Working Paper November Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages by bigbubbamust

VIEWS: 14 PAGES: 15

									                                                     
Working Paper 
November 2008 
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
                              
                              
                              
           Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and 
             Linkages to Care and Treatment 
                              
                                                     
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
 
          Table of Contents 
           
           
              I.      Introduction 
              II.     Background 
              III.    Providing treatment and care to HIV infected children  
              IV.     Early  infant  diagnosis  of  infants  and  children  exposed  to  or  infected  with 
                      HIV and linkage to treatment 
                      a.  Optimizing follow‐up of known exposed infants from PMTCT services 
                                i.  Scaling up HIV PCR 
                               ii.  Child Health Cards 
                      b. Provider‐initiated testing and counseling of sick children 
                                i. Child Health Days 




Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                      2
Working Paper – November 2008 
          Introduction 
          For  over  fifty  years,  UNICEF  has  been  dedicated  to  improving  maternal,  newborn  and  child 
          health around the world.  In the age of HIV this commitment has translated itself into our work 
          to help governments strengthen their health systems’ response to HIV. Today, interventions for 
          preventing HIV transmission from mothers to their babies and for treating HIV‐infected children 
          are  established  and  functioning  to  at  least  some  extent  in  nearly  every  country  in  the  world.  
          Progress  is  being  seen  in  many  of  these  countries  in  preventing  mother‐to‐child  transmission 
          and  putting  children  infected  with  HIV  on  life  saving  treatment.    However,  in  order  to  ensure 
          that  all  children  infected  with  HIV  receive  essential  treatment  and  care,  few  things  are  more 
          important than early and accurate HIV diagnosis. Without care and treatment, about one third 
          of children living with HIV will die in their first year of life and almost 50% by the second year of 
          life. In 2007, only 8% of infants born to women with HIV were tested within the first 2 months of 
          their  life–  a  critical  intervention  to  identify  those  who  are  infected  and  initiate  them  on 
          treatment  in  a  timely  manner.1    Consequently,  a  small  fraction  of  these  children  received  the 
          proper care and support needed. This paper describes the various processes that are necessary 
          to  implement  in  countries  in  order  for  all  infants  and  children  infected  with  HIV  to  receive 
          essential health services which translate into real progress on child survival.  
           
          Background 
          By the end of 2007, an estimated 33 million [30.3 million to 36.1 million] people were living with 
          HIV. The HIV epidemic is taking a heavy toll on women and children, especially in sub‐Saharan 
          Africa where women and girls accounted for more than 60% of all infections.  On 2007 alone, an 
          estimated  370,000  (330,000‐410,000)  children  younger  than  15  years  of  age  were  newly 
          infected with HIV, mainly through mother‐to‐child transmission.2 Almost all of these infections 
          in  infants  could  be  avoided  by  timely  delivery  of  known  effective  interventions  to  prevent 
          mother‐to‐child  transmission.    The  ultimate  goal  of  prevention  mother‐to‐child  transmission 
          (PMTCT)  and  paediatric  HIV  care  and  treatment  services  is  to  reduce  maternal  and  child 
          mortality  by  delivering  a  comprehensive  package  of  services  that  includes  antiretroviral 
          treatment  for  mothers,  cotrimoxazole  prophylaxis  for  mothers  and  infants,  and  early  infant 
          diagnosis  and  initiation  of  antiretroviral  treatment,  with  operational  linkages  to  child  survival 
          interventions (immunization, nutrition, malaria prevention) and sexual and reproductive health 
          care.  Scaling  up  this  comprehensive  range  of  interventions  will  bring  countries  closer  to  Unite 
          for  Children,  Unite  against  AIDS  goals  by  preventing  new  HIV  infections  among  women  and 
          children;  ensuring  that  women  living  with  HIV  and  children  exposed  to  HIV  have  access  to 
          treatment and care; and prolonging and preserving the quality of life for mothers, children and 
          families. 
           
          At the end of 2007, 33% of pregnant women living with HIV received antiretrovirals to prevent 
          mother‐to‐child transmission (491 000 of the total estimated 1.5 million pregnant women living 
          with  HIV).3  This  represents  a  noteworthy  increase  from  23%  in  2006,  15%  in  2005  and  10%  in 
          2004 (Fig. 1). 
           



