Western Australia's Operational Plan by roq91753

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									  Western Australia’s

   Operational Plan

For Indigenous Housing,
  Infrastructure, and

   Essential Services
   July 2006 - June 07
FOREWORD

The Aboriginal Housing and Infrastructure Directorate of the Western Australian
Department of Housing and Works is pleased to submit this Operational Plan for
the 2006/2007 financial year to its Commonwealth partner.

The Agreement is the third in a series of housing and infrastructure agreements,
and signifies a continuation of the partnership between the Commonwealth and
State Governments in the delivery of housing, infrastructure and essential services
to Aboriginal people. The programs, projects and initiatives contained in this
Operational Plan are in accordance with the principles of the Agreement for the
provision of Housing, Infrastructure and Essential Services for Indigenous People
in Western Australia November 2005-June 2008 (the Agreement). A new level of
program coordination and holistic service delivery will be undertaken during the
life of this Agreement, and this is reflected in the Operational Plan.

I commend this plan to you, as the next step in delivering the outcomes of the
Agreement, for the benefit of Indigenous people in Western Australia.




Bob Mitchell                               Danny Ford
Director General                           Executive Director
Department of Housing and Works            Aboriginal Housing and Infrastructure
                                                    CONTENTS


1     INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................ 4
2     POLICY CONTEXT..............................................................................................5
3     PRINCIPLES..........................................................................................................6
4     PLANNING PROCESS .......................................................................................7
       4.1   Process Overview ............................................................................................................... 7
       4.2   Project Categorisation ........................................................................................................ 9
       4.2   Needs based data sources................................................................................................ 11
       4.4   Community Prioritisation ............................................................................................... 11
       4.5   Project Delivery................................................................................................................. 12
5     PROGRAM OVERVIEW .................................................................................. 13
       5.1   Community Construction................................................................................................ 13
       5.2   Repairs and Maintenance ................................................................................................ 14
       5.3    Housing Management and Tenancy Support ............................................................. 15
       5.4    Land Use Planning .......................................................................................................... 17
       5.5   Governance and Training................................................................................................ 17
       5.6   Infrastructure and Essential Services............................................................................. 17
       5.7    Policy Initiatives............................................................................................................... 18
       5.8   Town Based Communities .............................................................................................. 18
7     ALLOCATION OF FUNDS..............................................................................19
8     KEY OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES AND TARGETS ...............................20
9     STATE PROJECT LISTING .............................................................................32
APPENDIX A – PLANNING PROCESS FLOW CHART ........................................................... 47
APPENDIX B – HOUSING MANAGEMENT REPORT............................................................. 48
APPENDIX C – KEY OUTCOME 10 ACTIVITY AREA ............................................................ 49
APPENDIX D - NRF REPORTING.................................................................................................. 50




                                                                3
1       INTRODUCTION

The Agreement for the provision of Housing, Infrastructure and Essential Services for
Indigenous People in Western Australia, November 2005- June 2008 was signed by the
former Australian Government Minister for Families and Community Services,
Senator Kay Patterson, and the former Western Australian Government Minister
for Housing and Works, Fran Logan, on 2 February 2006.

This Agreement formally acknowledges the role of the Aboriginal Housing and
Infrastructure Directorate (AHID), in the Department of Housing and Works, as
the program manager for the funding pool established under the Agreement. It also
refines the policy role of the Aboriginal Housing and Infrastructure Council
(AHIC) 1 and its relationship to the Western Australian Government.

The AHID is responsible for developing a triennial housing and infrastructure
plan that is reviewed annually to enable the development of the annual
operational plan. The three-year strategic plan to be completed by the AHIC will
inform the reviews of the triennial housing and infrastructure plan, and the
development of the annual operational plan.

The Agreement stipulates that the Operational Plan will allocate resources on the
basis of need across the state and will include:
•   Housing and infrastructure priorities contained in the State’s Housing and
    Infrastructure Plan;
•   Source of housing and infrastructure funds;
•   Description of programs and projects, including projected targets or outputs;
•   The administrative costs of the AHID and AHIC; and,
•   Indicative annual targets for outputs against the National Reporting
    Framework
The Agreement has also seen the establishment of a Senior Officers Group to:
•   oversee the development of the annual housing and infrastructure works
    program;
•   monitor the implementation of the works program;
•   provide advice to the AHIC on relevant Government policies, programs and
    strategic directions; and,
•   provide advice to AHIC in the development and implementation of strategies
    based on need.



1
 The Agreement established the Aboriginal Housing and Infrastructure Council (AHIC) consisting
of a Chairperson and four statewide representatives. The AHIC is the principle source of advice on
policies and strategies to improve housing, infrastructure and essential services outcomes for
Indigenous people in Western Australia
2      POLICY CONTEXT

The Strategic Plan 2003/04 – 2006/07 identified the key policy documents that
inform Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure on a whole of government,
Australian Government and State Government level. These include the Council of
Australian Government (COAG) principles, Building a Better Future: Indigenous
Housing to 2010 (BBF), Commonwealth State Housing Agreement (CSHA),
Community Housing and Infrastructure Program Policy 2002-2005 (CHIP),
Housing Ministers Conference (HMC) Resolutions, and the AHIC Policy
Guidelines. The Operational Plan reflects the priorities identified in these key
documents.

Some of the most recent changes in strategic policy direction to come into effect
during the year include:

•   The WA Government has agreed to take on the full funding of the RAESP
    Regional Service Provider contract from 2006/07.
•   A commitment from the WA Government to assume full responsibility for
    housing and essential services in Aboriginal Town Based Communities (ATBC)
    from July 2007. The normalisation of essential services will continue to be
    funded from the Agreement during 2006/07, with the aim being to finalise
    normalisation in the majority of East and West Kimberley communities during
    this time. An ATBC’s Special Projects Officer has been appointed to assess
    opportunities and develop strategies for the mainstreaming of housing
    responsibilities where feasible.
•   Full implementation of the new housing management and repairs and
    maintenance subsidy programs developed and introduced in 2005/06, which
    will ensure a more coherent and consistent funding regime, increased
    expenditure on housing maintenance and improved management outcomes.
•   The strategic application of funds, with agreement to prioritise capital
    investment in those communities within reasonable access to mainstream
    community services where that is consistent with the state-wide needs based
    planning process, in order to maximise the impact of addressing the COAG
    headline indicators.
•   A commitment by the State Government to work towards achieving one level
    of service delivery for the provision of housing, infrastructure, essential and
    municipal services to all Indigenous communities in Western Australia by 30
    June 2008 as agreed in the Commonwealth/State Bilateral Agreement on
    Indigenous Affairs 2006-2010. The Department of Housing and Works will
    participate in inter-agency processes to be established during 2006 to progress
    these matters with the Commonwealth Government.
•   DHW and FaCSIA will develop a strategy in relation to the withdrawal of
    expenditure on urban programs, including Aboriginal community managed
    housing.




                                         5
3      PRINCIPLES

The broad principles for achieving the Vision are outlined in the Agreement and in
the Strategic Plan. The operational plan commits to the broad principles, and
notes the following more specific principles in the Agreement that relate to
operational planning including:
•   The Parties are committed to robust program planning and resource allocation
    based on need as identified through approved data collection methods at
    community, regional, state and national levels.
•   To support as a priority those communities within reasonable access to
    mainstream community services where that is consistent with the state-wide
    needs based planning process, in order to maximise the impact of addressing
    the COAG headline indicators;
•   To support the intent of the National Homelands Policy or subsequent policy
    as endorsed by the COAG with the support of all levels of Government;
•   To support sustainability principles when considering further funding or
    resources; and
•   To pursue continuous improvements in program delivery including through
    testing different program management models, as determined by the Senior
    Officers Group, with the objective of determining models that provide best
    value for money in terms of cost, employment and training, synergies with
    linked programs and Indigenous economic development.




