EMD Hotel-Motel Cover .indd by chenshu

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 45

									Washington Military Department
Emergency Management Division
           JULY 2006
                                                                         INTRODUCTION               1

Introduction
This guidebook was developed by the                 MORE INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE
Washington Military Department, Emergency           Used in conjunction with information
Management Division, which is the agency            and instructions from local officials, this
responsible for helping state and local             guidebook will help you be responsive to your
governments prepare for emergencies. It             guests and employees should a disaster occur.
contains practical advice on how to respond
to disasters. We extend our appreciation
to Bob Hugo, general manager of the Shilo           WHAT THIS GUIDEBOOK COVERS
Inn Ocean Shores for allowing us to use his         A DVD accompanies this guidebook (located
model emergency plan as the basis for this          in the front sleeve): Tsunamis in Washington,
guidebook.                                          (run time: 4:31:26). It presents useful
                                                    information that will assist you to respond
                                                    disasters.
DO DISASTERS OCCUR ON
WASHINGTON’S COAST?                                 The Emergency Telephone Contact sheet is
Washington’s coastal communities experience         a convenient place to record all emergency
disaster situations every year. Each disaster       contact names and telephone numbers in one
has lasting effects, both to people and             place for emergency use.
property. Knowing what to do can reduce fear,       Place this guidebook in a central location,
anxiety and losses that accompany disasters.        such as the front desk, so that it can be located
If a disaster occurs in your area, local            quickly by all personnel. Take this guidebook
government and disaster responders will try         with you if you must evacuate your premises.
to help you, but you need to be ready as well.      You may choose to insert additional pages to
Local responders may not be able to reach you       address your facility’s unique situation and
immediately, or they may need to focus their        requirements.
efforts elsewhere.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW
You should know how to respond to any
disaster that could occur in your area, such
as earthquakes, tsunamis, extreme weather,
flooding, and other natural disasters described
in this guidebook.
Your organization should also be ready to be
self-sufficient for a minimum of three days.
This may mean providing shelter for guests
and employees, as well as first aid, food, water,
and sanitation.




                                                                                ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                    WEATHER RADIOS                1


Weather Radios
NOAA WEATHER RADIO (NWR)                           alerts they want to receive, based on the
NWR is a nationwide network of radio stations      county where they live. Warnings, watches,
broadcasting National Weather Service              and statements that may activate the NWR
Warnings, Watches, Forecasts and other             SAME system include, but are not limited to,
hazard information 24-hours a day.                 the following events:

Working with the Federal Communications            SAME ALERTS*
Commission (FCC) Emergency Alert System,           Tornados
NWR is an “all hazards” radio network,             Severe Thunderstorms
making it your single source for complete          Flash Floods
weather and emergency information.                 Tsunamis
NWR broadcasts warnings and post-event             Special Marine Warnings
information for all types of hazards—both
natural, such as tsunamis, and, environmental      * SAME alerts only historical events for Winter
(such as chemical spills).                         Storms, Wind Storms, and Flooding.

Broadcast range from a NWR transmitter is
approximately 40 miles.                            HAZARDS RELAYED FROM
                                                   LOCAL AUTHORITIES
Weather radios come in many sizes and with         Avalanches
a variety of functions and costs; from simple,     Child Abductions
battery-operated portables, to CB radios,          Civil Dangers
scanners, short wave sets, and in some cars        Civil Emergencies
and TVs.                                           Law Enforcement Warnings
NWR broadcasts Warnings (when the specific         Immediate Evacuation
hazard is a significant threat to public safety    Shelter-in-Place
and/or property, probability of occurrence         Hazardous Materials Warnings
and certainty of location is high, and the         9-1-1 Telephone Outages
onset time is relatively short), Watches (when     Nuclear Power Plant Warnings
conditions are favorable for the hazard but        Radiological Hazard Warnings
either the start time, probability of occurrence   *NWR SAME activation is determined by
or location is uncertain), and Forecasts and       local needs.
Non-weather Hazards information 24-hours
a day.
An Emergency refers to an event that by itself
would not kill, injure or do property damage,
but indirectly may lead to other things that
could result in a hazard.
Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME)
technology lets listeners pre-select the NOAA
National Weather Service and non-weather

                                                                              ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2           DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                             TELEPHONE CONTACTS                 1

Emergency Telephone Contacts
Hazardous Materials/      Medical/   Police/   Fire/
Materials Pelligrosos     Médico     Policìa   Bomberos


Emergency Dial:                                           For life-threatening events only.


Note: List emergency phone numbers only. Do not add numbers of vendors, service organizations,
or other non-emergency contacts. This list is for employee and guest safety exclusively. This book
is to used by employees of establishment.