          1 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
          2 2008 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic. Geneva, UNAIDS, 2008. 
          3 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
           
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                       3
Working Paper – November 2008 
          Figure 1.  Percentage of pregnant women with HIV receiving antiretrovirals for preventing mother‐to‐child 
          transmission of HIV in low and middle‐income countries, 2004‐2007 

            % of pregnant women living with HIV recieving ARVs for
                                                                     50%

                                                                     45%

                                                                     40%
                                                                                                                                33%
                                                                     35%

                                                                     30%
                                                                                                                 23%
                                   PMTCT




                                                                     25%

                                                                     20%
                                                                                                15%
                                                                     15%
                                                                                  10%
                                                                     10%

                                                                     5%

                                                                     0%
                                                                                2004            2005           2006            2007

                                                                                                                                            
          Source: UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children 
          in the health sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
           
          Because progress is being made in prevention of mother‐to‐children transmission of HIV, the 
          number of new infections in children is starting to decline (Figure 2).  However in 2007, 
          approximately one million pregnant women living with HIV gave birth without access to PMTCT 
          services. 3 
           
          Figure 2.  New infections among children under 5 years of age, 1990‐2007 
               600

                                                     500

                                                     400

                                                     300

                                                     200

                                                     100

                                                                     0
                                                                           1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

                                          Source:  2008 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic, UNAIDS

                                                                                                             
          HIV and AIDS are increasingly impacting on the health and welfare of children.   At the end of 
          2007, 2 million [1.9 million to 2.3 million] children younger than 15 years were estimated to be 
          living with HIV.4 Evidence has shown that HIV infection follows a more aggressive course among 
          infants and children than among adults, with 30% dying by age 1 year, and 50% by age 2 years 
          without access to life‐saving drugs, including antiretroviral therapy and preventive interventions 



          4 2008 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic. Geneva, UNAIDS, 2008. 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                                                               4
Working Paper – November 2008 
          such  as  cotrimoxazole  prophylaxis.5  In  2007,  an  estimated  270,000  children  younger  than  15 
          years of age died of HIV‐related  causes, with over 90% living in Sub‐Saharan Africa.  6 Many of 
          the  270,000  children  who  died  in  2007  never  received  an  HIV  diagnosis  or  entered  in  to  HIV 
          care.  7.Most of these deaths could have been avoided through early diagnosis of HIV and timely 
          provision of effective care and treatment. 
           
          There are 13 high burden countries which account for 75 per cent of the estimated 1.5 million 
          pregnant women living with HIV each year in low and middle in come countries and nearly 75 
          per cent of all children living with HIV.8  All but one of these countries (India) are in sub‐Saharan 
          Africa.    The  coverage  of  antiretrovirals  for  preventing  mother‐to‐child  transmission  varies 
          among the 10 countries that have the largest number of pregnant women with HIV. This tells us 
          that  the  scale‐up  of  PMTCT  services  is  possible  even  in  the  most  affected  countries  but  that 
          many children continue to be infected with HIV through mother‐to‐child transmission and early 
          diagnosis is needed to plan for appropriate follow up action.  
           
          Figure 6.  Percentage of pregnant women living with HIV receiving antiretrovirals for preventing 
          mother‐to‐child transmission of HIV in the 10 countries with the highest estimated number of 
          pregnant women living with HIV, 2007 
           250,000                                                                      100

                                                                                        90

           200,000                                                                      80      UNGASS 2010 target

                                                                                        70

           150,000                                                                      60

                                                                                        50

           100,000                                                                      40

                                                                                        30    Estimated number of HIV-
                                                                                              infected pregnant women, 2007
            50,000                                                                      20
                                                                                              % of HIV+ pregnant women
                                                                                        10
                                                                                              receiving ARVs to reduce the
                  0                                                                     0     risk of MTCT 2007
                                          ia




                                         da




                                                                                    a
                                                                           i
                                          ia




                                                           a
                                           e




                                                                         ia
                      ca




                                           a




                                                                  aw




                                                                                 di
                                        qu




                                                        bi
                                       ny
                                        er

                                       an




                                                                       op
                                      an
                     ri




                                                                               In
                                                       m


                                                               al
                              g




                                    Ke
                                     bi
                  Af




                                                                     hi
                                    nz




                                                     Za
                                   Ug
                           Ni




                                                               M
                                  am




                                                                   Et
                  h




                                Ta
               ut




                               oz
             So




                             M




                                                                                                                               
          Source: UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children 
          in the health sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
           
          In  these  most  impacted  countries,  HIV  infection  has  significantly  affected  child  survival.    The 
          World  Health  Report  2005  estimated  that  HIV  infection  contributed  to  3%  of  global  mortality 
          among  children  younger  than  5  years  of  age  in  2005.9  In  sub‐Saharan  Africa  as  a  whole,  the 


