appointed to the Faculty of Graduate Studies is available at
http://www.yorku.ca/grads/faculty/appointments.htm.




                            Further information is available at:
                       http://www.yorku.ca/grads/thesis/index.htm




                                            Page 16
THE DISSERTATION PROPOSAL -- PROGRAM GUIDELINES
The Supervisory committee must meet as a body with the student to discuss the dissertation
project and to assist the student in formulation of the dissertation proposal. Once all
members of the committee are satisfied with the significance and viability of the dissertation,
as demonstrated by the proposal, the committee will forward the proposal to the Graduate
Program Director. Forms to accompany the proposal are available at
http://www.yorku.ca/grads/policies/ethics.htm. All students submitting dissertation
proposals must complete the online tutorial and include the completion certificate along with
the proposal. The Graduate Program Director will then consider recommending to the Dean
authorization of the project.

All proposals should include or adhere to the following guidelines:

       1.      A title which states, directly and briefly, the subject of the research.

       2.      A clear statement of why this topic merits study and will make a contribution
               to political science.

       3.      A response to the question: "What is original about the way you are
               approaching this topic?" (Reference to other relevant research that has been
               done, and how your research will innovate, comes here.)

       4.      A statement of the principal guiding hypotheses you will be using to focus
               your investigation.

       5.      The research methods that will be employed.

       6.      The sources that will be used.

       7.      For both 5 and 6: Do you anticipate any problems of access to your research
               subjects or sources? How will you overcome them?

       8.      An indication of the likely structure of the dissertation, i.e. a projected outline
               of the chapters of the written study.

       9.      A selective bibliography, which covers both:
                      (a) theoretical works relevant to your chosen methodology;
                      (b) works bearing on the substance of the topic.

       10.     The proposal should be about 10-12 pages in length, including the
               bibliography. Footnotes are discouraged and in any event should be kept to
               an absolute minimum. The proposal is a sketch of work that is still
               anticipated, not a definitive guide to the finished project. The purpose of the
               proposal is to demonstrate that you are prepared to start work on the
               dissertation; it is not a part of the dissertation itself.



                                             Page 17
HUMAN PARTICIPANTS RESEARCH GUIDELINES

JURISDICTION AND SCOPE
The Faculty of Graduate Studies is governed by the Senate Policy for the Ethics Review
Process for Research Involving Human Participants. The Senate Policy for the Ethics
Review Process for Research Involving Human Participants states that all University-based
research involving human participants, whether funded or non-funded, faculty or student,
scholarly, commercial or consultative, is subject to the ethics review process.

Graduate students undertaking graduate courses, Major Research Papers, Theses, or
Dissertations and graduate program faculty members teaching graduate courses or
supervising Major Research Papers, Theses, or Dissertations in which research involving
human participants occurs will familiarize themselves with:
       a)      the Senate Policy for the Ethics Review Process for Research Involving
               Human Participants, and
       b)      the SSHRC/NSERC/CIHR Tri-Council Policy Statement Ethical Conduct for
               Research Involving Humans, August, 1998;
               http://www.pre.ethics.gc.ca/english/policystatement/policystatement.cfm
       c)      plus, complete the TCPC tutorial http://www.pre.ethics.gc.ca and have the
               completion certificate placed in their graduate program file.
Information relating to these documents can be found at the Office of Research Services,
214 York Lanes.

PROCEDURES
Students undertaking research with human participants may not begin that research until
their proposal has received approval from the appropriate body, as outlined below. Graduate
faculty and students are advised to consult the Senate Policy for the Ethics Review Process
for Research Involving Human Participants for definitions of "minimal risk", "human
participant", "research", and "Principal Investigator".

PROCEDURES FOR GRADUATE COURSES AND MAJOR RESEARCH PAPERS INVOLVING
UNFUNDED MINIMAL RISK RESEARCH
Prior to conducting their research, students are required to complete the TCPS tutorial and
have the completion certificate placed in their file. The tutorial is located at
http://www.pre.ethics.gc.ca

Each student will submit the following to the Graduate Program Office:
       a)     one original and one copy of a completed York University Graduate Student
              Human Participants Research Protocol Form (TD2), and
       b)     one original and one copy of the Written Informed Consent Document or the
              Script for the Verbal Informed Consent Statement.




                                           Page 18
The York University Graduate Student Human Participants Research Protocol Form (TD2),
and the Written Informed Consent Document or the Script for the Verbal Informed Consent
Statement will be reviewed by the Graduate Program/Department Ethics Review Committee
under an expedited review process (maximum of a 2 week turnaround).

Ethics Review Committees for research conducted in courses and for MRPs must be
composed of a minimum of two faculty members who are in an arm's length position in
relation to the research. The Committees may take the form of a standing Program or
Department Research Ethics Committee OR, where such committees do not exist, may be
composed of the Graduate Program Director (or designate) and one faculty member from the
program who is at arm's length from the research.

For both course work and MRP research, each Graduate Program will retain, for a period of
two years following the conduct of the research, a record of the York University Graduate
Student Human Participants Research Protocol Form (TD2), and the Written Informed
Consent Document or the Script for the Verbal Informed Consent Statement.

PROCEDURES FOR GRADUATE COURSES AND MAJOR RESEARCH PAPERS INVOLVING
RESEARCH THAT IS NOT MINIMUM RISK OR THAT IS FUNDED
Course work or MRP research involving human participants that does not meet the definition
of minimum risk as outlined in the Senate and Tri-council policies must be reviewed by the
Human Participants Review Sub-committee (HPRC) of the University.

Course work or MRP research involving human participants that is funded must be reviewed
by the Human Participants Review Sub-committee (HPRC) of the University. The definition
of "funded" does not include funding in the form of student OGS scholarships, SSHRC
fellowships, NSERC scholarships, or CIHR studentships. These awards are intended to
support students through their studies and do not require reports from students on the specific
research activities conducted. The definition of "funded" does apply to grants awarded for
specific research projects, whether those projects be the student's own research project or
research being conducted as part of a faculty member's funded research project. Typically,
for funded research, granting agencies require reports of the research conducted.

Students whose research is not minimum risk or whose research is funded must submit to
their Graduate Program Office:
        a)      one copy of the research proposal,
        b)      one TD4 form when the research being conducted is part of a faculty
                member’s funded project OR one copy of a completed appropriate form as
                instructed by the Office of Research Services.
In order to obtain research clearance from the HPRC of the University, students must contact
the Office of Research Services and follow the procedures outlined by that office.




                                           Page 19
PROCEDURES FOR THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN
PARTICIPANTS THAT IS UNFUNDED AND MINIMUM RISK
Prior to conducting their research, students are required to complete the TCPS tutorial
http://www.pre.ethics.gc.ca.
Each student will submit the following to the Faculty of Graduate Studies:
        a)     one thesis or dissertation proposal, with the FGS Thesis/Dissertation Proposal
               Submission Form (TD1),
        b)     one original and one copy of a completed York University Graduate Student
               Human Participants Research Protocol Form (TD2),
        c)     one original and one copy of the Written Informed Consent Document or the
               Script for the Verbal Informed Consent Statement, and
        d)     one copy of the completed Informed Consent Document Checklist for
               Researchers (TD3).

An alternate human participants research protocol form may be used in place of the York
University Graduate Student Human Partcipants Research Protocol Form (TD2), as long as
the alternate form includes all of the issues addressed in the York University Graduate
Student Human Participants Research Protocol From (TD2).

Proposals and forms will be reviewed by one of the Faculty of Graduate Studies Associate
Deans (Academic or Student Affairs) and the Chair (or Vice-Chair) of the University's
Human Participants Review Committee (HPRC).

PROCEDURES FOR THESIS AND DISSERTATION RESEARCH THAT IS NOT MINIMUM RISK OR
THAT IS FUNDED
Thesis and dissertation research that does not meet the definition of minimum risk as
outlined in the Senate and Tri-council policies must be reviewed by the Human Participants
Review Sub-committee (HPRC) of the University.

Thesis and dissertation research that is funded must be reviewed by the Human Participants
Review Sub-committee (HPRC) of the University. The definition of "funded" does not
include funding in the form of student OGS scholarships, SSHRC fellowships, NSERC
scholarships, or CIHR studentships. These awards are intended to support students through
their studies and do not require reports from students on the specific research activities
conducted. The definition of "funded" does apply to grants awarded for specific research
projects, whether those projects be the student's own research project or research being
conducted as part of a faculty member's funded research project. Typically, for funded
research, granting agencies require reports of the research conducted.

Students whose thesis or dissertation research is not minimum risk or whose research is
funded must submit to the Faculty of Graduate Studies one copy of the research proposal,
along with the FGS Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Submission Form (TD1), and one
Statement of Relationship between Proposal and Existing Approved Research/Facilities
(TD4) when the research being conducted is part of a faculty member’s funded project.




                                           Page 20
Students whose thesis or dissertation research is not minimum risk or whose research is
funded must submit to the Faculty of Graduate Studies Office the appropriate package and
documentation as requested by HPRC along with six additional copies in order to obtain
research clearance from the HPRC of the University. Students must contact the Office of
Research Services of the University to follow the procedures outlined by that office.



                            Further information is available at:
                      http://www.yorku.ca/grads/policies/ethics/htm



PROGRESS EVALUATIONS - REGULAR PROGRESS REPORTS
The Supervisor will normally meet with the student each month, and never less than once
each term, as required by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The Supervisory committee will
normally review the student's progress each month, and never less than once each term.
Once each year, normally in the Spring, the committee will meet as a group with the student,
to receive and discuss the student's Report on Progress, and to complete the Report for
submission to the Graduate Program Director. Between these annual reports, students and/or
Supervisory committees must inform the Graduate Program Director if the dissertation
project should be experiencing difficulties.

MID -TERM REPORTS
When roughly half of the dissertation, or a substantial number of chapters, has been drafted,
the Candidate and the Supervisory committee must undertake a collective assessment of the
progress of the work, reported to the Graduate Program Director on the mid-term progress
report. Whenever possible, this assessment will be based upon a meeting between the
Candidate and the Supervisory committee. Where a meeting is impossible to arrange, the
Supervisory committee, in correspondence with the Candidate and after having read the
submitted work, must meet as a body for a collective assessment. This assessment will be
communicated in writing to the Candidate, with a copy appended to the mid-term progress
report.

ORAL EXAMINATION
The final stage in the Ph.D. program is the oral defense of the dissertation before a
Dissertation Examining committee which must consist of: (i) at least three members from
the Graduate program; (ii) one York University faculty member from outside the program;
(iii) one external examiner from outside the University; (iv) the Dean of Graduate Studies or
the Dean's nominee. Membership must be recommended by the Program Director to the
Dean of Graduate Studies for approval. The Supervisor may not serve as chairperson.
Where one of a three member Supervisory committee does not belong to the Graduate
Program in Political Science, he or she may be included as the 'Outside' examiner from
another program, but one member of the Examining committee must then be a member of
the program who had no involvement in supervising the dissertation.



                                           Page 21
At least three members of the Examining committee, including the External Examiner and
the Dean's Representative, must have been at 'arm's length' from the dissertation.

The oral examination will center on the dissertation and will normally last between two and
three hours. The examination requirement is met if the committee accepts the dissertation
without revisions, or with specified revisions (e.g., those of a minor editorial nature, or which
may be clearly specified and otherwise do not radically change the development/argument of
the dissertation). Except where there are three or more votes for failure, a dissertation that is
not so accepted will be referred pending major revisions. Such revisions must be completed,
and the dissertation re-submitted to the Examining committee, within twelve months. Where
three or more examiners vote for failure, or two or more vote for failure following major
revisions, a dissertation is failed.