Name of Hotel or Motel:

Street Address of Hotel or Motel:

Front Desk Telephone:                                                      Extension:

Maintenance:                                                               Extension:

Housekeeping:                                                              Extension:

Restaurant:                                                                Extension:

Police Non-Emergency:

Fire Non-Emergency:

Hospital:

Coastal Medical Clinic:

Ambulance:

General Manager of Hotel or Motel

                Name:

                Office:                                                    Extension:

                Home:                                                      Cellular:




                                                                                              ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2             DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Emergency Telephone Contacts
Assistant General Manager of Hotel or Motel

              Name:

              Office:                                Extension:

              Home:                                  Cellular:

Regional Manager of Hotel or Motel

              Name:

              Office:                                Extension:

              Home:                                  Cellular:

Restaurant Manager

              Name:

              Office:                                Extension:

              Home:                                  Cellular:

Gas Utility             Daytime:                After Business Hours:

Electricity Utility     Daytime:                After Business Hours:

Water Utility           Daytime:                After Business Hours:

Propane Utility         Daytime:                After Business Hours:




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                 EMERGENCY SUPPLY                 1


Emergency Supply Checklist
Disasters happen anytime and anywhere.            ■   Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits
And when disaster strikes, you may not have           and vegetables
much time to respond. If you’ve gathered          ■   Canned juices, milk, soup (if powdered,
supplies in advance, your business can endure
                                                      store extra water)
an evacuation or confinement of guests and
employees. Maintain the supplies you’d most       ■   Staples, such as sugar, salt, pepper
likely need for a Shelter-in-Place instruction.
                                                  ■   High energy foods: peanut butter, granola
■   Prepare your organization to be self-             bars, trail mix
    sufficient for a minimum of 3 days
                                                  ■   Foods for infants, elderly persons or
■   Store your supplies in a convenient place         persons on special diets
    known by all staff
                                                  ■   If you must heat food, maintain a supply
■   Change your stored water supply every             of SternoTM
    6 months
                                                  ■   Comfort foods: cookies, hard candy,
■   Rotate your stored food every 6 months            sweetened cereals, lollipops, instant
                                                      coffee, tea bags
■   Re-think your needs, and replace batteries
    once a year                                   ■   Plastic storage bags for food
■   Personnel should maintain a minimum           ■   Paper cups, plates and plastic utensils and
    3-day supply of personal medications and          cooking utensils
    extra eye glasses.
                                                  ■   Non-electric can openers
MAINTAIN THESE ITEMS IN YOUR
EMERGENCY SUPPLIES:                               First Aid Supplies
                                                  ■ First aid kit and first aid manual
Water
                                                  ■   Roll 3” cohesive bandage
■ Store enough water for the average number
  of people staying in your facility              ■   3”x 5” sterile dressing
■   At minimum, 1 gallon of water per person      ■   Germicidal hand wipes or waterless,
    per day                                           alcohol-based hand sanitizer
■   Store water in plastic containers such as     ■   Antibacterial ointment
    soft drink bottles. Avoid using containers
    that will decompose or break, such as milk    ■   Cold packs
    cartons or glass bottles                      ■   Aspirin or nonaspirin pain reliever

Food
                                                  ■   Anti-diarrhea medication
Select foods that require no refrigeration,       ■   Laxative
preparation or cooking and little or no water,
such as:                                          ■   Antacid (for stomach upset)
                                                                                ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2           DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Emergency Supply Checklist
■   Syrup of Ipecac (use to induce vomiting        Other Supplies and Equipment
    if needed)                                     ■ Battery operated radio and extra batteries

■   Sterile adhesive bandages in assorted sizes,   ■   Flashlights and extra batteries
    hypoallergenic tape
                                                   ■   Fire extinguishers, small canister, ABC
■   Scissors, tweezers, needle                         type
■   Thermometer                                    ■   Sturdy shoes or work boots, work gloves
■   Assorted sizes of safety pins                  ■   Matches in a waterproof container
                                                   ■   Rain gear
Hygiene Supplies
■ Infant diapers                                   ■   Blankets or sleeping bags
■   Feminine supplies                              ■   Wrench (to turn off utilities), pliers
■   Personal cleansing agent/soap                  ■   Plastic sheeting and duct tape
■   Toilet paper, towelettes                       ■   Map of the area (for locating shelters)
■   Liquid dish detergent, paper hand towels       ■   Aluminum foil
                                                   ■   Plastic bags for sanitation
                                                   ■   Plastic bucket with tight lid for wastes




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                           EARTHQUAKE               1