          5 Newell, Marie‐Louise, et al., ‘Mortality of Infected and Uninfected Infants Born to HIV‐infected Mothers in Africa: A 
          pooled analysis’, The Lancet, vol. 364, no. 9441, 2–8 October 2004, pp. 1236–1243. 
          6 2008 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic. Geneva, UNAIDS, 2008. 
          7 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
          8 South Africa, Nigeria, Tanzania, Mozambique, Kenya, Zambia, Malawi, Ethiopia, India, Lesotho, Swaziland, Uganda 
          and Zimbabwe.  
          9 World Health Report, 2005. Make every mother and child count.  Geneva. World Health Organization, 2005 
          (http://www.who.int/whr/2005/whr2005_en.pdf) 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                              5
Working Paper – November 2008 
          proportion of mortality among children younger than 5 years attributable to HIV was about 7% 
          and more than 50% in some of the most severely affected countries.  HIV has been the leading 
          cause  of  death  among  children  younger  than  five  years  of  age  in  six  countries,  all  in  East  and 
          Southern Africa (Table 1).10 It is important to note that these estimates are from 2001, before 
          most of these countries had expanded PMTCT and paediatric care and treatment programmes.  
          Updated child mortality estimates that have adjustments made for HIV/AIDS are currently being 
          finalised and are expected to be available for 11 countries in early 2009.  
           
          Encouraging data coming from Botswana is showing that child mortality is beginning to decline.  
          In  2006,  Botswana’s  child  mortality  was  124  deaths  for  1000  live  births;  the  new  2007  figure 
          shows that mortality decreased to 40 per 1000 live births.  Similar declines are also being seen in 
          Lesotho  and  Swaziland.  11  A  major  reason  for  this  decline  in  child  mortality  is  linked  to  the 
          success of Botswana’s national PMTCT and paediatric HIV care and treatment programmes.  In 
          2007, over 95% of all pregnant women living with HIV received ARVs for PMTCT and about 9,500 
          infected children received ART, a 75 per cent increase from 2005 when 5,400 children were on 
          treatment.12    
           
          Table 1. Percentage of deaths attributable to HIV among children younger than five years, selected high‐
          burden countries 
          Country                                    Deaths among children younger   
                                                                                     
                                                     than five years attributable to HIV 
                                                     (%)                             
          South Africa                               57                              
                                                                                     
          Lesotho                               56                                   
          Botswana                              54                                   
          Namibia                               53                                   
          Swaziland                                                                  
                                                47 
                                                                                     
          Zimbabwe                              41                                   
          Source: World health statistics 2008, Geneva. World Health Organization, 2008 
           
          Providing treatment and care to HIV infected children  
          The  number  of  children  who  received  antiretroviral  treatment  rose  dramatically  to  almost 
          200,000 in 2007, up from around 127,000 in 2006 and 75,000 in 2005 (Figure 3). 13 Yet, coverage 
          will need to be greatly expanded if the Unite for Children, United against AIDS goal of providing 
          antiretroviral treatment, cotrimoxazole or both to 80 per cent of children in need by 2010 is to 
          be met.  
           
          In  addition  to  overall  scale‐up,  new  evidence  highlights  early  HIV  diagnosis  and  antiretroviral 
          treatment as critical for infants and indicates that a significant number of lives can be saved by 
          initiating antiretroviral treatment for HIV‐positive infants immediately after diagnosis within the 


          10 World Health Statistics 2008. Geneva. World Health Organization, 2008 
          (http://www.who.int/healthinfo/statistics/en)  
          11 Child mortality 30 years after the Alma‐Ata declaration. Lancet Vol 372 Sept 13, 2008 
          12 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
          13 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                        6
Working Paper – November 2008 
          first 12 weeks of life. The Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy (CHER) study from South 
          Africa demonstrates a 76 per cent reduction in mortality at one year of age when treatment was 
          initiated  within  this  time  period.14    Other  studies  have  shown  that  late  initiation  of  treatment 
          results in a child’s immune system to be severely compromised. One study showed that infants 
          and children started on ART when they were already severely immunodeficient never regained 
          normal  levels  of  immune  functioning  even  after  five  years  on  treatment.15,16    Another  study 
          showed that such infants and children are more likely to die than those children who received 
          treatment at an earlier stage. 17   
           
          Figure 3.  Number of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in low and middle income countries, 2005‐
          2007 
                   children <15 years reciving ART (thousands)




                                                                 250


                                                                 200


                                                                 150

                                                                                               198,000
                                                                 100
                                                                                127,000
                                                                  50
                                                                       75,000


                                                                   0
                                                                       2005      2006           2007
                C. & E. Europe and the Caucasus
                Middle East and North Africa
                South Asia
                East Asia and Pacific
                Latin America & Caribbean
                West and Central Africa
                Eastern and Southern Africa
                                                                                                                      
          Source: UNICEF calculations based on data collected through the PMTCT and Paediatric HIV Report Card 
          process and reported in:  UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for 
          women and children in the health sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
           
          Clinical guidelines issued by WHO therefore now recommend that all infants younger than one 
          year  of  age  with  confirmed  HIV  infection  should  start  antiretroviral  therapy,  irrespective  of 
          clinical  or  immunological  stage.  Previously,  recommendations  to  initiate  antiretroviral  therapy 
          among  children  were  based  on  an  immunological  and  clinical  assessment  before  initiating 
          treatment, and treatment was recommended only for the most severely affected children.  
           


