A Necessary Inclusion: Native Literature in Native Studies

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					A Necessary Inclusion:
				
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Description: In Canada, students who want to study Native literatures mostly enroll in English departments, as it is through them that they will have easy access to presenting their work at conferences; are, as graduate students, in the "right" departmental box for research grants from the social sciences and humanities (which categorizes Native Studies under "other"); and, last not least, learn theoretical approaches that, generally speaking, adhere to literary analysis more narrowly than taking courses in Native or Indigenous Studies, which requires community-linked scholarship with an ethical orientation.1 Further, only a few Native Studies departments in Canada include (a few) literature courses in their curriculum, and there is no Association of Canadian Aboriginal Literatures that could promote scholarship on literature. Aboriginal verbal arts draw attention to complexities, and it is exactly because of their lack of transparency; their suggestive, allusive, but not prescriptive characteristics; their avoidance of closure and easy solutions; their shifts and gaps and open-endedness that Aboriginal literatures should become an intrinsic component in the discipline of Native Studies, which, with its mandate to further the struggle toward decolonization, continuously engages in critical inquiry.
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