Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology by fws15200

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									Department of Counseling and
   Educational Psychology




School Psychology Program
Graduate Student Handbook
        2008-2009



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                                          Table of Contents
Full Time Faculty and Departmental Staff ………………………………………………………..                                  4-5

School Psychology Introduction …………………………………………………………………..                                         6

Program Accreditation …………………………………………………………………………….                                               7

Mission and Philosophy of the School Psychology Programs ……………………………………                            8

Goals and Objectives of the School Psychology Programs ……………………………………..                          8-10

Outcome Competencies                                                                            10-11

Behavioral School Psychology …………………………………………………………................                               11

Student Advisement ……………………………………………………………………………….                                              12-13

Curricula for the Master’s of Science in School Psychometry ……………………………………                        14

Curricula for the Educational Specialist in Education with emphasis in School Psychology …….    15-17

Curricula for the Doctor of Philosophy in School Psychology ……………………….....                      18-26

Proposed Curricula for Master’s of Science in School Psychometry …………………….                      27-28

Proposed Curricula for Educational Specialist in Education with emphasis in School Psychology   29-31

Proposed Curricula for the Doctor of Philosophy in School Psychology………………..                    32-35

Other Requirements: Professional Associations                                                     36

Program Assessment of Student Progress Toward Meeting Training Goals and Objectives               37

Student Evaluations                                                                               37

Knowledge Assessment for Master’s of Science Students                                             38

Knowledge Assessment for Educational Specialist Students                                          39

Knowledge Assessment for Doctor of Philosophy Students                                          38-41

Research Requirements                                                                           42-44

Dissertation                                                                                    43-44

Internship Requirements for Educational Specialist and Ph.D. Students                             45

Licensure, Certification, Job Placement                                                         45-46

Admissions, Residency, Registration for the Program                                             46-47



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Time Limit to Complete Degree, Other University Course Credit   47-48

Student Grievance and Appeals                                     49

Student Remediation and Probation; Retention & Dismissal        49-51

Financial Aid                                                     51

Graduate Assistantships                                           53

Outside contracts                                                 53

Student Awards                                                    53




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                        Full Time Departmental and Related Faculty and Staff

Coordinator of School Psychology Programs
Doggett, R. Anthony, Ph.D. (The University of Southern Mississippi). Assistant Professor and
       Coordinator School Psychology Programs. AAAA Licensed School Psychologist (Mississippi).
       Interests include applied behavior analysis, functional behavioral assessment, behavioral
       consultation, parent training, instructional interventions, behavioral pediatrics, and system-wide
       positive behavior intervention and supports.

School Psychology Core Faculty
Henington, Carlen, Ph.D. (Texas A&M University). Associate Professor. Nationally Certified School
       Psychologist, AAAA Licensed School Psychologist (Mississippi). Interests include pediatric
       psychology; academic interventions; infant, toddler, and early childhood assessment and
       intervention; assessment of atypical populations and individuals with behavior, emotional, and
       learning problems; children’s socialization and peer relationships.

Kane, Harrison D., Ph.D. (University of Florida). Assistant Professor. Licensed Psychologist (North
       Carolina), Licensed School Psychologist (North Carolina & Mississippi), National Certified
       School Psychologist. Interests include assessment and cognitive functioning of individuals.

Educational Psychology Faculty
Browning, Donna, Ph.D. (University of Tennessee, Knoxville). Instructor. Interests include creativity,
       and learning styles.

Elder, Anastasia, Ph.D. (University of Michigan). Assistant Professor. Interests include cognitive
        development and students learning in science and mathematics, use of technology in instruction.

Morse, David, T. Ph.D. (Florida State University). Professor. Specialty areas include educational
       measurement, research, statistics, creativity, gifted and talented, and computer applications.

Morse, Linda W., Ph.D. (Florida State University). Professor and Coordinator of Programs in Educational
       Psychology. Specialty includes instructional systems, higher order thinking skills, cognitive
       development, and creativity and giftedness.

Counselor Education Faculty
Dooley, Katherine, Ph.D. (University of Alabama), Professor and Coordinator of Community Counseling
       Program. Specialty areas include rehabilitation counseling, chemical dependency, and counseling
       supervision.

Hall, Kim, Ph.D. (Mississippi State University), Visting Assistant Professor. Specialty areas include
        problem based learning, school counselor accountability, and group activities for school
        counselors.

Heiselt, April K. Ph.D. (University of Utah), Assistant Professor. Specialty areas include the role of
         students within institutional governance and focuses on qualitative research.




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Hendren, Glen R., Ph.D. (University of Southern Mississippi), Professor and Department Head.
       Specializes in rehabilitation counseling and in deafness and hearing impairments.

Housley, Warren F., Ph.D. (University of Arkansas), Professor Emeritus. Specializes in elementary
       school counseling and issues affecting individuals who are aging.

Looby, E. Joan, Ph.D. (University of Georgia), Professor. Specialty areas include eating disorders and
       multicultural counseling. Cluster coordinator for community counseling.

Moore, J. Elton, Ed.D. (Mississippi State University), Professor and Director, Rehabilitation Research
       and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision. Specializes in rehabilitation of individuals
       who are blind or severely impaired.

Palmer, Charles, Ph.D. (University of Arkansas), Associate Professor. Specialty areas include
        rehabilitation and employment of persons with disabilities.

Sheperis, Carl J., Ph.D. (University of Florida), Assistant Professor. Interests include assessment and
        treatment of adolescent behavioral disorders and psychopathology, with specific emphasis on
        Reactive Attachment Disorder.

Underwood, J. R. Professor, Ph.D., (University of Wisconsin-Madison)Professor Emeritus. Specializes in
      giftedness, creativity, and group techniques.

Wells, Debb, Ph.D., (Mississippi State University) Visiting Assistant Professor Dr. Wells is the
        coordinator of the College Counseling and Student Affairs in Higher Education program
        emphases.

Special Education Faculty
Coffey, Kent, Ph.D. (University of Alabama), Professor. Specialty areas include multiple and severely
        disabled populations and working with parents of children with disabilities.

Devlin, Sandy, Ph.D. (University of Alabama), Professor. Specialty areas include children and youth with
        emotional/behavioral disorders and post secondary transition.

Mattox, Kim, M.S. (Mississippi State University), Instructor. Courses include Mentally Retarded and
        Psychology of the Exceptional Child and Youth.


Counseling and Educational Psychology Staff

Marcella Minor, Budget and Office Manager
Beth Robinson, Graduate Records Manager
Onnie Blackshire, Undergraduate Records Manager & Travel




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                            THE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM

         You are now a graduate student in the School Psychology program at Mississippi State
University. You have chosen one of the most outstanding training programs in the country. Our program
is outstanding because it has an excellent faculty from diverse backgrounds with outstanding applied
school psychology skills and teaching and research skills. The faculty in the program genuinely care
about your growth and success as a professional who will provide competent services to children,
families, and school personnel. Please take the time to get to know the school psychology core faculty
because they will play an important role in your education as a school psychologist.
         The broad goal of the School Psychology program is to advance the profession, practice, and
science of School Psychology, with an emphasis on behavioral theory and practice in school psychology.
You play an important part in helping us reach this goal. We intend to work with you on developing and
mastering school psychology and related skills so that upon graduating, one more effective school
psychologist is serving the public. You will be working with faculty mentors who make important
contributions in the science of school psychology by disseminating advances in intervention, policy, and
theory to the professional literature and professional conferences. In addition to special problems,
supervised pre-dissertation research and dissertations, the faculty will require and encourage you to work
on empirical and other scholarly works throughout your graduate career.
         The faculty expects you to work extremely hard to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to
be a successful school psychologist. We will work with you in this process, and we expect you to do all
that is necessary to become an effective school psychologist. Individuals who seek the services of school
psychologists have the right to expect quality services and you have the responsibility to meet their
expectations.




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                                                Accreditation
         Accreditation is important because it means your degree is recognized as meeting the standards of
the school psychology profession. The Ph.D., AAA Certification, and M.S. degree programs in School
Psychology all meet some National and/or State certification standards. Currently, the School
Psychology Program is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) through 2014.
The Educational Specialist Program is accredited by the National Association of School
Psychologists (NASP) through a partnership with the National Council on the Accreditation of
Teacher Education (NCATE) through 2011. The Masters program in school psychometry is not
accredited by APA or NASP; however, students are allowed to apply for licensure in the state of
Mississippi as a school psychometrist after completing the program. The masters program is considered
to be a non-terminal program as the faculty expect students to complete either the doctoral or educational
specialist degree.
         Beginning in 1997, students who do not graduate from APA approved programs will not be
eligible to apply for the professional licensure exam in Mississippi, which will prevent students from
becoming licensed psychologists in Mississippi.

M.S. Psychometry                  AAA Certification                Ph.D. Degree
AA License (MS)                   NASP Accredited                  APA Accredited
                                  AAA License (MS)                 NASP Accredited
                                                                   AAAA License (MS)


Contact information of accrediting bodies:

American Psychological Association
Committee on Accreditation
c/o Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
Education Directorate
750 First Street NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
(202) 336-5979
http://www.apa.org/ed/gp2000.html

National Association of School Psychologists
NASP Program Approval Board
4340 East West Highway, Ste 402
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 657-0270
(803) 323-2341
http://www.nasponline.org/certifcation/NASPapproved.html

Mississippi Department of Education
Educator Licensure/Certification
P.O. Box 771
359 North West St.
Jackson, MS 39205
(601) 359-3483
http://www.mde.k12.ms.us/license




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Mission and Philosophy of the School Psychology Programs
         The science and practice of school psychology are carefully integrated into our graduate
programs at the masters, educational specialist, and doctoral levels. While the program is designed to
train entry-level school psychology practitioners, the program stresses the importance of contributing to
the field by engaging in scientific behaviors. Thus, the program adheres to the scientist-practitioner model
where faculty and students are expected to be a) consumers of empirically-based practice, b) evaluators of
their own empirically-based practice, and c) producers of research that contributes to the field of school
psychology. In addition to adhering to the scientist-practitioner model detailed at the Boulder Conference
in 1949, the faculty also place an emphasis on training school psychologists who practice from a
behavioral paradigm providing empirically-based school psychological services to a diverse population of
individuals including children, families, school personnel, and other related professionals. Descriptions of
specific coursework related to behavioral school psychology are located on page 11 of this handbook.

Domains and Objectives of Training of the School Psychology Programs
         Every School Psychology student is expected to meet the program common core and emphasis
area knowledge and skill requirements. Opportunities for students to meet these requirements will occur
in the classroom and during practica and internship.
     The School Psychology faculty work to ensure that you will have curricular experiences, which will
enable you to develop and demonstrate knowledge and skills across four domains: I) Professional School
Psychology including Professional Orientation, Assessment, and Consultation/Interventions, II)
Research and Statistics, III) Psychological Foundations, and at the doctoral level, IV) Focus Area.
Each of these domains contains specific objectives of the faculty in the School Psychology Programs.
Please note that these domains and objectives are closely aligned with the Conceptual Framework
Program Outcomes (CFPO’s) of the College of Education and with the Standards for Training and Field
Placement Programs in School Psychology. Students will be evaluated on the knowledge, skills, and their
application by university faculty, and practica and internship supervisors through course examinations,
practica and internship evaluations, and annual evaluations completed by faculty with the input of other
university faculty.

Domain I. PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
        Professional school psychology at Mississippi State University is divided into three sub-domains:
professional orientation, assessment, and consultation/interventions. Through structured coursework and
evaluations completed by university faculty and supervisors, students will demonstrate competence and,
at a minimum, beginning practitioner level skills in the following areas:

      1. Professional Orientation. CFPO # 1, 3, 9, 10, 12; NASP 2.1, 2.6, 2.10
              Goal. Students will gain an understanding of functioning as a professional
              school psychologist.
              Objectives.
                 1.     Students will gain knowledge of all aspects of functioning as a professional
                        school psychologist.
                 2.     Students will gain knowledge of the history, roles, organizational structures of
                        schools and other systems.
                 3.     Students will gain knowledge of current professional trends in school
                        psychology practice and research.
                 4.     Students will gain knowledge of the ethical codes published by the American
                        Psychological Association (APA) and the National Association of School
                        Psychologists (NASP) as well as the standards, credentialing, legal issues
                        outlined by APA, NASP, and the Mississippi State Department of Education.
                 5.     Students will obtain and complete approved internship experiences related to
                        the practice of school psychology.


