Docstoc

Math Midterm Review Sheet - I

Document Sample
Math Midterm Review Sheet - I Powered By Docstoc
					                               Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                           Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010


1. Write 136 402 in expanded form: __________________________________________


2. Write 44 820 in word form:
_______________________________________________________________________


3. Write the following number in standard form:

       (5x10 000) + (8 x 1000) + (9x100) + (2x1) ______________________________


4. Graph the following on a number line:

              the set of even numbers greater than 11:
              the set of integers greater than -4


5. Add the following. Show your work in each of the boxes.


       9253 + 26 + 547 =                           87 229 + 20 179 + 31 068 =




6. Subtract the following. Show your work in each of the boxes.


         9774 – 2521 =                             5 988 451 – 1 637 228 =




                                            1
                                 Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                             Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010




7. Multiply the following. Show your work in each of the boxes.


              69 x 40 =               9735 x 8 =          532 x 607 =




8. Divide the following. Show your work in each of the boxes.


              53 624 ÷ 8 =                                752 ÷ 13 =




9. Solve the following word problem. Show your work and state the final answer in a
word sentence.

      A 4-sided building had 112 windows on each side of the building. Vandals broke
       31 windows on one side of the building and 89 on another side. How many
       windows were left?




                                               2
                                Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                            Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010




10. Find the value of each of the following using the rules for Order of Operations.
    Remember BEDMAS.

       (4 + 7) x (14 - 9) =                          26 – 18 ÷ 3 + 58 – 3 x 3 =
                                                      18-40÷5       15-4x2
                                             9 – 21÷ 3    13 – 4 x 3




11. Evaluate each by substituting the given numbers for the variables.
     xx + 14,
      + 5y      if x = 23                    (n + 5y) – (3n + y), if n = 6 and y = 8




12. Fill in the missing numbers to complete the following sequences.

       7, 11, 17, 25, _____, _____, _____            4, 9, 7, 12, 10, _____, _____, _____

       -10, -7, ____, -1, ____, ____                 -94, -83, ____, ____, ____, -39


13. Complete the function chart below and draw a graph of y = 2x + 3.


x y = 2x + 3
0
1
2
3
4




                                            3
                               Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                           Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
14. Circle the largest integer in each group.

              +3, -4, +5, -6, -7

              -5,     0, +2,   -1,   +1


15. Write the set of integers described below.

              the integers greater than -4 but less than +3


16. Calculate the following:

       (-6) + (-9) =                   (+3) + (-9) =                  (-4) + (+7) =

       (+5) + (+38) =                  0 + (-22) =             (+89) + (-37) + (+28) =


17. Translate the following into an expression involving integers and find the integer
    that represents the final altitude of the airplane.


          An airplane was flying at 12 000 feet. It then went down 250 feet, went down
           another 415 feet and then rose 125 feet. What was its altitude then?


18. Subtract the following integers.


       (+13) – (+5) =                  (-12) – (+4) =                 (+7) – (+14) =

       (-11) – (-6) =                  (+5) – (-22) =                 (+30) – (+14) – (-3) =


19.    Calculate. Watch the signs!

       (+8) x (+4) =                   (-5) x (-3) =                  (-8) x (+7) =

       (+66) ÷ (-3) =                  (+36) ÷ (+9) =                 (-270) ÷ (-30) =

       (+11) x (-7) =                  (-4) x (+43) =                 (-48) =
                                                                       (+6)




                                                4
                               Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                           Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
20. Solve each of the following. Show your work.

       y - 7 = 23                                    8x + 11 = 59




       20m – 4 = 15m+ 11                             7 + k = k + 14
                                                       2        3




21. Translate each of the following into an English statement.

      4y - 17
                 _______________________________________________________________________

      x + 10 _______________________________________________________________________



22. Translate each English statement into a mathematical phrase or sentence.

      a number decreased by twelve ________________________________________________

      The sum of fifteen and seven is a number.     ___________________________________



23. Solve the following using the proper procedure as follows:

       1. Identify what you are looking for and give it a name (such as „x‟).
       2. Translate the English sentence into a mathematical sentence (an equation).
       3. Solve the equation that you created.
       4. Answer the question with a final statement.