RESIDENCE REGULATIONS AND TIME LIMITS

M.A. PROGRAM
Award of the M.A. requires a minimum of one year's residence as an M.A. Candidate. All
requirements for a Master's degree must be fulfilled within twelve terms (four years) of first
registration as a full time or part time Master's student. Students may not continue to be
registered after the exhaustion of the time limit. Terms in which students register for Leave
of Absence, Maternity or Parental Leave, or No Course Available are not included in these
time limits. Continuous registration at York University must be maintained.

PH .D. PROGRAM
Award of the Ph.D. requires a minimum of two years of residence as a Ph.D. Candidate.
Candidates must complete all requirements, including the dissertation, within eighteen terms
(six years) of first enrolment as a doctoral student. Students may not continue to be
registered after the exhaustion of the time limit. Terms in which students register for Leave
of Absence, Maternity or Parental Leave, No Course Available or the Elective Leave are not
included in these time limits. Leaves of absence from the Ph.D. program are dealt with on an
individual basis. Continuous registration must be maintained.

York University also offers a part time Ph.D. program. Excluding the residence requirement,
the requirements for the part time program are identical to those for the full time program.
As with full time students, part time students must complete all requirements within six years
of initial registration. Continuous registration must be maintained. Given the past
difficulties of students completing the Ph.D. on a part time basis, the program has in recent
years admitted very few part time students.




                                            Page 22
GRADES

The grading system of the Faculty of Graduate Studies recognizes the following grades:
A+ (Exceptional); A (Excellent); A- (High); B+ (Highly Satisfactory); B (Satisfactory);
C (Conditional); F (Failure); I (Incomplete).

Grades are reported by the Course Director to the Registrar's office by the following dates:

       Fall term                      January 15   (full or half course)
       Full year and Winter term      May 15       (full or half course)
       Summer term                    September 15 (full or half course)

Withdrawal from the program will be required of any student who receives the following
grades:
        An F in one full or two half courses
        An F in one full course and a C in a half or full course
        A C in two full courses, a full and a half course, or three half courses.

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES
Students may withdraw from a course in good standing, provided that not more than two-
thirds of the course has been given. After this, students shall remain registered and will be
assigned grades as appropriate. The symbol W (withdrew in good standing) will be recorded
in place of a grade to indicate that a student was authorized to withdraw from a course in
which he or she was registered. If a student withdraws before one-third of the course has
been given, the requirement to record a W may be waived at the discretion of the program.

INCOMPLETES
In exceptional circumstances, with the appropriate supporting medical or other
documentation, students may apply for an incomplete grade in a course. Applications for an
incomplete must be made to the Graduate Program Director no later than the last week of
classes in the relevant term, and must be accompanied by the appropriate form, a full
rationale, supporting documentation, a realistic date of completion for outstanding course
work and support from the Course Director. Late or incomplete applications will not be
accepted. Approval for an incomplete can only be granted by the Graduate Program
Director; however, in courses in which more than two students request an incomplete in a
single year, these requests will be reviewed and can be approved only by the Graduate
Executive.

Students may not carry more than one full course equivalent (i.e. one full course or two half
courses) incomplete at a time. The only exception to this rule is that M.A. Candidates are
permitted to carry their Major Research Paper (GS POLS 6999 6.0) incomplete along with a
full course equivalent. The making-up of incomplete grades must be the student's top
priority. The 'realistic date for completion' for course work should normally be no more than
several weeks beyond the date for the regular submission of course work.




                                           Page 23
The maximum period for carrying an incomplete grade, as established by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies, is as follows:

        (a) incompletes granted in half courses must be removed within two months;
        (b) an incomplete granted in a full course must be removed within four months.

If outstanding course work has not been submitted by the deadlines set out above, the grade
for the course will automatically become an F.

It is possible to petition the Dean of Graduate Studies for relief from these regulations on
extraordinary academic or compassionate grounds. Extensions in such exceptional cases are
limited to a maximum of two additional months, for full or half courses. Petition forms are
available at http://www.yorku.ca/grads/policies/petitions.htm.



               Term                    Grade Due         Incomplete   Begin Petitioning   Final Grade
                                                           Expires      Process for 2         Due
                                                                      Month Extension

 Fall half course                   January 15         March 15       March 1             May 15

 Full year course (Fall/Winter)     May 15             September 15   September 1         November 15

 Winter half course                 May 15             July 15        July 1              September 15

 Full year course (Winter/Summer)   September 15       January 15     January 2           March 15

 Summer half course                 September 15       November 15    November 1          January 15

 Full year course (Summer/Fall)     January 15         May 15         May 1               July 15



Students who, for whatever reason, violate program regulations concerning either the
allowable number of ‘incompletes’ that may be carried at one time, or the meeting of
deadlines, jeopardize their academic standing. Permission to register for courses or to
continue registration as a full time student may be withheld while this unsatisfactory standing
continues. Where incomplete course work turns into grades of F in one or more full course
equivalent, students must be withdrawn from the program.

LENGTH OF PAPERS
The total amount of written work should not exceed 30 double-spaced pages in a half course
and 60 pages in a full course. (In the core courses, written work should not exceed 30 pages
and should take the form of several short papers approximating in scope and length the
answers to qualifying examination questions.) Required weekly readings should not exceed
300 pages. On this basis, 'incompletes' should be needed only in exceptional cases. In full
year courses, directors must assign written work for grades in both terms.




                                                   Page 24
TURNAROUND TIME FOR PAPERS
Faculty members who receive major written course work from students that meet stipulated
deadlines should assess, evaluate, and return papers within one month of the date that the
work was submitted. In the case of material read by two or more faculty members, (i.e.
MRP's) allowance must be made for circulation of the material, unless the student submits
multiple copies, and the normal consultative process among faculty. Students who do not
receive a grade within the above guidelines are required to inform the Program Director.
He/she will then make a written request of the course director or principal reader.




                           Further information is available at:
                     http://www.yorku.ca/grads/calendar/index.htm




UNACADEMIC PRACTICES

Students should be aware that the Graduate program has always taken most seriously the
question of unacademic practices. In particular, students should note the York University
Senate's definition of plagiarism.

Plagiarism is the misappropriation of the work of another by representing another person’s
ideas, writing or other intellectual property as one’s own. This includes the presentation of
all or part of another person’s work as something one has written, paraphrasing another’s
writing without proper acknowledgment, or representing another’s artistic or technical work
or creation as one’s own. Any use of the work of others, whether published, unpublished or
posted electronically, attributed or anonymous, must include proper acknowledgment.



                           Further information is available at:
                          http://www.yorku.ca/univsec/policies/
                                         and at
                      http://www.yorku.ca/grads/policies/index.htm




                                           Page 25
PETITION AND APPEAL PROCEDURES

APPEAL OF A GRADE
Students have up to two weeks following the submission of a grade for a course to appeal
that grade to the Executive committee. Before petitioning, the student should attempt to
clarify the matter with the director of the course in question.

If no satisfactory resolution is possible, the student must then notify the Program Director in
writing as to the exact nature of the appeal. The Executive committee will then deliberate,
requesting whatever additional material it deems necessary. When the appeal concerns a
grade assigned to specific written work, one (or more) additional readers will be asked to
furnish the Executive with an evaluation of the work. The Executive's decision on grades is
final.

OTHER PROGRAM APPEALS
Students wishing to appeal or petition their status on any other program or Graduate Faculty
matter should consult with the Program Director. Most appeals and petitions are addressed
to the Executive committee of the program in written form. The Executive's ruling then
either stands (for Program regulations) or guides future actions of the Director (for Faculty
regulations). Students may request a personal appearance before the Executive.
Students may appeal against the Executive's decisions on all matters save those of academic
judgement within fourteen days. Such appeals are directed to the Graduate Faculty.



                            Further information is available at:
                     http://www.yorku.ca/grads/policies/petitions.htm
                                          and at
                       http://www.yorku.ca/grads/calendar/regs.pdf




                                            Page 26
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY

The Faculty of Graduate Studies recognizes the mission of the university to seek, preserve,
and disseminate knowledge and to conduct research in a fair, open, and morally responsible
manner.

In such regard, the Faculty of Graduate Studies believes that intellectual property rights are
divided among several interests, and that the rights and obligations of various claimants
should be specified, fairly regulated, and that disputes arising may be mediated. All parties,
students and faculty are expected to behave in an ethically appropriate manner beyond their
immediate graduate student/supervisory relationship, to encompass intellectual property
rights, dissemination of research date, and in making decisions on authorship and publication
of joint research.

Because of the varied cultural aspects and practices that differ among the graduate programs,
each program is responsible for enacting and enforcing this policy of appropriate ethical
practices on intellectual property rights, in accordance with the basic tenets of the general
principles found in the Faculty of Graduate Studies Report on Intellectual Property
(February 1995). Programs which choose not to enact their own specific policy are bound by
the Faculty Policy on Intellectual Property for Graduate Programs.




                          Further information is available at:
              http://www.yorku.ca/grads/policies/intellectualproperty.htm




                                           Page 27
                       GRADUATE PROGRAM IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
                          CALENDAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
                                    2009-2010


GS POLS 5000I 6.0               Selected Issues in International Human Rights
Course Director:                Nergis Canefe                  ncanefe@yorku.ca
This course is designed as a survey course to facilitate active student participation in the
examination of classical and contemporary debates on the politics of human rights. It offers
a cross-section of critical debates on the history, legitimacy, forms and limits of application
of human rights. It also provides the student with the critical knowledge of the working
mechanisms (strengths and weaknesses, as well as gaps within) of the contemporary human
rights regime. While the first term is dedicated primarily to theoretical accounts, the second
term is allocated for case-studies.


GS POLS 5045 3.0                Ecology, Politics and Theory
Course Director:                Michelle Mawhinney           mmawhin@yorku.ca
What is the extent and nature of the environmental crisis and what are its social roots? What
sorts of political changes are required in response? This course looks at the major schools of
ecological-political thought and their approaches to these and other questions: “deep”
ecology, eco-feminism, anarcho-communalism, post-modernism, Heideggerian ecology,
Marcusian ecology and Marxian approaches are compared and investigated.


GS POLS 5055 3.0               The Idea of Democracy
Course Director:               Terry Maley                    tmaley@yorku.ca
This seminar critically examines key texts in contemporary democratic theory, focusing in
particular on debates and controversies pertaining to (a) the compatibilities and
incompatibilities between capitalism and democracy on the one hand, and socialism and
democracy on the other; (b) the crisis of modern democratic political representation and the
role which notions of ‘civil society’ and ‘globalization’ play in relation to that crisis; and
(c) new models and strategies for the democratization of state and economy and for the
development of popular democratic capacities.


GS POLS 5071 3.0                 The Politics of Cyberspace: Information and Power in the
                                 Surveillance Society
Course Director:                 Shannon Bell                   shanbell@yorku.ca
As a component of the information revolution and globalization, cyber, digital technology,
the internet, cyborg (cybernetic organism), artificial life (AL), artificial intelligence (AI),
virtual reality, prosthetics, robotics and tissue engineering – has since 1989 rapidly emerged
as a feature of contemporary politics. The cyber is subject to competing claims regarding its
positive and negative impact of power relations and individual identities.




                                            Page 28
This course focuses on a variety of interpretative methods that are applied to cyber and
cyberspace – communication theory, Marxism, feminism, postmodernism, posthumanism,
international relations, identity theory, information theory, technological determinism and
political economy.

The characterization of cyber and cyberspace as a new medium and its political significance
will be emphasized. The course will examine the influence of “non-place” on democratic
development, social power and interaction, as well as new identity formation.


GS POLS 5090 3.0              Classical Marxist Theory
Course Director:              Marcello Musto                musto@yorku.ca
This course will focus primarily on the writings of Marx and Engels with some consideration
of Marxism as it first developed as an ideology of mass parties in the context of the Second
International.