          14 Violari, A., et al., ‘Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy (CHER) Study’, presentation at the 4th IAS 
          Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Sydney, 22–25 July 2007. 
          15 Patel, K., et al., ‘Long‐Term Effects of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on CD4+ Cell Evolution Among Children 
          and Adolescents with HIV: 5 years and counting’, Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 46, no. 11, 1 June 2008, pp. 1751–
          1760. 
          16 Patel, K., et al., ‘Recovery of immune status with HAART is dependent on CD4% at time HAART is initiated’, Clinical 
          Infectious Diseases, 2008 (In Press).  
          17 Arrivé, Elise, et al., ‘Response to Anti‐Retroviral Therapy (ART) in Children in Sub‐Saharan Africa: A pooled analysis 
          of clinical databases – the KIDS‐ART‐LINC Collaboration’, poster abstract presented at the 14th Conference on 
          Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Los Angeles, 25–28 February 2007. 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                               7
Working Paper – November 2008 
          Even though  it is widely known that early initiation of ART in infants with HIV saves lives, and 
          that  children  respond  as  well  to  ART  in  low  and  middle  income  countries  as  in  high‐income 
          countries,18,19,20,21  very  few  children  under  the  age  of  two  are  currently  receiving  treatment.  
          Several  studies  suggest  that  the  median  age  at  which  children  living  in  low‐resource  countries 
          begin  treatment  is  between  five  and  nine  years  old,  much  later  than  children  living  in  high‐
          resource countries.22    
           
          BOX 1:  Estimates of children in need of treatment.  
          The  revised  clinical  guidelines  issued  by  WHO  have  implications  for  the  estimation  of  HIV 
          infection  among  infants  and  children.  In  July  2008  UNICEF  convened  a  special  meeting  of  the 
          UNAIDS  Reference  Group  on Estimates, Modelling and Projections to review the methods  and 
          assumptions  underpinning  the  estimation  of  the  burden  of  HIV  among  children  to  produce 
          estimates  of  the  number  of  infants  and  children  who  need  antiretroviral  therapy.    These 
          numbers are expected  to  be available in 2009 after  a series of regional HIV  estimates  training 
          workshops  take  place.    The  new  estimates  will  allow  for  the  calculations  of  coverage  rates  of 
          children  on  treatment,  facilitate  the  setting  of  national  and  sub‐national  targets  for  children, 
          and  through  better  tracking  of  service  coverage,  ultimately  improve  their  access  to  life‐saving 
          treatment.   
           
          Early diagnosis of infants and children exposed to or infected with HIV and linkage to 
          treatment 
          Identifying all children infected with HIV as early as possible is an essential component to child 
          survival. Without the proper care and support of these children, half will die before their second 
          birthday.    Early  infant  diagnosis  and  treatment  reduces  morbidity  and  mortality  and  leads  to 
          better  treatment  outcomes  for  a  child.    As  countries  scale‐up  early  infant  diagnosis,  the 
          processes of identifying these children should be introduced as a package of services in order to 
          strengthen  over  all  health  systems.  This  package  of  services  should  include  infant  feeding 
          counselling and support, nutritional support and cotrimoxazole.  The process of ensuring that all 
          exposed infants receive an HIV test provides an important opportunity for health care workers 
          to deliver comprehensive interventions for women and children.   
           
          Optimizing follow‐up of known exposed infants from PMTCT services 
          As stated earlier, many countries are moving towards national coverage of services for PMTCT; 
          however  most  children  born  to  women  with  HIV  are  not  being  systematically  monitored  and 
          followed up during the postpartum period and missing out on life‐saving services.  Experience 
          from  South  Africa  reveals  that,  without  a  systematic  and  structured  plan  that  includes  early 
          testing at 6 weeks, up to 85% of HIV‐exposed infants are lost to follow‐up from clinics providing 


