Eight Reasons Real Estate Agents Fail And proven ways to by bigpoppamust

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									Eight Reasons Real Estate Agents Fail
And proven ways to can avoid them
By Jim Luger

I’m not aware of any formal studies that explain why some agents choose to
“deactivate.” their licenses, but here are reasons that I’ve heard during my 30+
years as a real estate broker, and ways you can overcome them:


1. “I lost my nerve.”
No customers, no closings, no activity—and eventually no hope. It’s a downward
spiral that needs immediate corrective action. Here are three easy fixes:

    •   Talk to yourself. Ask yourself if you still want to succeed as an agent. If the
        answer is yes, then either go back to work, or take time out. Make sure you
        don’t abandon your goal just because you feel discouraged. Like bad weather,
        discouragement will pass.

    •   Talk to someone else. Talk to your manager or broker, a trusted friend or
        co-worker—find someone who is a good listener and has overcome difficulties.

    •   Avoid gripers, whiners, and doomsayers like bad breath. You need to
        protect your positive attitude in order to achieve positive results.


2. ”I ran out of money.”
It’s hard to stay excited and focus on your clients’ needs when bill collectors are
dunning you. As with most small businesses, a lack of capital is the number one
career killer. If you find yourself out on a thin financial limb, here are two survival
solutions:
     • Live with someone who can help pay the bills: spouse, partner, friend,
        parents, etc.

    •   Work part-time or full-time somewhere else while you are getting back on
        track. This might seem drastic, but hanging on—no matter how—is better
        than trying to start over later.


3. “I didn’t have enough support at home.”
It’s hard to stay enthused if your spouse or partner asks, “Did you make any sales
yet?” every time you come home. Perhaps your partner doesn’t understand the
nature of the real estate business, or maybe he or she sincerely thinks you should
give up this foolishness and get a “real job.” To make matters worse—if you are like
most independent-minded real estate agents—you might not have asked for support
from the man or woman in your life. You’ll need it, so ask!


4. “I didn’t have enough time.”
Are you too busy for real estate because you have another full- or part-time job,
family obligations and problems, or other distractions too numerous to keep track of?
The antidote for this distraction dilemma is a written statement of your goals and a
well-formed business plan. Sit down and write them out now.

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ContinuingEdExpress.com October 2008 E-Newsletter
5. “No one helped me.”
This is a limp reason for leaving the business because help is available to agents. The
key is that you have to look for it or ask for it. No one will drop in on your life and
offer solutions to your problems. You have to ask your manager or broker for help,
you have to enroll in educational courses, you have to listen to informative CDs and
read self-help books. If you take the initiative to seek help, you’ll find it.


6. “It wasn’t my fault.”
“It’s a bad time of the year…in a down market…I’m with the wrong company, in the
wrong part of town…I have too many personal problems.” Any of those problems
could present challenges to an agent’s real estate career, but they are most likely
rationalizations for one or more of the preceding five reasons.


7. “It was too hard.”
Look at it this way: if it were easy, it would not pay very well. And whether it’s too
hard depends on what you are comparing it to. Compared to building a spaceship,
it’s not so hard. Compared to mowing grass, selling real estate is very hard.


8. “I don’t like selling real estate.”
It’s not for everyone, but we sometimes have to compromise a certain amount of fun
in order to reach financial and lifestyle goals. When you are reaching your goals, real
estate can be a lot of fun!




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ContinuingEdExpress.com October 2008 E-Newsletter

								
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