                If half of a number is decreased by 20, the result is 41. What is the
                 number?




                                             5
                                  Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                              Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
24. Is 21 885 divisible by each of the following numbers? Answer “Yes” or “No”

                   by 2: _____________________
                   by 3: ______________________
                   by 5: _____________________


25. Factor each of the following into prime numbers using either the Factor Tree
    Method or the Repeated Division Method:


        630                                                  168




26. List all the factors of 60.

             40:


27. List only five multiples of 13:

             15:


28. Circle the prime numbers in the following list.

                    1     2       3     9      11     51


29. Find both the GCF (Greatest Common Factor) and LCM (Lowest Common
Multiple) of the following set of numbers. Show your work. (You may use any method
you want.)


       (18, 45)                                             GCF =               LCM =




                                              6
                               Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                           Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
                                      4
30. Write two equivalent fractions for .
                                      8




                         36
31. Write the fraction      in lowest terms.
                         60


32. Add or subtract the following and leave your answers in lowest terms (basic mixed
fractions).

        16 4                                               6 2
          -   =                                             - =
        20 20                                              7 3




        1 4                                              1  1
         + =                                            8 +2 =
        5 9                                              3  4




33. Multiply the following fractions and leave your answers in lowest terms.

       4x2=                                        15 x ½=
       5 3




                                                       1   1
       1/2 x 2/3 x 3/4 x 6/8 =                     4     x2 =
                                                       2   6




                                               7
                             Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                         Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
34. Divide the following fractions and leave your answers in lowest terms.

       4/9 ÷ 2/3 =                          10 ÷ 4/7 =




           3   7                                2   5
       2     ÷   =                          4     ÷3 =
           4 10                                 3   6




35.    On your test you will also be given one problem to solve. In order to get full
       marks you will need to get the correct answer and demonstrate and state how you
       used at least three different strategies to solve the problem. Strategies that you
       may use to solve the problem are: Act it Out, Break into Parts, Calculator, Chart
       or Organized Listing, Computation, Deductive Logic, Diagram, Formula,
       Graphing, Grouping, Guess and Check, Check for Hidden Assumptions, Model,
       Narrowing In, Search for a Pattern, Simplify or Work Backwards.




                                           8
                             Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                         Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010

                                 Notes and Study Helps


Some notes and special study helps are given to help with individual questions on the
review sheet. These correspond with the question numbers on the review sheet.

1 and 3. When a number is written in the form of 67 502, we call this standard form. That
same number can also be written in expanded form as follows to show the place value of
each digit:

(6 x 10 000) + (7 x 1000) + (5 x 100) + (2 x 1)

You may leave out the zero digits in the expanded form, but you must include the zeros
as place fillers in the standard form.

(See assignment p. 3 for additional practice)

2. When writing a number in word form, think of the larger number in periods, such as
the ones period, the thousands period, and the millions period and separate each period
with a comma. For example, in the following number there are 326 in the millions period
so we would write it as three hundred twenty-six million. The complete number would be
written as follows:

three hundred twenty-six million, five hundred fifty-one thousand, seven hundred eighty.

The number 326 551 780

4. When you draw your number line, be careful to use a ruler and to space your points out
evenly. Use circles on the number line to show the points you have chosen. For points
that continue on infinitely, simply put three dots at the end of the number line.

(See assignment p. 4 for additional practice)

5. When adding whole numbers, remember to line up the digits according to place value.
Also, remember that you can use the inverse operation (subtraction) to check addition.
You can also use estimation to check if your answer is reasonable.

(See assignment p. 7-8 for additional practice)

6. When subtracting whole numbers, remember to line up the digits according to place
value. Also, remember that you can use the inverse operation (addition) to check
subtraction. You can also use estimation to check if your answer is reasonable.

(See assignment p. 8-9 for additional practice)




                                            9
                              Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                          Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
7. When multiplying whole numbers, line up the digits according to place value.
Remember to add a zero when multiplying by a number in the tens place; add two zeroes
when multiplying by a number in the hundreds‟ place and so on. Also remember that you
can use the inverse operation (division) to check multiplication. You can also use
estimation to check if your answer is reasonable.

