CARDIAC REHAB

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					CARDIAC REHAB
THERAPEUTIC LIFESTYLE
    CHANGES DIET
       T.L.C.
WHAT ARE THERAPEUTIC
 LIFESTYLE CHANGES?
   Diet

 Exercise   Habits

 Smoking    Habits

   Weight

   Blood Pressure Control
   WHY DO WE NEED TLC?
 For those with Cardiac Disease or at
  high risk for Cardiac Disease
 Helps to lower the Bad Cholesterol
  (LDL), raise the good Cholesterol
  (HDL), improve Total Cholesterol
  levels, and improve Triglyceride
  levels.
 Prevent future heart attacks.
            THE TLC DIET
 Cholesterol: < 200 mg/day
 Total Fat: 25-35% of total calories
 Saturated Fats: < 7% of total calories
 Monounsaturated Fats: Up to 20% of total
  calories.
 Polyunsaturated Fats: Up to 10% total
  calories.
 Trans Fatty Acids: No established amount
 Total Calories: Balance calorie intake with
  calories burned to achieve desirable body
  weight and prevent weight gain.
THE TLC DIET
          Plant Phytosterols

          Increased Soluble
           Fiber

          Soy Products

          Omega 3 Fatty
           Acids
CHOLESTEROL
        A Fat-like substance
         found in animal
         products.
        Raises cholesterol
         levels in the blood.
        Sources of
         cholesterol: Egg yolks,
         meats, dairy, etc.
        Less than 200 mg
         cholesterol/day
           TOTAL FAT:
 There is a range of total fat
  recommended – 25-35% of calories.
 Usually with diabetes or metabolic
  syndrome, the level of total fat is
  higher.
 Saturated fats should still be very
  low, polyunsaturated and
  monounsaturated fats moderate.
    GRAMS OF TOTAL FAT
 Fatis measured in grams.
 Each gram of fat has nine calories.
 Some examples of total fat intake
  and calorie levels:

  1200 calories - 25% fat - 33 grams
  1500 calories - 25% fat - 42 grams
  1800 calories - 25% fat - 50 grams
        SATURATED FATS:
 These fats are usually found in animal
  products, but can be in some vegetables.
 Usually solid or hard at room temperature.
 Raises blood cholesterol more than any
  other fat in the diet
 Foods high in “sat fat” – coconut, bacon,
  sausage, cream, sour cream, hotdogs,
  bologna, cheeses, etc.
 These fats should be a small part of your
  diet.
    POLYUNSATURATED FATS:




   These fats are usually from a plant source.
   When polyunsaturated fats replace saturated
    fats, the LDL levels decrease.
   Sources are: Soybean, sunflower, cottonseed
    oils; margarines made from these oils.
MONOUNSATURATED FATS:
             These fats are usually
              found in plant
              sources.
             These fats can be
              substituted for
              carbohydrates with
              metabolic syndrome
              or diabetes
             Sources: Many nuts,
              olive, peanut and
              canola oils.
      TRANS FATTY ACIDS:
 These fats come from plant sources, but
  are liquid oils that have been processed
  and are made hard like saturated fats.
 These fats raise the cholesterol and LDL
  levels in the blood.
 Sources of these fats are: Stick
  margarine, Crisco-type fats, baked goods,
  breads, snack foods, donuts, etc.
            TOTAL CALORIES:
   How many calories do
    we need?
   Multiply your weight
    by 10-12 and that is
    your calorie level for
    weight maintenance.
   Subtract 500
    calories/day for each
    pound weight
    loss/week.
   Balance calories by
    eating a little less and
    exercising a little
    more.
 PLANT PHYTOSTEROLS:
 These  foods are found in plants and
  are thought to help lower
  cholesterol.
 Phytosterols are also added to foods,
  like margarine, spreads, cereals and
  cereal bars..
 Natural sources are: vegetables, nuts
  and seeds.
SOLUBLE FIBER:
          These foods have a “gel-
           like” substance that may
           help to lower cholesterol
           and LDL levels.

          Sources of soluble fiber:
           Oats, whole grain breads,
           dried beans and peas,
           apples, oranges, green
           beans, sweet potatoes,
           almonds, etc.