GS POLS 5110 3.0               Judicial Administration in Canada
Course Director:               Jacqueline Krikorian          jdk@yorku.ca
An overview of judicial administration in Canada. This course focuses on factors students
need to understand to tackle the serious problems in courts: civil and criminal processes, case
flow management, judicial independence, court structure, and current issues in the justice
system. The course will include a court observation exercise, and two mock jury
deliberations. This course is the core course for the Graduate Diploma in Justice System
Administration.


GS POLS 5165 3.0               Canadian Social Policy in Comparative Perspective
Course Director:               Ann Porter                  aporter@yorku.ca
The course analyses the design and implementation of social policy in Canada, seen in the
context of social policy development in other Western societies, including the United States
and Western Europe.


GS POLS 5175 6.0               Canadian Constitutionalism in Comparative Perspective
Course Director:               Jacqueline Krikorian          jdk@yorku.ca
This course examines the evolution of the Canadian constitution in comparative context.
Particular emphasis will be placed on the institutions and processes of federalism and the
interpretation and application of rights under the Charter.




                                           Page 29
GS POLS 5205 3.0               The New German Politics and European Integration
Course Director:               Sergei Smolnikov            ssmolnikov@yahoo.ca
This course analyzes Germany’s domestic and foreign policies in the wake of German
Unification and in the context of the end of the Cold War. After reviewing the historical
background of the “German Question”, the course discusses how the twin processes of
German “Unification” and the reshaping of Europe have affected German domestic and
foreign politics and policies.


GS POLS 5245 3.0                Gender and International Relations
Course Director:                Anna Agathangelou              agathang@yorku.ca
This course explores both the theoretical and empirical issues raised by the introduction of a
consideration of 'gender' in international relations. Issues covered include gender and the
environment, militarism, human rights, international political economy and so on.


GS POLS 5250 3.0               Canadian Foreign Policy
Course Director:               TBA
This seminar is devoted to an examination of the foreign policy of the Canadian government.
The course will focus on the determinants of government decision-making, comparing case
studies of some key decisions to the foreign policy theoretical literature. Of special interest
will be the dynamics of 'transition' decision-making; the overlap of status-quo and transition
forces in the post-Cold War era.


GS POLS 5280 6.0              Russia in World Affairs
Course Director:              Sergei Plekhanov               splekhan@yorku.ca
A study of relations between Russia and the world since the Communist Revolution of 1917
to the present. The seminar examines the political, military, economic, social and ideological
factors which shaped the foreign policies of the USSR from Lenin to Gorbachev; the Soviet
role in the Cold War; the Cold War's impact on the Soviet system; the international
implications of the USSR's collapse; the new issues and structures of international politics in
post-Soviet Eurasia; and the present state of relations between Russia and the West.

GS POLS 5404 3.0                 Politics and Cultures of Neoliberal Urbanism
Course Director:                 Laam Hae                      lhae@yorku.ca
This course examines the origins and historical development of neoliberalism as a political
ideology of municipal governments, and the impacts of neoliberal policies on
social/political/cultural relations in contemporary cities. Students also analyze theoretical
and political debates surrounding neoliberal urbanism.




                                            Page 30
GS POLS 5460 3.0                Working Class Politics In Capitalist Democracies
Course Director:                Stephen Hellman              shellman@yorku.ca
This seminar examines both the history of working class politics, examining some of the
“classic” examples of the early 20th Century and the challenges faced by workers’
movements and organizations since the end of the 20th Century. The challenges we will
examine will include such things as the changing class structure of modern capitalism.
International migration, women’s increased participation in the labor force and many of the
phenomena often lumped under the heading of “globalization”. We will also examine, how
effectively trade unions, political parties and social movements have responded to these
challenges.


GS POLS 5546 3.0              Protest Movements and Democracy
Course Director:              Todd Gordon                  tsgordon@yorku.ca
This seminar surveys the critical understandings of democracy articulated in mass protest
movements, drawing upon international examples including populism, women’s movements
and labour activism. Democracy is explored as a contested concept in various spatial and
historical contexts.

GS POLS 5575 3.0                The Politics of Southern Africa
Course Director:                Richard Saunders             rsaunder@yorku.ca
This course examines the continuing transition to post-colonial, post-apartheid Southern
Africa. Critical challenges to the consolidation of democracy and development in the region
will be considered through a number of country case studies, which will focus on the
changing nature of the state, the impact of economic liberalization and globalization, and
responses from emerging social forces. Special focus will fall on South Africa, where the
ending of apartheid and emergence of a new state have raised new contradiction; and on the
possibilities for the emergence of a more democratic political economy in the region


GS POLS 5590 3.0              Political Development in South Asia
Course Director:              Ananya Mukherjee-Reed ananya@yorku.ca
This course explores the various dimensions of South Asian political development, with
emphasis on political-economy and development issues. It examines the similarities and
differences between different South Asian nations and explores their contemporary dynamic
in a historical context.


GS POLS 5605 3.0              Ethical Politics
Course Director:              David Shugarman                 dshugar@yorku.ca
This course focuses on selected practical problems, cases and hypothetical questions that a)
deal with the conduct of public servants in regard to conflicts of interest, undue influence,
dishonesty and accountability, b) arise when there is controversy over what our
government(s) ought to do to address injustices and, c) draw politicians into responding to
conflicting demands from citizens over quality of life issues and autonomy.



                                           Page 31
GS POLS 5650 3.0                Provincial and Municipal Government in Ontario
Course Director:                Karen Murray                   murrayk@yorku.ca
This course draws upon social theory to examine Ontario provincial systems of government
and their relationship to cities, with a primary focus on issues pertaining to poverty and
disadvantage. The first section will introduce several analytical lenses for studying
governmental processes. The second assesses shifts from classical to welfare, and then to
neoliberal modes of rule. The final portion will consider alternative ways of conceptualizing
new modes of governance taking shape into the twenty-first century.


GS POLS 5810 3.0                Social Justice and Political Activists
Course Director:                Alex Levant                    alevant@yorku.ca
This seminar approaches social justice from the perspective of linking intellectual
understanding to practical intervention in social change. The course surveys various
philosophical terrains on which social justice has been addressed, discusses past approaches
to constructing a better world (utopias, liberalism, socialism), and addresses social justice in
the particular context of modern capitalism. It analyses the limits of the welfare state, the
implications of globalization, and the impasse of left politics. It considers a range of
alternative policy options, but its main focus will be on the possibilities of developing an
effective alternative politics.


GS POLS 6000A 3.0              The M.A. Colloquium
Course Director:               Heather MacRae                 hmacrae@yorku.ca
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with graduate study in the Department of
Political Science, to examine areas of common concern to students, and to prepare students
to write their Major Research Paper (MRP). Seminars will include introductions to faculty
members and their research, workshops on research preparation and proposal writing, and
information on well-being and graduate life.


GS POLS 6000R 3.0                Histories and Theories of Nationalism
Course Director:                 Gerald Kernerman            geraldk@yorku.ca
This course covers two eras, 1789-1914 and 1917-1989 moving along two axes: the narrative
history of the making of modern nations and nation-states; and the theoretical axis of the
history, that is to say the clash, of ideas.

GS POLS 6005 3.0               Theories of Cosmopolitanism
Course Director:               Fuyuki Kurasawa               kurasawa@yorku.ca
This course critically examines the idea of cosmopolitanism, as contained in some key
theoretical writings. It covers the main dimensions of cosmopolitan thought: moral and
ethical (universal human equality); socio-cultural (pluralism); economic (redistribution); and
political (cosmopolitics and global civil society).




                                            Page 32
GS POLS 6006 3.0               Theorizing Refugees: Nation-State-Exception
Course Director:               Gerald Kernerman               geraldk@yorku.ca
This advanced interdisciplinary seminar engages key theoretical interventions on ‘refugees’,
as figures of exception, and their implications for such practices as citizenship, borders,
sovereignty, human rights, the rule of law and nationalism.


GS POLS 6010 6.0              Symposium in Political Theory (Core Course)
Course Director:              Asher Horowitz (Fall)          horowitz@yorku.ca
                              David McNally (Winter)         dmcnally@yorku.ca
An intensive survey of selected political thinkers from Plato to Marx designed to give
students a broad background in the history of political thought. The course will also expose
students to different methodological tendencies in the study of the history of political theory.


GS POLS 6030 6.0               Theory and Practice of the State in Historical Perspective
Course Director:               George Comninel                 comninel@yorku.ca
This course is about the history and transformation of the Western state in its changing social
and economic contexts from antiquity to modern capitalism. The course will also deal with
paradigmatic ideas of the state as they appear in the classics of Western political thought, and
with contemporary debates surrounding the theory and history of the state.

A central theme of the course is the historical specificity of capitalism and its distinctive
political forms. One of our main objectives will be to define the specific historical processes
that give rise to capitalism. This means challenging some influential theories of the state and
its development, conventional conceptions of the relation between the "economic" and the
"political", and theories of history, both Marxist and non-Marxist, which tend to mask the
specificity of capitalism and the very particular conditions of its development. With special
emphasis on the problem of "transitions" -- from antiquity to feudalism, from feudalism to
capitalism, and from early capitalism to its industrial form -- we shall focus on the
differences among various European states, and their divergent historical paths, notably in
England, France and Italy.


GS POLS 6060 3.0              Appropriating Marx’s Capital I
Course Director:              David McNally                   dmcnally@yorku.ca
This course involves a systematic reading of Marx's life work, Capital (volume one). Major
theoretical issues concerning method, dialectics and critique are attended to, alongside
detailed discussion of concepts central to Marx's critique of political economy.
Note: This course will be offered in the Fall term hosted by Political Science and in the
Winter term hosted by Social and Political Thought.




                                            Page 33
GS POLS 6061 3.0               Appropriating Marx’s Capital II
Course Director:               Marcello Musto                 musto@yorku.ca
This course involves a close reading of the second and third volumes of Marx's Capital.
Topics to be covered include competition, finance, credit, banking, crises and the rate of
profit. The readings will also address significant interpretations in the secondary literature
having to do with imperialism, the world market and capitalist crises."


GS POLS 6075 6.0                 The Ethical and the Political in Levinas and Derrida
Course Director:                 Asher Horowitz                   horowitz@yorku.ca
The work of Emmanuel Levinas signifies what may be a radical reorientation of our
understanding of the ethical relation of an order to perhaps match or exceed that of the
transition from Greek to Christian philosophy or from medieval to modern thought. Such a
claim is certainly at least implicit in his writings. In Levinas’s phenomenology of the
human-to-human the ethical becomes a form of heteronomy and an undeniable appeal from
one singularity to another, but one that does not negate freedom and that necessarily
demands justice. To the extent that this claim is well-founded, the implications not only for
ethics, but for politics and for the relation between ethics and politics are enormous, across
the ideological spectrum, but especially for those traditions of political thought committed to
critique. The work of understanding and following through on these implications has,
however, barely begun within the disciplines directly concerned with the political. Nor has
Levinas himself pursued the political implications of his ethical thinking very far. This
course will therefore, first, offer students a relatively brief introduction to the
phenomenological background necessary to then, second, pursue a systematic grounding in
Levinas’ most central works, including his major works, Totality and Infinity and Otherwise
than Being. Attention will be paid throughout to the socio-political implications of his
thought.


GS POLS 6083 3.0              Technopolitics
Course Director:              Shannon Bell                shanbell@yorku.ca
Technology and politics have always been intertwined. This course examines the
technopolitical convergence in select works of Marx, Deleuze, Derrida, Nietzsche,
Heidegger, Steigler, DeLanda, Latoure, McLuhan, Virilio and Kroker.

The thread that links these political philosophers and social theorists is a convergence in the
belief that technology alters existence in terms of self and other, essence, agency,
consciousness, intimacy, intelligence, reason, life, embodiment, identity, and gender.