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      2.        Assessment. CFPO # 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12; NASP 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.7,
                2.8, 2.9, 2.11
                Goal. Students will gain an understanding of standardized, behavioral, and academic
                          assessment techniques.
                Objectives.
                1. Students will gain knowledge and skills in the use of standardized psychometric,
                     behavioral, and academic assessment techniques.
                2. Students will gain knowledge and skills in the ability to develop, select, administer,
                     score, and interpret assessment instruments with children from diverse backgrounds
                     who are both typically developing and exhibit various exceptionalities.
                3. Students will gain knowledge and skills in using assessment to determine eligibility
                     for services and how to link assessment procedures to interventions.
                4. Students will gain knowledge and skills in presenting results from the assessment in
                     written and verbal form to other professionals, parents, and students.

      3. Consultation and Interventions. CFPO # 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12; NASP 2.1, 2.2, 2.3,
          2.4, 2.5, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.11
                 Goal. Student will gain an understanding of effective consultation models and
                          empirically-based intervention strategies and techniques.
                 Objectives.
                 1. Students will gain knowledge and skills in empirically-based consultation models for
                     working with parents or caregivers and school or mental health personnel who care
                     for and provide educational and mental health services to children from diverse
                     backgrounds who are both typically developing and exhibit various exceptionalities.
                 2. Students will gain knowledge and skills in empirically-based behavioral and
                     cognitive behavioral interventions for working with children from diverse
                     backgrounds who are both typically developing and exhibit various exceptionalities.
                 3. Students will gain knowledge and skills in empirically-based academic interventions
                     for working with children from diverse backgrounds who are both typically
                     developing and exhibit various exceptionalities.

Domain II. RESEARCH AND STATISTICS. CFPO # 1, 7, 8, 11; NASP 2.1, 2.9, 2.10, 2.11
      Research and Statistics is a basic tenet of graduate school. Students will obtain the following
objectives specific to research and statistics:
                 Goal. Students will gain an understanding of research methods, statistics, and ethical
                          and legal issues in research.
                 Objectives.
              1.        Students will gain knowledge and skills in group design, traditional research
                        methods, and statistics.
              2.        Students will gain knowledge and skills in the ability to use single subject research
                        methods to evaluate the effects of different interventions.
              3.        Students will demonstrate the ability to carry out all aspects of a research projects
                        as demonstrated by completion of the College of Education and departmental
                        research requirements and the completion of a dissertation.

Domain III. PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS. CFPO # 1-10; NASP                             2.1–2.11
      Psychological Foundations embody the basis for all studies related to psychology. Students will
obtain the following objectives specific to knowledge and competence in the history and theories of
psychology, individual differences, cultural diversity, and the breadth of scientific psychology including
biological, social, and cognitive psychology.


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                 Goal. Students will gain an understanding of the literature related to the psychological
                        foundations of psychology including the history and theory of psychology,
                        physiological psychology, social psychology, cognition and learning theories,
                        and multicultural issues related to the provision of psychological services across
                        diverse populations of individuals.
                 Objectives.
              1.      Students will gain knowledge of the theories and history and systems of
                      psychology.
              2.      Students will gain knowledge of biological and social psychology and how these
                      disciplines relate to the research base and delivery of professional school
                      psychology services.
              3.      Students will gain knowledge in the theoretical perspectives of individual
                      differences in learning, cognition, and behavior change.
              4.      Students will gain an understanding of the impact of culture on behavior and
                      development, and develop respect and working knowledge of different cultural
                      practices.

  Domain IV. FOCUS AREA. CFPO # 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; NASP 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.7,
  2.8, 2.9, 2.11
Focus Area. School psychology is a broad-based field that crosses many professional and organizational
boundaries. In conjunction with their advisor and focus area professor, each doctoral level student will
select a focus area that will allow the student to acquire knowledge and skills in one of these areas. Focus
area requirements allow students to take courses across programs and departments to meet the following
goals and objectives:

        Goal. The student will gain an understanding of different theories, methods of inquiry, and
               processes and procedures for delivery of services from mental health and educational
               professionals whose primary training is not in school/educational psychology.
        Objectives.
             1. Student will acquire knowledge and skills related to working with children from
                 professionals whose primary training is not in school/educational psychology.
             2. Students will be exposed to and demonstrate an understanding of different theories,
                 methods of inquiry, and processes and procedures for delivery of services to a diverse
                 population of individuals and/or their families and caregivers.

       Competence in the focus area will be evaluated by the focus area professor (see Focus Area
*Minor Course Requirements).

Outcome Competencies to Demonstrate Evidence of Making Appropriate Progress on Domains and
Objectives of Training
         The gains each student makes in the five program common core areas are a function of the degree
the student is pursuing. Students enrolled in the doctoral degree program are expected to be leaders in the
field of school psychology and to have a greater understanding of the issues and mastery of the skills in
each of the program common core areas than at the masters or educational specialist level. The
knowledge and skills that students have gained will be assessed by faculty in the classroom through (a)
course assignments and examinations, (b) practicum and internship supervision, (c) the written and/or oral
comprehensive exams, (d) College of Education and departmental research requirements (i.e., research
and statistics coursework and activities) and (e) the required research process (i.e., educational specialist
project, dissertation). Students are expected to a) achieve grades of “B” or better in program core and
related coursework, b) obtain ratings of “expected” or above on all areas addressed by student annual
evaluations, c) receive passing scores on all comprehensive exams, d) receive acceptable ratings on


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practicum and internship evaluations, and e) complete required research projects (e.g., educational
specialist project, dissertation) conducted by outside personnel to evaluate their skills and competencies in
Domains I. Professional School Psychology including the sub-areas of professional orientation,
assessment, and consultation and intervention, II. Research and Statistics, III. Psychological Foundations,
and for doctoral students, IV. Focus Area. Additional information regarding expected performance in the
curricula and related areas can be found throughout this handbook and in the 2006-2007 Student
Evaluation Handbook.
                                BEHAVIORAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY

        The graduate program in school psychology has a distinct emphasis on behavioral school
psychology. This emphasis will occur throughout much of your formal course work, applied experiences,
and research. This emphasis is reflected in the following courses:
EPY 6113: Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions. In this course, basic theory and
methods of behavior change are presented. This course sets the stage for subsequent learning which
focuses on behavioral school psychology.

EPY 8493: Chi1d Behavior and Personality Assessment. In addition to exposing students to indirect
measures of personality, students acquire behavioral assessment skills that allow them to more directly
measure behavior across settings.

EPY 8773: Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits. In this course, students learn
how to construct and use curriculum-based measures. Students also learn how to develop and evaluate
academic interventions designed to improve a range of academic skills.

EPY 8763: Advanced Seminar in Child Behavioral & Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions. In this
course, students learn to apply behavioral techniques and principles to a variety of psycho-educational,
psychological, and behavioral problems.

EPY 8253: Child & Adolescent Development & Psychopathology. In this course, students learn how
environmental and genetic variables work alone and in tandem to impact a child's behavioral, social,
emotional, motor, and language development.

EDF 9443: Single-Subject Research Designs for Education. In this course, students learn how to
design small n research. Students will also learn how to graph and interpret single subject design graphs
in order to evaluate the effects of different interventions.

EPY 9713: Advanced Psychological Consultation: Theory and Practice. In this class, students are
required to learn several different models of consultation, including a generic model. However, the
emphasis is placed on direct behavioral consultation and students must attempt to apply the techniques of
direct behavioral consultation in a school setting.

EPY 8794: Supervised Experience in School Psychology: Consultation. In this class, students will
learn to apply behavior principles within classroom and clinic settings. Across both settings, students
have the opportunity to hone their direct and indirect intervention skills while working with parents,
teachers, and students.




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                                           Student Advisement

        One of the most important people in your graduate education is your advisor or major professor.
Your advisor is your advocate and confidant. Your advisor recommends and approves your program of
study, monitors your progress, approves course selection, helps you in securing practicum and internship
placements, recommends students for graduation, and assists you in the job search. When you write your
research project as an Ed.S. student or your dissertation as a doctoral student, your advisor or major
professor is critical to your success. Your advisor or major professor will spend hours with you
reviewing, editing, and having you rewrite sections of your thesis or dissertation.

        Master of Science Students. Your degree will be a M.S. in psychometry. After you have been
accepted into the program, the program faculty will assign you an advisor. You will receive a letter
informing you of your advisor and asking you to make an appointment with your advisor to develop your
graduate program of study.
        M.S. students must complete required course work, the master’s examination, and the Praxis I
exam. The M.S. degree will allow you to obtain licensure from the Mississippi State Department of
Education as a school psychometrist at the AA level. This is a non-terminal degree and students must
continue on to the educational specialist or doctoral degrees.

        Education Specialist Students. Your degree will be an Ed.S. in Education with an emphasis in
School Psychology. You will be assigned an advisor by the program faculty when admitted into the
program. You need to schedule a meeting with your advisor to discuss the selection of two additional
committee members. The two additional committee members will work with your advisor in selecting
your courses and will assist in the special problem you undertake. Once the three-faculty committee has
been approved by the Director of Graduate Studies, you should schedule a meeting with your advisor to
develop a graduate program of study. The program of study must be signed by each member of the
committee, the Graduate Coordinator, and the student.
        Ed.S. students must complete required course work and a supervised research project. In pursuit
of the Ed.S. degree, students will complete requirements for a masters degree in psychometry. The Ed.S.
degree will allow you to obtain certification from NASP as a Nationally Certified School Psychologist
(NCSP) and licensure from the Mississippi State Department of Education as a school psychologist at the
AAA level.

         Doctoral Students. Your degree will be a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Educational
Psychology with an emphasis in School Psychology. After you have been admitted, you will be assigned
an advisor by the program faculty and departmental Graduate Coordinator. Your advisor will help you in
selecting your first nine-twelve (9-12) hours of course work. Your advisor will discuss your advisement
needs, research interests, and curriculum needs. In pursuit of the Ph.D. degree, students will complete
requirements for a master’s degree in psychometry. The Ph.D. degree will allow you to obtain licensure
as a psychologist after completing coursework, defending your dissertation, and completing an approved
and/or accredited full-year internship and full-year post-doctoral fellowship. This degree will also allow
you to obtain certification as a NCSP and licensure from the Mississippi State Department of Educational
as a school psychologist at the AAAA level.
         As you become more familiar with the faculty and their research interests, you and your advisor
will discuss selection of a major professor, permanent advisor, and dissertation director. Often this is the
same individual. Your permanent advisor will help you select a major professor, a minor or focus area, a
focus area professor, a dissertation director (often your advisor), and a doctoral committee. These
committees will help develop a program of study that meets your particular training goals and objectives
and your research interests. Your doctoral committee will consist of a major professor and director of the
dissertation (often this is the same individual), your focus area (i.e., minor) professor and at least one
faculty member outside of the Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special


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Education. You should interview each potential committee member to decide if you want to work with
the individual and if he or she wants to work with you. After you have secured agreement from each
faculty member to serve on your committee, you and your major professor will initiate an Approval of
Committee form from the Department website at www.educ.msstate.edu/CEdEPy/forms.htm.

                                            Program of Study

         All graduate students must file a Program of Study with the Office of Graduate Studies. The
form containing the Program of Study will be initiated by the student. The Program of Study form must
be approved by the advisor, committee members, and the departmental Graduate Coordinator. You must
meet with your advisor to generate your official Program of Study (see Program of Study in the Forms
section, this can also be viewed on the Department website located at
www.educ.msstate.edu/CEdEPy/forms.htm). Until a formal Program of Study has been approved, you
have no guarantee the courses you take will be counted as a part of your degree program. Your Program
of Study may be modified by obtaining approval from your advisor, departmental graduate coordinator,
and the College of Education Dean. When you change a program (that is, drop or add a course) and have
obtained an approved change of program, it is your responsibility to enroll in the courses listed on your
modified Program of Study.
         The Graduate Records secretary is a valuable resource in completing the paperwork documenting
completion of degree requirements. The records office personnel will review your file with you to
determine all paperwork has been completed and will assist you in determining that all required signature
are on your documents.

                                  Prerequisite Undergraduate Courses

       Students should have the following undergraduate courses before entering the Ed.S. or Ph.D.
programs:

        1. Psychological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Introductory
           Psychology)
        2. Developmental Psychology (e.g., child development)
        3. Education, Learning, or Cognition (e.g., Theories of Learning).

