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Ethics - PowerPoint by kimclubb

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Business Essentials--Ethics--For High School students

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									ETHICS
Doing the Right Thing

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?
 Understanding

business ethics and social responsibility informs you of your rights as a consumer, employee, and a citizen.

SO WHAT IS ETHICS?
 Ethics

is the set of moral principles by which people conduct themselves personally, socially, or professionally. is the study of moral choices and values. It involves choosing between right and wrong.

 Ethics

WHAT ARE BUSINESS ETHICS?
 Business

ethics is a set of laws about how a business should conduct itself.
general, for any business to be successful, it must operate legally and humanely.

 In

ETHICS
 Not

everyone will have the same belief about what is ethical and what is not ethical background influences the decisions you make a combination of your life experiences pulled together

 Personal

 Are

IS THERE A UNIVERSAL ETHICAL STANDARD?
Yes—In Principle Are you comfortable with a world with your standards? Christian principle: The Golden Rule “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” Luke 6:29-38 “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.” Luke 10:27

TAUGHT IN ALL CULTURES
Judaism: What you hate, do not do to anyone. Islam: No one of you is a believer until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself. Hinduism: Do nothing to thy neighbor which thou wouldst not have him do to thee. Sikhism: Treat others as you would be treated yourself.

Buddhism: Hurt not others with that which pains thyself.
Confucius: What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others. Aristotle: We should behave to our friends as we wish our friends to behave to us. Plato: May I do to others as I would that they should do unto me.

THE GOLDEN RULE

TERMS ASSOCIATED WITH ETHICS
 Honesty  Loyalty  Dependability

Attitude  Initiative  Cooperation


HONESTY
to lie, steal, or deceive in any way  Fairness  Faithfulness to facts  Respectability in character
 Refusal

Are you being honest when you copy software from a friend?

LOYALTY
 Faithful

in allegiance  Firm adherence of a promise  Conscientious observance of a duty

Are you able to trusted with confidential information from a friend or on the job?

DEPENDABILITY
 Reliable  Trustworthy  Straightforward

When you tell someone you’ll meet them at a certain time are you prompt?

ATTITUDE
A

good attitude reflects good work ethics  Be positive

Are you a positive person to be around?

INITIATIVE
 Enterprising

things without being told  Going beyond what is expected

 Doing

Do you do things on your own or only when asked to?

COOPERATION
well with others  Associating with others for mutual benefit  Considering how other feel
 Working

Do you work well when given group activities or projects?

THEORIES OF ETHICS
 Ethical

fundamentalism—People look to an outside source or central figure for ethical guidelines  Utilitarianism—People choose the alternative that would provide the greatest good to society  Kantian ethics—A set of universal rules based on reasoning establishes ethical duties  Rawls’s social justice theory—Moral duties are based on an implied social contract

UTILITARIAN ETHICAL FRAME WORK


Under this framework, acting ethically means making decisions and taking actions that benefit people by maximizing “good” and minimizing “bad.”



Outcomes, results, or goals are the focus—not the action taken to achieve them. Utilitarians facing an ethical dilemma ask, “What is my goal? What outcome should I aim for?”

http://nefe.danielsfund.org/ethics/section_two/ue.html

FRAMEWORK FOR ETHICAL DECISION MAKING
 Recognize

an ethical issue  Get the facts  Evaluate the alternative actions from various perspectives  Make a decision and test it  Act, then reflect on the decision later

FORD PINTO ETHICAL DILEMMA

CASE STUDY “POCKETING THE DIFFERENCE”
John, a hard-working effective cashier  Occasionally his register does not balance  He reports shortages  He pockets overage for “college fund”  Overage has never been more than a dollar or two


CASE STUDY CONTINUED...
One day a customer pays with a $50 bill.  John thinks it’s a $20 bill and gives change accordingly.  The customer doesn’t notice that the change is incorrect.  At closing his register is $34.80 over


WHAT SHOULD HE DO?

WHAT ARE THE ETHICAL ISSUES?
Taking money that does not belong to him  Deciding what to tell the store manager


WHAT ARE THE ALTERNATIVES?
 Take  Tell

the money

the manager about the discrepancy

WHO ARE THE AFFECTED PARTIES?
John  The store manager  The customer


HOW DO THE ALTERNATIVES AFFECT EACH PARTY?
If John keep the money he can add it to his college fund  He may have to return it if the manager finds out or if the customer returns  The manager may develop a bad opinion of John  The customer may develop a poor opinion of the store


WHAT IS THE DECISION?


John should tell his boss about the overage The customer returns for the money and is pleased that John was honest. John bossed is impressed and John receives a bonus.



THINK ABOUT IT
Is John justified in taking the overage from his register when it’s only a dollar or less?


								
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