Docstoc

_Microsoft Word - Portavilion Press releaseToby Paterson

Document Sample
_Microsoft Word - Portavilion Press releaseToby Paterson Powered By Docstoc
					Press Release                                                                                               11 April 2008


PORTAVILION
an up projects production for London’s parks

Powder Blue Orthogonal Pavilion
by British artist TOBY PATERSON in POTTERS FIELDS PARK

5 July – 28 September

Portavilion is a portable public art project that will occupy a trail of high profile parks across Central London throughout the
summer 2008. A group of highly acclaimed international artists including Dan Graham in Holland Park, Toby Paterson in
Potters Fields Park, Annika Eriksson in Regents Park and Monika Sosnowska in Primrose Hill will present their own
temporary ‘pavilion’ specially created for a park environment as a celebration of London’s most treasured public spaces.
Portavilion is one of the most ambitious contemporary art projects to take place in London’s public realm. Its multiple sites will
form a trail across a range of Central London boroughs, which can be navigated by bike, on foot or public transport.


Toby Paterson‘s appreciation of architectural forms and structures has developed from skate boarding around abandoned
concrete buildings. From this perspective he experienced cities and buildings as spaces to navigate; a collection of isolated
forms and surfaces that could then be translated into paintings and sculptures. He works in a variety of forms, from large-scale
sculptural assemblages and architectural wall paintings to small paintings on paper and Perspex. Paterson’s work explores the
integration of art and architecture. He is influenced by his experience of the built environment, with a particular focus on post-
war architecture and an interest in the processes of abstraction within visual art.


Inspired by the language of Modernist architecture Paterson’s Powder Blue Orthogonal Pavilion will introduce a new feature
into the multifaceted ‘town-scape’ of the Southbank. The pavilion is less a discrete ‘building' and more a sculptural collection
and arrangement of planes that allow light and space to flow through and between them, setting it one remove from the many
functional structures that surround Potters Fields Park.The pavilion is an open, interpretable and non-prescriptive form
developed directly from the visual and formal vocabulary that Paterson has developed in his work for some time. Reference
points would include the optimistically light touch of the 1951 Festival of Britain, and in particular structures such as Erno
Goldfinger's kiosk designs and the Regatta restaurant, as well as exhibition designs by Basil Spence, Berthold Lubetkin and
Frederic Kiesler.


Other more traditional park architecture, such as bandstands, kiosks also exert a background influence.The ostensibly
'functionless' nature of the pavilion is intriguing for Paterson - particularly the notion of a building existing as nothing more than
an exposition of itself, with its possible or potential uses hinted at but not entirely prescriptive.


Toby Paterson talks about his work on Saturday 12 July at the Design Museum Tickets £8.5 (£6.5 concession) 0207 940
8783 www.designmuseum.org

              th
On Friday 11 July C-12 Dance Theatre will perform a newly choreographed dance around the Powder Blue Orthogonal
Pavilion as part of Big Dance 4pm, 6pm, 8pm

www.portavilion.com

For press information or images please contact UP Projects on t: 020 7033 3568 e: emma@upprojects.com
ENDS
Notes to Editors

Toby Paterson (b. 1974) lives and works in Glasgow and is highly acclaimed in the UK and internationally. He has recently
completed a substantial commission for the façade of the new BBC headquarters in Glasgow (designed by David Chipperfield
architects) and is about to embark on further significant projects in London and Bristol. Inspired by the language of Modernist
architecture his modular pavilion will introduce an innovative feature into the landscape of the Southbank. For more
information about the artist www.themoderninstitute.com


FinnForest - Powder Blue Orthogonal Pavilion has been made from Kerto generously donated by FinnForest
www.finnforest.co.uk


Potters Fields Park is a newly landscaped park next to Tower Bridge and City Hall on the Southbank.
www.discoverlondonbridge.co.uk


C-12 Dance Theatre was established in September 2005 by a group of young choreographers and dancers. They aim to
create unique, diverse and original material through a fusion of dance techniques and theatre www. C-12dancetheatre.com


UP Projects curate and produce arts projects and events outside traditional gallery and museum spaces and often in the
public realm. Inspired by the built environment and the unusual and often challenging spaces that exist within and around
buildings, their projects always respond specifically to their location. Since their first project in 2002, their work has
consistently attracted considerable public attention. www.upprojects.com


Emma Underhill, Portavilion Curator, established the non-profit arts organisation UP Projects in 2002 having previously
worked at The Saatchi Gallery, London for six years. Since then she has curated and produced a series of exhibitions and
projects in non-gallery spaces including Shine St Pancras Chambers, London (2002) and The Other Flower Show, V&A
Garden, London (2004) www.upprojects.com


Portavilion sponsors and supporters
Portavilion is funded by Arts Council England, London (www.artscouncil.org.uk); Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea,
London Borough of Westminster; London Borough of Camden; London Borough of Westminster; Outset Contemporary Art
Fund (www.outset.org.uk); The Lisson Gallery (www.lissongallery.com); The Modern Institute (www.themoderninstitute.com);
The Royal Parks (www.royalparks.org.uk); The Greater London Authority (www.london.gov.uk) Arts & Business
(www.aandb.org.uk); Finn Forest UK (www.finnforest.co.uk); The London Festival of Architecture (www.lfa2008.org); CABE
(www.cabe.org.uk); Potters Fields Park Trust (www.potters-fields-park.com); More London (www.morelondon.com); The
Design Museum (www.designmuseum.org); and Gunpowder Park (www.gunpowderpark.org) .

				
DOCUMENT INFO