          18 Puthanakit T et al. Efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV‐infected children participating in Thailand’s 
          National Access to Antiretroviral Programme.  Clinical and Infectious Diseases, 2005, 41:100‐107. 
          19 Wamalwa DC et al.  Early response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV‐1 infected Kenyan children.  
          Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 2007, 45:311‐317.  
          20 Song Ret al.  Efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV‐1 infected children in Kenya.  Pediatrics, 2007, 
          120:e856‐e861. 
          21 Zhang et al. Chinese pediatric highly active antiretroviral therapy observational cohort: a 1 year analysis of clinical, 
          immunologic, and virologic outcomes.  Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 2007, 46:594‐598.  
          22 See, for example: Janssens, Bart, et al., ‘Effectiveness of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV‐positive 
          Children: Evaluation at 12 months in  routine program in Cambodia’, Pediatrics, vol. 120, no. 5, pp. e1134–e1140; and 
          Reddi, Anand, et al., ‘Preliminary Outcomes of a Paediatric Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort from KwaZulu‐
          Natal, South Africa’, BMC Pediatrics, 17 March 2007, vol. 7, no. 13. 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                                 8
Working Paper – November 2008 
          services for PMTCT at 1 year of age, with 75‐80% already lost to follow‐up at 6 months of age.23  
          The follow‐up of known HIV‐exposed children is not only necessary to identify infants with HIV 
          to  ensure  the  timely  initiation  of  treatment  and  care,  but  to  also  avoid  postpartum  HIV 
          transmission and improve overall infant health outcomes.   
           
          Scaling up HIV PCR 
          However, standard HIV antibody testing cannot identify infected infants in their first year of life, 
          as  it  also  detects  maternal  HIV  antibodies  that  are  transferred  to  the  baby  during  pregnancy 
          (and subsequently decline slowly in the first year of life). More demanding testing methods that 
          rely on detecting HIV virus, or virological tests (HIV DNA PCR, HIV RNA PCR, bDNA, NASBA), are 
          required for diagnosing young infants.24  
           
          Virological testing detects HIV DNA or RNA. HIV DNA testing can also be reliably performed on 
          specimens collected onto filter paper, or dried blood spots (DBS) and sent to laboratories with 
          capacity  for  testing.  The  use  of  DBS  only  requires  a  few  drops  of  blood  from  an  infant.  Once 
          specimens are collected, they can be easily stored and transferred without cold‐chain systems 
          to  centralized  testing  locations  for  analysis.  The  use  of  DBS  enables  blood  samples  to  be 
          collected  in  remote  locations  and  allows  countries  with  a  limited  number  of  specialized 
          laboratories to expand access to virological testing. To date the HIV DNA PCR is the only testing 
          method  that  can  use  DBS  specimens  and  is  therefore  most  useful  in  the  context  of  PMTCT 
          follow‐up.    HIV  RNA  methods  are  also  reliable  and  can  be  done  on  plasma  and  whole  blood 
          specimens  and  are  well  suited  to  inpatient  or  sick  infants  where  specimens  using  DBS  are  not 
          essential.   
           
          Figure  4  shows  how  a  PCR  network  using  DBS  works.  What  it  shows  is  that  results  can  be 
          analyzed and returned to the clinic within just two weeks. Rapid return of and action on results 
          is essential to minimize morbidity and mortality in infants considering the very rapid progression 
          of disease in this population.  
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           

          23 Patton J et al.  Evaluation of Dried Whole Blood Spots Obtained by Heel or Finger Stick as an Alternative to Venous 
          Blood for Diagnosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in Vertically Exposed Infants in the Routine 
          Diagnostics Laboratory.  Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, February 2007, Vol. 14, No. 2.  
          24 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                           9
Working Paper – November 2008 
           
           
           
           
          Figure 4.  Example of PCR network using DBS, Kenya   




                                                                                                                               
          Steps for using DBS for PCR testing, Kenyan example.   
             1. Samples are collected from infant and placed on filter paper. 
             2. Samples placed in drying racks for a day to fully dry. They are placed in individual 
                 envelopes with desiccant and then placed in a larger airtight zip‐lock bag with 
                 humidity indicators for transport. 
             3. Samples sent via courier to a laboratory where PCR testing capacity is in place.  
             4. Adequateness of samples is assessed upon arrival at the laboratory; adequate 
                 samples are analysed for the presence of HIV and determined to be either a 
                 positive or negative result. 
             5. Results sent back to the centres via courier or e‐mail for quickest turnaround. In 
                 addition, all results sent via e‐mail are also sent via courier to ensure good 
                 records. 
             6. Results provided to the caregiver of the infant at the next clinic visit, and follow‐
                 up continues in accordance with the national algorithm for early infant diagnosis. 
           
          Some countries have made great strides in providing access to early infant diagnosis of HIV. In 
          2007, 30 low‐ and middle‐income countries used dried blood spot filter paper to perform DNA 
          PCR  testing  for  HIV  in  infants,  up  from  17  countries  in  2005  (Fig.  5).25    DBS  has  been  used  for 
          transporting  specimens  to  a  centralized  laboratory  for  HIV  DNA  testing  in  several  countries  in 
          sub‐Saharan Africa (Botswana, Côte d’Ivoire, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Zambia and others). 