The teleology of humans defining their world through fabrication, the instrumental direction
of tools and technology, is altered in what Steigler calls ‘originary technicity’ in human/
technological interface there is no obvious distinction between doer and means; technology
and human endeavor are coupled in a manner in which technology constructs the human, as
much as, perhaps more than, the human constructs technology.




                                            Page 34
This course has three objectives: 1) To determine how key thinkers in the 19th, 20th and 21st
centuries have constructed the techno-human interface. 2) To determine how these same
thinkers have derived not simply a politics of technology but a new political genre:
technopolitics. And, 3) To examine the terrain of technopolitics as a contested terrain.


GS POLS 6087 3.0              Politics of Aesthetics
Course Director:              Shannon Bell                    shanbell@yorku.ca
The Politics of Aesthetics develops an aesthetic framework from eight Continental
philosophers who have an aesthetic theory as part of their philosophy. The philosophers
include Hegel, Heidegger, Badiou, Ranciere, Bataille, Baudrillard, Virilio and Deleuze.
These are selected because their philosophy facilitates the artwork surpassing the aesthetic
theory.


GS POLS 6110 6.0               Canadian Government and Politics (Core Course)
Course Director:               Gabrielle Slowey (Fall)        gslowey@yorku.ca
                               Bruce Smardon (Winter) bsmardon@yorku.ca
The purpose of this course is to review and assess the state of scholarship on Canadian
politics. Through a critical discussion of major articles and books, the course evaluates the
major theoretical paradigms and methodological approaches which have dominated the study
of Canadian politics. These debates are set in the wider context of North American and
comparative politics.

The Fall term concentrates on the question of democracy in Canada, looking at the dominant
institutional approaches and critical views calling for more radical forms of democracy. It
covers a selection of topics that have occupied mainstream Canadian Political Science, such
as the constitution, federalism, multiculturalism, Aboriginal sovereignty and so forth.

The Winter term examines political economy approaches to state development, assessing
particularly Weberian, Marxian and feminist contributions. The themes covered focus on
methodological issues of the study of national capitalisms, key historical debates concerning
the process of Canadian industrialization and the position of the Canadian economy in the
world economy, and key issues in the present period of neoliberal globalization.

This course is designed to prepare students to write qualifying examinations in Canadian
Politics. Emphasis will be placed upon developing a critical perspective on the field as a
whole rather than focusing upon one or two areas of study.




                                           Page 35
GS POLS 6120 3.0               Canadian Public Law
Course Director:               Jacqueline Krikorian            jdk@yorku.ca
Public law governs the legal relationship between the state and society. How do courts
interpret laws pertaining to the “public interest?” When should government regulate the
behaviour of its corporations, citizens and residents? What is judicial review and in what
contexts is it appropriate? This course examines these types of questions by considering a
variety of public law issues in areas such as national security, human rights and intellectual
property.


GS POLS 6125 3.0              Theories of Contemporary Capitalism
Course Director:              Greg Albo                      albo@yorku.ca
The transformations of capitalism from the postwar period to the current era of globalization
has produced numerous theories of the evolving dynamics of accumulation and power. This
course looks at some of these theorizations including institutionalism, regulation theory, the
Monthly Review School, political Marxism, and social structures of accumulation. The
course will examine central texts of authors such as Mandel, Harvey, Galbraith, Brenner,
Dumenil, Sweezy, Gordon, Castells, Panitch and Gindin and others.


GS POLS 6145 3.0             Indigenous Development in the Fourth World
Course Director:             Gabrielle Slowey               gaslowey@yorku.ca
This course explores indigenous development experiences in Canada and throughout the
world, in comparative perspective. It draws on theories of development and
underdevelopment and examines the sociology, politics and economics of development as
well as environmental and cultural implications.


GS POLS 6155 3.0                Democratic Administration
Course Director:                Thomas Klassen                 tklassen@yorku.ca
The study of democratic administration is premised on a commitment to the progressive
extension of people’s capacities to govern themselves collectively. However, many of the
principles of public administration were developed prior to the democratization of the state,
and one result has been public administration and public policy-making procedures that are
unnecessarily hierarchical, inflexible, and inefficient. During the 1990s, citizen political
apathy, cynicism and alienation from the state was met with a neo-liberal response that has
drastically altered the state public service through downsizing, out-sourcing, privatization,
and “new public management” approaches that apply business administration tools to public
administration. Currently, however, there is increased citizen demand for participation in the
policy-making process, a higher standard of public service ethics and accountability, and
there have been some innovative responses from the state to address important public policy
issues. If the challenges created by the dynamics of the past two decades are to be met
successfully, it will be necessary to transcend the real factors that produce apathy and
alienation from the state. This seminar addresses these issues through: an investigation of
the bureaucratic impediments to increased democracy, an examination of the promise and
limits of recent attempts by governments to overcome such impediments, a historical and


                                            Page 36
comparative focus to better understand the possibilities of citizen empowerment and the way
in which social and political contexts shape those possibilities. The seminar will include
readings on both the theory and practice of democratic administration.
This course is the core course for the Graduate Diploma in Democratic Administration.


GS POLS 6175 3.0               Politics and Policies in Aging Societies
Course Director:               Thomas Klassen                 tklassen@yorku.ca
This course analyzes how the aging of the population in Canada, as well as the US, Europe
and the East Asian nations, impacts and shapes political debates, conflicts and public polices,
especially those related to income security, health care, and employment regulation.


GS POLS 6185 3.0              Governmentalities of Urban Poverty
Course Director:              Karen Murray                   murrayk@yorku.ca
Drawing upon governmentality themes, this course examines the types of knowledge and
practice that shape urban poverty as a distinct sphere of governmental action, such as in
relation to homelessness, mental health, food insecurity, addictions, and community
development.


GS POLS 6200 6.0                Advanced Study in International Relations (Core Course)
Course Director:                Nicola Short                   ncshort@yorku.ca
This course is intended as the final preparation for the qualifying examination in
International Relations for Ph.D. students with a major or minor in that field. The course
will cover the core material in four subfields: (1) global political economy; (2)
multilateralism; (3) conflict and security; (4) foreign policy analysis.


GS POLS 6205 3.0               Hegemony, Imperialism and Globalization
Course Director:               Hannes Lacher                hlacher@yorku.ca
This course analyses theories and concepts of power, supremacy, hegemony and imperialism
in different world orders since antiquity. Analytical emphasis is placed on explaining he
post-1945 period associated with American hegemony, Soviet power and subsequent patterns
of intensified globalization.




                                           Page 37
GS POLS 6220 3.0                Contemporary Security Studies:
                                Conflict, Intervention and Peacebuilding
Course Director:                Elizabeth Dauphinee             dauphine@yorku.ca
The global conflict management agenda is increasingly dominated with responding to a
range of local and regional violent conflicts, sometimes called ‘the new wars’, or ‘complex
political emergencies’. The international attention on these forms of conflict have given rise,
in turn, to a range of issues and intervention strategies that depart in important ways from
previous efforts at conflict management. GS/POLS 6220 provides an opportunity for
graduate students with a strong interest in international security and global public policy to
explore these issues and strategies in the context of an extended, policy-relevant research
project.

The first few weeks of the course will involve a concentrated and critical overview of the
recent literature on the nature of contemporary conflict, issues related to human security and
international intervention, and means of conflict management and post conflict
reconstruction. This work will be designed to inform the student-driven research projects that
will form the majority of the course, rather than provide a survey of the security studies
literature.

Following from this exploration of the current issues in conflict research, the course will
facility the design and development individual research projects on a significant issue or
problem related to contemporary conflict, security and conflict management. Students will
prepare and present to colleagues literature reviews, project proposals, draft research papers
and policy briefs. The overall objective of the course is to foster an understanding of the
place of scholarly research in the development and delivery of public policy — whether that
is state, intergovernmental, or non-governmental policy — in the area of conflict analysis
and management.


GS POLS 6225 3.0                 Critical Security Studies
Course Director:                 David Mutimer                 dmutimer@yorku.ca
There is a burgeoning literature concerning itself with issues of 'security', but which begins
from a dissatisfaction with the ways in which questions of security have traditionally been
considered within International Relations. This traditional conception of security has been
pithily captured by Ken Booth in one of the seminal works in this literature as 'security seen
through a missile tube and a gun sight'. Increasingly, this literature is being identified as
Critical Security Studies - although already that term is one contested among those working
from this initial dissatisfaction. The term is reasonably appropriate, however, as much of this
literature draws, selectively, from the wide range of critical social theories inside and outside
Political Science and International Relations. One of the recurrent critiques of 'critical'
scholarship is its unwillingness, or indeed inability, to inform and produce research.

This course will question that critique, both by examining the research output of the nascent
critical security studies literature, and by inviting the students to prepare, disseminate and
discuss their own research projects which are animated by some aspect of the critical social
theory literature.


                                            Page 38
The course will examine a selection of leading instances of research publications which have
been informed by critical social theory. The majority of these selections will be book length
studies. In parallel with each example critical security research, the course will examine
samples of the critical social theory which informed it. In each case, the course will pose
questions concerning the ways in which critical theory has informed the research, the sorts of
questions that it has allowed the author to ask about security which cannot be asked in other
ways, the possibilities within the texts which have not been explored by the authors, and the
limitations on research that are imposed by readings of critical social theory.


GS POLS 6230 3.0              Conflict, Militarism and Global Markets
Course Director:              Robert Latham                 rlatham1@yorku.ca
This seminar deals with the relationship between military power and capitalism in historical
and global perspectives. It focuses on the ways that war and militarism facilitate and limit
the global development of capitalism and vice versa. Mainstream views are contrasted with
Marxist and neo-Marxist ones. Current developments are assessed in light of theoretical
debates, and special emphasis is placed on evaluating recent transformations in war and
capitalism.

The overarching approach is socio-historical. While a starting point is the assumption that
the formation and transformation of capitalist states and economic systems is critical to the
subject, the seminar explores the relevance of a variety of transboundary forms including
empire, international order, and normative/institutional complexes such as liberalism and
modernity. The seminar situates conflict, militarism, and markets within wider socio-
historical contexts of which they are a part, such as capitalism or even “late-modernity.”


GS POLS 6245 3.0               The Global Politics of Health
Course Director:               Rodney Loeppky                  rloeppky@yorku.ca
This course examines ‘health’ at the intersection between global and national political
terrains. It explores the impact of extensive biomedical development, national competition,
and international trade on both the ‘reality’ and delivery of health for populations. It
challenges students to consider health from a variety of angles and intellectual perspectives,
encouraging a distinctly political understanding of health across a range of contexts.


GS POLS 6250 3.0              Neoliberalism
Course Director:              Nicola Short                    ncshort@yorku.ca
This course examines the theories, practices, implicit rationalities, and
tensions/contradictions of neoliberalism.




                                            Page 39
GS POLS 6260 6.0               The Capitalist Mode of Power: A Research Seminar
Course Director:               Jonathan Nitzan              nitzan@yorku.ca
A critical examination of the capitalist mode of power. The course explores competing
conceptualization of capitalism, while preparing students toward developing their own
independent research. Special emphasis is put on the fusion of theoretical and empirical
research.


GS POLS 6271 3.0                Political Economy: Major Texts
Course Director:                Gregory Albo                   albo@yorku.ca
This course surveys the history of thought in political economy from Mercantalist thinkers to
Keynes and the emergence of neoliberal economics. The course covers key texts by such
thinkers as Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Thomas Malthus, Karl Marx, Rudolph Hilerfering,
V.I. Lenin, Leon Walras, Alfred Marshall, and J.M. Keynes. Particular attention is paid to
issues having to do with methodology, the nature of the economic relations to other areas of
social life, theories of value and distribution, conceptions of competition and equilibriation,
and theories of value and accumulation.