                                        6
4     PLANNING PROCESS

Previously, Regional Housing and Infrastructure Plans based on the former
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) Regional Council
structure were developed, and were used to inform the Western Australian
Government strategic and operational plans.

The Western Australian Government has, since the demise of ATSIC in June 2004,
taken on responsibility for a state-wide, needs based housing, infrastructure and
essential services planning process for the allocation of pooled funding under the
Agreement. The process developed in Western Australia was endorsed by the
Aboriginal Housing and Infrastructure Council in August 2004, and has been
accepted by the Commonwealth Government in the negotiation of the current
Agreement.

4.1   Process Overview

For 2006-2007, AHID utilised the AHIC-endorsed state-wide needs-based
planning process developed in 2004, with minor modifications. The process for
2006-2007 comprised the following stages:

1     Data collection: Data was obtained from as wide a range of data sources as
      possible. These included:
          Remote Area Essential Services Program Manager;
          State agencies, including Department of Indigenous Affairs, Department
          of Planning and Infrastructure, Department of Health & Ageing,
          DOTARS and Aboriginal Lands Trust;
          Commonwealth agencies, including Department of Family, Community
          and Indigenous Affairs, Office of Indigenous Policy Coordination, as
          well as at a regional level via Indigenous Coordination Centres;
          ABS statistical information, including Community Housing and
          Infrastructure Needs Survey 2001, and Census 2001;
          State survey information from the Environmental Health Needs Survey
          2003. This was the most recent survey information available to the
          planning process;
          Community Layout Plans and As Constructed Surveys;
          Field officer reports from Department of Housing and Works and ICC
          staff;
          Local Government Environmental Health Officers
          Direct community submissions; and
          2005/2006 Back-up Project List

2     Data coordination and collaboration: Over 90,000 data items were collected
      in a purpose built database. The information was then assessed in line with
      the AHIC Strategic Plan, AHIC policies, and new strategic direction of the


                                        7
      state and commonwealth for funding larger communities in the first
      instance.

3     Project listing:    The information in the database resulted in the
      identification of over 1,200 potential projects across the state.

4     Strategic project assessment: The identified projects were assessed for
      compliance with the relevant policies and guidelines and AHIC strategic
      priorities.

5     Project Assessment: The final project list was sent for comment to
      representatives from Department of Housing and Works, Department of
      Family, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, Aboriginal Lands
      Trust, Department of Planning and Infrastructure, Department of
      Indigenous Affairs, the Remote Area Essential Services Program Manager,
      CAT, DOTARS and Shire of Derby-West Kimberley. The comments were
      then assessed against the guidelines and some minor changes were made to
      the program in line with these comments.

6     Regional Workshops: AHID planning staff conducted three rounds of
      regional workshops throughout the state. This consultation was with
      representatives from FaCSIA, local government, DOTARS, Parsons
      Brinckerhoff, CAT, DIA, DPI, Dept of Health & Ageing and DHW staff.
      The project list was examined throughout these consultations and was
      amended with the local knowledge provided.

7     Project prioritisation: The list of projects remaining after the project
      assessment processes was prioritised in accordance with a range of general
      categorisation assumptions. These are discussed in more detail in section
      2.2.

8     FaCSIA review:     The prioritised list for each region was reviewed by
      FaCSIA officers.

9     Approvals: Approval of the 2006-2007 Operational Plan is required by the
      State Minister for Housing and Works, and the Commonwealth Minister for
      Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

A flowchart of the process appears at Appendix A.




                                       8
4.2   Project Categorisation

All projects were categorised into one of eleven different categories. This
simplified the application of policies and guidelines where they applied uniformly
to all projects in a category. Categorisation also allowed a uniform approach to
dealing with complex, competing sources of information. The categories are listed
below:

1     AHID Administration

      Includes salaries, travel, on-costs and AHIC administration costs

2     Community Infrastructure

      Includes Plant, Equipment & Motor Vehicles

      Considerations include:
        Budget allocated for whole state
        Strategy to be developed for devolution of funds

3     Essential Services Infrastructure

      Includes Emergency Repair, Maintenance, Planning, Power Meters, Power Station
      Remediation, TRRP, Upgrade, RAESP Management, RSP Employment &
      Training, Service Connections & RSP Contract

      Considerations include:
        Contractual arrangement with Parsons Brinkerhoff (PB)
        Advice from PB
        Essential services required for construction program

4     Fencing

      Includes fencing to community boundary fencing and community housing

      Considerations include:
        To be linked into larger construction projects to achieve economies of
        scale.

5     Housing Maintenance

      Includes backlog repairs, Mobile Maintenance Teams & Repairs & Maintenance
      Subsidy

      Considerations include:
         Applying the implementation plan for each strategy
         Backlog maintenance program to address critical health or safety
        issues.


                                           9
        Once backlog has been addressed, new projects only eligible as part of
        Repairs & Maintenance Subsidy strategy. Projects outside Repairs &
        Maintenance Subsidy only to be considered if critical health or safety
        issue.

6   Housing Management/ Administrative Support

    Includes Administration Positions, Governance, IHMS, Operational Funding,
    Organisational Reviews, Recruitment & Workplace Relations, Training, & Home
    Ownership Initiatives

    Considerations include:
       Applying the implementation plan for each strategy
       Operational funding as per Housing Management Support Policy
       Maintaining administration positions such as CEO’s in 06/07 only (no
       new positions)

7   Landscaping and Greening Programs

    Includes Community Greening for the purpose of dust abatement

    Considerations include:
       Need to be clearly defined on what the dust issue is (i.e. in housing,
       from vehicles, etc).
       Effective Housing Management must be in place to ensure upkeep of
       gardens.
       The water supply must be sufficient and of good quality (i.e. not salty).

8   Permanent Housing

    Includes Construction, Community Upgrade Program, Stock Replacement,
    Upgrade, & Joint Venture Projects (for small communities and outstations)

    Considerations include:
       Essential services sufficient to support building
       Need verified against population density measure to reduce to 5.0
       (PDM's recalculated with underway construction to prioritise housing
       allocation)
       Must be IHO managed
       Demolition only to occur with construction projects to achieve
       economies of scale.

9   Planning, Surveys and Feasibility Studies

    Includes Community Layout Plans and As Constructed Surveys




                                      10
10    Roads, Airstrips & Rubbish Tips

      Includes Airstrips, CAT Contract, Internal Roads & Rubbish Tip

      Considerations include:
         Contractual arrangement with Centre for Appropriate Technology

11    Tenancy Support Services

      Includes In Home Practical Support program and Aboriginal Tenant Support
      Scheme

      Considerations include:
         Applying the implementation plan for each strategy

4.2   Needs based data sources

The primary source of survey data was the 2003 Environmental Health Needs
Survey (EHNS). This survey was conducted in Western Australia (as compared to
CHINS which is Australia-wide). The main advantage of EHNS is that
information is collected at individual dwelling level, as well as at community
level.

Where EHNS information required corroboration or supplementing, the national
Community Housing and Infrastructure Needs Survey 2001 was utilised. For
population figures, the ABS Census 2001 was also cross-referenced.