Earthquake
Washington is earthquake country. When the          ■   In buildings, the greatest danger exists
ground shakes, DROP, COVER, and HOLD.                   directly outside buildings, at exits, and
                                                        alongside exterior walls. Use caution when
                                                        exiting buildings. Many fatalities occur
PERSONNEL RESPONSIBILITIES                              when people run outside of buildings only
1. Know what to do during an earthquake.                to be killed by falling debris.
   This sections describes what action is
   appropriate indoors or out of doors during
   an earthquake.                                   WHEN OUTDOORS
                                                    ■ If you are outdoors, find a clear spot away
2. Advise guests and employees to use                 from buildings, trees, and power lines.
   the stairs instead of the elevators (if you        Drop to the ground.
   have elevators).
                                                    ■   Stay where you are until the shaking stops
3. When the shaking stops, inspect all water,           and you’re sure it’s safe to move.
   gas and electrical lines immediately. If
   damaged, shut them off. Also check that a        WHILE DRIVING
   propane tank did not fall off supports.
                                                    ■   When driving, an earthquake will feel like
4. Close off any structurally damaged areas.            all four tires have blown out. Carefully
                                                        navigate out of traffic lanes to the side of
5. Expect aftershocks, they can cause                   the road and stop. Turn off the vehicle
   damage, too.                                         ignition. STAY INSIDE YOUR VEHICLE
6. Advise all guests and employees not to               until the shaking stops.
   flush toilets until sewer lines are inspected.   ■   Avoid parking near bridges, tall trees, light
7. In the event of evacuation, front                    poles or buildings. Stay in your vehicle.
   desk personnel should take the guest                 Downed power lines could be deadly.
   registration book, emergency reports, and
   this Disaster Guidebook with them to the         WHEN IN TOWN
   safe evacuation site.                            ■ It is safer to remain inside a building after
                                                      an earthquake, unless there is a fire or
WHEN INDOORS                                          gas leak. There are no open areas in many
■ The best protection during an earthquake is
                                                      cities far enough from glass or other falling
  to get under a sturdy piece of furniture such       debris to be considered safe refuge sites.
  as a table, or beside a sofa or bed. Avoid          Glass from tall buildings does not always
  glass windows, glass display cases, and tall        fall straight down; it can catch a wind
  objects that could fall on you.                     current and travel great distances.

■   HOLD ON to a sturdy piece of furniture
                                                    ■   Never take elevators after an earthquake.
    and be prepared to move with it.




                                                                                 ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                             TSUNAMI               1

Tsunami
Tsunamis can move faster than a person             ■   Sometimes a tsunami causes the water near
can run. If you hear a tsunami siren or                shore to recede. If you see a sudden change
feel the ground shake, evacuate to higher              in the shoreline, head inland or for higher
ground immediately!                                    ground immediately.

The Pacific Coast, Strait of Juan de Fuca, Puget   ■   Follow the routes indicated by Tsunami
Sound, and large lakes have experienced                Evacuation Route signs.
tsunamis. Sudden raising or lowering of the        ■   For locally generated tsunamis, where
Earth’s crust during earthquakes generally             you might feel the ground shake, you may
cause a tsunami, although landslides and               only have a few minutes to move to higher
underwater volcanic eruptions can generate             ground. DO NOT wait for a tsunami
tsunamis as well.                                      warning to be announced.

PERSONNEL RESPONSIBILITIES
                                                   ■   A tsunami from a local earthquake could
                                                       strike some areas before a tsunami warning
1. The front desk must monitor NOAA
                                                       could be announced.
   Weather Radio or a local radio station for
   tsunami warnings at all times.                  ■   If people nearby seem not to know that a
2. If a tsunami warning is issued, advise all          tsunami is coming, tell them and help them
    guests and employees to head for higher            move away from the danger.
    ground immediately. See “Evacuation” in        ■   Follow the instructions of local emergency
    this manual.                                       and law enforcement authorities.
3. Alert all staff to notify all guests.           ■   High, multi-story hotels are located in
4. Keep telephone lines open for                       many low-lying coastal areas. The upper
   emergency use.                                      floors of these hotels may provide a safe
                                                       place if you cannot move quickly inland to
5. In the event of evacuation, front
                                                       higher ground.
   desk personnel should take the guest
   registration book, emergency reports, and       ■   Homes and small buildings located in low
   this Disaster Guidebook with them to the            lying coastal areas are not designed to
   safe evacuation site.                               withstand tsunami impacts. Do not stay in
                                                       these structures should there be a tsunami
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION                           warning.
■ Tsunamis can occur at any time,                  ■   Staying away from rivers and streams and
  day or night.                                        all low-lying coastal areas is the safest
                                                       advice when there is a tsunami warning.
■   A tsunami consists of a series of waves.
    Often the first wave may not be the largest.   ■   Do not return to low lying areas or the
                                                       beach until emergency officials give the
■   The danger from a tsunami can last for
                                                       “All Clear” notice.
    several hours after the arrival of the first
    wave. The following waves may be larger
    than the first wave.
                                                                              ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                VOLCONIC ERUPTION              1