(See assignment p. 9-10 for additional practice)

8. To divide questions given in the form of 116÷4, you need to rewrite them as follows:
                                      ___
                                    4)116

Line up your numbers in your quotient carefully. Remember the process of:
estimate – multiply- subtract – check – bring down. (Repeat if not finished)

(See assignment p. 10-11 for additional practice)

9. Be careful to choose the correct operation to reflect the information in the question. A
sample question and answer is given below:

Question: A parking lot had 76 rows for parking and spots for 30 cars in each row. The
parking lot was full except for 8 spots in the last row. How many vehicles were parked
there?
Answer:        Let v = vehicles.
               v = 76 x 30 – 8
               v = 2280 – 8 = 2272
               There were 2272 vehicles parked.

(See assignment p. 11 for additional practice)

10. BEDMAS stands for brackets, exponents, division, multiplication, addition and
subtraction. Division and multiplication are at the same level. Addition and subtraction
are at the same level. When solving parts of the question at the same level, simply work
left to right.

(See assignment p. 15-17 for additional practice)

11. If x = 2, then 3x means 3 times x not 32. In questions involving substitution, the other
rules for “Order of Operations” must also be followed.

(See assignment p. 18-22 for additional practice)

12. To complete the missing numbers in sequences, you need to find the pattern of the
numbers that are given and then extend the pattern.

(See assignment p. 23 for additional practice)



                                             10
                                       Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                                   Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010


      13. To complete the chart simply substitute the number into the function rule. A sample
      is given below. If x = 0, then y = 0 + 5 or 5. If x = 1, then y = 1 + 5 = 6.

            x y=x+5
            0   5
(2)         1   6
            2   7
            3   8
            4   9

      The corresponding x and y values are then put together to make an ordered pair that can
      be plotted on a graph. The ordered pairs for the chart above are (0,5), (1,6), (2,7), (3,8)
      and (4,9). The x value is always listed 1st in the ordered pair and the y value is listed 2nd.

      Once you have your ordered pairs, these can be plotted on the graph. To set up your
      graph, be sure to put the x-axis along the bottom going across, and the y-axis along the
      side going up and down. Plot the points on your graph on the lines, not in the spaces.
      When you have graphed all the points join them with a line. The above ordered pairs,
      when graphed should like the following.

                               y

                             12

                             11

                             10

                              9

                              8

                              7

                              6

                              5

                              4

                              3

                              2

                              1
                                                                                  x
                              0     1   2   3   4   5   6    7   8   9 10 11 12



      (See assignment p. 24-26 for additional practice)



                                                        11
                              Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                          Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010


14 and 15. The set of integers is as follows:

       I = {…, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2, +3, +4 …}

The numbers farther to the right are the larger numbers.

(See assignment p. 29-31 for additional practice)

16. Number lines can be used to help in the addition of integers. (See p. 31). You can also
add integers by using the following two rules:

   1. If the signs are the same, add the numbers and keep the same sign.

       Examples: (+3) + (+5) = +8
                 (-7) + (-5) = -12

   2. If the signs of the integers are different, subtract the numbers and take the sign
      of the numerically larger number.

       Examples: (-9) + (+4) = -5
                 (+8) + (-3) = +5

(See assignment p. 31-35 for additional practice)

17. (See assignment p. 32 for additional practice)

18. To subtract integers, you can use the following rules.

       1. To subtract a positive integer is the same as adding its opposite.

       Example: (-6) – (+7) = (-6) + (-7) = (-13)

       2. To subtract a negative number is the same as adding its opposite.

       Example: (-8) – (-5) = (-8) + (+5) = (-3)

(See assignment sheet, “Subtracting Integers” for additional practice)




                                            12
                              Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                          Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
19. To multiply integers remember the following rules:

       1. If the signs are the same, the product is positive.

              Example:         (+3) x (+4) = +12
                               (-3) x (-4) = +12

       2. If the signs are different, the product is negative.

              Example:        (+3) x (-4) = -12
                              (-3) x (+4) = -12

       (See assignment sheets, “Multiplying Integers”and “Review: Multiplying and
       Dividing Integers” for additional practice.)