Population Determination

It was essential to the prioritisation process to determine accurate population and
permanent dwelling numbers for each community. The data sources offered a
wide variety of figures, which had to be verified and corroborated. Each
community was therefore assigned a final population and permanent dwelling
count after comparing all available data sources. These final figures have allowed
AHID to establish a final Population Density Measure (PDM) count for each
community, which with final permanent dwelling count, formed the basis of
project prioritisation.

4.4   Community Prioritisation

1     Larger permanent communities were prioritised first. In the first instance
      the hub communities, then the remaining communities with more than 100
      people, then the remaining RAESP communities of more than 50 people.

2     Small communities and outstations (< 50 persons) were considered to be
      lower priority and do not form part of the program (except for the
      suggestion of a joint funding program). The Remote Area Essential
      Services Program contains a small contingency fund for emergency
      breakdowns in small communities. No new housing or infrastructure

                                        11
      capital funds are identified, with the exception of a $1.2 million contingency
      fund for priority cases. The terms and criteria for this contingency fund are
      currently being finalised by the Senior Officers Group established under the
      Agreement.
3     Communities were further prioritised within their community type
      category based on the PDM. For those with equivalent PDMs, those with
      larger populations were considered higher priority.

Further Considerations

1     Effective housing management and reporting must be in place, where rent
      is collected and an ongoing maintenance strategy is identified.
      Communities that did not have this in place are earmarked for projects in
      subsequent years to allow time for housing management to be dealt with.

2     Some communities that were considered lower priority on the list were
      bought forward to link in with existing projects that had not yet been
      delivered, to achieve economies of scale.

3     One community (Joy Springs) was bought forward based on local regional
      knowledge of the situation at the community – this was identified by DPI,
      Shire of Derby-West Kimberley and Derby FaCSIA.

4.5   Project Delivery

A NAHS approach has been used in the formulation of the program. Therefore, if
a community has been identified as a priority in 06/07, then all projects that are
required to take place on that community will generally be delivered in the same
year. This has removed the need for prioritisation of project categories.

Low priority Projects

These projects have not been identified in the program as they are considered to
be lower priority or are the responsibility of another government department.

• Temporary Shelters – due to low priority of small communities and outstations
  of which this category would affect
• Sport & Recreation Facilities
• Community Access Roads
• Office Equipment & Furniture
• Administration & Community Buildings
• Visitors accommodation




                                        12
5     PROGRAM OVERVIEW

5.1   Community Construction

The Community Construction program produces new housing and stock
replacement for discrete Aboriginal communities. The construction contracts are
managed in-house with an open tender process being applied to the larger-scale
projects identified for 2006/2007. Tenders can be linked with housing upgrades,
infrastructure projects and the national Fixing Houses for Better Health program
where practicable. Communities are closely consulted in the design and placement
of the dwellings.

From 2006, the delivery of construction projects to communities will be contingent
on appropriate housing management and maintenance regimes being in place.

The focus from 2006 will be on larger scale projects in the major communities, with
corresponding economies of scale. AHID will continue to apply the Indigenous
Preferential Tendering Policy, which will assist Indigenous businesses to obtain
contracts, while promoting Indigenous employment and apprenticeships. The
larger scale of projects will provide greater opportunity for longer term
employment and traineeships.

Program Highlights

1     For 2006/2007, major construction projects are identified in 39
      communities, which will result in a net increase of 94 houses in Western
      Australia’s Aboriginal communities (after 87 stock replacements). Total
      Cost - $57.3M.

      Construction Programmed for 2006/07
               Item         No         Total Budget           Unit Cost
        New Construction    94      $30.89M                  $328,617
        Stock Replacement   87      $26.4M                   $303,563
        Demolitions         87      $870,000                 $10,000

2     In order to achieve economies of scale in the delivery of housing and
      associated infrastructure and services to communities, an integrated
      planning and investment approach is being taken. The following example
      provides an outline of the program for Kalumburu, which replicates the
      whole of community approach associated with the NAHS program.

      •   Construction of 10 new houses, including four
          for people with disabilities
      •   8 housing upgrades
      •   Power station and water upgrades
      •   Street lighting and fencing
      •   Housing management support funding
      •   CEO / admin support


                                        13
         •     R & M subsidy to be negotiated in 2006-2007

               Total approximately $4.76M

         Other major communities to be targeted in a similar fashion during 2006/07
         include:

              Community       New        Upgrades       Housing            R&M           Essential
                             Houses                    Management         Subsidy        Services
             Ardyaloon         25            10
             Bidyadanga        15            5
             Djarindjin         2            10
             Kunawarritji*
             Looma              14
             Muludja             4
             Parnngurr
             Punmu**            3
             Ringer Soak        6             3
             Wannan             5            8
             Warburton          5            10
             Wirrimanu          14           9
             Yungngora          7             2
         * Looking at options as a hub community
         ** Looking at options, eg clustering. Funding identified for both operational support and
            R & M Subsidy but are not eligible as a
            “stand alone” community.

3        We are looking at entering into a proposal with Boys Town, through in
         house bid arrangements, to deliver training and employment outcomes as
         well as investment in social capital, to the remote communities of
         Wirramanu, Ringer Soak and Mindibungu.

5.2      Repairs and Maintenance

In 2005, Western Australia developed a three-pronged repairs and maintenance
strategy. The three elements of this strategy are:

•     A maintenance backlog scheme, to address existing maintenance needs,
      especially in health-critical areas such as plumbing and electrical. Contracts for
      this work are awarded following a competitive tender process;
•     A repairs and maintenance subsidy scheme. The subsidy is available to assist
      Indigenous communities and Indigenous Housing Organisations that manage
      remote /town based community housing to carry out repairs and maintenance
      on houses under their management. The AHID will provide funding from
      $1000 up to $1500 per house on the proviso that the organisation matches this




                                                  14
      funding. Adequate rent levels must be set and collected to support community
      matching2.
•     Regional business development initiatives, including the establishment of
      mobile maintenance teams to service regional areas.

All three elements of the strategy aim to improve the environmental health of
people in Aboriginal communities, while also increasing the useful life of the
material assets. They also provide opportunities for Aboriginal employment,
training, and business development. Repairs and maintenance also supports the
national Fixing Houses for Better Health program where applicable.

5.3      Housing Management and Tenancy Support

Environmental health, community development and sound asset management all
depend on quality housing management practices and appropriate tenancy
support services. AHID is offering the following products and services to develop
quality housing management in communities:

•   Indigenous Housing Management System (IHMS): The IHMS is a PC based
    program designed to support Indigenous Housing Organisations with
    management of their rental stock. IHMS is designed to assist in the
    management of applications, tenancies, properties, property maintenance and
    in the collection of data required to meet Commonwealth and State reporting
    requirements. The system has been installed in 28 communities/ICHOs to
    date. It is intended to install IHMS in a further 20 communities/ICHOs in 2006-
    2007.
Housing Management Subsidy: Funding is available to assist IHO/resource
agencies in the management of remote/town based community housing.
Financial assistance can only be utilised towards housing management purposes.
Eligibility requires an IHO/resource agency to manage a minimum of 30
remote/town based community houses. Allocation per house starts at $2,000 (30-
60), $1,750 (61-100), $1,500 (101+). Adequate rent levels must be set and collected.
It is estimated that approximately 37 agreements encompassing 132 communities
will take up the housing management subsidy in 2006-20073. This will result in
approximately 69% of the total population in Western Australia’s Aboriginal
communities receiving the scheme’s benefits.

Support and advice to communities is provided by AHID regional project officers.
Communities who fall outside the eligibility criteria are encouraged to cluster with
other communities, or come under an external housing management provider, in
order to become eligible.