          We need 10-25 grams/
           day.
              SOY PRODUCTS:
   Soy foods can be
    substituted in the diet, in
    place of animal proteins to
    help lower LDL levels.
   Studies show that soy
    protein may improve
    cholesterol, improve
    hypertension, and improve
    blood vessel health.
   Sources of soy are: tofu,
    edamame, meat
    replacements, soy milk,
    roasted soy nuts and
    more.
   Substitute 25-50 gm of soy
    protein for animal protein
    each day to lower LDL.
    OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS:
 These fats can be found in fish as well as
  some plant sources.
 Studies show that these fatty acids have
  potential benefits for preventing heart
  disease.
 Sources of these fats are: salmon,
  mackerel, sardines, herring, trout and
  plant sources, flax, canola, walnuts and
  soy products.
 It is recommended to add 2 servings of
  fish weekly to increase omega 3 fatty
  acids.
    EATING WELL WITH THE TLC
             DIET
 The TLC diet calls for a variety of foods.
 It is a mixture of foods that are low in
  saturated fats, trans fats and high in fiber
  and taste!
 It will satisfy your tastes and your heart!
     EATING WELL WITH TLC:
    BREADS/CEREALS/GRAINS
 We need 6 or more servings/day
 A serving is 1 ounce or 1 cup

 These foods can be higher in fiber, vitamin
  B complex, calcium, and iron.
 These foods are usually low in saturated
  fats, cholesterol, and total fat.
 Use whole grains breads, cereals, rice,
  crackers and low fat cookies and desserts.
    EATING WELL WITH TLC:
  VEGEGABLES, BEANS, PEAS
 We  need 3-5 servings each day.
 A serving size is ½ cup cooked and 1
  cup raw.
 These foods are good sources of
  vitamins, fiber, minerals, protein and
  other nutrients.
 Use fresh or frozen to reduce sodium
  and get plenty of fiber. All are great
  for you!
       EATING WELL WITH T L C:
               FRUITS
   We need 2-4 servings
    each day.
   A serving is one piece
    or ¾ cup.
   Good sources of
    vitamins, fiber and
    sweet flavor.
   Use fresh or frozen or
    “light” canned fruits.
    All are great for you!
    EATING WELL WITH T L C:
         DAIRY FOODS
 We  need 2-3 servings each day.
 A serving size is 8 oz. or 1 cup
 These foods provide Calcium,
  Vitamin D, protein, and
  carbohydrates.
 The best sources are fat-free, skim
  or low fat milk, cheeses, cream
  cheese, sour cream, non-dairy
  creamer and frozen products.
EATING WELL WITH T L C:
PROTEIN FOODS: MEATS
               We need 5 ounces
                each day or less.
               A serving = 1 ounce
               Choose lean red
                meats: sirloin, round,
                rump, tenderloin, loin,
                etc.
               Limit organ meats.
               Choose red meats less
                often.
               All meats, even fish
                and chicken, have fats
                and cholesterol.
   EATING WELL WITH T L C:
   POULTRY, FISH AND EGGS
 Choose  skinless poultry.
 Choose any fish product.

 Bake, broil, stew, grill, poach – DO
  NOT FRY!
 Try to eat 2 servings of fish/week.

 Choose egg whites any time – only 2
  egg yolks each week.
       EATING WELL WITH T L C:
           FATS AND OILS
   We need about 3-6 servings of added fats/day.
   A serving is 1 teaspoon.
   Choose canola, olive or peanut oils. Choose
    margarines with “No Trans Fats”, liquid oil or
    water as the first ingredient.
   EATING WELL WITH T L C:
   EATING A BALANCED DIET
 Eating a variety of foods is key to
  staying healthy.
 Watching portion sizes, on the labels
  and by using your “eyeballs” help
  with weight management.
 Include plenty of fruits, vegetables,
  whole grains, lean meats and dairy
  and a little fat and you are set!!
A WORD ABOUT CARB FOODS
               Good, Bad, or What?
               We need carbs, even
                with diabetes.
               Try to choose the
                more complex carbs:
                whole grain breads,
                cereals, pastas, fruits,
                etc.
               Avoid the sugars:
                cokes, candy, cakes,
                pies, etc.
   EATING OUT WITH T L C
 Choose   carefully, but always ENJOY!
 Ask for double side veggies or
  salads.
 Ask for dressing, sauces, and butter
  on the side.
 Choose grilled, steamed, garden
  fresh, stir fried, blackened, etc.
 Ask a lot of questions and request
  yours prepared the way you want it.
      COOKING WITH T L C
 Use non-stick cookware with spray oil or
  very little (1 tsp.) oil.
 Start off with 90% or leaner meats.
 Allow soups, stew, gravies, broths, etc. to
  cool for several hours and remove visible
  fat.
 Use non fat milk/skim evaporated milks
  for creamed items.
 Use fat free seasonings: bouillon, fat free
  soups, herbs, spices, non fat sour cream,
  etc.
      HEART HEALTHY LIVING
   Learn to enjoy cooking and eating low fat
    and with less salt. It takes a little time and
    effort, but the rewards in taste and health
    will be worth it.

				
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