  To divide integers remember the following rules:

       1. If the signs are the same, the quotient is positive.

              Example:        (+12) ÷ (+4) = +3
                              (-12) ÷ (-4) = +3

       2. If the signs are different, the quotient is negative.

              Example:        (+12) ÷ (-4) = -3
                              (-12) ÷ (+4) = -3


       (See assignment sheet, “Dividing Integers” “Review: Multiplying and Dividing
       Integers” for additional practice.)


20. Use the following rule to solve for unknown variables in an equation:

                   To solve for an unknown variable in an equation,
                              you must isolate the variable
                 by doing the same thing to both sides of the equation.

See instructions on the following pages for explanations on solving various types of
problems:      Type I Equations: p.36
               Type II Equations: p. 37
               Type III Equations: p. 39
               Type IV Equations: p. 40
               Ratio Type Equations: p. 42

(See assignment p. 36-43 for additional practice)



                                             13
                               Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                           Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010



21 and 22. A list of some symbols, phrases and sentences that you will use for this type of
question is found on p. 44 of your assignments.

(See assignment p. 44-45 for additional practice)

23. A sample question and answer is given below:

Question: Twice a number increased by nine is equal to fifty-one. What is the number?

Answer:                Let x be the number.
                       2x + 9 = 51
                       2x = 42
                       x = 21
                       The number is 21.

When you have finished solving for the variable, remember to check your answer by
substituting the number back into the original question to see if it works. For example, in
the above question, if x = 21, then in the original question, 2 x 21 + 9 = 51 which is true.

(See assignment p. 46-49 for additional practice)

24. See the handout sheet, “Divisibility Rules” to review the divisibility rules for 2, 3, 4,
5, 6, 8, 9, and 10.

(See assignment p. 51 for additional practice)

25. See assignment sheets p. 55-56 for samples of the Factor Tree Method and the
Repeated Division Method. Remember that when you are finished, all of the numbers at
the end must be prime numbers. Remember that 1 is not a prime number.

(See assignment p. 55-56 for additional practice)

26 and 28. Factors of a number are all the numbers that divide evenly into that number. If
a number has only two factors (1 and itself) then it is a prime number. If a number has
more than two factors, then it is a composite number. Divisibility rules can be used to
check for factors.

The factors of 13 are as follows: (It is a prime number)
               13:1, 13

The factors of 24 are as follows: (It is a composite number)
               24: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24

(See assignment p. 52 for additional practice)



                                              14
                              Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                          Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010



27. When you multiply a whole number by other whole numbers, all of the products are
multiples of the original number. For example, the multiples of 5 are 5, 10, 15, 20, 25
and so on because 5 x 1=5, 5 x 2 = 10, 5 x 3 = 15, and so on.

(See assignment p.53 for additional practice)

29. The GCF of two or more numbers is the Greatest Common Factor or the highest
number that is a factor of all of those numbers. To find the GCF of numbers, you can start
by writing each of the numbers as the product of prime factors. Then multiply any of the
factors that are common to all of the numbers.

Example:

20 = 2 x 2 x 5

36 = 2 x 2 x 3 x 3

The factors that are common to both of the numbers are 2 x 2 so the GCF is 4.

The LCM of two or more numbers is the Lowest Common Multiple or the lowest number
that is a multiple of all of those numbers. To find the LCM of numbers, you start by
writing each of the numbers as the product of prime factors. Then multiply any numbers
that appear in any of the prime factorizations by the most time they appear. In the above
example, the factor 2 appears twice at the most, the factor 3 appears twice at the most and
the factor 5 appears once at the most.

Therefore the LCM is equal to 2 x 2 x 3 x 3 x 5 = 180

(See assignment p. 57-61 for additional practice)

30. Equivalent means equal value. To make equivalent fractions, you multiply or divide
the numerator and denominator by the same number. For example, if I want to find an
                        12
equivalent fraction for    I can do the following.
                        15

      Multiply both the numerator (12) and the denominator (15) by the same number.

