Assuring high quality phonic wor

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					Assuring high quality phonic work – snapshot self-assessment form

The self-assessment below provides a snapshot of how this programme
meets the core criteria for a high quality phonics programme. For more
detailed information on how this programme meets each of the core criteria
please click here or scroll further down to the detailed form.

When completing this form you will find it helpful to refer to the explanatory
notes which can be found by scrolling down the core criteria page of this
website.


Name of programme: Code-Breakers

Is this programme a full, stand alone phonics teaching programme?
YES


                                                  Please tick as appropriate
Does this programme:                                      Fully Not
                                                          meet meet
present high quality systematic phonic work, as
defined by the Independent review of teaching of
                                                          
early reading and now encapsulated in the Primary
Framework, as the prime approach to decoding print
(see Note 1)

enable children to start learning phonic knowledge
and skills systematically by the age of five with the
                                                          
expectation that they will be fluent readers having
secured word recognition skills by the end of key
stage one (see Note 2)

Is this programme designed for the teaching of
discrete, daily sessions progressing from simple to
                                                          
more complex phonic knowledge and skills and
covering the major grapheme phoneme
correspondences (see note 3)

enable children’s progress to be assessed (see note
4)
                                                          
use a multi-sensory approach so that children learn
variously from simultaneous visual, auditory and
                                                          
kinaesthetic activities which are designed to secure
essential phonic knowledge and skills (see note 5)

demonstrate that phonemes should be blended, in
order, from left to right, ‘all through the word’ for
                                                          
reading
demonstrate how words can be segmented into their
constituent phonemes for spelling and that this is the
                                                         
reverse of blending phonemes to read words

ensure children apply phonic knowledge and skills as
their first approach to reading and spelling even if a
                                                         
word is not completely phonically regular

ensure that children are taught high frequency words
that do not conform completely to
                                                         
grapheme/phoneme correspondence rules



ensure that, as early as possible, children have
opportunities to read texts (and spell words) that are
                                                         
within the reach of their phonic knowledge and skills
even though every single word in the text may not be
entirely decodable by the children unaided



Please explain how your programme meets the core criteria above:

Code-Breakers is a synthetic phonics programme which teaches phoneme-to-
grapheme correspondences in a systematic, child-friendly (and teacher-
friendly) way. It was written with teachers for teachers and is produced by
Hamilton Trust, an educational charity.

Code-Breakers is provided as daily 15 minute, multi-sensory sessions, which
allow children to learn in a logical and enjoyable way.

Code-Breakers offers a structured scheme of word-level work for Reception,
Y1 and Y2. The programme treats written English as a code with a letter or
letters used to represent spoken sounds. The focus throughout is to teach
explicitly and systematically how these sounds are represented in writing.
Children learn to sequence, segment and blend sounds in order to write
(encode) and read (decode). The lively sessions are given a narrative context
through the use of puppets and all writing is made purposeful. End-of-term
assessments are built in to the carefully-researched structure.

Code-Breakers has a proven track record of helping children to read and write
and is used by many thousands of UK teachers. In our national Code-
Breakers pilot, teachers who used the Code-Breakers scheme commented on
    the fun, meaningful sessions
    the swift progress children make
    the increased confidence children show when writing independently.
Please provide a brief explanation of what your programme provides,
e.g. resources, training etc

Daily Sessions: These consist of a weekly overview followed by five 10-15
minute daily sessions for each week from Reception through to the end of Y2.

Puppets: 2 puppets (Boris and Sid)

Picture cards: A set of clear durable picture cards for use in sessions

Video: Clips of Code-Breakers in action

Code-Breakers Book: The background and philosophy of the scheme


Contact details

Only contact/ further information details can be added to this box.
Code-Breakers is available to purchase in hard copy from
www.hamiltoneducation.org.uk

OR it can be downloaded without charge by Friends of Hamilton from our
charity's website:
www.hamilton-trust.org.uk/tbankindex.asp?id=9

Any ordering enquiries should be sent to Hamilton Education at:
enquiries@hamiltoneducation.org.uk           tel: 01865 241245

If you have other queries on Code-Breakers, please contact:
Deidre Holes (Project Manager)
Hamilton Trust
1a Howard Street
Oxford
OX4 3AY
enquiries@hamilton-trust.org.uk             tel: 01865 253980
Assuring high quality phonic work – Detailed self-assessment form

This 2nd self assessment form gives schools and settings detailed and
expanded information about this programme set against each core criterion.
For the snapshot version please click here.

