ANTICIPATION GUIDE Decision Making  Circle Agree or Disagree beside each statement below

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ANTICIPATION GUIDE Decision Making  Circle Agree or Disagree beside each statement below Powered By Docstoc
					                                            ANTICIPATION GUIDE
                                              Decision Making
                    Circle Agree or Disagree beside each statement below before you read and listen to each of
                     the presentations.
                    You will read one, and present to the class that topic.
                    When finished, consider the statements again, and based on new information, circle Agree or
                     Disagree in the right side of each statement, with new evidence. Add new information in last
                     column


 Before Reading                           Statement                           After Reading                Other Notes
1. Agree/ Disagree      A bill is a proposed law (p. xx)                    Agree/ Disagree



2. Agree/ Disagree      Bills are passed by the House of                    Agree/ Disagree
                        Commons (p. xx)

3. Agree/ Disagree      A bill is read only twice in the House of           Agree/ Disagree
                        Commons (p. xx)


4. Agree/ Disagree      The Senate also must pass a bill (p. xx)            Agree/ Disagree



5. Agree/ Disagree      The Governor General has no role in                 Agree/ Disagree
                        passing laws (p. xx)


6. Agree/ Disagree      Most provinces have a lieutenant governor Agree/ Disagree
                        (p. xx)


7. Agree/ Disagree      A same sec marriage bill was passed in              Agree/ Disagree
                        2005. (p. xx)


8. Agree/ Disagree      Every cyclist in Ontario must wear a                Agree/ Disagree
                        helmet while riding a bicycle. (p. xx)


          Which of the above information is most important to your life? Explain.




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                     Case Studies – Decisions Made and Enforced
  Federal – central government that makes laws that apply to all Canadians
  Provincial – government that makes laws that apply to the people of a province such as
  Ontario
  Municipal – government that makes bylaws that apply to the people of a town, city or
  village such as Burlington, Toronto and Woodstock

  Case              Level of           Why was the law   Who started the    Who signed the
                  government              passed?             law            law? Why?
1. Same-
Sex
Marriage
2005




2. The
Helmet
Law in
Ontario
1995



3) Safe
Drinking
Water




4) Dog
By-law




       Which one of these laws affects your life most? Explain.



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How Are Decisions Made and Enforced?


Before You Read
   Brainstorm with a partner some of the laws you are aware of and what are the
    possible reasons for each of the laws you list.

How are Laws Passed?
1. All laws start out as an idea. An elected member of parliament suggests that a law
should be made. It starts out as a bill. A bill is a proposed law, usually introduced by a
Cabinet Minister and sponsored by the government. There are also private members’
bills that can by introduced by any member of parliament, but they still needs to go
through the same stages.

2. Each bill deals with the interests of a citizen, a group, an institution or a community.
Each bill must pass through three readings in the House of Commons. The House of
Commons is where the elected members of parliament (MP’s) meet to discuss, debate
and vote on the laws that the government wants to pass.

3. There are several steps for the bill to go through. The following is how a bill becomes
a law at the federal level. The bill goes first through the House of Commons and then the
same process in the Senate. The final stage is to the Governor General for signature.

[Insert picture of House of Commons – Ottawa – with MPs working]




http://static.flickr.com/8/12045792_fe034a9f87.jpg
House of Commons, Ottawa, Members of Parliament at work, 2001

As You Read


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   Which words in paragraphs 1, 2, 3 connect to the graphic that follows? Explain your
    thinking to a partner.

[Many visual organizers as below]
HOUSE OF The bill is prepared by the Minister responsible and the Department of
COMMONS Justice


                  First Reading – the bill is read in the House of Commons and members of
                  parliament vote on it – there is no discussion yet




                  Second Reading – MP’s discuss the principle of the bill. They are
                  allowed to speak only during the debate and then vote




                   Committee – MP’s study the bill clause by clause. MP’s can suggest
                   amendments as well. They then present their report to the House of
                   Commons




                   Third Reading – there is debate during this reading as well, but it is
                   usually brief.


SENATE

                   First Reading – the bill is read in the Senate and Senators vote on it –
                   there is no discussion yet



                   Second Reading – Senators discuss the principle of the bill.




                  Committee – Senators study the bill clause by clause.




                Third Reading – the bill is read in the Senate and Senators vote on it




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GOVERNOR           The bill is given Royal Assent by being signed by the Governor General
GENERAL            and becomes an Act of Parliament.


4. In the province of Ontario, laws are passed in a similar method, but there is no Senate
or Governor General. Instead, it is the Lieutenant Governor who signs the bills into
laws, after third reading at Queen’s Park.
[Insert picture of Queen’s Park with MPP’s or perhaps a political action or protest?