          25 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                     10
Working Paper – November 2008 
          Preliminary  data  from  Botswana,  Rwanda  and  South  Africa  show  a  significant  increase  in  the 
          numbers of HIV‐exposed infants being tested as a result of this intervention.   
           
          Fig. 5. Number of low‐ and middle‐income countries with virological testing and policies for provider‐
          initiated testing and counselling for infants and young children, 2005–2007. 
                                   90
                                            2005 (n=79)                                                      78
                                   80                                                              76
                                            2006 (n=108)
                                   70
                                            2007 (n=109)
             Number of countries




                                   60

                                   50                                                     47

                                   40
                                                                  30
                                   30
                                                          23
                                   20           17

                                   10

                                   0
                                        Number of countries using dried blood     Number of countries with a policy on
                                            spots for virological testing       provider initiated testing and counselling
                                                                                      for infants and young children

                                                                                                                              
          Source: UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children 
          in the health sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
           
          Even where virological testing is available through DBS, transport time and logistics can still pose 
          barriers to providing timely results.  The first barrier is that specimens stay too long at the clinic 
          before they are shipped to the laboratory for analysis, and the second is that even when results 
          – positive or negative – reach the clinic, they are not communicated in a timely manner to the 
          patient and caregiver so that appropriate action can be taken.  
           
          Child Health Cards 
          Maternal,  newborn  and  child  health  clinics,  where  a  child  often  receives  his  or  her  first  set  of 
          vaccinations, provide important opportunities to identify and test infants and children who are 
          known  to  be  exposed  to  HIV.  Several  countries,  including  Cameroon,  Malawi,  Rwanda, 
          Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania and Zimbabwe have revised child health cards to include 
          HIV‐related  information,  making  tracking  of  exposed  children  easier  and  increasing  the 
          likelihood that infants known to be exposed to HIV are referred for virological testing and put on 
          treatment.    These  cards  have  also  helped  exposed  children  receive  other  critical  interventions 
          such  as  cotrimoxazole  prophylaxis  and  nutritional  support.  Many  countries  have  high  levels  of 
          immunization coverage, and the age at which infants receive their first dose of the diphtheria, 
          pertussis,  tetanus  immunization  (DPT1)  –  at  or  around  six  weeks  of  age  –  is  an  ideal  time  for 
          early  virological  testing  for  HIV  as  part  of  a  comprehensive  package  of  services  essential  for  a 
          child’s health.   
           




Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                             11
Working Paper – November 2008 
          Box 2.  Documenting the 
          mother’s HIV status on the 
          child health card in 
          Zimbabwe 
          In Zimbabwe, the mother’s 
          HIV status is documented 
          on the child health card so 
          that health workers seeing 
          the child at his or her six‐
          week visit can provide 
          appropriate care to the 
          child. This includes referral 
          for virological testing to 
          determine whether the 
          child has been infected with 
          HIV and requires referral to 
          treatment services. 
           
                                                                 
          Provider‐initiated testing and counseling of sick children. 
          However, to‐date most children are entering HIV care and treatment programmes for children 
          at an older age after being identified in acute and chronic care facilities rather than as a follow‐
          up of services for preventing mother‐to‐child transmission. A recent report from Malawi showed 
          that  80%  of  children  were  referred  to  ART  clinics  as  a  result  of  provider  initiated  testing  and 
          counselling in acute and chronic care facilities.26   
           
          In  countries  such  as  Malawi  and  Zambia,  provider‐initiated  testing  and  counselling  of  sick 
          children has  helped to substantially increase the numbers of HIV‐infected infants and  children 
          who are detected. In 2007, 78 countries reported that they have a policy on provider‐initiated 
          testing and counselling for infants and young children, up from only 47 countries in 2005 (Fig. 
          5).27 
           
          Child Health Days 
          Another modality for scaling up early diagnosis of young children takes advantage of child health 
          days,  organized  in  many  countries  to  deliver  health  and  nutrition  services  on  a  large  scale. 
          During  child  health  days  in  Lesotho  in  2007,  more  than  4,400  children  were  tested  for  HIV 
          (including some through  DBS PCR) and screened for tuberculosis and malnutrition. Nearly 100 
          per  cent  of  participants  (adults  and  children)  were  tested.  Overall  HIV  prevalence  among 
          children  was  3  per  cent,  and  children  who  tested  positive  were  immediately  referred  to 
          appropriate  care  at  the  nearest  antiretroviral  treatment  clinic.28    As  a  model  for  provider‐
          initiated  HIV  testing,  the  Lesotho  experience  is  an  important  one  to  highlight  and  discuss, 
          because of its high participation rate and seeming effectiveness.   