                 12 2   24    12     24
                   x  =    so    and    are equivalent fractions.
                 15 2   30    15     30




                                            15
                                Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                            Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
       Divide both the numerator and denominator by the same number. A common
        factor of 12 and 15 is 3. If I divide both the numerator and denominator of the
                 12                                                  4
        fraction     by 3, I will end up with the equivalent fraction .
                 15                                                  5

    To check if fractions are equivalent, you can cross-multiply.

         3 12
          =         3 x 40 = 120 and 10 x 12 = 120 so these are equivalent fractions.
        10 40



    (See assignment p. 64-65 for additional practice)

31. When writing a fraction in simplest terms, you must divide the numerator and
denominator by the same number. Keep doing this until there is no number left, other
than one, that can divide into both the numerator and denominator.

(See assignment p. 66 for additional practice)

32. Rules for Addition of Fractions:

        1. Rewrite the fractions with a common denominator.
        2. Add the numerators but keep the denominators the same.
        3. Simplify if possible to lowest terms and rewrite as a mixed fraction if necessary.

    Rules for Subtraction of Fractions:

        1. Rewrite the fractions with a common denominator.
        2. Subtract the numerators but keep the denominators the same.
        3. Simplify if possible to lowest terms and rewrite as a mixed fraction if
           necessary.

    Rules for Addition and Subtraction of Mixed Numbers:

        1.   Change all mixed fractions to improper fractions.
        2.   Rewrite the fractions with a common denominator.
        3.   Add or subtract the numerators while keeping the denominators the same.
        3.   Simplify if possible to lowest terms and rewrite as a mixed fraction if
             necessary.

(See assignment p. 70-75 for additional practice)

(See assignment p. 67 for instructions on converting back and forth between improper
and mixed fractions and for additional practice)




                                               16
                                 Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                             Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
33. Rules for Multiplication of Fractions (see p. 76)

1. Indicate that you intend to multiply the numerators by placing a times sign between
   them.
2. Indicate that you intend to multiply the numerators by placing a times sign between
   them.
3. Simplify the fractions by dividing common factors into both the numerator and
   denominator.
4. Multiply the numerators and then the denominators.
5. Convert your result to a mixed fraction if you can.

        3 6   3x6    3 x3   9
        x  =      =      =
        8 5   8 x5   4 x5 20

(See assignment p. 76 for additional practice)

Rules for Multiplying Mixed Fractions

   1. Convert all mixed fractions to improper fractions.
   2. Simplify the fractions by dividing common factors into both the numerator and
      denominator.
   3. Multiply the numerators and then the denominators.
   4. Convert the result to a mixed fraction if you can.

                   2         1 8 5   2 5 10    1
              2     x   1    = x  =  x =   =3
                   3         4 3 4   3 1  3    3

(See assignment p.77-78 for additional practice)

34. Rules for Division of Fractions

       1. Change the question to a multiplication question by writing the reciprocal
          (multiplicative inverse) of the divisor (second fraction).
       2. Proceed as you would in a multiplication question.

        2 4  2 9 1 3  3   1
        ÷  = x = x  = =1
        3 9  3 4 1 2  2   2

(See assignment p.79 for additional practice)




                                             17
                             Grade 7 Math: Mr. McAuley
                         Midterm Review Sheet: January, 2010
Rules for Dividing Mixed Fractions

       1. Convert all mixed fractions to improper fractions.
       2. Change the question to a multiplication question by writing the reciprocal of
          the divisor.
       4. Proceed as you would in a multiplication question. (see p.80)

                      3   7   11    7 11 10 11 5 55      13
                 2     ÷   =    ÷   =  x   =   x =   =3
                      4 10     4   10 4   7   2  7 14    14
              
(See assignment p. 80-81 for additional practice)


35. Problem Solving. See problem solving sheets for additional practice.




                                           18

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:223
posted:5/21/2010
language:English
pages:18