2
  Management of a minimum of 30 houses is required to access this scheme. However, this provides the
opportunity for smaller communities to come under the auspices of an ‘umbrella’ housing management
organisation in order to achieve eligibility.
3
  Management of a minimum of 30 houses is required to access this scheme. However, this provides the
opportunity for smaller communities to come under the auspices of an ‘umbrella’ housing management
organisation in order to achieve eligibility.


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    Operational Funding Formula
                              Remote Communities
                           Operational Funding Formula
              Total
            Number of   Allocation   Minimum Monies   Maximum Monies
             Houses     Per House       Allocated        Allocated
            Managed

              0-29         Nil            Nil              Nil

              30-60      $2,000         $60,000          $120,000

             61-100      $1,750         $121,750         $190,000

                                                      + $1,500/house
              101+       $1,500         $191,500
                                                         over 101


    Example: IHO/resource agency managing 35 houses. Entitlement is $2000 per
    house. 35 houses x 2000 per house = $70,000.
    Example: IHO/resource agency managing 60 houses would be entitled to
    $120,000, however, IHO/resource agency managing a minimum of 61 houses
    would be entitled to $120,000 plus $1750 per house over 60 houses.
    Funding for 101+ managed houses is set at a lesser amount as communities
    with this amount of housing are considered established and should be working
    towards self sufficiency. Therefore communities managing 101+ houses would
    receive $190,000 plus $1500 per house for every house over 100.

    ICHOs are required to submit a Housing Management Report (see Appendix
    B) on a quarterly basis. This will provide information on rental collection,
    maintenance expenditure, rental stock, property inspections and population.

•   Urban ICHOs: For 2006/2007, urban ICHOs have continued to receive housing
    management funding according to a similar formula to that applied to remote
    ICHOs. However, no capital projects have been identified for urban ICHOs.
    FaCSIA’s WA State office has agreed to work with AHID to develop strategies
    to link urban ICHOs with mainstream service providers. The spot purchase
    program for Urban ICHOs is not being progressed in 2006/07.

•   Tenancy Support Services: Tenancy support services are offered by AHID as a
    supplement to housing management and maintenance regimes. In particular,
    the In Home Practical Support program is administered by AHID and
    delivered by local Aboriginal people. Participants have the opportunity to
    develop and improve their home living skills including clean and healthy
    living practices, family budgeting and knowledge of tenancy obligations. The
    aim is to develop skills and confidence to effectively manage a home and
    maintain a healthy family life. It is estimated that at least 7,200 people will
    have access to tenancy support services in 2006-2007. There is a commitment
    to pursue mainstream funding for tenancy support services.




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5.4      Land Use Planning

As in previous years, AHID intends to continue the following planning activities:
• Community Layout Plans, contracted to the Department of Planning and
   Infrastructure; and,
•     As Constructed Surveys, contracted to Sinclair Knight Merz engineers.

5.5      Governance and Training

The objective of this program is to implement reforms that will enhance
governance within the Indigenous community housing sector.

AHID will target high risk Indigenous community housing organisations where
intensive assistance will be provided to a community over a 12 month period to
ensure that more effective housing management outcomes can be achieved. A
panel of consultants who are experienced and skilled in the areas of corporate and
community governance will be engaged to deliver assistance. It is anticipated this
will lead to a strong, self-managing governing sector. It is intended to offer this
service to 10 communities with a total population of 2882 people in 2006-2007.

Accredited training for housing officers will be offered through the Certificate
III/IV in Community Social Housing. A total of 14 Housing Officers are currently
undertaking Certificate III through Kimberley TAFE in Broome, of these students
10 have indicated an interest in completing Certificate IV. 8 participants in the
Kununurra region have been identified to undertake Certificate III and are due to
commence this semester. AHID is also planning to deliver training to the Pilbara
and Kalgoorlie regions. It is estimated that 18 housing officers will undertake this
training in 2006-2007.

5.6      Infrastructure and Essential Services

The Remote Area Essential Services Program (RAESP) provides a comprehensive
maintenance service for essential services (power, water, sewer) in 91 Aboriginal
communities in Western Australia. This equates to service delivery to
approximately 80% of the population in Western Australian Aboriginal
communities. This maintenance program has an obvious and vital environmental
health outcome, along with some training and employment outcomes. The
RAESP is externally managed under contract to Parsons Brinkerhoff, who then
sub-contracts to three regional service providers. From 2006-2007, the program
will be fully funded by the State Government.

The RAESP Contracted State Program Manager, Parsons Brinckerhoff, manages
the RAESP capital infrastructure on behalf of AHID. Parsons Brinckerhoff engage
external project managers on behalf of AHID to design, document and project
manager capital projects. The procurement of contractors to undertake the works
is done by AHID. In terms of other non-RAESP capital works, AHID engages
project manages directly and undertakes procurement of contractors itself.


                                          17
$1.105 million was allocated under the Agreement in 2005-2006 for provision of
card power meters and an accompanying education program in selected
communities. This will be delivered through 2006-2007.

A key element of the RAESP program is the on-the-ground operational services
provided by the Aboriginal Essential Service Operators (AESOP’s). The AESOP
trainees go through an 18-month training program in essential services prior to
becoming graduated AESOP’s. Currently thirty AESOP’s are active within the role
throughout the State. The current RAESP budget for training and development is
$82,000 statewide.

5.7    Policy Initiatives

The following policy initiatives are budgeted for 2006-2007:

• A Disability Needs Assessment in four larger Aboriginal communities. This
  pilot project will see an occupational therapist assess the housing needs of
  disabled and aged residents;
• Consultancy work likely to arise from HMC Resolutions work and AHIC;
• Further development of AHID’s planning database; and,
• Home Ownership initiatives, including funding for the Home Purchase
  Incentive Scheme.
• The contract for a Recruitment and Workplace Relations Service was signed on
  18 January 2006, and is for 2 years plus an option for a third year (at AHID
  discretion).

5.8   Town Based Communities

The Western Australian Government is investigating options for alternative
funding for town-based communities outside of the IHIA funding pool, in
response to Clause 6 of the Agreement.




                                        18
6       SOURCE OF FUNDS

      Estimated cash at bank 30 June 2006                                       35,000,000

      Australian Government
             CSHA – ARHP tied                                                   16,271,000
             CHIP                                                               36,000,000
             Healthy Indigenous Housing (Governance)                             2,315,000
             Power meters                                                        1,000,000
             Power Meter Education Program                                         105,000
      Australian Government Subtotal                                            55,691,000

      State / Territory Government
               State Housing and Infrastructure                                 16,271,000
               Additional State contributions                                    6,000,000
      State / Territory Government Subtotal                                     22,271,000

      TOTAL OF FUNDS                                                          112,962,000




7       ALLOCATION OF FUNDS

      Estimated value of carry-forward projects from                            50,000,000
      2005/2006

      Programs                                                                           $
              Community Construction                                            35,495,000
              Repairs and Maintenance                                            7,195,850
              Housing Management and Support                                    10,111,355
              Land Use Planning                                                    500,000
              Governance and Training                                            2,668,000
              Infrastructure and Essential Services                             28,667,653
              Policy Initiatives                                                   347,500
      Total Programs                                                            84,985,358

                Administration Costs                                              5,418,798
                AHIC Administration costs                                           120,000

      TOTAL ALLOCATION                                                        140,524,1564




4
 Capital projects have been over-allocated to ensure no underspend. Any projects not commenced in 2006-
2007 will be carried forward to 2007-2008.