Name of programme: Code-Breakers

Is this programme a full, stand alone phonics teaching programme?
YES
Please explain how your programme meets the following core criteria:

This programme presents high quality systematic phonic work, as defined by
the Independent review of teaching of early reading and now encapsulated in
the Primary Framework, as the prime approach to decoding print (see Note 1)
by:

Teaching phoneme-to-grapheme correspondences via a structured and
systematic programme, based on thorough research and teacher-feedback.
Code-Breakers treats English as a written code, with a letter or letters
representing each of the language’s 44 sounds. The programme teaches
children
     to segment and sequence the sounds they can hear in a word.
     the various ways a sound may be represented in writing so that
       children can start to write (or encode) words independently
     to blend the graphemes (letters) in words to decode (or read) words.
From the beginning it is made clear that any given sound may be written in a
number of ways and that any given grapheme may represent more than one
sound. So, the sound /ee/ in ‘sleep’ may be written ee, but it may also be
written y as in ‘happy’, e as in ‘she’ or ea as in ‘meal’ or ie as in ‘piece’.



This programme enables children to start learning phonic knowledge and
skills systematically by the age of five with the expectation that they will be
fluent readers having secured word recognition skills by the end of key stage
one (see Note 2):

Code-Breakers comes in the form of daily 10-15 minute sessions. These
sessions cover the whole period from the beginning of Reception through to
the end of Year 2. The Reception sessions can be adapted to allow for
children who have fewer terms in Reception.
Code-Breakers in Reception and Year One aims
     to show children that the sounds we say can be broken up
       (segmented) into identifiable individual sounds
     to demonstrate that writing is a code. We can write down (encode)
       these sounds that we hear.
Y2 Code-Breakers also adopts a sound-led approach, showing children how
we can write and then memorise a wide range of phoneme-to-grapheme
patterns in words. Children are given a list of spellings to learn each week,
based on the phoneme-to-grapheme patterns learned that week.
Code-Breakers is deliberately paced quite quickly, with regular revision and
reiteration built in to help children’s knowledge accumulate


This programme has been designed for the teaching of discrete, daily
sessions progressing from simple to more complex phonic knowledge and
skills and covering the major grapheme phoneme correspondences (see note
3):

Hamilton Trust has based the systematic structure of Code-Breakers’ daily
sessions on published research from recognised academic experts (eg, Diane
McGuinness, Marilyn Adams) as well as by the writers themselves (Ruth
Merttens, Darrell Wood). Code-Breakers matches exactly the
recommendations of the Rose Report.
Code-Breakers starts with the prerequisite skill for all encoding and decoding
activities – sequencing sounds. Children are given practice identifying first,
last and middle sounds from a sequence of sounds. When they have
mastered these sequencing skills, they progress to identifying phonemes,
reproducing them and encoding them as their commonest graphemes.
Children are given extensive practice in segmenting (breaking words up into
their phonemes) and in blending as both are essential skills in writing and
reading.
The sessions follow a careful pattern of stages, introducing children to more
complex phoneme/grapheme correspondences as they become more secure
in their knowledge of simpler patterns.



This programme enables children’s progress to be assessed (see note 4):

Code-Breakers has revision opportunities and assessment schedules built in
to its structure. Weekly formative assessments and termly summative
assessments are a strength of the programme. Suggested assessment
activities are included in the Daily Sessions book at the end of each term.
Also included are
      photocopiable sheets to help teachers record the outcomes of the
        assessments
      class organisation advice, e.g. how children should be grouped when
        carrying out the assessments
      advice on other things for teachers to bear in mind as they assess, e.g.
        where the most difficult spelling patterns are to be found in a term.
All end-of-term assessments cover the phoneme-to-grapheme
correspondences which have been taught and learned through the term.
This programme uses a multi-sensory approach so that children learn
variously from simultaneous visual, auditory and kinaesthetic activities which
are designed to secure essential phonic knowledge and skills (see note 5):

The ages of children targeted by Code-Breakers means adopting a multi-
sensory approach is essential.
Each daily 15 minute session is given a narrative context through the use of
two puppets, Boris and Sid. The characters leave notes for each other which
the children learn to write and read.

In Reception, children learn matching actions for each phoneme which helps
reinforce that sound in the child’s memory, e.g. the phoneme /l/ is reinforced
by a licking action, /m/ is matched with tummy-rubbing ‘mmmm’.

Before children ever learn any of the individual phonemes, they are given lots
of practice in sequencing various non-phonemes e.g. clap, whistle, knock.
Children identify the first middle and last of these before progressing to
segmenting, sequencing and blending sounds in CVC (consonant, vowel,
consonant), and later more complex, words.

Picture cards are used in sound identification games throughout Code-
Breakers, as well as individual and group writing activities.