GS POLS 6275 3.0                Ethnonationalist Conflicts and World Politics
Course Director:                Susan Henders                     henders@yorku.ca
Widely considered to be among the most intractable and bitter of intergroup encounters,
ethnonationalist conflicts increasingly confront the contemporary world with the dilemmas
of its own political imagination. This course proceeds from the basis that state formation and
international relations present us with a framework for political community that is inherently
rooted in identity-based conflict - that is, in the ideal Westphalian relationship of contiguity
between sovereign, people, and territory. It is thus that ethnic conflict might be seen not as a
'primitive' aberration of international political life, but rather as one of its historical
cornerstones. The purpose of this course is to explore the ways in which ethnonationalist
conflict permeates and reflects the international order in both contemporary and historical
contexts. The course is primarily led through students' own research projects.


GS POLS 6281 3.0               Topics in Political Economy:
                               Comparative and International II
Course Director:               Rodney Loeppky                rloeppky@yorku.ca
This course has two objectives. In the first two-thirds of the semester, we will explore
single contemporary works in comparative and international political economy. These texts
will vary from year to year, but include authors such as Ellen Wood, David Harvey, Robert
Brenner and Shirin Rai. The latter portion of the course (in March) is designed as an
opportunity for students to explore and mobilize plans for thesis work, or for other writing
projects. This is intended as a ‘workshop’ venue, in which students will receive productive
feedback on their work-in-progress. The course requirements include one presentation on
course readings, one presentation on student research, and a term paper (6000 word limit).




                                            Page 40
GS POLS 6410 6.0               The Study of Comparative Politics (Core Course)
Course Director:               Hannes Lacher (Fall)           hlacher@yorku.ca
                               Stephen Hellman (Winter) shellman@yorku.ca
The purpose of this course is to survey major approaches and issues in the study of
comparative politics and engage students in the contemporary debates in the field. Students
(especially majors) are expected to acquire in-depth knowledge of their principal area of
specialization in other courses. Weekly readings are chosen so as to address central themes
and introduce students to the diversity of theoretical approaches that constitute the field. In
addition to keeping up with weekly readings and participating actively in seminar discussion,
students will be required to submit two short papers (ten pages) in each term.


GS POLS 6425 3.0                Political Parties, Social Conflict and the State:
                                Representation in Modern Societies
Course Director:                Simone Bohn                     sbohn@yorku.ca
This course tackles the evolving dynamics of representation in modern societies and the
changing role of political parties, both when it comes to their relationship with civil society
and other entities of aggregation of interests (such as the social movements, for instance) and
with the state. It analyzes how societal conflict is channeled through and processed by
political institutions and how political parties work to shape public policies at the state level.
The discussion focuses on the topics such as (1) the impact of the societal context on the
emergence of political parties and the resulting type of party system; (2) the transformation
of mass-based political parties as a response to changes in the social cleavages; (3) the debate
on the purported weakening of the class cleavage, the de-“ideologization” of socialist and
progressive parties and the prospects of structural social transformation through the electoral
via; (4) the increase in complexity of civil society, the appearance of alternative entities of
interest aggregation or instances of direct democracy and the displacement of parties from
their central (almost monopolistic) representative role; (5) the transformation of parties from
labor-based to capital-intensive organizations; (6) the appearance of the so-called “cartel
parties” and their alleged colonization of state and distancing from civil society; (7) the rise
of anti-system parties; (8) the proliferation of hate politics and the extreme right amidst the
growing interconnectedness of cultures, markets and nation-states and (9) the debate on the
multi-faceted decline of political parties. The course has both a strong longitudinal and
cross-sectional design. Students will analyze the dynamics of representation both over time
(from the end of the nineteenth century on) and in very different societies of the globe
(including the United States, Germany, England, France, Portugal, Italy, Norway, Japan,
Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Uganda, the non-party countries from the Pacific and
some post-communist states).




                                             Page 41
GS POLS 6435 3.0                Capitalism and Welfare States
Course Director:                Ann Porter                     aporter@yorku.ca
This course examines the relationship between the development of capitalism and attempts to
address “the social” via welfare states. The approach is both historical and theoretical, with a
key underlying concern to examine the contradictions, possibilities and limits of differing
approaches to the welfare state in an era of globalization. The course integrates comparative
and Canadian perspectives. It examines such topics as: the rise of capitalism and early
approaches to addressing social needs; the goals and contradictions of the Keynesian welfare
state; crisis and restructuring of welfare states; approaches to the welfare state in an era of
globalization; neo-liberalism, its limits and possible alternatives.


GS POLS 6470 3.0                 Globalization and the State
Course Director:                 Sabah Alnasseri               alnaseri@yorku.ca
The goal of this seminar is to arrive at a historically grounded, comparatively well-informed
and theoretically enriched understanding of the role states play in the global capitalism. This
requires transcending the commonplace theoretical dichotomy between markets and states,
and the illusion that capitalist forces have by passed or escaped the state under global
neoliberalism, in order to develop appropriate conceptual tools to understand the active role
states have played in making globalization happen, as well as the nature of state interventions
in the current global economic crisis. This will involve recovering and developing what was
valuable in the neo-marxist theories of the state, and in order to apprehend the central role of
the American state in global capitalism also advancing towards a new theory of capitalist
empire for our time. These theorizations of state and empire will be used to address specific
dimensions of globalization and the internationalization of the state (in relation to finance
and law in particular), and to examine what states have done to forestall or manage a series
of financial and economic crises in the neoliberal era. Finally, we will explore under what
conditions such crises are likely to prove unmanageable, and what would be the likely
consequences of this, both in relation to the oft-predicted but as yet little realized decline of
American empire, and in relation to the development of political alternatives to global
capitalism.


GS POLS 6485 3.0               Contemporary Social Transformations Knowledge,
                               Political Economy and Agency
Course Director:               Ananya Mukherjee-Reed ananya@yorku.ca
The course examines contemporary debates about social transformations with particular
emphasis on the dimensions of knowledge, political economy and agency. Its objective is to
assist students in formulating their own critical inquiry about transformative processes.




                                            Page 42
GS POLS 6505 3.0              Religious Fundamentalisms and Global Politics
Course Director:              Saeed Rahnema                 srahnema@yorku.ca
This course examines the rise of religious fundamentalisms and their impact on global
politics. Christian, Jewish and Islamic Fundamentalisms, despite their diverse and
conflictual messianic aims and objectives, follow similar worldly politics and strategies.

The strategies of apocalypticist Christian fundamentalists, dispensationalists, and Christian
reconstructionists, and their collaborations and support of different Jewish Fundamentalists
in the United States and Israel are explored, and their main organizations and movements
studied.

In Muslim countries, failures of modernization programs under the auspices of international
capital and authoritarian regimes, along with the demise of the secular left and liberal
nationalist movements in these societies, have given rise to variances of Islamism fighting
for the establishment of ‘true’ Islamic states. The unresolved Israeli-Palestinian conflicts,
along with more aggressive western interventions in the region, particularly in post-
September 11, have further intensified confrontations within these societies, and generally
between Muslims and the West. At the same time, economic and political turmoil in the
Islamic world has given rise to growing migration to the west and expansion of Islamic
diasporas. The interaction between religion in diaspora and in its originating societies will
also be the subject of inquiry in the course.


GS POLS 6515 3.0                The Making of the Modern Middle East:
                                Politics, States and Societies
Course Director:                Sabah Alnasseri                alnaseri@yorku.ca
This course will cover the history of state building, political trends, region-specific issues of
significance in the context of International Relations, Comparative Politics, and International
Political Economy, history of nationalism and other dominant ideologies in the post-Ottoman
and post-colonial periods, and, the nature of new political movements, parties and formations
in modern Middle Eastern states.


GS POLS 6525 3.0                 Diasporas: Transnational Communities and
                                 Limits of Citizenship
Course Director:                 Nergis Canefe                   ncanefe@yorku.ca
This course provides a comparative inquiry about the nature of transnational communal,
religious, and political identities at the age of late capitalism. It puts emphasis on critical
approaches to diasporas, their variant constructions of homeland and home, and their marked
effects on the politics of the post-Westphalian state and international relations.




                                            Page 43
GS POLS 6555 3.0                 Transitions from Authoritarianism: Analyzing People
                                 Power, Colour Revolutions and Democracy Promotion
Course Director:                 Bernie Frolic                 bfrol@yorku.ca
The course looks at recent transitions from authoritarianism in selected political systems
throughout the world. Emphasis is on the interaction among domestic political economy,
civil society, external actors, and related forces that comprise the ecology of the recent
successful and failed "colour revolutions."

Questions to ask are: How do effective challenges to authoritarian regimes emerge? Can they
be non-violent? Are they models for transition elsewhere? How are authoritarian regimes
mobilizing to stop these revolutions?

We also explore in some detail the role of external actors in facilitating democratic transition
and consolidation, specifically the use of "democracy promotion” instruments. Has this
intervention by the West been successful? Have organizations such as the American National
Endowment for Democracy (NED) been successful in promoting democratic change?

Seminar participants ideally will devote most of their work in the seminar to a close analysis
of regime change in one country.


GS POLS 6566 3.0                Advanced Topics in Latin American and
                                Caribbean Politics
Course Director:                Judy Hellman                 jhellman@yorku.ca
This course examines the social impact of “globalization” on Latin America and the
Caribbean, focusing on the responses that neoliberal policies call forth. First, we look at the
ways in which new social and political movements, including producers’ cooperatives,
develop to meet new needs created by neoliberalism. However, collective action is not the
only response that may be stimulated by deteriorating social and economic conditions. Thus,
the second half of the course will consider international migration and the “transnationalism”
that results from the international flow of capital, commodities, individuals and whole
communities.


GS POLS 6585 3.0                Civil Society and Democratization in the South
Course Director:                Richard Saunders                rsaunder@yorku.ca
This course considers the origins, impact, potential and theoretical problems arising from
current struggles around issues of democratization in the developing countries of the "Global
South". The focus falls primarily on the role of "civil society" - including membership-based
and non-governmental organizations, socio-economic associations, rights based groups and
other institutions - in confronting the state over failed development and inadequate
“governance” against the backdrop of social and economic dislocations fueled by
globalization. One goal of the seminar is to locate civil society and civic activism in the
South in the context of broader contemporary theoretical debates around civil society, class
and identity; another is to investigate the specificity of civic democratic struggles in the
South by means of case studies from a variety of regions and sectors.


                                            Page 44
GS POLS 6630 3.0               The Political Economy of East Asia
Course Director:               Gregory T. Chin                gtchin@yorku.ca
This course compares different theories, concepts and approaches to the political economy of
emerging powers in Asia. It asks: do regions matter in the study of the emerging powers,
and if so, why? We will study the rise of the emerging powers in Asia, the world’s most
dynamic economic region, and the implications for the region and world order. The course:
1) examines the rise of China, Japan, India and Russia (CJIR), as part of the regional
phenomena in terms of international production, financial and monetary relations, and
international organization; 2) compares the process of region formation and new balance of
power in Asia to elsewhere, including other parts of the Global South; and 3) distinct
patterns of political-economic expansion from Asia into other regions and across the Global
South, with a focus on the role of CJIR as drivers of change in terms of new hierarchies of
power and environmental impact. The main themes of the course are: emerging powers, new
economic diplomacy, regionalization/regionalism, and world order. The aim is to better
understand the impact of the rise of the emerging Asian powers on the structure of
international power, and world order change. Regular attention will be given to comparing
different social science methods for field investigation of the subject matter.


GS POLS 6655 3.0             Theories and Institutions of European Integration
Course Director:             Willem Maas                     maas@yorku.ca
This advanced comparative politics seminar considers the history, politics, and theories of
European law and integration, from the end of the Second World War to the present,
focusing on the European Union and its institutions. It is designed to complement
GS POLS 6656 (Politics and Policies of European Integration) offered in the Winter term.