         Students who have not met these prerequisite course requirements may enroll in the program and
take these undergraduate courses as they progress through their degree program. As students progress
through their Ph.D. program they are required to complete the requirements for the M.S. degree in School
Psychometry and obtain their AA license in School Psychometry from the Mississippi State Department
of Education. This certification is important because it will allow students to obtain more training across
all areas of School Psychology service delivery in the Counseling and School Psychology Laboratory and
other settings. In order to earn their M.S. degree, students will be required to complete the courses
outlined below and pass the PRAXIS I exam.
         Currently, the M.S. degree in the School Psychology Program is a 53-hour, non terminal degree
designed to be started in the fall semester and be completed in two years. During each of these semesters,
you will need to take 9 to 13 semester hours if you intend to complete the program in two years. Whether
or not you want to complete the M.S. degree in two years, it is essential that you enroll in courses in the
appropriate sequence if you are to earn the M.S. degree in a timely fashion. You must also be sure you
have met prerequisite course requirements for each course in which you enroll. Failure to follow course
sequences or enroll in prerequisites will likely to cause delays in your graduation, often as much as a year.
         Students seeking a M.S. in psychometry are required to pass the Praxis I exam prior to applying
to enroll in the assessment practicum. Additionally, students are required to pass the Master’s
comprehensive examination during the spring semester of their second year.


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        Obtaining a degree in school psychometry will allow students to obtain their AA licensure from
the Mississippi State Department of Education. This license will offer greater options for the student and
the faculty in securing graduate assistantships including departmental teaching assistantships and school-
based assistantships. Please remember that this is a non-terminal degree and students must continue on
the educational specialist or doctoral level contingent upon passing program requirements at the masters
level.
                                 Current Master of Science Curriculum
EDF 8363         Function and Methods of Research in Education (3 hours)
EDF 9443         Single-Subject Research Designs for Education (3 hours)
EPY 6113*        Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
EPY 6214*        Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 8253         Child & Adolescent Development & Psychopathology (3 hours)
EPY 8263         Psychological Testing in Educational & Related Settings (3 hours)
EPY 8293         Cognitive Development (3 hours)
EPY 8493         Child Behavior & Personality Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8694         Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Assessment (4 hours)
EPY 8703         Introduction to School Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8723         Individual Assessment for Educational Related Settings (3 hours)
EPY 8763         Advanced Behavioral & Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
EPY 8773         Assessment & Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits (3 hours)
EPY 8933         Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 9713         Advanced Psychological Consulting: Theory & Practice (3 hours)
PSY 6403*        Biological Psychology (or other biological basis course; (3 hours)
EDX ---3         Special Education Elective (3 hours) – See below
COE              Counselor Education Elective (3 hours) – See below

* These courses are split level. If the student had these courses as an undergraduate at MSU, they do not
have to re-take the course provided they made a "B" or better. If students had similar courses at other
universities, they must meet with the instructor to determine if they can be waived. For each course that
was taken as an undergraduate, students must enroll in another equivalent course approved by
your major advisor and committee in order to earn sufficient hours to graduate.
        Students are required to take one three credit hour Special Education Elective. Below are some of
the common course options:
Special Education
EDX 8143: Early Education for the Disabled
EDX 8203: Practicum: Diagnosis of Special Education Populations
EDX 8303: Seminar in Mental Retardation
EDX 8393: Seminar in Education for the Emotionally Disabled
EDX 8403: Teaching the Emotionally Disabled

Counselor Education
COE 8013      Counseling Skills Development
COE 8913      Counseling Children




                                                14 of 53
                        Current Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) in Education
                         with an Emphasis in School Psychology Program

         The Ed.S. with an Emphasis in School Psychology Program is a planned program of a minimum
of thirty (30) semester hours above the master's degree under the direction of a major advisor and two
committee members. The Ed.S. Program is designed to provide advanced course work in school
psychology and is currently designed to be completed in four years. In addition to providing AAA
licensure in School Psychology, the Ed.S. program is approved by the National Association of School
Psychologists (NASP) and qualifies students to sit for the Praxis II exam in School Psychology. Upon
passing this exam, students become Nationally Certified School Psychologists (NCSP), which allows
students to become certified in most states. However, because reciprocity is not absolute, perspective
students planning on working within school systems in other states should check to determine if those
particular states accept NCSP.
         Non-course work Ed.S. Requirements.
         1.     You must have a master's degree in School Psychometry to complete the Ed.S. in
                Education with an Emphasis in School Psychology program.

       2.    Eighteen semester hours must be earned at MSU.

       3.    You must establish academic residency at MSU. Residency may be established by (a)
             enrolling at MSU for one semester of full-time study (minimum of nine hours), (b) two
             semesters of half-time study (minimum of six semester hours each semester), (c) one
             summer of full-time study (minimum of nine semester hours), or (d) one summer of half-
             time study (six semester hours) and one semester of half-time study (six semester hours).

       4.    A three-six hour special research project (i.e., educational specialist project) or six-hour
             thesis is required.

       5.    You must complete a minimum 1200 hour internship in a school-based setting that is
             approved by the school psychology faculty and consistent with the Standards for Training
             and Field Placement in School Psychology outlined by NASP in 2000. Please note that
             most of the students enrolled in our program obtain closer to 1500 hours as they complete
             10-month internships engaged in direct and indirect activities for a minimum of 40 hours
             per week.

      Course work Ed.S. with an Emphasis in School Psychology Requirements.
      The following coursework is required for an Ed.S. degree with an emphasis in School Psychology
in addition the masters curriculum (56 hours) described above:
      COE 8073           Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3 hours)
      EPY 8794           Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Consultation (4 hours)
      EDX/PSY/EPY Advanced Psychology, SPED, or Educational Psychology Elective* (3 hours)
      EPY 9703           Contemporary Legal, Ethical &Professional Issues in School Psych (3 hours)
      EPY 7000           Directed Independent Study/Educational Specialist Research Project (3 hours)
      EPY 8780           Internship in School Psychology (6 hours for two semesters = 12 hours)
      * Students may select from the following courses:
      EDX ----           Special Education elective (see list from Master’s program)
      PSY 8223           Systems and Theories of Psychology
      PSY ____           Advanced Social Psychology Elective
      EPY 6990           Advanced Educational Psychology Elective
  *** Note: Students who wish to apply to the Ph.D. program are not encouraged to complete their Ed.S.
                     internship years, as this would require an extra year of internship.


                                                15 of 53
           EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST REQUIRED SEQUENCE OF COURSES
                       (AAA and NASP CERTIFICATION)

                                             YEAR 1

SEMESTER 1
EPY 8253      Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology
EPY 8703      Introduction to School Psychology
EPY 6214      Educational and Psychological Statistics
EDF 9443      Single Subject Research Design

13 hours

SEMESTER 2
EDX ---3      Special Education Elective (See below)
EPY 8263      Psychological Testing in Educational and Related Settings
EPY 8723      Individual Assessment for Educational Related Settings
COE 8073      Cultural Foundations in Counseling

12 hours

SUMMER
EPY 8493      Child Behavior and Personality Assessment
EPY 6113      Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions
EPY 8773      Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits

9 hours

                                             YEAR 2

SEMESTER 1
EPY 8293   Cognitive Development
EPY 8933   Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment
EPY 9713   Advanced Psychological Consultation: Theory and Practice

9 hours

SEMESTER 2
EPY 8694   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Assessment
EPY 8763   Advanced Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions
EPY 9703   Legal and Ethical Issues in School Psychology

10 hours

SUMMER
PSY 6403      Biological Psychology

3 hours




                                             16 of 53
                                                 YEAR 3

SEMESTER 1
COE         Counselor Education Elective (usually COE 8013 or 8913)
EDF 8363    Functions and Methods in Educational Research
PSY/EDX/EPY Advanced psychology, special education or educational psychology elective

9 hours

SEMESTER 2
PSY/EDX/EPY Advanced psychology, special education or educational psychology elective (if not taken
            during the fall of third year)
EPY 8790    Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Consultation Practicum
EPY 7000    Directed Independent Study: Educational Specialist Research Project

10 hours

                                                 YEAR 4

SEMESTER 1
EPY 8780   Internship in School Psychology

6 hours

SEMESTER 2
EPY 8780   Internship in School Psychology

6 hours

Important Considerations:

Students are encouraged to graduate with their masters degree at the end of their second year and obtain
an educator license as a AA school psychometrist. It is important to note that students must take the
Praxis I in the fall of their second year prior to going on assessment practicum. Students who do not
pass this test will not be allowed to go on assessment practicum.

Students will take their comprehensive masters exam in the spring of their second year contingent upon
meeting the appropriate course requirements.

Some students may elect to take additional practicum courses through EPY 8890 Supervised Experiences
in School Psychology: Clinic Practicum or EPY 9723 Seminar in School Psychology. Any student who
receives a grant-funded school-based assistantship must enroll in EPY 8890 or EPY 9723 in order to
receive the appropriate supervision to provide school psychological services.

Students will take the Praxis II in school psychology during their internship year.




                                                 17 of 53
                                     Ph.D. Degree Program of Study

        Students accepted into the Ph.D. program in School Psychology should either hold a Master's
degree in school psychology/psychometry or should obtain AA licensure as a school psychometrist from
the Mississippi State Department of Education within their first 3 years in the program. For students
entering the program with only an undergraduate degree, the Ph.D. program in school psychology is
designed to be completed in 5 years. At least 120 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree are
necessary for you to earn a doctorate from the Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and
Special Education. The work will be divided as follows:

                                  Current Ph.D. Course Curricula

Ph.D. Course Requirements

COE ----       Elective (see below)
COE 8073       Cultural Foundations in Counseling
EDF 8363       Function and Methods of Research in Education
EDF 9373       Educational Research Design
EDF 9443       Single Subject Research Designs in Education
EPY 6113       Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions
EPY 6214       Educational and Psychological Statistics
EPY 8214       Advanced Educational and Psychological Statistics
EPY 8253       Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology
EPY 8263       Psychological Testing in Educational and Related Settings
EPY 8293       Cognitive Development (or equivalent)
EPY 8493       Child Behavior and Personality Assessment
EPY 8703       School Psychology
EPY 8723       Individual Assessment for Educational and Related Settings
EPY 8763       Advanced Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions
EPY 8773       Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits
EPY 8694       Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Assessment
EPY 8794       Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Consultation
EPY 8890       Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Clinic or
   EPY 9723    Seminar in School Psychology
EPY 8933       Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment
EPY 9000       Dissertation Research (20 hours)
EPY 9213       Advanced Analysis in Educational Research
EPY 9703       Contemporary, Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psych
EPY 9713       Advanced Psychological Consultation: Theory and Practice
EPY 9730       Doctoral Internship in School Psychology (18 credit hours)
PSY 6403       Biological Psychology
PSY 8223       Systems and Theories of Psychology or EPY 8990 History & Systems in Psychology
EDX ----       Special Education Elective A (See below)
EDX ----       Special Education Elective B (See below)
PSY ----       Advanced Social Psychology Elective (See below)
31-35.         Focus-Area Requirement Requirements (See below)




                                              18 of 53
Special Education Electives
        Students must select two Special Education graduate course electives. These courses must be
approved by the student's advisor (i.e., major professor). Below are examples of courses students may
select.

Special Education
EDX 8123: Organization and Supervision of Special Education
EDX 8143: Early Education for the Disabled
EDX 8153: Language Development -Assessment and Remediation
EDX 8173: Special Education in the Regular Classroom
EDX 8183: Seminar in Learning Disabilities
EDX 8203: Practicum: Diagnosis of Special Education Populations
EDX 8303: Seminar in Mental Retardation
EDX 8393: Seminar in Education for the Emotionally Disabled
EDX 8403: Teaching the Emotionally Disabled
EDX 8990: Special Topics in Special Education

Social Psychology Electives
         Students must select one of the following Social Psychology Courses. Any deviation from these
listed courses must be approved by the student's major professor.

PSY 6643       Social Cognition
PSY 8613       Advanced Social Psychology
EPY 8990       Social Psychology Foundations of Education


Counselor Education Electives
        Students may select one of the following Counselor Education Courses. Any deviation from these
selections must be approved by the student's advisor (i.e., major professor).