Volcanic Eruption
Washington State’s five large volcanoes are        PRINCIPAL HAZARDS NEAR
prime visitor attractions, and they also are       CASCADE VOLCANOES
capable of future eruptions. Because the           ■ Volcanic Ash—consists of tiny rock
time between eruptions is measured in                fragments. Ash falls at air temperature.
decades or centuries, eruptions are rare,            It is not toxic. Ashfall reduces visibility.
and not a part of our everyday experience.           It irritates eyes and can cause breathing
Volcanoes show symptoms that they are                difficulties. Ash is blown by the wind—
about to erupt, usually for weeks or months          80% of the time from west to east, away
in advance. To help protect residents and            from most major population centers.
visitors, scientists, emergency and land-use       ■ Lahars (volcanic mudflows)—in valleys
managers work collaboratively to monitor             that commence on an erupting volcano,
the volcanoes, analyze their risk, and plan          these flows of mud, rock and water rush
effective emergency responses. It is important       down valleys at speeds of 20 to 40 miles per
for residents and visitors to be aware of simple     hour. Smaller events are more common
steps that they can take to reduce risk from         in the high reaches of some valleys on the
volcanic activity on the rare occasions when         volcanoes.
it does occur.                                     ■ Lava flows—melted snow and ice that can
                                                     initiate a lahar, but seldom travel off the
PERSONNEL RESPONSIBILITIES                           slopes of an erupting volcano. Lava flows
■ Know the principal hazards:                        are not a direct threat to residents and
  ● Ashfall                                          visitors in Washington State.
  ● Lahars (volcanic mudflows)
  ● Lava flows                                     DURING OR AFTER AN ERUPTION
■ Learn whether you live, work or travel in a      ■ Avoid unnecessary driving in ash. If
  volcano hazard zone (see map).                     you must, drive slowly, with windows
■ Know where to get information about                and dampers closed; use headlights and
  current activity:                                  windshield washer fluid.
  ● NOAA Weather Radio                             ■ During prolonged exposure to ash, use a
  ● Emergency Alert System (EAS) messages            breathing mask.
     on commercial radio and TV.                   ■ Reduce ash penetrations into buildings by
  ● See Volcano Updates at:                          closing doors, windows and ventilation
     http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/                      systems.
■ Advise guests and employees to follow            ■ Learn more about effects of volcanic ash by
  official’s recommendations to evacuate an          visiting: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/
  area or Shelter-in-Place.                        ■ If you are surprised by a lahar in a valley
■ Maintain your stock of emergency                   near a volcano, GET TO HIGH GROUND.
  preparedness supplies.                           ■ Listen to radio and TV, or weather radio
■ In the event of evacuation, front                  instructions from authorities.
  desk personnel should take the guest             ■ Follow official orders to evacuate or to
  registration book, emergency reports, and          Shelter-in-Place.
  this Disaster Guidebook with them to the         ■ When danger has passed, organize
  safe evacuation site.                              inspection and clean up crews.
                                                                             ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2             DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




                           IN T HE STAT E OF WA SHINGTON
    The catastrophic eruptions of Mount St. Helens in May 1980      Since the signing of the Declaration of Independence in
    are a reminder that Cascade volcanoes hold potential to         1776, most generations of Washingtonians have witnessed
    disrupt our communities. Eruptions and lahars at Mount          volcanic eruptions from one or more of the state’s five
    St. Helens took the lives of 57 people and caused billions of   magnificent Cascade volcanoes.
    dollars in property damage.

        What activity is most likely at the volcano closest to you?
    Mount Baker, located in Whatcom
    County, erupted most recently in the                                    Volcano Hazard Zones for Western
    mid-1800s. River valleys are prone                                      Washington and Northern Oregon
    to landslides and lahars (volcanic
    mudflows). Small steam plumes near
    the summit are observed frequently.
    Glacier Peak is located in
    Snohomish County. The volcano
    last erupted in the 18th or 19th
    century. Large explosive eruptions
    in the past spewed ash to the east
    into Montana. Lahars threaten river
    valleys to the west.
    Mount Rainier, located in Pierce
    County, produced small eruptions
    in the 19th century. Numerous
    large landslides flowed down the
    volcano’s flanks into river valleys
    over the past 6,000 years. More than
    150,000 people live on lahar deposits
    in river valleys around the volcano.
    Mount St. Helens is located in
    Skamania County. It is one of the
    most explosive and active volcanoes
    in the Cascades. The eruption
    on May 18, 1980, was the most
    destructive volcanic eruption in U.S.
    history.
    Mount Adams, located in Yakima
    County, is referred to as the “quiet
    giant.” Mount Adams produces lava
    flows, and is also prone to large
    landslides and lahars in the river
    valleys to the south, west, and north.
                                                                                                                     APRIL 2004




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                    SEVERE WEATHER                  1