                                                   19
8      KEY OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES AND TARGETS

The Key Operational Activities to be undertaken in 2006-07 linked to BBF
Outcomes and Strategic Actions identified in the Strategic Plan are outlined in the
next section. Planned targets for 2006-07 have been set against the key activities.

National Reporting Framework Indicators

The National Reporting Framework requires jurisdictions to report against the
following indicators:

Clause 11.5.1.5. of the Agreement states “Indicative annual targets for outputs against the
National Reporting Framework, for each of the subsequent years of the Agreement will be
agreed between the Australian Government and Western Australian Governments in
writing prior to 31 March 2006 for the 2006-2007 financial year and prior to 31 March
2007 for the 2007-2008 financial year;” These have not been negotiated except verbally at
State level, where it was agreed that a key indicators would be selected and reported on.

Quantitative data items
D1 Number of permanent dwellings at 30 June 2005
D2 Number of improvised dwellings at 30 June 2005
D3 Number of permanent dwellings not connected to water at 30 June 2005
D4 Number of permanent dwellings not connected to sewerage at 30 June 2005
D5 Number of permanent dwellings not connected to electricity at 30 June 2005
D6 Total number of households living in permanent dwellings at 30 June 2005
D7 Total rent collected from tenants for the year ending 30 June 2005
D8 Rent charged to tenants for the year ending 30 June 2005
D9 Total recurrent expenditure for the year ending 30 June 2005
D10 Total capital expenditure for the year ending 30 June 2005
D11 Total direct costs for the year ending 30 June 2005
D12 Total number of permanent dwellings occupied at 30 June 2005
D13 Total number of households with overcrowding at 30 June 2005
D14 Total number of households requiring additional bedrooms at 30 June 2005
D15 Total number of additional bedrooms required at 30 June 2005
D16 Total number of households for which household groups and dwelling details were known at
30 June 2005
D17 Total number of bedrooms in permanent dwellings at 30 June 2005
D18 Total number of people living in permanent dwellings at 30 June 2005
D19 Number of Indigenous Community Housing Organisations at 30 June 2005
D20 Number of Indigenous Community Housing Organisations with a housing management plan
at 30 June 2005
D21 Total number of Indigenous employees in ICHOs at 30 June 2005
D22 Number of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who had completed accredited training at 30 June
2005
D23 Number of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who were undertaking accredited training at 30
June 2005
D24 Total number of employees in ICHOs at 30 June 2005

Qualitative data items
Q1 Whether new houses and upgrades meet national minimum standards
Q2 Allocation of resources on the basis of need
Q3 What jurisdictions are doing to assist ICHOs in developing and implementing housing plans
Q4 Strategies and outcomes to increase Indigenous employment in housing services
Q5 Mechanisms for Indigenous input to planning, decision making and delivery of services


                                              20
Q6 Co-ordination of housing and other services that seek to improve the health and well-being of
Indigenous people

The majority of Operational Plan key outcomes are linked to NRF indicators, and
these have been identified against each outcome. They are also shaded in the
above list.

Housing Ministers Resolutions

Australian Government and State/Territory Housing Ministers agreed at their
meeting on 3 December 2004:

1      To review all mainstream housing and related programs (in relevant State,
       Territory and Australian Government portfolios) with a view to achieving greater
       equity in resource allocations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous clients.
2      That all Jurisdictions place a greater emphasis on Indigenous Housing
       Management programs to focus on issues of sustainability.
3      That HMAC develop options for increased investment in Indigenous housing
       subject to each option providing for:
       - The findings of the review of mainstream programs;
       - An equitable share of additional funding being provided by all jurisdictions;
       - Clear identification of the additional outcomes to be delivered;
       - Proposed delivery mechanisms that demonstrate a clear improvement on
           current arrangements;
       - Improved effectiveness of community housing management of maintenance;
       - Housing delivered through community participation which will build a sense
           of ownership and responsibility.

A series of strategies to address Resolutions One and Two have been developed,
and are being implemented nationally. Some Operational Plan activities can be
linked to Resolution Two strategies, and these have been identified where they
exist. They are also shaded in the table below.




                                              21
HMC RESOLUTIONS SCHEDULE TWO STRATEGIES

  2.1    Deliver a fully pooled Indigenous housing program with one level of service delivery in each jurisdiction pending
         agreement and implementation of satisfactory hand over provisions.
  2.2    Develop and implement a coordinated approach to the sustainable development of local Indigenous communities with the
         genuine involvement of local communities with particular reference to outstations.
  2.3    Develop and implement a national and jurisdictional needs analysis and planning process for housing related essential
         service infrastructure at a building block and community level. The national needs analysis will be funded jointly by
         jurisdictions with the following steps:
         • Engage stakeholders and agree process;
         • Develop data standards and methodology; and
         • Implement joint needs analysis and planning based on this analysis.
  2.4    Audit ICHO governance structures and implement performance-based funding models that require demonstrated good
         governance.
  2.5    Maximise opportunities for economies of scale and greater efficiencies in Indigenous community housing organisations
         (ICHOs) in consultation with organisations, tenants and communities including the development of regional networks for
         housing management.
  2.6    Strengthen capacity building strategies including the development of joint initiatives with FaCSIA from 2005-06 when the
         $56M new funding for capacity building commences.
  2.7    Develop and apply national policy principles covering ICHO rent setting, rent collection and recurrent funding
         requirements while allowing flexibility to address different jurisdictional contexts.
  2.8    Collect nationally consistent, complete and comparable dwelling level data to better measure and cost asset management
         funding requirements and monitor improvement in the lifecycle of dwellings and housing management in the following
         stages:
         • Development of data standards; and
         • Development and implementation of action plan.
  2.9    Collect nationally consistent, complete and comparable financial data to better monitor planned expenditure and cost
         recurrent funding requirements in the following stages:
         • Development of data standards; and
         • Development and implementation of action plan.
  2.11   Adopt streamlined planning and approval processes to minimise the requirement to roll over funds and limit the potential
         for under-expenditure.