This programme demonstrates that phonemes should be blended, in order,
from left to right, ‘all through the word’ for reading:

The intense focus which is given to the prerequisite skill of sequencing
demonstrates the central importance which Code-Breakers places on
blending phonemes in order from left to right.
By the end of Reception, children on the Code-Breakers programme are
experts at identifying the first, middle and last sounds in simple CVC
(consonant-vowel-consonant) words. Children learn to count the sounds in
any given word, from the beginning to the end of that word, so ‘mouth’ has
three sounds: /m/, /ou/, /th/, This skill is repeated throughout the programme.
As the children’s bank of familiar graphemes (letters representing sounds)
increases, they learn to write (encode) and then read (decode) both familiar
and unfamiliar words by segmenting and blending the constituent sounds in
each word.


This programme demonstrates how words can be segmented into their
constituent phonemes for spelling and that this is the reverse of blending
phonemes to read words:

The starting point for Code-Breakers is very different from that of traditional
phonics programmes. Initially, rather than focusing on letters and which
sounds they are used to represent (decoding), it begins with sounds, which
children already use in the course of their everyday speech, and focuses on
how we can represent these sounds in writing (encoding). Throughout the
programme, children learn to encode, or write, a sound in a particular way
(e.g. /ee/ as ‘y’) BEFORE they learn to decode, or read it in a number of
different words (e.g. mummy, happy, sunny etc).
Code-Breakers sets out to teach, systematically and explicitly, the different
ways a single sound is represented in writing. Thus the sound /ee/ in ‘sleep’
may be written ee, but it may also be written y as in ‘happy’, e as in ‘she’ or ea
as in ‘meal’, or ie as in ‘piece’.



This programme ensures children apply phonic knowledge and skills as their
first approach to reading and spelling even if a word is not completely
phonically regular by:

Children will attempt to read a word using phonic knowledge as their first
approach if they have learned this strategy and know it to be useful.
Code-Breakers teaches this as the only strategy.

The programme does not use flash-cards or encourage children to attempt to
guess a word from its shape or size. Although using contextual clues can be a
useful strategy for more fluent readers to fall back on, for children at the
beginning of the process of learning to read, context is far less helpful. Code-
Breakers children are never asked to consider ‘what the word might be’ from
the context of the sentence.

Children who are learning to read with the Code-Breakers programme are
only taught, in a fun and engaging way, to tackle new words by segmenting
the word into its constituent sounds and then blending the sounds together to
read the word.


This programme ensures that children are taught high frequency words that
do not conform completely to grapheme/phoneme correspondence rules by:

From Term 2 of Reception onwards, each week of the Code-Breakers
programme involves children being introduced to one or more new
graphemes (letters which represent sounds). As the children learn these, they
also are taught to write and read high frequency, phonically irregular words for
the short phrases and sentences which they encode and decode.
Words such as ‘was’, ‘is’, ‘come’, ‘like’, ‘they’, etc turn up regularly in these
activities and children are taught to read and write these alongside the
phonically regular words.




This programme ensures that, as early as possible, children have
opportunities to read texts (and spell words) that are within the reach of their
phonic knowledge and skills even though every single word in the text may
not be entirely decodable by the children unaided:

Throughout Code-Breakers, children are introduced to one or more
graphemes in a week which they learn to write in a variety of contexts. A
typical week will end with children reading (decoding) a short text based
around the graphemes they have learned that week. So, for example in Year
1, Term 2, Week 1, children learn the grapheme igh to represent the /ie/
sound. At the end of the week, children decode Boris’s sentence: This hat is
too tight. They then go on to write and read a variety of other simple
sentences using sight, might, light etc. The following week starts, as usual,
with a sound track game which enables children to rehearse the graphemes
they learned the previous week.



Please provide a brief explanation of what your programme provides,
e.g. resources, training etc

Alongside the Daily Sessions book (including assessment materials), puppets,
picture cards and Code-Breakers book, we provide a useful training
video/DVD showing teachers using Code-Breakers in the classroom.

Teachers may also opt to buy a set of magnetic graphemes and the Code-
Breakers Spell It By Sound book.


Contact details

Only contact/ further information details can be added to this box.
Code-Breakers is available to purchase in hard copy from
www.hamiltoneducation.org.uk

OR it can be downloaded without charge by Friends of Hamilton from our
charity's website:
www.hamilton-trust.org.uk/tbankindex.asp?id=9

Any ordering enquiries should be sent to Hamilton Education at:
enquiries@hamiltoneducation.org.uk           tel: 01865 241245

If you have other queries on Code-Breakers, please contact:
Deidre Holes (Project Manager)
Hamilton Trust
1a Howard Street
Oxford
OX4 3AY
enquiries@hamilton-trust.org.uk             tel: 01865 253980

				
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