Severe Weather / Storm Surge
Many types of severe weather conditions will       NOAA WEATHER RADIO —
occur throughout the year. Your primary            WHAT TO LISTEN FOR
source of information concerning severe            ■ OUTLOOK: Winter storm conditions are
weather conditions typical in your area is           possible in the next 2-5 days. Stay tuned to
available through your local emergency               local media for updates.
management office or NOAA Weather Radio.
                                                   ■   ADVISORY: Winter weather conditions
                                                       are expected to cause significant inconve-
Actions you can take to reduce the                     niences and may be hazardous. If you are
impacts of severe weather hazards:                     cautious, these situations should not be
■   Contact your local emergency management            life threatening.
    office for additional information.             ■   WATCH: Winter storm conditions are
■   Listen to your radio to learn where local          possible within the next 36-48 hours.
    shelters will be established should the        ■   WARNING: Life-threatening severe winter
    need arise.                                        conditions have begun or will begin within
■   Know the routes to local shelters to assist        24 hours. Act now!
    guests and employees to a shelter site.        ■   In the event of evacuation, front
■   Maintain your Emergency Telephone                  desk personnel should take the guest
    Contact sheet with current emergency               registration book, emergency reports, and
    telephone information.                             this Disaster Guidebook with them to the
                                                       safe evacuation site.
■   Contact 9-1-1 only for life-threatening
    emergencies. Non-emergency numbers
                                                   POWER OUTAGE
    should be kept handy for other types of
    inquiries.                                     When the power is out, safety becomes a
                                                   major concern.
■   Arrange for employees to take cardiopulmi-
    nary rescue (CPR) and Automated External       ■   Have an alternate heat source and supply
    Defibrillator (AED) training so they can           of fuel.
    respond quickly to an emergency.               ■   Consider purchasing a generator,
■   Install A-B-C type fire extinguishers              especially important if someone requires
    throughout your facility, and instruct staff       life-sustaining equipment that runs on
    in their use.                                      electricity.
                                                   ■   Register life-sustaining and medical
KEEP AHEAD OF A WINTER STORM                           equipment with your utility company.
■ Listen to your NOAA Weather Radio,
                                                   ■   If your site is the only one without power,
  commercial radio and television for the              check the fuse box or circuit breaker panel.
  latest winter storm warnings, watches                Turn off appliances before replacing fuses
  and advisories.                                      or resetting circuits.

                                                                               ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2           DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Severe Weather / Storm Surge
■   Conserve water, especially if you are on        ■   Plan strenuous outdoor activities for early
    a well.                                             or late in the day when temperatures are
                                                        cooler.
■   Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed.
                                                    ■   Take frequent breaks when working
■   Never allow guests or employees to use a            outdoors.
    charcoal barbeque indoors.
                                                    ■   At first signs of heat illness (dizziness,
■   Have a supply of battery-operated                   nausea, headaches, muscle cramps), move
    flashlights or glow sticks for alternative          the person to a cooler location, and have
    lighting.                                           them slowly drink a cool beverage. Call
■   If you use a kerosene heater, gas lantern or        9-1-1 for medical attention immediately
    stove indoors, maintain ventilation to avoid        if the person does not feel better in a few
    a build up of toxic fumes.                          minutes.

■   Have a corded telephone available;              ■   If air conditioning is not available, direct
    remember that cordless phones will not              people to the lower floors out of the
    work when the power is out.                         sunshine.


WINDSTORMS                                          WINTER STORMS
■ Encourage everyone to stay indoors.               ■ Encourage guests to stay inside.

  Falling trees or blowing debris cause most        ■   When using alternate heat from a fireplace,
  fatalities.                                           wood stove, space heater, etc., use fire
■   Know who in your facility might need                safeguards and properly ventilate.
    special assistance, specifically the elderly,   ■   If no heat is available, close off unneeded
    disabled, or non-English speaking people.           rooms. Stuff towels in cracks under doors.
                                                        Cover windows at night.
SEVERE HOT WEATHER
                                                    ■   Avoid shoveling heavy snow, pushing a car
■ To avoid heat stroke, encourage guests
                                                        or walking in deep snow. The strain from
  to stay indoors and in an air-conditioned
                                                        the cold and the hard labor may cause a
  environment as much as possible.
                                                        heart attack. Sweating could lead to a chill
■   Provide plenty of fluids but avoid beverages        and hypothermia.
    that contain alcohol, caffeine or a lot of
    sugar.
■   Check frequently on people who are elderly,
    ill or may need help.
■   Cover windows that receive morning or
    afternoon sun. Awnings or louvers can
    reduce the heat entering a building by as
    much as 80%.
ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                                FLOODS                1