GS POLS 6656 3.0               Politics and Policies of European Integration
Course Director:               Heather MacRae                 hmacrae@yorku.ca
This advanced comparative politics seminar addresses specific policies of European
integration. Course topics will include such policy areas as foreign and security policy,
environmental policies, social policies, gender and identity politics. The course will attempt
to offer an understanding of the various policy areas of the European Union. It furthermore
aims to question who the key actors in the EU policy making are and analyses who benefits
from the process of integration in Europe.




                                           Page 45
GS POLS 6700 6.0                Advanced Studies in Women and Politics (Core Course)
Course Director:                Karen Murray (Fall)           murrayk@yorku.ca
                                Leah Vosko (Winter)           lvosko@yorku.ca
This course provides a comprehensive survey of the theoretical and empirical literature in the
fields of feminist theory, feminist epistemology, and women and politics broadly defined.
The course reviews the major streams in feminist theory including liberal, socialist, radical,
lesbian, postmodern and postcolonial theory. It also explores the methodological and
epistemological critiques of these different theoretical approaches to the study of women,
power and social relations. The course contextualizes these theoretical foundations through
a detailed consideration of gender and the changing global order. Topics include: gender
and restructuring, citizenship, nationalism, migration, security and organizing through human
rights discourse.


GS POLS 6705 3.0              Gender and International Human Rights:
                              Law, Citizenships and Borders
Course Director:              Pat McDermott                   patmcd@yorku.ca
This course introduces students to the structure and the main mechanisms of international
human rights law and its impact on women and gender relations. The focus of the course is
on the United Nations, its agencies, and its system of international Conventions and
Declarations designed to increase gender equality.


GS POLS 6745 3.0                Transnational Feminism(s):
                                Globalization, Empire and the Body
Course Director:                Anna Agathangelou             agathang@yorku.ca
This course examines transnational feminist theories on the historical connections of body,
nation, gender, racializations, sexualizations and globalization. This course also explores
how increasingly global structures of inequality are demanding global structures,
movements, and new theorizations by feminists worldwide.




                                           Page 46
GS POLS 6765 3.0                Feminist Political Economy:
                                Key Concepts and New Directions
Course Director:                Ann Porter                      aporter@yorku.ca
The purpose of this course is to explore the development of and possibilities for a feminist
political economy. The course examines key readings from the literature, drawing out
linkages between theoretical developments and movements for social change. While key
theoretical concepts from feminist political economy as it developed from the 1970s will be
discussed, of particular concern is to examine possible new directions as a result of
challenges from diverse groups of women, challenges from the global south, from
globalization, neo-liberalism and from changes in labour markets and household structures.
Questions to be examined include: What is the relationship between the economic
production and social reproduction (the division between states, households, communities
and subsistence sectors in ensuring household survival strategies and social well being)?
How do we understand the role of unpaid labour in the economy? What is the relationship
between transformations at the household and local level and broader social and economic
changes taking place? What are the interconnections between gender, race, imperialism and
the extension of, as well as resistance to, capitalist markets?




                                           Page 47
                                                           GRADUATE PROGRAMME IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
                                                                      COURSE OFFERINGS
                                                                          2009-10


  TERM                                 COURSE                               COURSE DIRECTOR           DAY/TIM E/PLACE                          FIELD


F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 5000I 6.0/                                     N ERGIS C AN EFE            T UESDAY                        I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
               AP POLS 4255 6.0                                       N CAN EFE @ YO RKU . CA     12:30 – 2:30
                                                                                                  215 M C L AU GH LIN C OLLEGE
               S ELECTED I SSU ES IN I NTERNATION AL
               H U M A N R IGH TS

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # M28W 01

F ALL          GS POLS 5045 3.0/                                      M ICH ELLE M AW H IN N EY   W EDN ESDAY                     P O LITICAL T HEORY
               AP POLS 4045 3.0                                       M M AW H IN @ YO RKU . CA   12:30 – 2:30
                                                                                                  N836 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               E COLOGY , P O LITICS AN D T HEORY

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # D87Z01

F ALL          GS POLS 5055 3.0/                                      T ERRY M ALEY               T UESDAY                        P O LITICAL T HEORY
               AP POLS 4055 3.0                                       M ALEY @ YO RKU . CA        4:00 – 7:00
                                                                                                  B10 H EALTH , N U RSIN G AN D
               T H E I D EA   OF   D EM OCRACY                                                    E N VIRO N M EN TAL S CIENCE
                                                                                                  B U ILD IN G
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # Z31M01

W IN TER       GS POLS 5071 3.0/                                      S H AN N ON B ELL           T UESDAY                        1) C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4071 3.0                                       SH AN BELL @ YO RKU . CA    11:30 – 2:30                    2) P O LITICAL T HEORY
                                                                                                  1022 V ARI H ALL
               T H E P O LITICS O F C YBERSPACE : I N FO RM ATIO N
               AN D P O W ER IN THE S U RVEILLAN CE S O CIETY


               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # S51S01




                                                                                      Page 48
  TERM                              COURSE                                  COURSE DIRECTOR           DAY/TIM E/PLACE                 FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 5090 3.0/                                      M ARCELLO M U STO           T HU RSDAY             P O LITICAL T HEORY
               AP POLS 4090 3.0                                       M U STO @ YO RKU . CA       7:00 – 10:00 P .M .
                                                                                                  105 V ANIER C OLLEGE
               C LASSICAL M ARXIST T HEORY

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                      C ATALO GU E # Y77X01

F ALL          GS POLS 5110 3.0/                                      J ACQ U ELIN E K RIKORIAN   F RIDAY                C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4105 3.0/                                      JD K @ YO RKU . CA          11:30 – 2:30
               SB PUBL 5110 3.0/                                                                  1005 V ARI H ALL
               GS LAW 6710P 3.0

               J U D ICIAL A D M IN ISTRATIO N   IN   C AN AD A

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                      C ATALO GU E # W 48D01

F ALL          GS POLS 5165 3.0/                                      A N N P O RTER              T UESDAY               C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4165 3.0                                       APO RTER @ YO RKU . CA      2:30 – 5:30
                                                                                                  1020 V ARI H ALL
               C AN AD IAN S O CIAL P O LICY     IN   C OM PARATIVE
               P ERSPECTIVE

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                      C ATALO GU E # K11N01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 5175 6.0/                                      J ACQ U ELIN E K RIKORIAN   T HU RSDAY             C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4175 6.0                                       JD K @ YO RKU . CA          11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                                  2005 V ARI H ALL
               C AN AD IAN C ON STITU TIO N ALISM       IN
               C O M PARATIVE P ERSPECTIVE

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                      C ATALO GU E # M72K01




                                                                                      Page 49
  TERM                             COURSE                                   COURSE DIRECTOR                DAY/TIM E/PLACE                         FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 5205 3.0/                                      S ERGEY S M O LN IKO V           T UESDAY                       C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4205 3.0                                       SSM O LN IKO V @ Y AH O O . CA   11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                                       1020 V ARI H ALL
               T H E N EW G ERM AN P O LITICS AN D
               E U RO PEAN I N TEGRATIO N

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                   C ATALO GU E # E00H01

F ALL          GS POLS 5245 3.0/                                      A NN A A GATH AN GELO U          M ON DAY                       1) I N TERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
               AP POLS 4245 3.0/                                      AGATH AN G @ YO RKU . CA         11:30 – 2:30                   2) W O M EN AN D P OLITICS
               GS W MST 6118 3.0/                                                                      1018 V ARI H ALL
               AP W MST 4802 3.0/
               GL W MST 4802 3.0

               G EN D ER AN D I N TERNATIO N AL R ELATIO N S

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                   C ATALO GU E # X88H01

W IN TER       GS POLS 5250 3.0/                                      TBA                              T UESDAY                       I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
               AP POLS 4250 3.0                                                                        7:00 – 10:00
                                                                                                       S156 R O SS BU ILD IN G
               C AN AD IAN F O REIGN P OLICY

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                   C ATALO GU E # S30W 01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 5280 6.0/                                      S ERGEI P LEKH AN O V            W EDN ESDAY                    1) C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4280 6.0                                       SPLEKHAN @ YO RKU . CA           11:30 – 2:30                   2) I N TERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                                                                       216 M C L AU GH LIN C OLLEGE
               R U SSIA IN W O RLD A FFAIRS

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                   C ATALO GU E # B46D01




                                                                                       Page 50
  TERM                          COURSE                                  COURSE DIRECTOR              DAY/TIM E/PLACE                            FIELD


W IN TER   GS POLS 5404 3.0/                                      L AAM H AE                     T UESDAY                           C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           AP POLS 4404 3.0                                       LHAE @ YO RKU . CA             4:00 – 7:00
                                                                                                 320 F ARQ U HARSO N B U ILD IN G
           P O LITICS AN D C U LTU RES O F N EOLIBERAL
           U RBAN ISM

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                     C ATALO GU E # Z08Q01

W IN TER   GS POLS 5460 3.0/                                      S TEPH EN H ELLM AN            T HU RSDAY                         C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           AP POLS 4470 3.0                                       SHELLM AN @ YO RKU . CA        2:30 – 5:30
                                                                                                 N836 R O SS B U ILD IN G
           W ORKING C LASS P O LITICS IN C APITALIST
           D EM O CRAC IES

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                     C ATALO GU E # Y05P01

F ALL      GS POLS 5546 3.0/                                      T O D D G O RD O N             T HU RSDAY                         C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           AP POLS 4402 3.0                                       TSGO RD O N @ YO RKU . CA      7:00 – 10:00 P .M .
                                                                                                 113 M C L AU GH LIN C OLLEGE
           P RO TEST M O VEM EN TS AN D D EM OCRACY

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                     C ATALO GU E # G12D01

F ALL      GS POLS 5575 3.0/                                      R ICH ARD S AUN DERS           T UESDAY                           C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           AP POLS 4575 3.0                                       RSAU N D ER @ YO RKU . CA      2:30 – 5:30
                                                                                                 216 M C L AU GH LIN C OLLEGE
           T H E P O LITICS O F S O U TH ERN A FRICA

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                     C ATALO GU E # Q48F01

F ALL      GS POLS 5590 3.0/                                      A NAN YA M U KH ERJEE -R EED   F RIDAY                            C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           AP POLS 4590 3.0                                       AN AN Y A @ YO RKU . CA        2:30 – 5:30
                                                                                                 2016 V ARI H ALL
           P O LITICAL D EVELO PM EN T IN S O U TH A SIA

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                                     C ATALO GU E # S50E01



                                                                                  Page 51
  TERM                               COURSE                                 COURSE DIRECTOR          DAY/TIM E/PLACE                          FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 5605 3.0/                                      D AVID S HU GARM AN        T UESDAY                        1) P O LITICAL T HEORY
               SB PUBL 5605 3.0                                       DSHU GAR @ YO RKU . CA     2:30 – 5:30                     2) C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4106 3.0                                                                  219 S TON G C OLLEGE

               E TH ICAL P OLITICS

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                              C ATALO GU E # W 36C01

W IN TER       GS POLS 5650 3.0/                                      K AREN M URRAY             F RIDAY                         C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               SB PUBL 5650 3.0                                       M U RRAY K @ YO RKU . CA   4:00 – 7:00
               AP POLS 4151 3.0                                                                  S104 R O SS B U ILD IN G

               P RO VIN CIAL AN D M U N ICIPAL G O VERN M EN T IN
               O N TARIO

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                              C ATALO GU E # R28R01

F ALL          GS POLS 5810 3.0/                                      A LEX L EVAN T             F RIDAY                         C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               AP POLS 4410 3.0                                       ALEVAN T @ YO RKU . CA     11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                                 1018 V ARI H ALL
               S O CIAL J U STICE AN D P O LITICAL A CTIVISTS