COE 8013        Counseling Skills
COE 8913        Counseling Children




                                               19 of 53
                         Ph.D. Sequence of Courses: School Psychology
                     (APA & NASP APPROVED: AAAA CERTIFICATION)

                                             YEAR I

SEMESTER 1: Fall
EPY 8253    Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology
EPY 8703    School Psychology
EPY 6214    Educational and Psychological Statistics
EDF 9443    Single Subject Research Designs in Education

SEMESTER 2: Spring
EPY 8263    Psychological Testing in Educational and Related Settings
EPY 8214    Advanced Educational and Psychological Statistics
EDF 8363    Function and Methods of Research in Education
EPY 8723    Individual Assessment for Educational and Related Settings

SEMESTER 3: SUMMER
EPY 8493    Child Behavior and Personality Assessment
EPY 6113    Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions
EPY 8773    Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits
COE ----    Counseling Elective (e.g., Counseling Skills, Counseling Children)

                                           YEAR 2
SEMESTER 1: Fall
EPY 8293    Cognitive Development
EPY 8933    Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment
EPY 9213    Advanced Analysis in Educational Research
EPY 9713    Advanced Psychological Consultation: Theory and Practice

SEMESTER 2: Spring
EPY 8694    Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Assessment
EPY 8763    Advanced Child Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Interventions
PSY 8223    Systems and Theories of Psychology
EDF 9373    Educational Research Design

SEMESTER 3: SUMMER
COE 8073    Cultural Foundations in Counseling
FOCUS AREA




                                             20 of 53
                                               YEAR 3
FALL EVEN YEARS

SEMESTER 1: Fall
EPY 9703    Contemporary, Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology
EDX ----    Special Education Elective A (See below)
EPY 8890    Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Clinic or EPY 9723 Seminar in School
            Psychology
FOCUS AREA

FALL ODD YEARS

SEMESTER 1: Fall
EPY 8890    Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Clinic or EPY 9723 Seminar in School
            Psychology
EDX ----    Special Education Elective A (See below)
EDX ----    Special Education Elective B (See below)
FOCUS AREA

SPRING ODD YEARS
SEMESTER 2: Spring
EPY 8794    Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Consultation
FOCUS AREA
FOCUS AREA

SPRING EVEN YEARS
SEMESTER 2: Spring
PSY 6403    Biological Psychology
EPY 8794    Supervised Experiences in School Psychology:
            Consultation
FOCUS AREA

                                               YEAR 4
FALL ODD YEARS

SEMESTER 1: Fall
EDX ----    Special Education Elective B (See below)
EPY 9003    Dissertation Research
FOCUS AREA
FOCUS AREA

Students must also complete the following requirements this year:

        A MINIMUM OF ONE REFEREED PRESENTATION AT A REGIONAL OR NATIONAL
        CONFERENCE AND ONE SUBMITTED PUBLICATION TO A REFEREED JOURNAL
        FOCUS AREA COMPREHENSIVE EXAM
        WRITTEN PRELIMINARY COMPREHENSIVE EXAM
        APPLICATION TO INTERNSHIP SITES




                                               21 of 53
FALL EVEN YEARS

SEMESTER 1: Fall
EPY 9703    Contemporary, Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School and Educational
            Psychology
EPY 9003    Dissertation Research
FOCUS AREA
FOCUS AREA

Students must also complete the following requirements this year:

        A MINIMUM OF ONE REFEREED PRESENTATION AND ONE SUBMITTED
        PUBLICATION TO A REFEREED JOURNAL
        FOCUS AREA COMPREHENSIVE EXAM
        WRITTEN PRELIMINARY COMPREHENSIVE EXAM
        APPLICATION TO INTERNSHIP SITES

SPRING EVEN YEARS

SEMESTER 2: Spring
PSY 6403    Biological Psychology
PSY 6---    Advanced Social Psychology Elective (See below)
EPY 9003    Dissertation Research

SPRING ODD YEARS

SEMESTER 2: Spring
EDF 9443    Single Subject Research Designs in Education
PSY 6---    Advanced Social Psychology Elective (See below)
EPY 9003    Dissertation Research

                                               YEAR 5

EPY 9730        Internship in School Psychology (Full Year, 2000 hours, 18 credit hours)
EPY 9000        Dissertation Research (must have 20 hours)




                                               22 of 53
                                   Course Requirements by Area

Professional School Psychology 62 Hours

       Practice and Professional Issues (24 hours)
       EPY 8703        School Psychology
       EPY 9703        Contemporary, Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psych
       EPY 9730        Internship in School Psychology (18 credit hours)

       Assessment (19 hours)
       EPY 8263       Psychological Testing in Educational and Related Settings
       EPY 8493       Child Behavior and Personality Assessment
       EPY 8723       Individual Assessment for Educational and Related Settings
       EPY 8773       Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits
       EPY 8933       Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment
       EPY 8694       Supervised Experience in School Psychology:
                      Assessment Practicum

       Consultation and Intervention (19 hours)
       COE ----       Elective (e.g., Counseling Skills, Counseling Children)
       EPY 6113       Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions
       EPY 8763       Advanced Child Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Interventions
       EPY 8773       Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits
       EPY 9713       Advanced Psychological Consultation: Theory & Practice
       EPY 8790       Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Consultation
       EPY 8890       Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Clinic or EPY 9723
                      Seminar in School Psychology

Statistics and Research 43 Hours

       Statistics
       EPY 6214       Educational and Psychological Statistics
       EPY 8214       Advanced Educational and Psychological Statistics
       EPY 9213       Advanced Analysis in Educational Research

       Research
       EDF 8363       Function and Methods of Research in Education
       EDF 9373       Educational Research Design
       EDF 8443       Single Subject Research Designs in Education

       Research Projects
       EPY 9000        Dissertation Research (20 hours)
       Supervised research requirements for College of Education and Department




                                              23 of 53
Psychological Foundations 21 Hours

        Cognitive-Affective Basis of Behavior
        EPY 8293       Cognitive Development

        Biological Basis of Behavior
        PSY 6403        Biological Psychology or
          *PSY 8573 Psychopharmacology (*only if the student has completed PSY 6403 or approved
                                               equivalent course)

        Social Basis of Behavior
        COE 8073        Cultural Foundations in Counseling
        PSY 8613        Advanced Social Psychology or
          EPY 8990 Social Psychology Foundations of Education

        Individual Behavior
        EPY 8253       Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology
        EPY 8293       Cognitive Development
        COE 8073       Cultural Foundations in Counseling
        EDX ---3       Special Education Elective, (a)
        EDX ---3       Special Education Elective, (b)

        General Psychology
        PSY 8223       Systems and Theories of Psychology or
                       EPY 8990 History and Systems in Psychology


Focus Area (Minor) 12-18 Hours

       FOCUS AREA (Minor) COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS

        School psychology is a broad field and school psychology practitioners and researchers benefit
from the professional endeavors of many other professionals with different training and backgrounds. The
focus area requirements are designed to give students the opportunity to be exposed to a broad array of
theory, practice, and research in areas related to school psychology. Focus area requirements should
allow students to focus their electives on a topic but allow for breadth (research, theory, and practice) by
allowing students to take courses across disciplines and departments. The focus area requirement is
designed to encourage students and faculty across units, departments and disciplines to work together to
strengthen their programs. Course work for the focus area may come from any academic department in
the university. Students will meet with their advisor and potential focus area professors to establish a
focus area minor.

        Process of Completing Focus Area Requirement
        1. The focus area professor can not be a core school psychology professor.

        2. The student, in conjunction with her/his major professor will select a focus area and a focus
           area professor. The student will work with these individuals to construct a Focus Area
           program of study which will consist of three graduate courses that are not part of the required
           School Psychology program and one independent study writing project (e.g., PSY 7003) or
           four courses and a focus area examination. All three courses must be graduate level courses
           and approved by the focus area professor and the students' major professor. They can be


                                                 24 of 53
            across departments and units (including our own department) but they can not be part of the
            required School Psychology program. Courses should revolve around a central topic [i.e.,
            antisocial behavior in children could be the central theme and the students could take courses
            from sociology (e.g., juvenile delinquency), psychology (e.g., child behavior therapy), special
            education (e.g., teaching behavior disordered children) , etc.]. The next section lists possible
            focus areas and an example of courses that will satisfy specific focus areas. These courses are
            provided only as examples. Students are encouraged to work with their major professor and a
            focus area professor to develop their own focus area and collection of courses that fit their
            particular professional interest.

        3. The student must have a 3.0 QPA on focus area courses.

        4. The student must pass a focus area examination (see next section).

        5. Students will not be allowed to take their written comprehensive preliminary exam before
           their focus area exam is passed. However, under no circumstances will students be allowed to
           attend internship until both their focus areas exam and their written preliminary
           comprehensive exams are passed.

Focus Area Exam for Doctoral Students

        There are two options for focus area (minor) exams. For students taking three courses and writing
a paper, the paper will serve as their minor exam. For students taking four courses or more, they may
choose to write a paper or take an oral or written examination administered by their focus area professor.
The option that is chosen will depend upon the arrangement between the student and the focus area
professor.

Option 1: APA Style Paper
       1. For students who are taking three courses and writing a paper (again they should register for
           an independent study elective, for example course number 7003, in the focus area professor's
           program). The paper will serve as the student’s written focus area examination. The paper
           must be written in APA style. This paper can be either expository (e.g., literature review,
           conceptual paper, etc.) or empirical (e.g., experimental, descriptive, correlational, etc.). The
           goal of the focus area requirements is for students to learn skills, methods, theories, and/or
           techniques from other disciplines and apply these to the field of school psychology. Students
           may continue to work on an expository paper or empirical study that was part of a class
           assignment and use this for their Focus Area exam.

            The student’s major professor and focus area professor will read the paper and grade it on
            pass/fail basis. In the case where these two professors disagree (one passes and the other fails
            the paper) the student’s entire Ph.D. committee (5 faculty) will grade the paper on a pass/fail
            basis. At least 50% of the committee members must grade the paper a pass in order for the
            student to have satisfactorily completed the focus area requirements.

Option 2: Oral or Written Exam

            For students taking four courses, the typical focus area examination (oral or written,
            administered by the focus area faculty member, will be used to evaluate the student in their
            focus area.




                                                 25 of 53
Examples of Focus Areas
   I.      Special Education
           A. Teaching Exceptional Children
                   EDX 6503           Teaching the Severely & Profoundly Impaired Child
                   EDX 8403           Teaching the Emotionally Disabled
                   EDX 8173           Special Education in the Regular Classroom
                   EDX 8183           Seminar in Learning Disabilities
      Potential Focus Area Professors: Devlin, Coffey, Arnault



            B. Children with Severe and Profound Disabilities

                        EDX 6503        Teaching the Severely & Profoundly Impaired Child
                        PSY 8323        Psychopathology
                        EDX 8303        Seminar in Mental Retardation
                        EDX 6613        Teaching Children & Youth with Physical/Multiple Disabilities
                Potential Focus Area Professors: Coffey, Armstrong

    II.     Counseling

                        COE 8023 Counseling Theory
                        COE 8043 Group Techniques and Procedures
                        COE 8173 Counseling Gifted Students
                        COE 8913 Counseling Children
                        COE 8903 School Counseling Services
                Potential Focus Area Professors: Sheperis, Young, Underwood, Looby

    III.    Clinical Psychology
                        PSY 6373 Forensic Psychology
                        PSY 8323 Psychopathology
                        PSY 8333 Systems of Psychotherapy
                        PSY 8383 Behavior Therapy
                        PSY 8573 Psychopharmocology
                Potential Focus Area Professors: Armstrong, Jacquin, Fee, Spirrison

Other possible focus areas:
      Adolescents with Behavior Disorders
      Family Systems and Therapy
      Multicultural Issues
      Juvenile Delinquency
      Psychoeducational Statistics and Measurement
      Developmental Psychology
      Preschool Assessment & Intervention
      Psychoeducational Issues for students with Physical Disabilities (e.g. vision, hearing, ambulatory,
        etc.)
      Transition from School to Work for Students with Disabilities

In addition to these possible focus areas, students could take more traditional focus areas: Educational
Technology & Educational Leadership; however, they would have the option of taking courses both
within and outside the department.