As You Read
   As you read the following case studies, record in your notes the answers to the
    following questions
    a) Which level of government is involved?
    b) why was the law passed?
    c) who started the law (private member or cabinet)?
    d) Who signed the law? Why?
1) Same-Sex Marriage 2005
5. Members of Parliament have passed a divisive and radical bill, putting Canada one
step closer to becoming just the third country in the world to sanction same-sex marriage.
After years of debate, the House of Commons put Bill C-38 to a vote after its third and
final reading late Tuesday night.
6. With the Liberals enjoying the support of almost all the Bloc Quebecois and NDP
MPs, the legislation passed easily in a 158 to 133 vote.
Now, it will take Senate approval and royal assent to make Canada the third country in
the world, after the Netherlands and Belgium, to officially recognize same-sex marriage.
"(This) is about the Charter of Rights,'' Prime Minister Paul Martin said before the vote
was cast Tuesday.
7. "We are a nation of minorities. And in a nation of minorities, it is important that you
don't cherry-pick rights. A right is a right and that is what this vote tonight is all about."
[adapted from
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/1120045252727_19 CTV.ca
News Staff]
2) The Helmet Law in Ontario 1995
8. If you ride a bicycle in Ontario and you are under the age of 18, you must wear an
approved helmet if you ride on a road or sidewalk. This law was passed in 1995 Parents
can be charged if they knowingly allow their children under 16 to ride a bicycle without a
helmet.
9. The law was passed when Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) Dianne
Cunningham of London responded to requests from community groups such as the injury
prevention community and an injury of a friend’s child. She introduced a private
member’s bill in 1990. Often private members’ bills do not become law. The bill was
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reintroduced in 1991, but with the support of the NDP who were the government at the
time. After much debate and consultation with community groups such as cycling
committees, Bill 124 was passed in July 1993. It came into effect on October 1, 1995.
10. There have been some attempts to require skateboarder and scooter riders to wear
helmets but this has not yet been passed.

3) Safe Drinking Water
11. As a result of the deaths at Walkerton and the far-reaching Inquiry, the government
of Ontario introduced several significant new laws intended to protect drinking water.
The new laws include the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Sustainable Water and Sewage
Systems Act, and the Nutrient Management Act. Justice O’Connor, who led the inquiry
into the deaths at Walkerton, also recommended that legislation to protect sources of
drinking water be enacted in Ontario. This legislation is currently being developed by two
government-appointed committees.
[adapted from
http://www.ecolawinfo.org/WATER%20FAQs/Regulatory%20Context%20for%20Water
/OntWatLeg.htm#ontwat_03

[Insert picture of municipal government either an imaginary one, or perhaps photo of real
one in Brampton or Mississauga?]

4) Dog By-law

                                     CITY OF WATERLOO


                                    BY-LAW NO. 91-101


                                                      CONSOLIDATION

BY-LAW TO PROHIBIT THE RUNNING AT LARGE OF DOGS IN THE CITY OF
WATERLOO, FOR IMPOSING A LICENSE FEE ON THE OWNERS OF DOGS, FOR
REGULATING THE DISPOSAL OF DOGS FOUND RUNNING AT LARGE IN THE
SAID CITY AND FOR OTHER MATTERS RELATING TO DOGS.

      WHEREAS the Municipal Council of The Corporation of the City of Waterloo
deems it desirable to prohibit the running of dogs at large in the City and otherwise
providing for the seizing, impounding and killing of dogs running at large and for selling
dogs so impounded as hereinafter set forth and for licensing and regulating the owners of
dogs in the said City.

       PASSED this        12th     day of      August, 1991.

              (SIGNED) B.TURNBULL                              (SIGNED) R.C.KEELING

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              MAYOR                                        CLERK


After You Read
1. Which of the case studies included has the most impact on your life personally?
   Why?
2. Take turns with a partner, explaining how a bill becomes a law in Ontario only, then
   one in Canada. Why is there a difference?
3. Draft a law that you would like passed. Determine which level of government is
   involved and prepare the law and the reason WHY you want this law passed.




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                                        Chapter 2 Review

Build Your Vocabulary and Understanding
1. Using this vocabulary list, use each of the following in an oral sentence, with a
   partner. Be sure the following words are also in your personal dictionary.
       a) Federal                                   b) democracy
       c) Municipal                                 d) election
       e) returning officers                        f) parliament
       g) Bill                                      h) Senate
       i) House of Commons                          j) political party
       k) minority government                       l) majority government
       m) lobbying
Think It Through
2. What do you wonder now that you have gone through this chapter? Start three
   statements with “I wonder….”
3. Brainstorm with a partner, as many services as you can think of provided by the three
   levels of governments. Together identify the level of governments responsible for
   each of these services. Record the top three services provided by the three levels.
   Rank them in order of importance. Use the following to help you organize the
   services.