Floods and Flash Floods
Flooding can occur nearly anywhere, at any         ADDITIONAL SAFETY INFORMATION
time. Most flood-related deaths occur in           ■ Do not drive through rushing water.
automobiles. Sadly, many of these fatalities
are avoidable. In many cases, if the driver        ■   Moving flood waters contain a deadly
had turned around instead of driving onto a            amount of force. For each foot of flood
flooded roadway, one or more lives would have          water, 1500 pounds of an automobile’s
been spared.                                           weight is displaced. This means that two
                                                       feet of water will send most automobiles
                                                       floating helplessly downstream.
FLOOD WATCH AND FLOOD WARNING
■ A WATCH is issued when flooding or               ■   Escaping from a vehicle once flood waters
  flash flooding may occur with additional             have carried it away is nearly impossible.
  rainfall.
                                                   ■   When vehicles are captured in deep water,
■   A WARNING is issued when flooding is               water pressure on the outside of the vehicle
    about to occur or already occurring.               prevents occupants from opening doors.
                                                   ■   Water depth is very difficult to estimate on
PERSONNEL RESPONSIBILITIES                             roads, especially at night when many flood
1. If a flood Watch or Warning is issued,              deaths occur.
   immediate precautions should be taken.
                                                   ■   If you are located in a flood-prone area, be
2. If it becomes necessary to evacuate the             prepared to move quickly to higher ground
   lower level (front desk, hotel lobby,               at the first indication of flooding.
   restaurant and lobby, lounge and lower
   level guest rooms), contact all guests and      FLASH FLOODS
   employees and instruct them to go to the
                                                   ■ Flash flood waters rise very quickly. Water
   safe evacuation site or to higher floors.
                                                     that covered a road by only 6 inches at one
3. Front desk personnel should take the guest        moment could easily be 2 to 3 feet deep just
   registration book, emergency reports, and         seconds later!
   this Disaster Guidebook with them to the
                                                   ■   Know where high ground is and know how
   safe evacuation site.
                                                       to get there quickly.
4. A shelter area should be designated at a safe
                                                   ■   Be especially cautious at night. It’s harder
   elevation. Supplies needed at the shelter
                                                       to recognize the danger in the dark.
   area are as follows:
   ■ First aid equipment and supplies.             ■   Do not attempt to cross flowing water
   ■ Water                                             which may be more than knee deep. If you
   ■ Non-perishable food                               have doubts, don’t cross.
   ■ Blankets
   ■ Battery-operated radio and spare              ■   If your vehicle stalls, abandon it and seek
      batteries.                                       higher ground immediately.
5. Stay tuned to the radio for advisories from
   the authorities.
                                                                                ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                             TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES           1


Washington Coast
Geographic Locations of Coastal Maps




                                               ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Jefferson County
Port Townsend




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                 TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES           3

Clallam County
Sequim




                                   ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
4          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Clallam County
Port Angeles




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                 TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES           5


Clallam County
Angeles Point




                                   ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
6          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Clallam County
Agate Bay / Crescent Bay (Crescent Beach)




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                             TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES           7

Clallam County
Clallam Bay / Kydaka Point




                                               ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
8          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Clallam County
Neah Bay / Makah Bay




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                 TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES           9

Clallam County
La Push




                                   ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
10                                           DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Grays Harbor County
Copalis Beach / Ocean City
                                                                                                                         k
                                                                                                                       ee
                                                                                                                  Cr                                                  LEG EN D
                                                                                    H al bert                                 Hw
                                                                                                                                    y
                                                                                    Moclips                                                                       Tsunami hazard zone—
                                                                                                                                                                  greatest risk
                                                                               R iver
                                                              s                                                                                                   Tsunami hazard zone—
                                                          clip
                                                   Mo                                                                                                             marginal risk
Moclips
 Beach
 Access
                        old N orth Beach
                        H igh School
                                                                                                                                                                  H igher ground
                   A   O tis        Ave                                                                                                                           Evacuation route
                   Moclips
                                                                                                                                                        A         Assembly area
                       Sunset
                       Beach                                                                                                                                      Fire station
Annelyde G ap                      A
 Beach Access                                Pacific Beach                                                                                                        Clinic
                                             Fire Station
 Pacific Beach
 N aval Station        A           H ighland H eights                                                                               C re
                                                                                                                                        ek
                       Mai n St




                                       Pacific Beach
                                        Elementary                Joe
                                          School
    Pacific                                                                                                       71
                                                                                                                       00

    Beach                                                                          8100
        Pacific Beach                         Seabrook B
           State Park                   A     D evelopment eav                 Aloha
                                                                    er             Oc
                                                                                            ean

                                                                                   Creek
                                             Yellow
              Roosevelt                      Bluff
           Beach Access                                       Elk

                                        O cean G rove                                       Cr
                                                                                                                                                       Be




                                                                                                              e                                                        0       0.5             1 mile
                                                                                                       Li n
                                                                                                                                                         ac