          26 HIV unit, Department of Clinical Services.  Ministry of Health; National TB Control Program; Lighthouse Trust, 
          Lilongwe; and United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Malawi, ‘Report of a country‐wide survey of 
          HIV/AIDS services in Malawi for the year 2006’,    
          27 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
          28 Preliminary and summary reports on Child Health Days in Lesotho provided by UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa 
          Regional Office, February 2008 (internal documents).  
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                      12
Working Paper – November 2008 
           
           
          How UNICEF can contribute to early infant diagnosis scale up and strengthening the 
          continuum of care for children and mothers in high burden countries 
           
          The  scale‐up  of  paediatric  HIV  care  and  treatment  is  possible  and  necessary  for  child  survival.  
          Uptake  of  antiretroviral  therapy  in  children  increased  between  2005  and  2007  in  13  countries 
          that  account  for  three  quarters  of  children  living  with  HIV  (Fig.  7).  The  number  of  children 
          receiving  antiretroviral  therapy  increased  2.6  times  in  South  Africa,  3  times  in  Kenya,  nearly  4 
          times in Mozambique and nearly 5 times in Zimbabwe. 29 
           
          Figure 7.  Number of children younger than 15 years receiving ART in 13 countries with high number of 
          pregnant women living with HIV, 2005‐2007 
                                                                                                                                                                 32,060
             South Africa                                                                   12,247
                                                                                                                                    23,369
                                                                                                        15,345
                 Nigeria        900
                                                       5,279
                                                                                                       15,090
                  Kenya                                                          10,000
                                                      5,000
                                                                                          11,602
                 Zambia                                           7,200
                                                      5,000
                                                                                      11,176
               Tanzania               2,318
                                              3,576
                                                                                   10,439
                 Malawi           1,999
                                                          5,763
                                                                           8,887
                    India               2,959
                                1,300
                                                                         8,532
                 Uganda                                               7,800
                                                      5,000
                                                                          8237
              Zimbabwe                            4367
                                1,700
                                                              6,320                                                                                   2005    2006    2007
            Mozambique          1,686
                                              3,443
                                                  4,534
                Ethiopia             2,512
                                1,260
                                    2123
              Swaziland         1155
                                851
                                 1553
                 Lesotho        1143
                                623


                            0                            5,000                     10,000                15,000           20,000             25,000          30,000          35,000

                                                                                                     Number of children receiving ART

                                                                                                                                                                                       
          Source: UNICEF calculations based on data collected through the PMTCT and Paediatric HIV Report Card 
          process and reported in:  UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for 
          women and children in the health sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
           
          While significant progress is being made in putting children on treatment, it is evident that those 
          children currently on treatment still represent only a small proportion of those who need it.  In 
          theses 13 high burden countries, no countries with available data reported more than 25 per 
          cent of infants born to women living with HIV received in an HIV test within 2 months of birth in 
          2007 (Table 2).  The fact there has recently been a greater focus on early infant diagnosis and 
          numerous partners – including the Baylor International Paediatric AIDS Initiative, the Clinton 
          Foundation HIV/AIDS Initiative, Columbia University International Center for AIDS Care and 
          Treatment, Elizabeth Glaser Paediatric AIDS Foundation, PEPFAR, WHO and UNICEF – have 
          identified it as priority activity, 2008 data is expected to show great improvements in early 
          infant diagnosis for a number of these countries.  However, coverage of early infant diagnosis 


          29 UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for women and children in the health 
          sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                                                                                            13
Working Paper – November 2008 
          and the subsequent availability of treatment for all children who need it will need to be greatly 
          expanded if the Unite for Children, United against AIDS goal is to be met.   
           
          Table 2:  13 countries high burden countries, defined by number of estimated pregnant women 
          living with HIV and adult HIV prevalence, select indicators, 2007 
           