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (U N D ERGRAD U ATE )                                                              C ATALO GU E # S31J01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6000A 3.0                                      H EATHER M AC R AE         M ON DAY                        N/A
                                                                      HM ACRAE @ YO RKU . CA     8:30 – 11:30
               T H E M A C O LLO Q UIU M                                                         S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G
                                                                                                 T H E V ERN EY R O O M

                                                                                                 F IRST 6 S ESSIO N S F ALL/
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                     F IRST 6 S ESSIO N S W IN TER   C ATALO GU E # J95Z01




                                                                                     Page 52
  TERM                                  COURSE                         COURSE DIRECTOR              DAY/TIM E/PLACE                    FIELD


W IN TER       GS POLS 6000R 3.0/                                G ERALD K ERNERM AN            T HU RSDAY                 P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SPTH 6028 3.0                                  GERALD K @ YO RKU . CA         2:30 – 5:30
                                                                                                1016 V ARI H ALL
               H ISTO RIES AN D T H EO RIES O F N ATIO N ALISM

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # C28A01

F ALL          GS POLS 6006 3.0/                                 G ERALD K ERNERM AN            T HU RSDAY                 P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SOCI 6610 3.0/                                 GERALD K @ YO RKU . CA         2:30 – 5:30
               GS SPTH 6382 3.0                                                                 335 C ALU M ET C OLLEGE

               T HEORIZING R EFU GEES :
               N ATIO N -S TATE -E XCEPTIO N

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # M22R01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6005 3.0/                                 F U Y U KI K U RASAW A         T UESDAY                   P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SOCI 6196 3.0                                  KU RASAW A @ YO RKU . CA       2:30 – 5:30
                                                                                                S156 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               T H EO RIES O F C O SM O PO LITANISM

               H O ST : S O CIO LO GY (G RAD U ATE )                                                                       C ATALO GU E # K97F01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6010 6.0                                  A SHER H O RO W ITZ (F ALL)    T UESDAY                   P O LITICAL T HEORY
                                                                 H O RO W ITZ @ YO RK . CA      10:30 – 1:30
               S Y M PO SIU M   IN   P O LITICAL T HEORY                                        S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G   C O RE C OU RSE FOR P OLITICAL
                                                                 D AVID M CN ALLY (W IN TER )   T H E V ERN EY R O O M     T HEORY
                                                                 D M CN ALLY @ YO RKU . CA
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # D42A01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6030 6.0/                                 G EORGE C O M N IN EL          F RIDAY                    P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SPTH 6101 6.0                                  CO M N IN EL @ YO RKU . CA     10:30 – 1:30
                                                                                                S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               T H EO RY AN D P RACTICE O F THE S TATE IN                                       T H E V ERN EY R O O M
               H ISTO RICAL P ERSPECTIVE

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENCE                                                                               C ATALO GU E # T89X01


                                                                                  Page 53
  TERM                               COURSE                                COURSE DIRECTOR            DAY/TIM E/PLACE                         FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 6060 3.0/                                     D AVID M C N ALLY            M ON DAY                        P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SPTH 6200A 3.0                                     D M CN ALLY @ YO RKU . CA    11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                                  225 B ETH U N E C OLLEGE
               A PPROPRIATING M ARX ’S C APITAL I

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # E29W 01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6060 3.0/                                     D AVID M C N ALLY            M ON DAY                        P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SPTH 6200A 3.0                                     D M CN ALLY @ YO RKU . CA    11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                                  S156 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               A PPROPRIATING M ARX ’S C APITAL I

               H O ST : S O CIAL & P O LITICAL T H O UGH T                                                                        C ATALO GU E # U76H01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6061 3.0/                                     M ARCELLO M U STO            T HU RSDAY                      P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SPTH 6200B 3.0                                     M U STO @ YO RKU . CA        4:00 – 7:00
                                                                                                  328A B EH AVIO U RAL S CIENCE
               A PPROPRIATING M ARX ’S C APITAL II                                                B U ILD IN G

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # P63U01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6075 6.0/                                     A SHER H O RO W ITZ          W EDN ESDAY                     P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SPTH 6701 6.0/                                     H O RO W ITZ @ YO RKU . CA   12:30 – 2:30
               GS PHIL 6450 6.0                                                                   335 C ALU M ET C OLLEGE

               T H E E THICAL AN D   THE   P O LITICAL IN L EVINAS

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # B17Y01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6083 3.0                                      S H AN N ON B ELL            T UESDAY                        P O LITICAL T HEORY
                                                                     SH AN BELL @ YO RKU . CA     7:00 – 10:00 P .M .
               T ECHN OPOLITICS                                                                   0013 TEL B U ILD IN G

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # P10P01




                                                                                      Page 54
  TERM                              COURSE                           COURSE DIRECTOR                 DAY/TIM E/PLACE                            FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 6087 3.0/                               S H AN N ON B ELL                 T UESDAY                          P O LITICAL T HEORY
               GS SPTH 6648 3.0/                               SH AN BELL @ YO RKU . CA          7:00 – 10:00 P .M .
               GS CMCT 6336 3.0                                                                  0013 TEL B U ILD IN G

               P O LITICS O F A ESTHETICS

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                       C ATALO GU E # B17R01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6110 6.0                                G ABRIELLE S LO W EY (F ALL)      W EDN ESDAY                       C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
                                                               GSLO W EY @ YO RKU . CA           11:30 – 2:30
               C AN AD IAN G O VERN M EN T AN D P OLITICS                                        S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G          C O RE C OU RSE FOR
                                                               B RU CE S M ARD O N (W IN TER )   T H E V ERN EY R O O M            C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
                                                               BSM ARD O N @ YO RKU . CA
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                       C ATALO GU E # R93Y01

F ALL          GS POLS 6120 3.0/                               J ACQ U ELIN E K RIKORIAN         T HU RSDAY                        C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               SB PUBL 6200 3.0/                               JD K @ YO RKU . CA                7:00 – 10:00 P .M .
               GS SLST 6050 3.0                                                                  W 356 S CH U LICH S CH O OL O F
                                                                                                 B U SIN ESS
               C AN AD IAN P UBLIC L AW

               H O ST : S CH U LICH MPA P ROGRAM                                                                                   C ATALO GU E # Y09D01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6125 3.0                                G REG A LBO                       W EDN ESDAY                       1) C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
                                                               ALBO @ YO RKU . CA                4:00 – 7:00                       2) C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               T H EO RIES O F C O N TEM PO RARY C APITALISM                                     S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G
                                                                                                 T H E V ERN EY R O O M
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                       C ATALO GU E # V92V01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6145 3.0                                G ABRIELLE S LO W EY              T UESDAY                          1) C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
                                                               GSLO W EY @ YO RKU . CA           11:30 – 2:30                      2) C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               I N D IGENO U S D EVELO PM ENT IN   THE                                           S156 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               F O U RTH W O RLD

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                       C ATALO GU E # V63G01




                                                                               Page 55
  TERM                              COURSE                              COURSE DIRECTOR         DAY/TIM E/PLACE                         FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 6155 3.0/                                  T H O M AS K LASSEN       F RIDAY                        1) C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
               SB PUBL 6155 3.0/                                  TKLASSEN @ YO RKU . CA    11:30 – 2:30                   2) C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               GS LAW 6680 3.0/                                                             S536 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               GS PPAL 6155 3.0                                                                                            C O RE C OU RSE FOR
                                                                                                                           D IPLO M A IN D EM O CRATIC
               D EM OCRATIC A D M IN ISTRATIO N                                                                            A D M IN ISTRATIO N

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # K48T01

F ALL          GS POLS 6175 3.0                                   T H O M AS K LASSEN       W EDN ESDAY                    C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
                                                                  TKLASSEN @ YO RKU . CA    2:30 – 5:30
               P O LITICS AN D P O LICIES IN A GING S O CIETIES                             228 B ETH U N E C OLLEGE

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # X86Q01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6185 3.0                                   K AREN M URRAY            T HU RSDAY                     1) C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
                                                                  M URRAK @ YO RKU . CA     4:00 – 7:00                    2) C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               G O VER N M EN TALITIES O F U RBAN P O VERTY                                 204 B EH AVIO U RAL S CIENCE   3) W O M EN AN D P OLITICS
                                                                                            B U ILD IN G
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # M57Z01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6200 6.0                                   N ICOLA S HO RT           T HU RSDAY                     I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                                  NCSHO RT @ YO RKU . CA    8:30 – 11:30
               A D VAN CED S TU D Y IN I NTERNATION AL                                      S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G       C O RE C OU RSE FOR
               R ELATIO N S                                                                 T H E V ERN EY R O O M         I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # N36R01

F ALL          GS POLS 6205 3.0                                   H ANN ES L ACH ER         F RIDAY                        I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                                  H LACH ER @ YO RKU . CA   11:30 – 2:30
               H EGEM O N Y , I M PERIALISM   AN D                                          335 C ALU M ET C OLLEGE
               G LO BALIZATIO N

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # Y4OU01




                                                                                 Page 56
  TERM                          COURSE                           COURSE DIRECTOR            DAY/TIM E/PLACE                     FIELD


F ALL      GS POLS 6220 3.0                                E LIZABETH D AU PH IN EE     W EDN ESDAY                I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                           D AU PH IN E @ YO RKU . CA   2:30 – 5:30
           C O N TEM PO RARY S ECU RITY S TUD IES :                                     335 C ALU M ET C OLLEGE
           C ON FLICT , I N TERVEN TIO N AN D
           P EACEBU ILD IN G

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                           C ATALO GU E # P39H01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6225 3.0                                D AVID M U TIM ER            W EDN ESDAY                I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                           D M U TIM ER @ YO RKU . CA   2:30 – 5:30
           C RITICAL S ECU RITY S TUD IES                                               1020 V ARI H ALL

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                           C ATALO GU E # K82N01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6230 3.0                                R O BERT L ATHAM             T UESDAY                   I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                           RLATHAM 1@ YO RKU . CA       11:30 – 2:30
           C ON FLICT , M ILITARISM   AN D   G LOBAL                                    S125 R O SS B U ILD IN G
           M ARKETS

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                           C ATALO GU E # Y11F01

F ALL      GS POLS 6245 3.0                                R O D NEY L OEPPKY           W EDN ESDAY                I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                           RLOEPPLY @ YO RKU . CA       11:30 – 2:30
           T H E G LOBAL P O LITICS O F H EALTH                                         N812 R O SS B U ILD IN G

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                           C ATALO GU E # F45N01

F ALL      GS POLS 6250 3.0                                N ICOLA S HO RT              T UESDAY                   I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                           NCSHO RT @ YO RKU . CA       2:30 – 5:30
           N EOLIBERALISM                                                               225 B ETH U N E C OLLEGE

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                           C ATALO GU E # U71J01




                                                                            Page 57
  TERM                                  COURSE                        COURSE DIRECTOR             DAY/TIM E/PLACE                       FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 6260 6.0                                 J O N ATH AN N ITZAN       T U ESD AY 2:30 – 5:30          I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                                NITZAN @ YO RKU . CA       204 B EH AVIO U RAL S CIENCE
               T H E C APITALIST M O D E O F P O W ER : A                                  B U ILD IN G
               R ESEARCH S EM INAR                                                         AN D
                                                                                           T H U RSD AY 11:30 – 2:30
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                               S101 R O SS B U ILD IN G        C ATALO GU E # G04A01

F ALL          GS POLS 6271 3.0/                                G REG A LBO                W EDN ESDAY                     I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
               GS SPTH 6271 3.0                                 ALBO @ YO RKU . CA         4:00 – 7:00
                                                                                           S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               P O LITICAL E CO N O M Y : M AJOR T EXTS                                    T H E V ERN EY R O O M

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # E87G01

F ALL          GS POLS 6275 3.0                                 S U SAN H END ERS          F RIDAY                         I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                                HEND ERS @ YO RKU . CA     11:30 – 2:30
               E THN O N ATIO N ALIST C O N FLICTS AN D                                    101A M C L AU GH LIN C OLLEGE
               W O RLD P OLITICS