                                                                                                                                    22
OUTCOMES, STRATEGIES, TARGETS

                                                                                                                                       NRF
                                                                                                                                                            RELATED
                              BBF                                                                                                INDICATORS
                                                                                                                                                          OPERATIONAL
    KEY OUTCOMES             Outcome          OUTCOME TARGETS                     HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                    and HMC
                                                                                                                                                            TARGETS
                              Area                                                                                               STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                                (see lists above)
1   Reduce overcrowding      3,1,6       1   Reduce PDM in communities to 5       •   Increased investment in larger priority   1   D1, D13, D14     1 Increase in No of
    levels and improve                       through provision of new                  communities, including new housing,                              permanent dwellings
    quality of housing                       dwellings                                 stock replacement and major                                   2 No. of house constructions
    stock                                2   Reduce number of uninhabitable            upgrades.                                2   D1-D5                • 1 Year = 94 plus 87
                                             dwellings through stock                                                                                        stock replacements
    See Program Highlights                   replacement & upgrades. Target =                                                                            • 3 Year = 128 plus 128
    1 (p.13) for unit cost                   87 stock replacement & 145                                                                                     stock replacements
    information in                           upgrades (reduction of 232                                                                              3 No. houses upgraded
    accordance with the
                                             uninhabitable properties)                                                                                   • 1 Year = 145
    Minister’s request
                                                                                                                                                         • 3 Year = 273
                                                                                                                                                     4 No. of demolitions = 87
2   Improve Asset            1,2,3,5,6   1   Reduce % of dwellings in need of     •   Integrated R&M strategies including:      1   D9, HMC 2.9      27 R&M subsidy agreements,
    Preservation (life of                    major repairs Target = 13% less               critical repairs backlog program &                        covering 91 communities,
    dwellings) & quality                     dwellings will be in need of major             FHBH;                                                    1,803 houses and 10,330
    of housing stock                         repairs in targeted communities               recurrent funding support for                             population.
                                         2   Increased maintenance                          R&M (thorough R&M Subsidy           2   HMC 2.8
                                             expenditure per house. Target                  Agreements);
                                             expenditure of $3000 per house                development of regional and
                                             per year in participating                      community based Indigenous
                                             communities. This year will                    maintenance businesses (eg.
                                             establish baseline. Increase                   mobile maintenance teams, MSP
                                             measurable from 07/08                          teams).
                                                                                  •   House upgrade program
3   Improve Housing          2,5         1   Increase in total rent collections   •   Development and encouragement of          1   D7, D8           1 37 HM Operational
    Management                               (on previous year) Target $50 per         external / regional models of                                   Support funding
    (tenancy                                 week per house, or $35 per                management. Smaller communities          HMC 2.5, 2.7, 2.85     agreements, covering 132
    management)                              person. This year will establish          required to come under regional or                              communities, 2366 houses
                                             baseline. Increase measurable             external management to be eligible for                          and 69% population.
                                             from 07/08                                operational funding support.



5
 Improvements in housing management will directly assist in maximising opportunities for economies of scale and greater efficiencies in Indigenous
community housing organisations (HMC 2.5), by encouraging clustering of smaller communities and establishment of regional management
organisations. It will allow for the application of national rent setting policies (HMC 2.7), rent collection and uniform recurrent funding. It will also
promote the collection of community level data which will contribute to nationally consistent reporting (HMC 2.8)

                                                                                                                                                                   23
                                                                                                                               NRF
                                                                                                                                                   RELATED
                              BBF                                                                                        INDICATORS
                                                                                                                                                 OPERATIONAL
     KEY OUTCOMES            Outcome        OUTCOME TARGETS                  HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                 and HMC
                                                                                                                                                   TARGETS
                              Area                                                                                       STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                        (see lists above)
                                       2   % rent collection targets met     •   Consistent funding support through     2   D7,D8           2 No. of IHOs = 18
                                           Targets for each community are         implementation of the Housing
                                           set when housing management            Operational Support funding policy,
                                           support agreements are entered         which establishes minimum rent
                                           into. This year will establish         targets, requirement for IHMS,
                                           baseline. Increase measurable          tenancy agreements etc.
                                           from 07/08                        •   Roll out IHMS to a further 25
                                       3   % of direct debit participation        communities.                          3   D20
                                           Reporting on direct debit         •   Improve occupancy rates
                                           participation included in
                                           organisational reporting.
                                       4   No of permanent dwellings                                                    4   D12
                                           occupied.

4.   Improved                2         Governance reforms implemented.       •   Target high risk IHO/communities       Q3,HMC 2.2, 2.4,
     Governance (increase                                                        with significant AHID program and      2.6
     capacity of                                                                 projects investment.
     communities to govern                                                   •   Provide intensive assistance to
     themselves)                                                                 identified IHO/communities over a
                                                                                 12-month period.
                                                                             •   Perform a governance meeds analysis
                                                                                 on each IHO/community, develop
                                                                                 and implement action plans in order
                                                                                 to reform and stabilise governance
                                                                                 structures.
                                                                             •   Also related to Healthy Indigenous
                                                                                 Housing funding.
                                                                             •   Governance Implementation Plan (has                        Governance Plan to be agreed
                                                                                 been removed as more work is                               by 7 September 2006.
                                                                                 required).




                                                                                                                                                          24
                                                                                                                                   NRF
                                                                                                                                                       RELATED
                             BBF                                                                                             INDICATORS
                                                                                                                                                     OPERATIONAL
    KEY OUTCOMES            Outcome         OUTCOME TARGETS                   HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                    and HMC
                                                                                                                                                       TARGETS
                             Area                                                                                            STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                            (see lists above)
5   Provide Tenancy         2                                                 •   Expand the IHPS program to                Q3                  12 contracts negotiated
    Support/Living Skills                                                         communities who have signed up for                            covering 65 communities,
    (to ensure tenants                                                            repairs and maintenance subsidy and       HMC 2.26            7200 people
    have the skills to                                                            operational support funding.
    better care for and                                                       •   Support tenant skills development and
    manage their housing)                                                         promote positive environmental
                                                                                  health outcomes through the In Home
                                                                                  Practical Support program to eligible
                                                                                  communities.

6   Essential Services      8         RAESP to cover all communities with a   •   Ensure that power, water and              D3, D4, D5          RAESP being delivered to 91
    (ensure reliable                  permanent population of 50+.                sewerage infrastructure in                                    of 96 communities (with over
    power, safe drinking                                                          communities remains functional to                             50 population), covering
    water and effective                                                           support their environmental health.                           10,432 people.
    waste water                                                               •   Continue to implement the Remote
    management                                                                    Area Essential Services Program for
    infrastructure)                                                               infrastructure maintenance.
                                                                              •   Capital works to provide replacement,
                                                                                  additional or upgraded essential
                                                                                  services infrastructure

7   Employment,             4         1   Increase in number of               •   Provide Indigenous employment             1    D21-D24, Q4    1 No of new apprenticeships
    Apprenticeship and                    apprenticeships                         opportunities in housing management            HMC 2.27         created
    Training                          2   Increase the number of trained          through operational funding.              2    D22,D23        2 No. of people directly
    Opportunities                         and qualified housing officers.     •   Support this by offering Certificate IV                         employed
                                      3   Communities managing their own          in Community Social Housing course        3    D20, HMC       3 18 people undertaking
                                          essential services routine              to housing officers.                           2.6              accredited Community
                                          operational and maintenance         •   Continue to provide opportunities for                           Social Housing training
                                          tasks.                                  local Aboriginal companies to win                             4 No. of people recruited to
                                      4   Full time employment for 2005           construction and upgrade contracts,       4    D21-D24          AESOP
                                          recruitment intake by 2008 (50).        through utilisation of the Indigenous




6 Provision of tenancy support is an integral component of a ‘package’ of services designed to contribute to the sustainable development of local
Indigenous communities with the genuine involvement of local communities (HMC 2.2)
7 Employment, apprenticeships and training opportunities are a component and a consequence of implementing a ‘package’ of services designed to

contribute to the sustainable development of local Indigenous communities with the genuine involvement of local communities (HMC 2.2)

                                                                                                                                                              25
                                                                                                                                       NRF
                                                                                                                                                      RELATED
                             BBF                                                                                                 INDICATORS
                                                                                                                                                    OPERATIONAL
    KEY OUTCOMES            Outcome         OUTCOME TARGETS                      HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                     and HMC
                                                                                                                                                      TARGETS
                             Area                                                                                                STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                                (see lists above)
                                                                                     Preferential Tendering Policy, to
                                                                                     ensure preference is given to local
                                                                                     Aboriginal companies, who employ
                                                                                     and train local Aboriginal people.
                                                                                 • Continue to utilise the Construction
                                                                                      Tender Waiver policy, where
                                                                                      communities are able to construct their
                                                                                      own housing.
                                                                                 • Encourage Indigenous Group Training
                                                                                      Schemes to tender for large scale
                                                                                      building contracts
                                                                                 • Develop the capacity of Aboriginal
                                                                                      communities to carry out routine
                                                                                      operational and maintenance tasks
                                                                                      associated with essential services
                                                                                      through Aboriginal Essential Service
                                                                                      Operator Program.
                                                                                 • Essential Services Operator Program -
                                                                                      delivered through Regional Services
                                                                                      Providers
                                                                                           Training and employment
                                                                                           opportunities for Indigenous
                                                                                           people.
                                                                                           Apprenticeship opportunities
                                                                                           through tender process.
                                                                                 • Provides a career path and progression
                                                                                      for AESOP graduates
8   Greater Effectiveness   5         Ensuring that assistance is properly       Needs Based Planning Process
    and Efficiency                    directed to meeting objectives, and that   As described in s. 4.4 of the Plan resources
                                      resources are being used to best           have been strategically allocated on the
                                      advantage                                  basis of need and within the agreed policy
                                                                                 priorities of the State and Commonwealth.