                                                                                      No. of 
                                                                                                  % of infants 
                                                                                     infants                      Number of 
                                         Estimated                                                born to HIV 
                                                       Percent                    born to HIV                          HIV‐
                                         number of                                                  infected 
                           Estimated                    of HIV     Estimated        infected                        infected 
                                             HIV                                                    mothers 
                            adult HIV                  related     number of        mothers                         children 
                                           positive                                               receiving a 
              Countries    prevalence                  death in      children     receiving a                         (<15) 
                                          pregnant                                                 virological 
                             (15‐49),                  children    living with     virological                     receiving 
                                          women,                                                  test for HIV 
                            end 2007                   under 5     HIV, 2007      test for HIV                         ARV 
                                            2007                                                   dx within 
                                                         (%)                       dx within                      treatment, 
                                          Rounded                                                 2months of 
                                                                                  2months of                          2007 
                                                                                                  birth, 2007 
                                                                                  birth, 2007 
             Ethiopia           2            66100       4        92000         94           <1          4534 
               India            0            64500      …           …            …           …           8887 
               Kenya            6            76200      15      *150000       17000          22          15090 
             Lesotho           23            12300      56        12000        3437          29          1553 
              Malawi           12            72700      14        91000        2435           3          10439 
          Mozambique           16            97100      13       100000         585           1          6320 
              Nigeria           3           188600       5       220000          …           …           15345 
           South Africa        18           221400      57       280000          …           …           32060 
            Swaziland          26            13200      47        15000        2517          19          2123 
            U. Rep. of                                           140000          …           … 
             Tanzania           6            99800       9                                               11176 
             Uganda             5            78300       8       130000        5437           7          8532 
              Zambia           15            75900      16        95000        7664          10          11602 
            Zimbabwe           15            52500      41       120000         375           1          8237 
          *UNAIDS data for Kenya is published only as a range [130 000 ‐ 180 000], 150 000 was used for 
          calculation purposes. 
          …  refers to unavailability of data 
          Source: UNICEF calculations based on data collected through the PMTCT and Paediatric HIV Report Card 
          process and reported in:  UNICEF,UNAIDS, WHO,  Towards Universal Access: Scaling up HIV services for 
          women and children in the health sector – Progress Report 2008, UNICEF, New York, 2008. 
           
           
          UNICEF is strategically focusing new advocacy, communication and resource mobilization efforts 
          on EID scale up and strengthening the continuum of care for children and mothers in these 13 
          high burden countries.  The current investment priority is finding all children who are HIV‐
          positive, rather than only those showing signs of AIDS‐related illnesses, and getting them on 
          treatment as early as possible (six weeks of age). In order to determine eligibility at six weeks of 
          age, dried blood spot testing must be made available at health facilities closer to communities 
          and children must be tested at convenient times and locations (usually linked with the health 
          system and the infants’ regular check‐ups or immunizations). Monitoring and evaluation 
          systems must also be strengthened in the context of early infant diagnosis and access to 
          treatment. 
           
          Scaling up paediatric testing and treatment requires making funding available to improve 
          linkages between antenatal, post‐natal and further stages of health care. Funding must be made 
Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                        14
Working Paper – November 2008 
          available to ensure a continuum of care for both child and mother from the prenatal stage 
          through childhood to ensure that the mother stays healthy and able to provide and care for her 
          child and that the child receives life‐saving paediatric treatment. Otherwise, follow up for many 
          children will be lost once their regular post‐natal checkups and vaccination process is over.    
           
          As mentioned above, buying PCR testing machines, building testing networks, ensuring the 
          availability of reliable courier systems for transport of dry blood spots and training medical 
          professionals require substantial investments.  Other key investments include increased use of 
          child health cards, strengthening linkages with infant feeding and counselling, the roll‐out of 
          provider‐initiated testing, making cotrimoxazole easily accessible to children and adolescents 
          living with HIV, and improving monitoring and evaluation systems. In some cases, national 
          governments, PEPFAR and the Global Fund are already covering such costs. In other countries, 
          sizable investment in all of these areas is necessary and UNICEF is well positioned to contribute 
          both financially and technically.  
           
          UNICEF country offices contribute to accelerating the scale up of early infant diagnosis testing as 
          well as paediatric treatment and treatment for mothers in a variety of ways.  In some countries 
          UNICEF could play a key role in financing a new early infant diagnosis network and helping to 
          ensure the right treatment and care options are available.  In other countries, the government 
          only seeks technical assistance from UNICEF country offices in the process.   
           
          The following annexes provide examples of how UNICEF country offices would use new funding 
          to contribute to scale up in several programme countries. Funding gaps for such interventions 
          are listed and unit costs are currently being analyzed and will be available soon.    
           
          Recommendations 
           
          Governments, with the support of the international community, should ensure 
          equitable access to and the scale‐up of effective services, including diagnosis and 
          antiretroviral treatment for children, by; 
           
                  • Explicitly including children in national treatment targets and plans and 
                      ensuring that children are included when monitoring progress towards 
                      universal access 
           
                  • Improving the coverage of treatment interventions by ensuring the 
                      decentralization of paediatric care from urban, tertiary care centers to more 
                      primary clinics. 
           
                  • Ensuring that infant diagnostics for HIV is a priority area for action within the 
                      scale‐up towards universal access, using the most appropriate technologies 




Scaling up Early Infant Diagnosis and Linkages to Care and Treatment                                       15
Working Paper – November 2008 

								
To top