                                                 26 of 53
                                           Proposed Curricula

        The School Psychology faculty are in the process of revising the program curricula requirements.
These changes are based on data collected during self-studies of the program for accreditation from both
the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and the American Psychological Association
(APA) as well as feedback from current students and alumni. The faculty believe that the following
sequence of courses will allow students to obtain didactic knowledge and applied skills in a timely
manner while still representing best practices in the field and compliance with the standards established
by our accrediting bodies. The following is the proposed coursework and a tentative course sequence:

          PROPOSED MASTER OF SCIENCE COURSES: SCHOOL PSYCHOMETRY
                             (AA CERTIFICATION)
                                   52 hours

                                Proposed Master of Science Curriculum
EPY 6113*       Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
EPY 6214*       Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 8253        Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology (3 hours)
EPY 8293        Cognitive Development (3 hours)
EPY 8493        Child Behavior and Personality Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8703        Introduction to School Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8723        Individual Assessment for Educational Related Settings (3 hours)
EPY 8763        Advanced Child Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
EPY 8773        Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits (3 hours)
EPY 8890        Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Academic Clinic (3 hours)
EPY 8890        Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)
EPY 8933        Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 9713        Advanced Psychological Consulting: Theory and Practice (3 hours)
EDF 9443        Single Subject Designs in Education (3 hours)
COE             Elective (3 hours)
EDX             Elective (3 hours)
PSY 6403        Biological Psychology



Note: This is a 52-hour curriculum that would allow students to earn a master of science (M.S.)
degree in school psychometry in five (5) semesters. Students would be able to obtain licensure
from the Mississippi Department of Education at the AA level as school psychometrist. This
would be a non-terminal degree and students must complete the specialist or doctoral
program in school psychology.

*   Indicates course offered as split level. If the student has taken the course at the undergraduate level,
    student may waive the course at the graduate level if they obtained a “B” in the course at the
    undergraduate level. However, the student must take another equivalent course approved by their
    major advisor and committee to replace the credit hours to meet all requirements for the degree.




                                                 27 of 53
                  PROPOSED MASTER OF SCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCE:
                             SCHOOL PSYCHOMETRY


                                          YEAR 1
FALL SEMESTER
EPY 8253   Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology (3 hours)
EPY 8703   Introduction to School Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8723   Individual Assessment for Educational Related Settings (3 hours)
EPY 6113   Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)

12 credit hours

SPRING SEMESTER
EPY 8933   Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8493   Child Behavior and Personality Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8763   Advanced Child Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
EDX        Special Education Elective

12 credit hours

SUMMER SEMESTER
EPY 8773  Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits (3 hours)
EDF 9443  Single subject Designs in Education (3 hours)
EPY 8890  Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Academic Clinic (3 hours)

9 credit hours
                                            YEAR 2
FALL SEMESTER
EPY 6214   Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 9713   Advanced Psychological Consulting: Theory and Practice (3 hours)
EPY 8293   Cognitive Development (3 hours)
EPY 8890   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)

13 credit hours

SPRING SEMESTER
PSY 6403    Biological Psychology (3 hours)
EDX, PSY, COE Elective

6 credit hours




                                           28 of 53
EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST PROPOSED COURSES: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
                      (AAA and NCSP CERTIFICATION)
                  30 hours beyond the Master of Science Degree

                                         Proposed Curriculum

COE 8073        Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3 hours)
EPY 8890        Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)
EPY 9703        Contemporary Legal, Ethical & Professional Issues in School Psych (3 hours)
EDX or PSY      Elective (3 hours)
EPY 7000        Directed Independent Study – Educational Specialist Research (6 hours)
EPY 8780        Internship in School Psychology (12 hours)


Note: This is a 30-hour curriculum beyond the masters degree (52 hours) that would allow
students to earn an educational specialist degree (Ed.S.) with an emphasis in school psychology in
a total of eight (8) semesters or three (3) academic years. Students would be able to obtain
licensure from the Mississippi Department of Education at the AAA level as school
psychologists. They will also be able to obtain certification as a Nationally Certified School
Psychologist (NCSP) from the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP).




                                                29 of 53
             EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST SEQUENCE OF PROPOSED COURSES:
                 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (AAA & NCSP CERTIFICATION)

                                          YEAR 1
FALL SEMESTER
EPY 8253   Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology (3 hours)
EPY 8703   Introduction to School Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8723   Individual Assessment for Educational Related Settings (3 hours)
EPY 6113   Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)

12 credit hours

SPRING SEMESTER
EPY 8933   Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8493   Child Behavior and Personality Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8763   Advanced Child Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
PSY 6403   Biological Psychology

12 credit hours

SUMMER SEMESTER
EPY 8773  Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits (3 hours)
EDF 9443  Single subject Designs in Education (3 hours)
EPY 8890  Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Academic Clinic (3 hours)

EPY 9703        Contemporary, Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology or
                (note: this course is offered every other year so some students will take it their first
                summer and others will take it their second summer).
9-12 credit hours
                                                 YEAR 2
FALL SEMESTER
EPY 6214        Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 9713        Advanced Psychological Consulting: Theory and Practice (3 hours)
EPY 8293        Cognitive Development (3 hours)
EPY 8890        Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)

13 credit hours

SPRING SEMESTER
COE 8073    Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3 hours)
EPY 8890    Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)
PSY 6403    Biological Psychology (3 hours)
EDX, PSY, COE Elective

12 credit hours




                                                  30 of 53
                                                     YEAR 2

SUMMER SEMESTER
EDX, PSY, COE Elective (3 hours)

EPY 9703           Contemporary, Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology
                   (note: this course is offered every other year so some students will take it their first
                   summer and others will take it their second summer).

3-6 credit hours
                                                     YEAR 3

FALL SEMESTER
EPY 8780   Internship in School Psychology (6 hours)
EPY 7000   Individual EdS Research Project (3 hours)

9 hours

SPRING SEMESTER
EPY 8780   Internship in School Psychology (6 hours)
EPY 7000   Individual EdS Research Project (3 hours)

9 hours

This sequence of courses yields 82 credit hours across 8 academic semesters or 3 academic years.


Note: Those students who have departmental assistantships in clinical or educational settings must also
be enrolled in EPY 8890 Supervised Experiences in School Psychology for the semester in which they
have the assistantship. All students must complete at least three semesters of EPY 8890 (one of which
must be completed during the summer semester) regardless of whether they have a departmental
assistantship.




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                     PH.D. PROPOSED COURSES: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
                             (AAAA, NCSP, Licensed Psychologist)

Ph.D. Course Requirements
COE -----      Elective (3 hours)
COE 8073       Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3 hours)
EDF 9373       Educational Research Design or EPY 9263 Applied Research Seminar (3 hours)
EDF 9443       Single Subject Research Designs in Education (3 hours)
EPY 6113       Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
EPY 6214       Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 8214       Advanced Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 8253       Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology (3 hours)
EPY 8293       Cognitive Development or equivalent (3 hours)
EPY 8493       Child Behavior and Personality Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8703       Introduction to School Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8723       Individual Assessment for Educational and Related Settings (3 hours)
EPY 8763       Advanced Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
EPY 8773       Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits (3 hours)
EPY 8794       Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Consultation (3 hours)
EPY 8890       Supervised Experiences in School Psychology (6-18 hours)
EPY 8933       Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 9000       Dissertation Research (20 hours)
EPY 9213       Advanced Analysis in Educational Research (3 hours)
EPY 9703       Contemporary Legal, Ethical, & Professional Issues in School Psych (3 hours)
EPY 9713       Advanced Psychological Consultation: Theory and Practice (3 hours)
EPY 9730       Doctoral Internship in School Psychology (18 credit hours)
PSY 6403       Biological Psychology (3 hours)
EDX -----      Special Education Elective A (3 hours)
EDX ----       Special Education Elective B (3 hours)
PSY 8613       Advanced Social Psychology (3 hours)
XXX ----       Focus-Area Requirement Requirements (12 hours)

New Courses

EPY ----        History and Systems in Psychology (3 hours)
EPY ----        Psychometric Theory (3 hours)



Note: Those students who have departmental assistantships in clinical or educational settings must also
be enrolled in EPY 8890 Supervised Experiences in School Psychology for the semester in which they
have the assistantship. All PhD students must have at least seven semesters of EPY 8890 (one of which
must be completed during the summer semester) regardless of whether they have a departmental
assistantship.




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            PH.D. SEQUENCE OF PROPOSED COURSES: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
                          (AAAA, NCSP, Licensed Psychologist)

FALL SEMESTER
EPY 8253   Child and Adolescent Development and Psychopathology (3 hours)
EPY 8703   Introduction to School Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8723   Individual Assessment for Educational Related Settings (3 hours)
EPY 6113   Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)

12 credit hours

SPRING SEMESTER
EPY 8933   Integrated Psycho-Educational Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8493   Child Behavior and Personality Assessment (3 hours)
EPY 8763   Advanced Child Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (3 hours)
PSY 6403   Biological Psychology (3 hours)

12 credit hours

SUMMER SEMESTER
EPY 8773  Assessment and Interventions for Academic Skills Deficits (3 hours)
EDF 9443  Single subject Designs in Education (3 hours)
EPY 8890  Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Clinic (3 hours)

EPY 9703          Contemporary Legal, Ethical, & Professional Issues in School Psych (3 hours) or
EPY 8990          History and Systems in Psychology (3 hours)

                  Note: EPY 9703 Ethics and EPY 8990 History are offered on rotating years;
                  however, both courses must be taken to fulfill the requirements for the doctoral
                  degree.

9-12 credit hours

                                                 YEAR 2
FALL SEMESTER
EPY 6214   Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 9713   Advanced Psychological Consulting: Theory and Practice (3 hours)
EPY 8293   Cognitive Development (3 hours)
EPY 8890   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)

13 credit hours

SPRING SEMESTER
EPY 8214   Advanced Educational and Psychological Statistics (4 hours)
EPY 8890   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences(3 hours)
XXX ----   Counseling or Special Education Elective (3 hours)
XXX ----   Focus Area Elective

12 credit hours




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                                                 YEAR 2

SUMMER SEMESTER
XXX ----  Counseling, Special Education Elective, or Focus Area Elective (3 hours)
XXX ----  Counseling, Special Education Elective, or Focus Area Elective (3 hours)

EPY 9703          Contemporary Legal, Ethical, & Professional Issues in School Psych (3 hours) or
EPY 8990          History and Systems in Psychology (3 hours)

                  Note: EPY 9703 Ethics and EPY 8990 History are offered on rotating years;
                  however, both courses must be taken to fulfill the requirements for the doctoral
                  degree.

9 credit hours
                                          YEAR 3
FALL SEMESTER
EPY 9213   Advanced Analysis in Educational Research (3 hours)
EPY 8890   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)
EPY 9000   Dissertation (3 hours)
XXX ----   Counseling, Special Education, or Focus Area Elective (3 hours)

12 credit hours

SPRING SEMESTER
EDF 9373   Educational Research Design or EPY 9263 Applied Research Seminar (3 hours)
EPY ----   Psychometric Theory or PSY 8613 Advanced Social Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8890   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 9000   Dissertation (3)

Note: Psychometric Theory and PSY Advanced Social Psychology are both required for the
doctoral program; however, students must rotate these courses between their 3rd and 4th spring
semester in the program as Psychometric Theory is only offered every other year.

12 credit hours

SUMMER SEMESTER
COE 8073  Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3 hours)
XXX ----  Counseling, Special Education Elective, or Focus Area Elective (3 hours)

6 credit hours

                                                 YEAR 4

FALL SEMESTER
EPY 8890   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)
EPY 9000   Dissertation (3 hours)
XXX ----   Counseling or Special Education Elective (3 hours)

9 credit hours




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SPRING SEMESTER
EPY ----   Psychometric Theory or PSY 8613 Advanced Social Psychology (3 hours)
EPY 8890   Supervised Experiences in School Psychology: Field Experiences (3 hours)
EPY 9000   Dissertation (3)
XXX ----   Counseling or Special Education Elective (3 hours)

12 credit hours

Note: Psychometric Theory and PSY Advanced Social Psychology are both required for the
doctoral program; however, students must rotate these courses between their 3rd and 4th spring
semester in the program as Psychometric Theory is only offered every other year.


SUMMER SEMESTER

No scheduled coursework



                                           YEAR 5
SEMESTER 1
EPY 9730   Doctoral Internship in School Psychology (6 hours)
EPY 9000   Dissertation (3 hours)

9 credit hours

SEMESTER 2
EPY 9730   Doctoral Internship in School Psychology (6 hours)
EPY 9000   Dissertation (3 hours)

9 credit hours

SEMESTER 3
EPY 9730   Doctoral Internship in School Psychology (6 hours)
EPY 9000   Dissertation (3 hours)

9 credit hours

This sequence of courses yields 147 hours across 14 academic semesters or 5 academic years.




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OTHER REQUIREMENTS

         There are other important requirements for the masters, educational specialist, and doctoral
degree at MSU. It is your responsibility to know them and to make sure your program of study conforms
to them. These requirements fall into 5 broad categories: Professional Membership, Student Evaluation,
Knowledge Assessment, Research Requirements, and Internship Requirements. In addition, to help you
through the maze of requirements for the university, you should develop a thorough working knowledge
of the Mississippi State University College of Education Graduate Students' Guide. It is available at no
cost to you from the College of Education Dean in Room 309 Allen Hall and on the College of Education
website (www.educ.msstate.edu).