Priority       Service Provided/Level of Government                    Explanation




What Do You Say About That?
4. Use four of the words in the first question and prepare a role-play a situation that
   relates the words together, with one or two other students.
5. Prepare a visual representation that shows your understanding of three of the words in
   the first question. You can use stick people if you like.
Why Should I Care?
6. Select a law that has been passed or one that you believe should be passed and
   explain how it relates to your life. Provide examples from your own family or
   personal experience, as well as how it will be important in the future. This can be
   written as a paragraph or expressed orally.
7. Find an article about an issue that is currently in the news that concerns you and place
   it in your Civics Scrapbook. Identify the article with a heading that identifies the issue
   as being local, national or global. Write a brief paragraph that explains why you care
   about this issue.

Take Action – My Active Citizen Portfolio
8. Add to your list of ideas of issues that are worth taking action on that you began in
   chapter 1. Include topics from this chapter, as well as skimming the table of contents
   to see if other issues may be important. Select two from the list that seem to be most
   important and check them. You can change your mind later.
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s: Jan Haskings-Winner/Rob Mewhinney

1) Challenges of teaching Civics …. (feedback/suggestions before it‟s
   too late)

2) Features of My Passport to Civics
     a) Meets 100% of new expectations (CWS, 2005)
     b) Visuals (pictures, cartoons) with purpose of illustrating
        concepts for reluctant readers
     c) Graphic organizers and “Think Literacy” approach
     d) Biographies (eg. Ainsworth Dyer) ordinary Canadians
     e) Up to date eg. PM. GG
     f) Engaging subtitles (eg. „What‟s with this garbage?”) and
        chapter titles
     g) Inclusive focus (of course)
     h) Paragraphs numbered
     i) Includes „taking action‟ in each chapter leading to culminating
        activity
     j) End of chapter questions are different
         Build Your Vocabulary and Understanding
         Thinking It Through
         What Do You Say About That?
         Why Should I Care?
         Take Action – My Active Citizen Portfolio

3) Teacher Guide features and your suggestions?

http://www.drivinguide.com/images/Flags/Canada/passport_leaf.gif




OHASSTA Draft, 2006                                                     9
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s: Jan Haskings-Winner/Rob Mewhinney

3) Challenges of teaching Civics …. (feedback/suggestions before it‟s
   too late)

4) Features of My Passport to Civics
     k) Meets 100% of new expectations (CWS, 2005)
     l) Visuals (pictures, cartoons) with purpose of illustrating
        concepts for reluctant readers
     m) Graphic organizers and “Think Literacy” approach
     n) Biographies (eg. Ainsworth Dyer) ordinary Canadians
     o) Up to date eg. PM. GG
     p) Engaging subtitles (eg. „What‟s with this garbage?”) and
        chapter titles
     q) Inclusive focus (of course)
     r) Paragraphs numbered
     s) Includes „taking action‟ in each chapter leading to culminating
        activity
     t) End of chapter questions are different
         Build Your Vocabulary and Understanding
         Thinking It Through
         What Do You Say About That?
         Why Should I Care?
         Take Action – My Active Citizen Portfolio

3) Teacher Guide features and your suggestions?

http://www.drivinguide.com/images/Flags/Canada/passport_leaf.gif




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                                      Passing a Bill
Complete the chart below by inserting the following words: amendment, bill, clause.
committee, discuss, first, Governor General, house of commons, principle, second,
third, vote, in the proper blanks. Some can appear more than once.

HOUSE OF A ____ is prepared by the Minister responsible and the Department of
___________ Justice


         ______ Reading – the bill is read in the ______________ and members of parliament
         _____ on it – there is no discussion yet



         ________ Reading – MP’s __________ the principle of the bill. They are allowed to
         speak only during the debate and then vote



         ___________ – MP’s study the bill clause by clause. MP’s can suggest ____________ as
         well. They then present their report to the House of Commons




         _________ Reading – there is debate during this reading as well, but it is usually brief.

___________

         _______ Reading – the bill is read in the Senate and Senators vote on it – there is no
         discussion yet



         ________ Reading –the __________ of the bill is discussed by the Senators.




       ___________ – Senators study the bill clause by ___________.



       __________ Reading – the bill is read in the Senate and Senators vote on it

GOVERNOR
GENERAL
                The bill is given Royal Assent by being signed by the ____________ and becomes
                an Act of Parliament.

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Refer to page xx to check your answers.




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