                                                                                 Responsibility for program planning was
                                                                                 transferred to DHW from ATSIC in
                                                                                 2003/04. The process has evolved over the
                                                                                 last three years to include a comprehensive
                                                                                 consultative process. We have moved
                                                                                 away from a regional based one year plan

                                                                                                                                                         26
                                                                                                                                   NRF
                                                                                                                                                  RELATED
                          BBF                                                                                                INDICATORS
                                                                                                                                                OPERATIONAL
    KEY OUTCOMES         Outcome         OUTCOME TARGETS                     HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                     and HMC
                                                                                                                                                  TARGETS
                          Area                                                                                               STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                            (see lists above)
                                                                             to a State needs based rolling three year
                                                                             plan. The level of information and data
                                                                             has improved significantly and will further
                                                                             improve in 06/07 with the online web base
                                                                             of RAPHID

                                                                             Asset Preservation
                                                                             The intent is to extend the economic life of
                                                                             capital    investment      in    Aboriginal
                                                                             communities through more effective
                                                                             management and maintenance strategies.
                                                                             From 2006/07, the WA Government,
                                                                             through its repairs and maintenance
                                                                             subsidy scheme will contribute $4.4M for
                                                                             repairs and maintenance with communities
                                                                             matching this amount. Total repairs and
                                                                             maintenance funding for 2006/07 - $8.8M.

                                                                             Evaluation of Services
                                                                             New     service    agreements     will   be
                                                                             implemented from 2006/07.         The new
                                                                             agreements have enhanced compliance
                                                                             requirements      and       provide     for
                                                                             organisational reviews. This will influence
                                                                             future policy development around value
                                                                             for money for provision of services.

                                                                             Customer Satisfaction
                                                                             This is an area that DHW/FaCSIA will
                                                                             develop and an agreed strategy for
                                                                             2006/07.

9   Improved             6         Program performance reporting based       S.16 of the Agreement specifies the State’s
    Performance Linked             on national data collection systems and   financial and performance reporting
    to Accountability              good information management.              requirements against the Strategic and
                                                                             Operational Plans in a manner consistent
                                                                             with the National Reporting Framework.

                                                                             In relation to improving data collection for
                                                                             reporting and accountability requirements
                                                                                                                                                     27
                                                                                                NRF
                                                                                                               RELATED
                BBF                                                                       INDICATORS
                                                                                                             OPERATIONAL
KEY OUTCOMES   Outcome   OUTCOME TARGETS   HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                    and HMC
                                                                                                               TARGETS
                Area                                                                      STRATEGIES
                                                                                         (see lists above)
                                           the following strategies are being
                                           implemented:
                                           • Revised service agreement contracts
                                                with enhanced compliance
                                                requirements including specific
                                                information on aspects of housing
                                                management and maintenance. This
                                                should enable us to provide better
                                                information against NRF indicators.
                                           • We note that the ABS CHINS survey
                                                will be implemented late in 2006 that
                                                will enable a snapshot of the state of
                                                housing and infrastructure in
                                                Aboriginal communities. This will
                                                complement EHNS 2004.
                                           • Continued implementation of the
                                                Indigenous Housing Management
                                                System. Refer to s.5.3 of the Plan.
                                           • Launching of the Remote Aboriginal
                                                Housing Infrastructure Planning
                                                Database on to the web in August 2006
                                                that will enable key stakeholders to
                                                directly input current information on
                                                all aspects of our programs and
                                                changing circumstances within
                                                Aboriginal communities.

                                           The above strategies place a stronger
                                           emphasis on the collection of accurate data
                                           and particularly the need to establish
                                           baseline data to measure progress over the
                                           period of the Agreement.

                                           We will continue to work on the Housing
                                           Ministers’ resolutions in order to meet the
                                           agreed requirements.




                                                                                                                  28
                                                                                                                              NRF
                                                                                                                                             RELATED
                         BBF                                                                                            INDICATORS
                                                                                                                                           OPERATIONAL
     KEY OUTCOMES       Outcome         OUTCOME TARGETS                  HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                    and HMC
                                                                                                                                             TARGETS
                         Area                                                                                           STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                       (see lists above)
10   Co-ordination of   7         A ‘whole of government’ approach       •   DHW will continue to work co-
     Services                     that ensures greater coordination of       operatively with other Government
                                  housing and housing related services       agencies and service providers to
                                  linked to improved health and              ensure effective co-ordination of
                                  wellbeing outcomes.                        services. (Appendix C – Activity Area)
                                                                         •   In addition to the above DHW will be
                                                                             actively involved in
                                                                             State/Commonwealth processes for
                                                                             achieving one level of service delivery
                                                                             for the provision of housing,
                                                                             infrastructure, essential and municipal
                                                                             services to all Indigenous communities
                                                                             in WA by June 30 2008.
                                                                         •   WA operates under pooled funding
                                                                             arrangements and NAHS is not
                                                                             separately identified, however, as
                                                                             demonstrated in s.4.4 of the Planning
                                                                             Process the NAHS concept of whole of
                                                                             community large scale investment is
                                                                             being prioritised and implemented.
                                                                             Eg new construction priorities are
                                                                             being integrated with backlog repairs
                                                                             and maintenance programs,
                                                                             community infrastructure investment,
                                                                             essential service upgrades and
                                                                             strategies to improve housing
                                                                             management, governance
                                                                             administration in priority
                                                                             communities. The Fixing Houses for
                                                                             Better Health program priorities are
                                                                             complementing our broader repairs
                                                                             and maintenance strategy.
                                                                         •   The Aboriginal and Remote
                                                                             Communities Power Supply Project
                                                                             (ARCPSP), a partnership between the
                                                                             Office of Energy and the
                                                                             Commonwealth, is focusing on new
                                                                             power supply arrangements including
                                                                                                                                                29
                                                                                                                              NRF
                                                                                                                                             RELATED
                       BBF                                                                                              INDICATORS
                                                                                                                                           OPERATIONAL
     KEY OUTCOMES     Outcome         OUTCOME TARGETS                  HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                      and HMC
                                                                                                                                             TARGETS
                       Area                                                                                             STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                       (see lists above)
                                                                           generation, distribution and retail, in a
                                                                           number of communities on the
                                                                           Dampier Peninsula and the Kimberley
                                                                           region. Once the power supply
                                                                           arrangements are in place, the pilot
                                                                           communities will be supplied with
                                                                           electricity generated by an
                                                                           independent power producer. DHW
                                                                           will upgrade the internal wiring of all
                                                                           houses prior to ARCPSP.
                                                                       •   A metering plan will be introduced to
                                                                           coincide with the introduction of
                                                                           standard electricity charges. Horizon
                                                                           Power will mange the retailing of
                                                                           electricity to consumers.
                                                                       •   This process will assist FaCSIA’s
                                                                           strategic agenda to implement external
                                                                           service arrangements for power
                                                                           supply and management of power
                                                                           stations.