                                         Professional Associations

        School Psychology professionals must belong to professional associations after they earn their
degrees if they are to stay current in the field. Active participation in professional associations is vital to
professional success. Each graduate student is required to join at least two profession associations.
Membership dues are usually less for students and members receive professional newsletters, journals,
and announcements of professional activities. School Psychology students should join and become active
in:
        APA (Division 16)
        National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)
        Association for Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)
        Mississippi Association for Psychology in the Schools (MAPS).

In addition, students may benefit from joining several other organizations including, but not limited to:
         Council for Exceptional Children (CEC)
         Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy (AABT)
         South Eastern Psychological Association (SEPA)
         Mid-South Education Research Association (MSERA)




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                               Assessment of Student Progress
                    toward Meeting Program Training Goals and Objectives

        The knowledge and skills that students have gained will be assessed by faculty in the
classroom through (a) course assignments and examinations, (b) the written and/or oral
comprehensive exams, (c) practicum and internship evaluations, (d) annual student evaluations
and (e) the required research process. (i.e., research and statistics coursework and related
research activities) Students are expected to a) achieve grades of “B” or better in program core
and related coursework, b) receive passing scores on all comprehensive exams (e.g., masters
comprehensive exam, doctoral comprehensive written and oral exams, focus area exam), c)
receive acceptable ratings on practicum and internship evaluations, d) obtain ratings of
“expected” or above on all areas addressed by student annual evaluations, and e) satisfactorily
complete required research expectations and research projects (e.g., present at least one refereed
presentation at a professional conference, submit at least one manuscript for publication,
complete all required components of the doctoral dissertation). Unsatisfactory performance in
graduate level coursework is defined as a grade of “U”, “D”, or “F” in any course and/or more
than tow grades below a “B” after admission to the program. Unsatisfactory performance also
includes failing the master’s comprehensive examination twice, failing the written
preliminary/comprehensive examination twice, failing the doctoral oral preliminary/
comprehensive examination twice, or failing the doctoral dissertation defense twice. Any of
these or a combination of these failures will result in termination of the student’s graduate study
in the program.
                                      Student Progress Evaluations

         During the spring semester, the program faculty meet to discuss and evaluate the progress of each
student with special emphasis on each student's performance subsequent to the previous evaluation.
Through this mechanism, satisfactory progress is noted, performance exceeding satisfactory progress is
commended, and concerns regarding less than satisfactory performance are identified in order to promote
remedial efforts. In addition, the evaluation process is intended to ensure that all program faculty are
informed as to the progress of all students in the program. Finally, the student is required to conduct a
self evaluation of their own progress, to complete the evaluation form, and to receive faculty feedback on
their self evaluation. If a significant deficiency is noted, the student and their advisor will develop a
specific written plan to help the student continue to progress through the program.
         Below is an outline of the evaluation categories. For more information, see the current
Student Evaluation Handbook.

Students will receive ratings across four major areas along with ratings in sub-areas under each category.

I. Academic Performance
         A. Classroom performance
         B. Required Research progress (e.g., educational specialist project, dissertation)
         C. Focus Area Requirements
II. Clinical and Interpersonal Skills
         A. Practioner performance
         B. Professional behavior
III. Professional Development
         A. Professional progress
         B. Independent research
IV. Summary Progress


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                             PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS REVIEW FORM

         In addition to reviewing student's professional performance, students' personal characteristics
related to his/her professionalism will be evaluated using the Personal Characteristics Review Form
(PCRF). All students will receive feedback after any formal evaluation by the faculty. If a student is not
making satisfactory progress as evidenced by their grades and/or less than average evaluations by the
department faculty, at minimum, the faculty advisor will meet with the student to discuss the evaluation.
For more information, see the Student Evaluation Handbook.

                                         Knowledge Assessment

         Through the comprehensive examination process, you will be given an opportunity to
demonstrate (a) mastery of best practices in school psychology as supported by research and theoretical
literature; (b) the ability to apply, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate knowledge gained in relation to
problems encountered in school psychology; and (c) the ability to present answers in an organized,
research based, and grammatically acceptable fashion.

M.S. Comprehensive Examination

         The Department of Education Graduate Program handbook gives information regarding
procedures for taking the Masters Comprehensive Examination. Students entering the program with a
bachelor’s degree usually take this exam during the spring semester of their second year. All Ph.D.
students will be required to pass this exam by the end of their third year so that they may qualify for AA
certification. The Masters Comprehensive examination consists of 100 written multiple-choice questions
covering the Professional School Psychology training domain including the sub-domains of 1)
Professional Orientation, 2) Assessment, and 3) Consultation/Intervention. Students must apply to take
the exam by the end of the second week of the term in which they plan to take the comprehensive exam.
The application may be obtained from the departmental records secretary. To pass the exam, students
must correctly answer 65% of the items on each area. Examinations are scheduled three times a year
(each semester and in the summer). If you fail to pass the Masters Comprehensive Exam, you must
schedule a meeting with the coordinator of school psychology programs and your major professor to
discuss remedial action. You will then be allowed to take the exam one additional time. If a second failure
occurs, you will be dismissed from the program.

PRAXIS I Exam

         School psychologists must be certified by the State of Mississippi to serve in a school. In order to
be certified in psychometry, students should complete our M.S. program and must pass the Praxis Exam.
AAA and AAAA licensure require students to obtain a 590 on the School Psychology Battery of the
PRAXIS. Ph.D. and Ed.S. students must apply for licensure as they meet the requirements. AA licensure
will allow students to work in the School Psychology and Counseling clinic as they pursue their advanced
degree. Students who do not meet minimum PRAXIS requirements for AA licensure by their third year in
the program will be advised to withdraw from the program. Masters students must take the PRAXIS Core
and obtain the following minimum scores. These scores and actual exam subsection are subject to change
by the State Department of Education.

        Section                  PPST Score
        Reading                                   170
        Writing                                   172
        Math                                      169



                                                 38 of 53
         These exams are given on campus three times a year. You must register to take the exam several
months before it is administered. Have your scores sent to Mississippi State University, College of
Education, the Mississippi Department of Education, and yourself. It is not necessary to wait until a
graduate degree has been earned or until course work requirements for licensure have been completed.
However, because students who fail to meet minimum requirements can not obtain certification in
Mississippi, we recommend that M.S. students take the exam prior to entering the program. All Ph.D. and
Ed.S. students should pass the AA licensure PRAXIS I requirements and obtain their license as they
progress through the program. Students who do not pass the Core PRAXIS requirements after they have
completed the MS degree should meet with their advisor before continuing with AAA Certification or a
Ph.D.
Praxis II: School Psychology Speciality Area Examination
         Students pursuing the educational specialist and doctoral degrees must take and obtain the same
Core area scores on the Praxis I and the same score on the masters comprehensive exam as listed above.
The Praxis II Speciality Area examination in School Psychology allows students in the educational
specialist and doctoral programs to obtain certification as a Nationally Certified School Psychologist
(NCSP). Students in the Ed.S. program must take this examination during their fourth year or internship
year in order to graduate with the educational specialist degree with an emphasis in school psychology.
Educational specialist students must obtain a 590 on the School Psychology Battery of the Praxis II to
obtain licensure as a school psychologist from the Mississippi Department of Education. Students must
obtain a score of 660 to obtain certification as a NCSP from NASP. Starting with the Fall 2007 cohort,
doctoral students are required to take the Praxis II Speciality Area examination prior to the fall semester
in which they schedule to take their doctoral written and oral comprehensive exams. Doctoral students
must obtain a score of 660 or they will required to retake the examination. Cohorts accepted into the
doctoral program prior to the Fall 2007 semester are not required to take the Praxis II but are strongly
encouraged to do so in order to obtain certification as a NCSP from NASP.

Additional Exams for Doctoral Students

         If you are pursuing the Ph.D. degree, you must complete three other comprehensive examinations
in addition to those listed above. These include the a) focus area examination, b) written preliminary
comprehensive examination, and the oral preliminary comprehensive examination. Each of these
assessments is described in full detail below.

Focus Area Examination
        All students pursuing the Ph.D. degree are required to pass an examination in the focus area. The
focus examination may be taken whenever the course work in the minor focus has been completed. There
are two options for focus area (minor) exams. For students taking three courses and writing a paper, the
paper will serve as their focus area (minor) exam. For students taking four courses or more, they may
choose to write a paper or to take an oral or written exam administered by their focus area professor.
        This information has been previously stated but is duplicated below for your convenience.

Option 1: APA Style Paper
       For students who are taking three courses and writing a paper (again they should register for an
       independent study elective, for example course number 7003, in the focus area professor's
       program) the paper will serve as the student’s written focus area examination. The paper must be
       written in APA style. This paper can be either expository (e.g., literature review, conceptual
       paper, etc.) or empirical (e.g., experimental, descriptive, correlational, etc.). The goal of the focus
       area requirements is for students to learn skills, methods, theories, and/or techniques from other
       disciplines and apply these to the field of school psychology. Students may continue to work on
       an expository paper or empirical study that was part of a class assignment and use this for their
       Focus Area exam.


                                                  39 of 53
        The student’s major professor and focus area professor will read the paper and grade it on
        pass/fail basis. In the case where these two professors disagree (one passes and the other fails the
        paper) the student’s entire Ph.D. committee (5 faculty) will grade the paper on a pass/fail basis.
        At least 50% of the committee members must grade the paper a pass in order for the student to
        have satisfactorily completed their focus area requirements.

Option 2: Oral or Written Exam
       For students taking four courses, the typical focus area examination (oral or written, administered
       by the focus area faculty member, will be used to evaluate the student in their focus area.

Written Preliminary Comprehensive Examination (WPE)
        The WPE will be scheduled three times a year. AT LEAST 60 DAYS BEFORE THE WPE IS
SCHEDULED, you must apply through the Departmental Graduate Coordinator to take the WPE.
Doctoral students should read the information regarding both the written and oral portions of the
Preliminary Examination in the College of Education Doctoral Student’s Guide. To be eligible to take the
Written Preliminary Examination for the Doctor of Philosophy in Education degree, students must:

        1.    have demonstrated satisfactory performance on the pre-dissertation research requirement
              (i.e., Qualifying Examination on Statistics/Research);

        2.    be within six-hours of completing all course work* (exclusive of Internship and
              Dissertation Research hours);

        3.    have completed all research skill requirements, including your supervised pre- dissertation
              research defense;

        4.    have passed a Focus Area Examination and have a letter from the Minor Professor
              substantiating this;

        5.    have the Dissertation topic approved (the formal Dissertation Proposal does not have to
              have been approved); and

        6.    be enrolled for a minimum of one semester hour of credit during the semester in which the
              Preliminary Examination is administered.

*A student enrolled in more than six-hours of course work during the Spring term but who will have
completed all course work (excluding Dissertation and Internship hours) by the end of the Spring term
will be eligible to take the Written Preliminary Examination during the March administration of the
examination (assuming that all other prerequisites for eligibility have been satisfied).

        WPE Content. The WPE is constructed as essay questions by the School Psychology program
        faculty and scored by School Psychology faculty. You are allotted one day to answer the WPE
        essay questions. The examination is divided into two 4-hour sections. The School Psychology
        Foundation section examination covers the following three areas. You will be required to answer
        one question from each of these sections:

        1. Assessment
        2. Consultation and Intervention
        3. Practice and Professional Issues



                                                 40 of 53
The Psychology Core will focus on the following areas. You will be required to answer one question
from the pool of questions covering the Psychology Core.

        Biological Basis of Behavior
        Cognitive Basis of Behavior
        Social/Cultural Basis of Behavior
        Individual Behavior
        General Psychology and Educational Psychology

        You are expected to type your answers. If you are unable to type, the department will retain your
hand written original after you photocopy it so you may acquire the services of a typist to transcribe your
handwritten copy. The typed text will be checked against the original handwritten copy to determine if
any changes have been made to the answers outside the examination setting. To assure yourself that you
fully understand WPE policies and procedures, you need to read carefully the College of Education
Doctoral Students' Guide can be obtained at www.educ.msstate.edu/HANDBOOKS/dhbook.pdf. Failure
to heed this advice could cause you stress, if not downright grief.