                                                                                                  A-
                                                                                                                                                          h




                                         109                                                                                                Creek

                                                                                                                                                                                        er
                                                                                                                                                                                R iv
                                                                                                                                                                                                    Carlisle

                                                                                   on   e
                                                                                Bo
                                                                                                                                                                      Rd




                                                  Iron Springs


                           Copalis                                                                                                                                           Carlisle
                            H ead
                                                                                                                                        s
                                                                                                                               al i
 P A C I FI C




                                                                                                                        C    op                                                                 Carlisle
                                                                                                                                                                                                Lakes




                                                                                                                                                           ek
                                                                                                                                                       C re
        O C EA N




                           G riffiths-Priday
                                  State Park
                                                                                                                                                                                                        Rd




                                                                                                                        r
                                                                                                                     da
                                                                                                                   Ce                                                                        el g
                                                                                                                                                                                                 ri n
                                                                                                                                                                                        Sh
                                    Benner                                                   Copalis
                              Beach Access                                                                                          Beac h             Langley
                                                                                                                                                         H ill
                                                                                                                                                                        Rd
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Copalis

                                    H eath G ap                    Copalis                                                                                                                        Station
                                                                                                                                                                                                             A
                                  Beach Access
                                                                   Beach                                                                                                      Copalis Crossing
                                                                                                                                                                                  Fire Station
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Copalis
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Crossing



                                                             109

                                                                                                                                                   k
                                                                                                                                                 ee
                                                                                                                                            Cr
                                                                                                                                                                        k
                                                                                                                              rry                                Cr
                                                                                                                                                                      ee
                                                                                                                            be
                                                                                                                       an
                                                                                                                  Cr
                                         O cean City                    N orth Beach
                                       Beach Access                     School D istrict
                                                                                                                        or




                                       O cean 2nd St
                                                                                                                   nn




                                                                    A
                                                                                                              Co




                                        City
                                                                        Lang
                                                                        Lake
                                                                                                                                             Saddle             Saddle Mountain
                                                                                                                                               H ill            H ousing D evelopment

                                                                   109
                                                                                                                                                                                         C am
                                                                                                                                                                                          H ogan




                                                                                                                   109
                                                                                                                                                                                             pbel l




                                            Sampson
                                                                                                                                                                                                    Sl ough
                                                                                                                                                                                                    Rd




                                            O cean City                  115                                                                                                   B urrow
                                             State Park
                                                                                                                                        G rays H arbor                                   s         Rd


ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                  TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES         11

Grays Harbor County
Oyhut / Ocean Shores

                                  109




           115

                                 LEGEND



                           Tsunami hazard zone—
                           greatest risk
                           Tsunami hazard zone—
                           marginal risk
   OYHUT
                           Higher ground
                           Evacuation route
                     A     Assembly area
                           Police station
                           Fire station




OCEAN
SHORES




                 0   0.5           1 mile




                                                                    ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
12         DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Grays Harbor County
Hoquiam / Aberdeen




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                              TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES         13

Grays Harbor County
South Aberdeen / Cosmopolis




                                                ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
14         DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Grays Harbor County
Westport / Grayland




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                        TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES         15


Pacific Harbor County
North Cove / Tokeland




                                          ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
16         DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Pacific County
Raymond / South Bend




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                 TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES         17

Pacific County
Bay Center




                                   ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
18         DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Pacific County
Surfside / Ocean Park / Klipsan Beach




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                TSUNAMI EVACUATION ROUTES         19


Pacific County
Pacific Park / Long Beach / Seaview / Ilwaco




                                                  ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
20         DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                          EVACUATION               1


Evacuation Procedures
EVACUATION PLAN                                   ■   Tsunami waves can continue for hours. The
■ Each business should develop an                     first wave can be followed by others a few
  evacuation plan that addresses the unique           minutes or a few hours later. And the later
  elements of its site.                               waves can be larger.

■   Include all personnel in the development      ■   If a tsunami is generated off our coast,
    of your plan to ensure that all areas are         there may be no time to send a hazard
    adequately addressed.                             warning. The first waves could arrive
                                                      within 15-30 minutes. The only tsunami
■   Insert your plan in this section of your          warning might be an earthquake felt
    Disaster Response Guidebook.                      on shore, or a sudden receding of the
                                                      shoreline water.
■   Evacuation plans should be practiced every
    6 months by all personnel.
                                                  WHEN AT THE BEACH
■   Update your plan after each practice          ■ If you hear a siren, or other warning
    exercise to address new situations.             devices, or if the ground shakes, do not
■   In the event of evacuation, front               hesitate. Move inland or to high ground
    desk personnel should take the guest            immediately!
    registration book, emergency reports, and     ■   If the ocean recedes from the shoreline,
    this Disaster Guidebook with them to the          do not hesitate. Move inland or to high
    safe evacuation site.                             ground immediately.