11   Smaller Remote   8         Progress the housing, infrastructure   •   Current services to smaller remote
     Indigenous                 and essential services provision to        communities are limited, however, we
     Communities                smaller remote Indigenous                  will continue to provide RAESP
                                communities (homelands and                 emergency breakdown services to
                                outstations).                              ensure basic essential services can be
                                                                           maintained. Approximately one-third
                                                                           of the State’s fully funded contribution
                                                                           to the RAESP service is allocated to
                                                                           emergency breakdowns.
                                                                       •   Under the Agreement Commonwealth
                                                                           and State Governments have agreed to
                                                                           develop a strategy for progressing the
                                                                           joint funding, planning, co-ordination
                                                                           and management of housing,
                                                                           infrastructure and essential services to



                                                                                                                                                30
                                                                                              NRF
                                                                                                             RELATED
                BBF                                                                     INDICATORS
                                                                                                           OPERATIONAL
KEY OUTCOMES   Outcome   OUTCOME TARGETS   HOW / KEY STRATEGIES / POLICY                  and HMC
                                                                                                             TARGETS
                Area                                                                    STRATEGIES
                                                                                       (see lists above)
                                                smaller communities beyond those
                                               currently already serviced by the
                                               Western Australian Government.
                                           •   It is acknowledged, however, that
                                                small communities and outstations (<
                                                50 persons) are lower priority given
                                                the need to strategically allocate
                                                funding where it can have the most
                                                effective outcomes and impacts.
                                                (Refer to 4.4) The moratorium on
                                               outstations is being observed and no
                                               new investment in new housing will
                                               occur.




                                                                                                                31
9   STATE PROJECT LISTING




                            32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
APPENDIX A




        47
                                                                                                                               APPENDIX B

                                                   HOUSING MANAGEMENT REPORT

Name Of Organisation:                                       1/7-30/9/2006   1/10-31/12/2006   1/1-31/03/2007   1/4-30/6/2007

Rental Collection
Target Rent Collection for the Quarter
Actual Rent Collection for the Quarter
Percentage (%) of Direct Debit Participation

Maintenance
Expenditure on Maintenance for the Quarter
Amount of Maintenance Identified as Tenant Liability
How Much Tenant Liability Collected this Quarter

Rental Stock
How Many Permanent Properties
Bedsitter
1 Bedroom
2 Bedroom
3 Bedroom
4 Bedroom
Other
Number of Properties Occupied
Number of Properties Unoccupied
Number of Signed Tenancies

Property Inspections
Number of Planned Property Inspections Completed
Number of Ingoing Property Inspections Completed
Number of Vacant Property Inspections Completed

Population
Number of Permanent Residents
Number of Visitors

                                                                                                                                       48
                                                                 APPENDIX C

KEY OUTCOME 10 - ACTIVITY AREA


    Activity Area                         Relevant Agencies
 Essential Services   Office of Energy, Office of Water Strategies,
                      Department of Indigenous Affairs, Horizon Power,
                      Water Corporation WA, Parsons Brinckerhoff (RAESP
                      Program Manager), Regional Service Providers,
                      Commonwealth Indigenous Co-ordination Centres,
                      Fire and Emergency Services, FaCSIA, Sinclair Knight
                      Merz (Program Managers - As Constructed Surveys),
                      Department of Health (Water Purity Committee),
                      Aboriginal Communities
 Land Use Planning    Department of Planning and Infrastructure,
                      Aboriginal Lands Trust, Local Government
                      Authorities and Aboriginal Communities
 Program Planning     Commonwealth ICCs, FaCSIA , DIA, DPI,
 and Policy           Department of Health, ALT, DOTARS, Local
                      Government Environmental Health Officers and
                      Aboriginal Communities
 Environmental        Department of Health, DIA, Local Government
 Health/              Environmental Health Officers, Local Government
 Community            Authorities, Regional Service Providers (RAESP),
 Infrastructure       Office of Energy, Office of Water Strategies, FaCSIA
 Construction of      Local Government Authorities, ALT, Aboriginal
 housing, and other   communities, private contractors and project
 structures, road     managers (Architects), Health Habitat, DPI, ICHOs,
 construction,        Disability Services Commission, Parsons Brinckerhoff
 housing              , Sinclair Knight Merz (Program Managers - As
 maintenance          Constructed Surveys), FaCSIA, Main Roads WA,
                      Telstra
 Housing              ICHOs, external regional providers, DIA, Homeswest,
 Management and       contracted support service providers (including
 Tenancy Support      Homemaker Services)




                                                                             49
                                                                                                                                                                          APPENDIX D


NRF REPORTING


                                     NRF Indicators                                        2004/05            2005/06                            Notes
D1       Number of permanent dwellings at 30 June 2006                                        2530*             2866#
D2       Number of improvised dwellings at 30 June 2006                                        347*               347*
D3       Number of permanent dwellings not connected to water at 30 June 2006                  190*                  0       To be provided by 30/09/06 ###
D4       Number of permanent dwellings not connected to sewerage at 30 June 2006               236*                  0       To be provided by 30/09/06 ###
D5       Number of permanent dwellings not connected to electricity at 30 June 2006            151*                  0       To be provided by 30/09/06 ###
D6       Total number of ICHO managed permanent dwellings by number of                                                       To be provided by 30/09/06
         bedrooms (5+, 4, 3, 2, 1) at 30 June 2006
D7       Total rent charged to all tenants for the year ending 30 June 2006                                                  To be provided by 30/09/06
D8       Total rent collected from tenants for the year ending 30 June 2006                                                  To be provided by 30/09/06
D9       Total recurrent expenditure for organisation for the year ending 30 June 2006    $4,800,440        $6,268,316
D10      Total capital expenditure for the year ending 30 June 2006                      $29,026,948       $60,052,748
D12      Total number of permanent dwellings occupied at 30 June 2006                            N/A               N/A       Data has been requested as part of Service
                                                                                                                             Agreement requirement.
D13      Number of dwellings with overcrowding at 30 June 2006                                              PDM 6.2##        Population Density Measure only
D14      Total number of persons living in permanent dwellings at 30 June 2006                                               (See note re D13)
D20      Number of ICHOs with a housing management plan                                                                      To be provided by 30/09/06
D21      Total number of Indigenous employees in ICHOs at 30 June 2006                                                       To be provided by 30/09/06
D22      Number of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who had completed accredited                                                To be provided by 30/09/06
         training at 30 June 2006
D23      Number of Indigenous employees in ICHOs who were undertaking accredited                                             To be provided by 30/09/06
         training at 30 June 2006
D24      Total number of employees in ICHOs at 30 June 2006                                                                  To be provided by 30/09/06

*   Data from WA's Environmental Health Needs Survey 2003, for all WA communities
#   EHNS did not include all communities. Subsequent data collection for AHI program planning process indicates 2866 permanent dwellings as at 30 June 2006 which will be
    used as our baseline data.
## Individual household information is not available and from experience changes regularly due to mobility of Indigenous people. PDM figures is the average across all
    communities. Community level PDMs are available on request and are used for program planning purposes. Target PDM in priority communities = 5.0 (Key Outcome No 1)
### RAESP data for 91 communities serviced for 2005-06. This represents 80% of population.




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