        WPE Grading Process: Each question will be graded by the core school psychology faculty using
        a Likert scale (1-5). Students must pass all four questions in order to pass the WPE. Students
        must average a 3 to pass a question. Whenever possible, faculty ratings will be blind. When there
        is a discrepancy of more than 1 point across faculty and the student fails a question (on average)
        the low and high scores will be removed. The remaining scores will be averaged. If the student
        still fails to pass, they would have to follow College of Education guidelines in an attempt to
        appeal a failed WPE (see the College of Education Doctoral Student Handbook). If a student fails
        a question, they will be required to re-take that section within 30 days. Although the specific
        question will be different, it will be from the same pool of questions. If the student again fails the
        question, they will have failed the exam and will be required to re-take the entire exam with
        another pool of questions at the next WPE administration. If a student fails two or more
        questions, they will have failed the entire examination and will be required to take the entire
        examination again at the next WPE administration. Before students take the examination a second
        time, they must meet with their advisor and develop and file a written remediation plan designed
        to assist them in passing the WPE. This plan may include taking additional course work, auditing
        courses, scheduling regular meetings with their advisor, completing and summarizing assigned
        readings, writing position papers, taking practice exams, etc. These remediation steps are
        extremely important as students who fail the WPE twice will be dismissed from the program.

Oral Preliminary Examination
The Oral Preliminary Examination (OPE) needs to be scheduled immediately after you have been notified
by your major professor that you passed the WPE. The OPE will be conducted by your doctoral
committee with each member asking you questions. You will be expected to demonstrate (a) thorough
familiarity with school psychology literature; (b) understanding of the relationships among the various
areas of fields related to school psychology; (c) general knowledge and training including the use of oral
English; and (d) the ability to apply, synthesize, and evaluate knowledge gained in relation to problems
encountered in school psychology. To perform well on the OPE, you will need to be able to think
quickly, express ideas and thoughts fluently and competently, and express opinions in a well-articulated,
logical, and comprehensive manner. There are a number of policies and rules regarding the OPE. They
appear most succinctly in the Doctoral Students' Guide. Once again, you are urged to know these rules
and policies.




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                                    Program Research Requirements

         All educational specialist students are expected to be consistently engaged in program and
personal research throughout their program. This will be accomplished as part of formal coursework,
through collaborative projects with faculty and other students, and through the requirement of completion
of the educational specialist research project.

        All doctoral students are expected to be consistently engaged in research throughout their
program. This will be accomplished as part of formal course requirements, through collaborative projects
with faculty and other students, and through the requirement to present a minimum of one (1) refereed
paper at a regional or national conference and the submission of one (1) research manuscript to a refereed
journal. Students who do not successfully complete and defend their pre-dissertation research
requirement by the end of their third academic year (72 hours of graduate study) may be dismissed from
the school psychology program.

                    College of Education and Departmental Research Requirements

        The Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education Graduate Student
Handbook and the College of Educational Graduate Student Handbook outlines the research skills
requirements. These requirements can be met in several ways. However, the school psychology faculty
strongly encourage students to be continuously involved in research. Furthermore, students should also
participate in moving the practice and science of school psychology forward by disseminating their
research findings.

Educational Specialist Students

         The school psychology program strongly encourages students in the educational specialist
program to contribute to research by engaging in faculty and student research projects and by presenting
professional presentations and posters at professional association meetings. Ed.S. students are required to
complete an educational specialist project in order to graduate from the program. Students must identify
a director along with two other faculty to serve as committee members. Students are encouraged to
choose faculty with similar research interests in order to assist in the development and completion of a
well planned study. Students must enroll in three (3) hours of independent study (EPY 7000) under their
director’s name. Students often gather the data for their independent project in the school systems or
clinics depending on the nature of the scientific inquiry. Ed.S. students must present the completed
research project at a colloquium meeting. At that time, the committee will make one of two decisions
which include: a) pass or b) fail. The student must also develop a professional manuscript that is to be
evaluated by members of the committee. At that time, the committee will make one of three decisions
which include: a) accepted, b) accepted with minor changes, or c) rejected. If students, fail either the oral
presentation or the written project, they will be allowed to meet with the committee to address their
concerns and given one more chance to address the concerns through another oral presentation or
resubmission of the written project. Although, not formally required for graduation, students are
encouraged to submit the research project for presentation at a professional conference and submit the
manuscript for publication in an appropriate peer-referred journal.

Doctoral Students

        The school psychology program requires doctoral students to present as a first author a minimum
of one (1) refereed paper at a regional or national conference and the submission of one (1) research
manuscript to a refereed journal by the end of their third year (72 graduate hours) in the program.
Processes and procedures related to this project are described below. As the school psychology program


                                                 42 of 53
stress students' contribution to the field through research, the school psychology faculty encourage
students to meet their research skills requirements in the following ways.

        Part I
        Adequate completion of the departmental and program statistics and research sequence.

        Part II
        Authoring (student must be primary or first author), submitting, and presenting a scholarly paper
        at a regional or national professional meeting or serving as primary author of a scholarly paper
        published in a refereed professional journal.

                                               Dissertation

         There are several steps involved in completing a dissertation. A dissertation pre-proposal is not
required. However, many students choose to go through this step in order to receive feedback regarding
their proposed research before progressing deeper into the dissertation process.

Dissertation Preproposal

         Doctoral students in the School Psychology program may convene their committee to present a
Preliminary Dissertation Proposal. You should schedule this meeting only after your major professor and
director of the dissertation have approved the direction of your dissertation research. You may schedule
this meeting at any point after your Doctoral Program of Study has been filed and your doctoral
committee has been approved by the Proposal is a concept paper and the approval of it, and the direction
of the dissertation, is not binding upon you or your doctoral committee. Your proposal should adhere to
the following format.

        1.    A one-paragraph introduction should present the topic.
        2.    A 300-word abstract of relevant research and theoretical literature with no citations should
              follow.
        3.    An outline of your literature review should follow.
        4.    A listing of the research questions appears next.
        5.    A detailed methodology needs to be described.
        6.    An explanation of the proposed data analysis needs to be presented next.
        7.    A list of references in APA style should be attached (No fewer than 10 references).

Dissertation Proposal

          You may schedule a dissertation proposal meeting any time AFTER you have passed the
Doctoral Comprehensive Examination requirement. At the dissertation proposal meeting, you are
expected to present the first three chapters (introduction, review of literature, and methodology) of your
dissertation in its final form. To reach this stage of completion, you must work closely with your major
professor and director of your dissertation. You MUST anticipate a number of rewrites, especially if you
fail to follow APA style.
          Because you are at the proposal stage, you are strongly cautioned against collecting data for your
dissertation. Collecting data prior to formal approval of the research plan puts you at great risk. The
committee may reject your proposal or recommend a modification which would force you to begin anew.
You should NEVER collect data unless you have gained approval from the MSU Committee on the
Protection of Human Subjects (IRB). Additionally, all graduate students in the College of Education
must complete IRB training with a certificate of completion during their first semester. This certification
must be renewed every three years.


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         The specific guidelines for the proposal meeting are contained in the College of Education
Doctoral Students' Guide. You should review the information in the Guide as you prepare for the
dissertation proposal meeting. If you do review it and follow the outlined procedures, the stress you
experience at this stage in the dissertation process may be reduced. You should contact your major
professor, director of the dissertation, and committee members to schedule a date, time, and place for the
dissertation proposal meeting. It is your responsibility to coordinate the scheduling of the meeting. After
you have obtained agreement from your committee on the date, time, and place of the meeting, you must
inform the Records Secretary. The Records Secretary will then issue a written invitation to all members
of your committee and the faculty of the department. An announcement inviting the public to attend your
meeting will be placed on the departmental announcements bulletin board.
         You must submit a copy of your dissertation proposal to your committee members at least ten
(10) working days prior to the scheduled meeting date. Also, you must submit a copy to the Departmental
Graduate Coordinator and the Records Secretary. Faculty not on your committee, students, and the public
may read the copy of the proposal held by the Records Secretary. They may attend your proposal meeting
and ask you questions upon invitation of your major professor.

Dissertation Defense

         The faculty expects you to consult with your Major Professor frequently and comprehensively as
you conduct your research and write the initial drafts of your dissertation. If you do not stay in close
contact with your major professor during this critical period, you can expect to experience stress, delays,
rewrites, teeth gnashing, and sundries of other unpleasantries.
         Among the important ethics of scientific research, there is one which you must be extremely
careful not to violate during the dissertation research process. This cardinal ethic is "Absolute adherence
to the research protocol you report in your research procedures section." If you do not follow the research
protocol you designed and had approved by your committee and the university's Committee on Protection
of Human Subjects (IRB), you could be subject to severe penalties.
         After you have collected and analyzed the data and written your dissertation, you are ready to
meet with your major professor to discuss defending your dissertation. Your major professor will review
your draft and, with few exceptions, ask you to rewrite and rewrite portions, small or large amounts, of
your draft. After your major professor is satisfied that you have a defendable dissertation, he or she will
meet with you to discuss scheduling your dissertation defense.
         After getting the "go ahead" from your major professor, you must schedule your dissertation
defense meeting. After you have arrived at a date, time, and place agreeable to the committee members,
you should inform the Records Secretary of the agreed upon meeting time. The Records Secretary will
then issue a written invitation to all of your committee and the faculty of the department (educational
psychology as well as counselor education) .An announcement inviting the public to attend your meeting
will be placed on the departmental bulletin board.
         You must submit a copy of your final dissertation draft to your committee members at least 10
working days (i.e., two calendar weeks) prior to the scheduled meeting date. You must also submit a copy
to the Departmental Graduate Coordinator and the Records Secretary. Faculty not on your committee,
students, and the public may read the copy of the dissertation held by the Records Secretary. They may
attend your dissertation defense meeting and ask you questions upon the invitation of your major
professor.




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                                        Internship Requirements

Educational Specialist Students

        All educational specialist students must complete a minimum 1200 hour internship during their
program over a 10 month period of time according to the Standards for Training and Field Placement
Programs in School Psychology. However, most students in this program obtain closer to 1500 hours
during their internship year. The internship year is completed during your fourth year of training. As an
educational specialist intern, you must be supervised by a professional holding an advanced degree in
school psychology that is certified and/or licensed by their state as a school psychologist for a minimum
of 2 hours per week. A minimum of 600 hours must be completed within a school setting. Please see
current edition of the internship manual for further information regarding internship.

Doctoral Students

         All doctoral students must complete a 12 month 2,000 hour internship during their programs.
Although NASP only requires 1500 hours, APA requires a 2,000 hour pre-doctoral internship for
licensure purposes. Therefore, students are required to meet the 2,000 hour requirement. The internship
year is completed during your fifth year of training. As a doctoral intern, you must be supervised by a
professional holding a doctoral degree in psychology for a minimum of 2 hours per week. To assist in
obtaining licensure as a psychologist, all students are encouraged to seek an APA Approved internship
site. According to the Standards for Training and Field Placement Programs in School Psychology
accepted by the Delegate Assembly of NASP on July 15, 2000, at least 600 hours must be completed in a
school-based setting or you must demonstrate at least equivalent experience. Currently, equivalent
experience may include completion of an internship at the educational specialist level in school
psychology or other approved applied experiences in school psychology. Specifically, NASP requires
that 1) the prior internships must have been preceded by appropriate graduate coursework and practica
and must include a range of activities consistent with both program goals and NASP “Domains of School
Psychology Training and Practice”, 2) the experience must have been consistent with NASP internship
standards, particularly the conditions related to supervision, credentials of supervisors, and completion of
600 hours in a school-based setting, 3) there is evidence that the intern successfully completed the
internship and has continued to use the knowledge and skills obtained from the experience on a continual
basis, and 4) the internship and supervision experiences can be appropriately documented for program
approval and accreditation as well as candidate application for state and national certification and
licensure. Please see current edition of the internship manual for further information regarding internship.

                                             Licensure and Certification
         All graduate students in the department should plan to become certified as a psychologist in
Mississippi after they have completed the necessary course work and have enough experience. Ed.S. and
Ph.D. students should apply for National Certification through NASP so that they may become Nationally
Certified School Psychologists (NCSP). National Certification allows much smoother transition to
certification in other states and also ensures a quality of training and professionalism in individuals who
hold this certification. Ph.D. students should also apply for Licensure as a psychologist in Mississippi or
other state in which they are practicing. Licensure demonstrates that school psychologists are legitimate
mental health professionals. Starting January 1997, only students from APA approved programs will be
eligible for licensure in Mississippi.