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # C57P01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6281 3.0                                 R O D NEY L OEPPKY         W EDN ESDAY                     I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                                RLOEPPKY @ YO RKU . CA     11:30 – 2:30
               T O PICS IN P O LITICAL E CO N O M Y :                                      N836A R O SS B U ILD IN G
               C O M PARATIVE AN D I N TERN ATIO N AL II

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # S22D01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6410 6.0                                 H ANN ES L ACHER (F)       M ON DAY                        C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                H LACH ER @ YO RKU . CA    11:30 – 2:30
               T H E S TU D Y   OF   C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS                              S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G        C O RE C OU RSE FOR
                                                                S TEPH EN H ELLM AN (W )   T H E V ERN EY R O O M          C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                S HELLM AN @ YO RKU .CA
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                               C ATALO GU E # G83D01




                                                                               Page 58
  TERM                           COURSE                               COURSE DIRECTOR              DAY/TIM E/PLACE                            FIELD


W IN TER   GS POLS 6425 3.0                                     S IM O N E B O H N             T UESDAY                           C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                SBO H N @ YO RKU . CA          11:30 – 2:30
           P O LITICAL P ARTIES , S O CIAL C O N FLICT AN D                                    N836A R O SS B U ILD IN G
           THE S TATE : R EPRESEN TATIO N IN M OD ERN
           S O CIETIES

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                          C ATALO GU E # J73P01

F ALL      GS POLS 6435 3.0                                     A N N P O RTER                 T HU RSDAY                         1) C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                APO RTER @ YO RKU . CA         11:30 – 2:30                       2) C AN AD IAN P OLITICS
           C APITALISM   AN D   W ELFARE S TATES                                               101A M C L AU GH LIN C OLLEGE

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                          C ATALO GU E # X57B01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6470 3.0/                                    S ABAH A LNASSERI              F RIDAY                            C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           GS SPTH 6200D 3.0                                    ALNASERI@ YO RKU . CA          11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                               335 C ALU M ET C OLLEGE
           G LO BALIZATIO N   AN D THE   S TATE

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                          C ATALO GU E # Z23Q01

F ALL      GS POLS 6485 3.0                                     A NAN YA M U KH ERJEE -R EED   W EDN ESDAY                        C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                AN AN Y A @ YO RKU . CA        4:00 – 7:00
           C O N TEM PO RARY S O CIAL T RAN SFO RM ATIO N S :                                  106 F ARQ U HARSO N B U ILD IN G
           K NO W LEDGE , P O LITICAL E CO N OM Y AN D
           A GENCY

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                          C ATALO GU E # T04A01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6505 3.0                                     S AEED R AH N EM A             W EDN ESDAY                        C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                SRAH N EM A @ YO RKU . CA      11:30 – 2:30
           R ELIGIO U S F U N DAM EN TALISM S AN D G LOBAL                                     N814 R O SS BU ILD IN G
           P OLITICS

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                          C ATALO GU E # M14D01




                                                                                Page 59
  TERM                           COURSE                                 COURSE DIRECTOR           DAY/TIM E/PLACE                    FIELD


F ALL      GS POLS 6515 3.0                                       S ABAH A LNASSERI           F RIDAY                    C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                  ALNASERI@ YO RKU . CA       11:30 – 2:30
           T H E M AKIN G O F THE M O D ERN M ID D LE E AST :                                 1152 V ARI H ALL
           P OLITICS , S TATES AN D S O CIETIES

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                 C ATALO GU E # B02C01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6525 3.0/                                      N ERGIS C AN EFE            M ON DAY                   C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           GS SPTH 6674 3.0                                       N CAN EFE @ YO RKU . CA     11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                              N814 R O SS B U ILD IN G
           D IASPORAS : T RAN SN ATIO N AL C O M M U N ITIES
           AN D L IM ITS O F C ITIZEN SH IP


           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                 C ATALO GU E # Y69M01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6555 3.0                                       B ERN IE F RO LIC           T UESDAY                   C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                  BFRO L @ YO RKU . CA        6:00 – 8:30 P .M .
           T RAN SITIO N S FRO M A U THO RITARIAN ISM :                                       YCAR S EM INAR R O O M
           A NALYZING P EOPLE P O W ER , C O LO U R
           R EVO LU TIO N S AN D D EM O CRACY P RO M O TIO N

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                 C ATALO GU E # T33B01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6566 3.0/                                      J U D Y H ELLM AN           T HU RSDAY                 C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
           GS SPTH 6305 3.0                                       JHELLM AN @ YO RKU . CA     11:30 – 2:30
                                                                                              S101 R O SS B U ILD IN G
           A D VAN CED T O PICS IN L ATIN A M ERICAN       AN D
           C ARIBBEAN P OLITICS

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                 C ATALO GU E # Z81A01

F ALL      GS POLS 6585 3.0                                       R ICH ARD S AUN DERS        W EDN ESDAY                C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                  RSAU N D ER @ YO RKU . CA   2:30 – 5:30
           C IVIL S O CIETY   AN D   D EM O CRATIZATIO N                                      N812 R O SS B U ILD IN G
           IN THE S O U TH


           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                 C ATALO GU E # X28J01


                                                                                  Page 60
  TERM                              COURSE                                      COURSE DIRECTOR           DAY/TIM E/PLACE                       FIELD


F ALL          GS POLS 6630 3.0                                           G REGO RY T. C H IN         T UESDAY                    I NTERN ATIO N AL R ELATIO N S
                                                                          GTCH IN @ YO RKU . CA       11:30 – 2:30
               T H E P O LITICAL E CO N O M Y   OF   E AST A SIA                                      S125 R O SS B U ILD IN G

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # R64T01

F ALL          GS POLS 6655 3.0/                                          W ILLEM M AAS               T UESDAY                    C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
               *GS HIST 5380 3.0                                          M AAS @ YO RKU . CA         7:00 – 10:00 P .M .
                                                                                                      B208 Y ORK H ALL
               T H EO RIES AN D I N STITU TIO N S O F E URO PEAN                                      G LEN D ON C OLLEGE
               I N TEGRATIO N

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # M27T01

W IN TER       GS POLS 6656 3.0                                           H EATHER M AC R AE          T HU RSDAY                  C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                          HM ACRAE @ YO RKU . CA      11:30 – 2:30
               P O LITICS AN D P O LICIES O F E URO PEAN                                              N836A R O SS B U ILD IN G
               I N TEGRATIO N

               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # W 21N01

F U LL-Y EAR   GS POLS 6700 6.0                                           K AREN M U RRAY (F ALL)     T UESDAY                    W O M EN   AN D   P OLITICS
                                                                          M U RRAY K @ YO RKU . CA    2:30 – 5:30
               A D VAN CED S TU D IES IN W O M EN      AN D   P OLITICS                               S674 R O SS B U ILD IN G    C O RE C OU RSE FOR
                                                                          L EAH V O SKO (W IN TER )   T H E V ERN EY R O O M      W O M EN AN D P OLITICS
                                                                          LVOSKO @ YO RKU . CA
               H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                                      C ATALO GU E # H99R01

F ALL          GS POLS 6705 3.0/                                          P AT M C D ERM O TT         M ON DAY                    W O M EN   AN D   P OLITICS
               GS SLST 6055 3.0/                                          PATM CD @ YO RKU . CA       11:30 – 2:30
               GS W MST 6133 3.0/                                                                     S156 R O SS B U ILD IN G
               GS SOCI 6896 3.0

               G EN D ER AN D I N TERNATIO N AL H U M A N R IGH TS :
               L AW , C ITIZEN SH IPS AN D B ORD ERS

               H O ST : S O CIO -L EGAL S TUD IES (G RAD U ATE )                                                                  C ATALO GU E # P92M 01


                                                                                          Page 61
  TERM                          COURSE                           COURSE DIRECTOR          DAY/TIM E/PLACE                      FIELD


F ALL      GS POLS 6745 3.0/                               A NN A A GATH AN GELO U    W EDN ESDAY                W O M EN   AN D   P OLITICS
           GS W MST 6127 3.0                               AGATH AN G @ YO RKU . CA   2:30 – 5:30
                                                                                      S101 R O SS B U ILD IN G
           T RAN SN ATIO N AL F EM IN ISM (S):
           G LO BALIZATIO N , E M PIRE AN D THE B O D Y

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                         C ATALO GU E # T15E01

W IN TER   GS POLS 6765 3.0/                               A N N P O RTER             T HU RSDAY                 1) W O M EN AN D P OLITICS
           GS W MST 6137 3.0                               APO RTER @ YO RKU . CA     2:30 – 5:30                2) C O M PARATIVE P OLITICS
                                                                                      335 C ALU M ET C OLLEGE
           F EM IN IST P O LITICAL E CO N O M Y :
           K EY C O N CEPTS AN D N EW D IRECTIO N S

           H O ST : P O LITICAL S CIENC E (G RAD U ATE )                                                         C ATALO GU E # C04K01




                                                                          Page 62
                                                               GRADUATE PROGRAMME IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
                                                                      COURSE OFFERINGS 2009-10

R E A D IN G C OU RSES REQU IRE PR IOR APPR OVAL OF THE G RA DU ATE P RO GR AM M E D IR E C TO R B EF O R E ST U D EN T S W IL L B E A L LO W E D A C C ESS T O EN R O L . O N C E A PPR OVA L
HA S BEEN A TTAINED , YO U W ILL B E ISSUE D A PE R M ISSIO N O N TH E SYSTEM A N D YO U M A Y TH EN PR O C EED TO EN R O L IN TH E C O U R SE . F O R M S A R E A VA IL A BL E IN T H E
PRO GR AM OFFICES .



                                                                                      READING COURSES

 F ALL                         GS POLS 6990 3.0
                               T H IS IS A H ALF R EADIN G CO U RSE OFFERED IN    THE   F ALL TERM .
                               C ATALO GU E # Q77U01

 F ALL                         GS POLS 6990A 3.0
                               T HIS IS FOR STUD ENTS W HO   W ISH TO D O A    2 N D R EADIN G CO U RSE IN   THE   F ALL TERM .
                               C ATALO GU E # V47P01

 F U LL Y EAR                  GS POLS 6990 6.0
                               T HIS IS A FULL YEAR R EADIN G CO U RSE BEGIN N IN G IN     THE   F ALL TERM .
                               C ATALO GU E # D71P01

 F U LL Y EAR                  GS POLS 6990A 6.0
                               “S PECIALIZED M IN O R ” R EADIN G CO U RSE .
                               C ATALO GU E # H41K01

 W IN TER                      GS POLS 6990 3.0
                               T H IS IS A H ALF R EADIN G CO U RSE OFFERED IN    THE   W INTER   TERM .
                               C ATALO GU E # K24G01

 W IN TER                      GS POLS 6990A 3.0
                               T HIS IS FOR STUD ENTS W HO   W ISH TO D O A    2 N D R EADIN G CO U RSE IN   THE   W INTER   TERM .
                               C ATALO GU E # N94B01




                                                                                              Page 63
                 GRADUATE PROGRAMME IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
                        COURSE OFFERINGS 2009-10


                                  M .A. PROGRAM M E


F ALL/W IN TER      GS POLS 6999 6.0

                    M.A. M AJOR R ESEARCH P APER

                    C ATALO GU E # A30M 01

                                          OTHER

S UM M ER 2010      GS POLS 6282 3.0

                    I N TERN ATIO N AL P O LITICAL E CO N OM Y   AN D   E CO LO GY S UM M ER S CH O OL
                    (IPEE S UM M ER S CH O OL )

                    C ATALO GU E # TBA IN    THE   S UM M ER 2010 TERM .




                                          Page 64

								
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