TSUNAMI EVACUATION
■ Coastal or sub-marine landslides, or
                                                  ON-SITE EVACUATION PROCEDURES
  volcanic eruptions can generate tsunamis,       1. REMAIN CALM!
  but large sub-marine earthquakes most
  commonly cause them.                            2. If management personnel are present,
                                                     they will take control of the situation. If
■   Tsunamis are generated when these                management personnel are not present,
    geologic events cause large, rapid               maintenance or security personnel will
    movements in the sea floor that displace         take control of the situation.
    the water column above. That swift change
                                                  3. In the event of an evacuation, a designated
    creates a series of high-energy waves that
                                                     safe gathering place should be identified.
    radiate outward like pond ripples. Local
                                                     The safe place will be dependent on the
    offshore tsunamis would strike the adjacent
                                                     type of emergency. The safe place may be a
    shorelines within minutes.
                                                     parking lot, a restaurant, conference room,
■   If unable to get to an assembly area or to       or a large room that will accommodate the
    high ground, moving to higher levels in a        number of people involved.
    building (verticle evacuation) may be the
    only choice.
                                                      Continued on next page.

                                                                              ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2           DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Evacuation Procedures
4. In the event of any emergency, all depart-          EVACUATE TO A SHELTER OR
    ment heads should stay in contact with             ASSEMBLY AREA
    each other in order to promote cooperative         1. If instructed to evacuate to a shelter or
    efforts to ensure the effectiveness of this           assembly area, follow the route authorities
    plan, and the safety of guests and                    recommend. Don’t take shortcuts, they may
    employees.                                            be blocked or expose you to dangerous
5. In the event of a disaster, front desk will            situations.
    notify all departments. Assign this task to        2. Listen to an NWR radio to make sure the
    available staff if possible.                          evacuation order applies to your area. Local
6. Notify all occupied rooms stating: “Maam/              officials may call for evacuation in specific
    Sir, we have an emergency situation. We               areas at greatest risk.
    have been instructed by the authorities to         3. Listen to an NWR radio for information
    direct all of our guests to: 1) exit the (hotel/      on evacuation routes, temporary shelters
    motel) immediately; or 2) go directly to the          and procedures. Leave the area quickly and
    (safe gathering place identified by those in          calmly.
    charge).”                                          4. Avoid using the telephone. Call 9-1-1 only
7. Tell the guests to use the stairways to                in life-threatening emergencies.
    exit the building (if you have elevators).         5. Staying calm will help you move safely
    Elevators must be available for guests who            and avoid delays or accidents caused by
    are unable to use the stairs, such as the             irrational behavior.
    physically challenged, injured, and the
                                                       6. Do not assume that a shelter will have
    elderly.
                                                          everything you need. Take your Disaster
8. Check all guest areas (restaurant, laundro-            Supply Kit.
    mat, fitness area, pools and saunas, public
                                                       7. Carpool to the evacuation site, if possible.
    restrooms.
                                                          Traffic may be very heavy and parking at a
9. Evacuate yourself and all remaining per-               shelter or assembly area may be limited.
    sonnel, taking the guest register, emergency
    reports, cash drawer keys, and this Disaster       HOW TO SHELTER-IN-PLACE
    Response Guidebook.                                1. One of the instructions you may be given
10. Do not reenter the building or area until             during a disaster is to Shelter-in-Place. This
    it has been declared safe by the official             means you should go indoors and stay there
    authorities.                                          until authorities determine that it is safe.
11. All employees and guests should gather             2. To Shelter-in-Place, close and lock doors
    in the parking lot/safe gathering place. It           and windows.
    is the responsibility of the head of each          3. Turn off ventilation systems (heating, air
    department or senior manager to note who              conditioning, fireplace vents).
    is there and who is missing.
                                                       4. Go to a room with the fewest doors and
12. All guests and employees are to remain                windows, and seal the room.
    in the safe place until official authorities
                                                       5. Listen to your portable radio for official
    provide further instructions.
                                                          instructions or notice that it is safe to leave.

ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                         UTILITY SHUT OFF             1


Emergency Utility Checklist
Hotel/Motel Gas Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




Restaurant Gas Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




                                                                                    ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Emergency Utility Checklist
Hotel/Motel Propane Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




Restaurant Propane Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
                                                                          UTILITY SHUT OFF            3

Emergency Utility Checklist
Hotel/Motel Electricity Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




Restaurant Electricity Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




                                                                                    ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006
2          DISASTER RESPONSE GUIDEBOOK FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS




Emergency Utility Checklist
Hotel/Motel Water Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




Restaurant Water Main Shut Off
Paste in a typed instruction telling exactly how to shut off the utility. Include a simple
illustration if possible.




ISSUE DATE: JULY 2006

								
To top