                                              Job Placement

       Graduates of our educational specialist and doctoral programs have secure varied and interesting
jobs. Among our recent graduates, several are assistant professors at universities, others are psychologists


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or administrators at private or public mental health centers, and of course, several are employed with
school systems. The School Psychology Coordinator posts job announcements in the department
regularly. Students should also inform their professors as they are looking for a position. Many job leads
are passed informally to professors. If faculty members know students are searching, they will assist
students in any way possible. The Mississippi State University Career Center assists students in looking
for professional positions as they near graduation. Advice on resume preparation, job listings, interview
coaching, maintenance of reference letters, and employer directories are some of the services available.

Your success in obtaining the job you desire is somewhat dependent upon your performance in the
program. By putting forth your best effort and seeking as many applied and research-based training
experiences as possible, you will make yourself more marketable to internship sites (An APA approved
internship is required for licensure in many states) and employers. Furthermore, by committing yourself
early in your training you will find that your scientist-practitioner skills are likely to make you an
extremely effective practitioner. We believe that the clients we serve, directly or indirectly, deserve the
best from our graduates.

                       Matriculation Through the School Psychology Programs

Program Admission

         Students who have completed a bachelor’s degree of a graduate degree in psychology, education,
counseling, social work, or other related fields are good candidates for our program. Admission to the
school psychology programs is based on the objective evaluation of student performance in five important
areas which include a) Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) in undergraduate and graduate work, b)
performance on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), c) Letter of Intent for graduate work in school
psychology, d) Letters of Recommendation from three sources who can evaluate the student’s academic
abilities and personal characteristics, and e) performance during a professional interview with the faculty
on campus or via phone interview. All required materials must be received by February 1. The program
will not accept GRE scores older than five years and the average score expected by faculty in the program
is a 1000 (Verbal + Quantitative). Official transcripts must be sent to evaluate coursework and cumulative
GPAs for undergraduate and graduate work. The average GPA expected by faculty in the program is at
least a 3.00 on a 4.00 scale. The Office of Graduate Studies provides forms for the Letter of Intent and
Letters of Recommendation; however, students are encouraged to attach additional documentation if the
space provided on these documents does not allow for an adequate representation of your abilities.
Students are interviewed by all faculty in the school psychology program for 20-30 minutes periods of
time usually around the beginning of March after a review of the materials received by February 1.
Interested applicants are invited for an interview after an initial review of GRE scores, GPAs, and letters
of intent and recommendation. Faculty utilize a standardized set of questions during the interview
process to guide academic ability, motivation, and goodness of fit for the program. Interviewees are also
encouraged to ask important questions regarding the study of school psychology at MSU of the faculty
and representative graduate students during the interview process as well. Decisions about admission are
made by the faculty are made after interviews and students are notified of their admission status by mid-
March. Several admission decisions exist which include: a) Full admission, b) Provisional admission, c)
Contingent admission, d) placement on a wait list, or e) rejection. Students who are admitted to the
program are required to provide a letter of acceptance or denial to the Program Coordinator by April 15.

Contingent and Provisional Admissions

        Some of you have been admitted to the program contingently or provisionally. Students may be
admitted this manner because they have not taken the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or some section of
their application suggests weaknesses (e.g., low GRE scores, marginal letters of recommendation).


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Students admitted provisionally must obtain a 3.25 or higher on their first 9 -12 hours in the program.
Students who do not meet this requirement will be dropped from the program. Students who do meet this
requirement will be reconsidered for full admission but must submit letters of recommendation from two
of the MSU professors who served as instructors in their courses.

Establishment of Residency

Full time study on the MSU campus is required of all graduate students to establish residency and to
ensure a high degree of involvement in the program. Full time study is defined as 9 or more hours during
the fall or spring semesters and 12 hours during a ten week summer term. The residency requirement may
be satisfied in the following ways:

        1.    Full time study for any two consecutive terms (fall semester, spring semester, 10 week
              summer term).
        2.    Full time study for ten week summer terms two years in a row.

                                               Registration

        Because prompt registration allows the department and your faculty to plan coursework for the
next semester, you are urged to pre-register as early as possible each term. If you fail to register
during the pre-registration time period, it is likely that the courses that you need and plan to take will be
canceled due to enrollment requirements for courses to be held.
        You will need to obtain your Registration Access Code (RAC number) from your advisor each
semester to access the online registration site. That RAC number is available no later than the first day of
pre-registration for the next term.

                                      Examinations and Enrollment

        All graduate students must be enrolled in at least one-hour the term in which they do the
following:

        1.    take the Final Comprehensive Examination,
        2.    take the Doctoral Preliminary Examinations [both written and oral] , and
        3.    defend the Educational Specialist Project or Dissertation.


                                  Time Limit to Complete Your Degree

        Once you are admitted to the graduate program in School Psychology, the faculty expect you to
work toward earning your particular degree in a regular, consistent manner. The faculty expect you to be
enrolled at MSU each semester until you complete your studies. Faculty are not permitted by
university policy to advise, review dissertation drafts, or instruct students who are not enrolled in the
university. The university's continuous enrollment policy is one you should be familiar with, especially as
you approach graduation. Failure to conform could cost you a significant amount of unnecessary time and
money to graduate. Students must complete their degrees within 6 -years of being accepted into the
Masters or Ed.S. Program and within 8 years of being accepted into the Doctoral Program. There are
almost no exceptions to this policy; therefore, it is in your best interest to progress steadily through the
program.




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                                            Out-of-Date Courses
1.    Courses that the student completes 8 years prior to graduation are considered out-of-date unless that
      course was part of a program of study where the student earned a degree. All requests for
      validations of out-of-date courses should be made on the appropriate form and given to the student's
      faculty advisor. In the event the faculty advisor is no longer at the university, requests shall be
      given to the department head. The written request shall explain the circumstances making such a
      validation necessary and include a statement that the student's knowledge of the content of the out-
      of-date courses has been retained and that current information has been reviewed.

2.    Upon receiving a request, the student's advisor will ask two additional faculty members to serve on
      an Oral Examination Committee. The advisor will assist the student in preparing for the oral
      examination by providing reading lists and suggesting preparation activities. The committee shall
      examine the student on the content of each out-of-date course. Successful performance, as judged
      by the examination committee, will result in a validation of the course. Unsuccessful performance
      will result in the student taking the course at MSU.

3.    If a majority of the examination committee votes that the student has demonstrated retention of
      course content and knowledge of current information in an out-of-date course, a recommendation
      that the validation be granted will be forwarded to the Director of Graduate Education for the
      College of Education on the appropriate form.

4.    In the event that a majority of the examination committee votes do not recommend that validation
      be granted for any course, the student may request from the student's advisor an oral reexamination
      committee. The reexamination will be scheduled no sooner than three months after the first
      examination.

5.    If a majority of the reexamination committee votes to not recommend the validation be granted for
      any course, their decision will be final.

6.    Students who are denied a recommendation for a validation may confer with their faculty advisor to
      schedule additional course work to complete their degree.

                                        Courses at Other Universities
        You may, with the approval of your major professor, take equivalent courses listed on your
Program of Study at other universities. The hours accrued at other universities may not be used to satisfy
residency requirements, and you must meet all MSU residency requirements regardless of the hours taken
at another university.
        Master of Science degree candidates are allowed to transfer in 9 credit hours into their MS
program. AAA Certification students with a Masters degree must take a minimum of 18 hours at the
Mississippi State or Meridian campus.
        If you want to enroll at another university and have the courses count toward your degree, you
must complete Permission To Take A Program of Study Course At Another University form. This is
located at the following site www.educ.msstate.edu/CEdEPy/pdf/request.pdf. You must secure an
approving signature from your advisor or major professor giving you permission to enroll in the course.
Many universities require permission from the MSU Graduate Dean before they will allow students
seeking graduate degrees at MSU to enroll in their courses.
        Internships must be taken at Mississippi State University if credit is desired for the M.S., AAA
Certification, or Ph.D. degrees. For doctoral students whose master's degree program included an
internship at another university, that internship may be used to satisfy departmental standards at the M.S.



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level, but under no circumstances will the department permit a doctoral level internship to be transferred
from another university.

                                         Program Status Appeal

         Students may appeal their program status for failing to meet departmental or program
requirements. Students who wish to file appeals must meet with the department head. The department
head can accept an appeal or refer students to the Departmental Appeals Committee. The department head
will outline the process for bringing appeals before the Departmental Appeal Committee. Students are
also able to appeal specific grades and attempt to have any other problems or grievances addressed. The
process is outlined in The Graduate School Bulletin and the College of Education Doctoral Students'
Guide. However, the first step is typically to inform your advisor or another professor of your appeal,
grievance, or issue. Then your advisor will assist you through the process.

                                   Student Problems and Grievances

         The faculty and staff will strive to make your graduate school experience rewarding, educational,
and fair. They will treat you with respect and dignity. However, in the course of your graduate school
training, you may run into some problems. The faculty wants to encourage you to approach any of them if
you are having problems. They will do all they can to help you solve or resolve these problems.
However, if at any time you feel you have not been treated fairly or with respect by any faculty, staff, or
student, you are encouraged to discuss these matters with your advisor or any faculty member who will
help you determine the most appropriate course of action. Serious grievances or problems typically
follow a responsible chain through the:

        School Psychology Program (SPP) coordinator,
        the department head,
        the assistant dean of the college of education,
        the dean of the college of education,
        the provost, and
        the president.

         However, students may approach any faculty member or administrator who will assist them in
taking the appropriate professional and ethical action. Most issues are resolved informally at the
department level. A formal grievance procedure policy is provided in the Departmental Graduate Student
Handbook (p. 10-11) and the University policies and procedures for due process, grade appeal, violations
of the student code of honor, and academic dishonesty can be accessed via the Office of Graduate Studies
website at . http://www.msstate.edu/dept/grad/2006_2007_Bulletin.pdf.

                                      Student Remediation and Probation

The Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education Consent Form that is
provided during the Departmental Orientation during the first week of classes states “The Department of
Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education faculty members believe, they have a
responsibility to dismiss students who are unable to render competent service due to academic or personal
limitations. They also recognize their obligation to assist students in obtaining remedial assistance as
needed, to consult with colleagues and document their decision to refer students for assistance or to
request that students be dismissed from the program, and to assure that students have adequate recourse to
address decisions made. If in the professional judgment of a faculty member, a student's behavior is
deemed substandard, unethical, illegal, and/or professionally unbecoming at any time during the course of
training (including course work, practica, and internships), a faculty review committee will be called to


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review the performance and behavior of the student and to make recommendations for remediation to the
Department Head.”
          Unfortunately, there are times when a student may not perform all of the requirements necessary
to fulfill the expectations of a didactic or applied course or they may exhibit behaviors that are
inappropriate for professional graduate study. With regard to academic deficiencies, the student is
typically given a grade of “Incomplete” in the course and a remediation plan is developed to address the
academic deficiencies. With regard to the display of problematic behavior, such concerns are typically
documented on a personal characteristics form completed by the student’s advisor. As such, remediation
plans detailing the specific expectations and timelines to complete these expectations are typically
developed by the instructor of an academic course and/or the student’s advisor. However, the instructor
of record or advisor may seek input from faculty in the school psychology program or department in
developing the remediation plan. This formal plan is outlined in writing, reviewed by the faculty, signed
by all relevant parties, and placed in the students file. This plan is then explained to the student in
conjunction with identification of remedial supports in order to ensure optimal success for the student.
University policy requires that all “I” grades be adjusted within one semester of the assignment of such a
grade or the “I” automatically turns to a “F.” If the student successfully completes the plan, then an
appropriate grade for the course will be assigned. In addition, a letter stating that the terms of the
remediation plan have been fulfilled will be placed in the student’s for students placed on remediation for
behavioral or academic concerns. If a student fails to complete the plan in an appropriate manner, they
will be placed on probation, except in unusual circumstances. The school psychology faculty will then
hold a staff meeting to discuss the terms of the probation for each individual student case. Adaptations to
the initial remediation plan may be made or a new plan may be developed. This formal probation plan is
outlined in writing, reviewed by the faculty, signed by all relevant parties, and placed in the students file.
As with the remediation plan, problem solving efforts are made with the student to identify the supports
needed for successful completion of the probation plan. Students will remain on probation for at least one
academic semester. For academic deficiencies, appropriate grade changes will be made. In addition, a
letter stating that the terms of the probation plan have been fulfilled will be placed in the student’s for
students placed on probation for behavioral or academic concerns. If a student fails to fulfill the
requirements of the probation plan, he or she may be dismissed from the program. Other potential
reasons for dismissals are located below in the Student Retention and Dismissals section of this
handbook. Student efforts at successfully completing remediation or probation plans will also be
reviewed during annual reviews by school psychology faculty. If, at any time, the student feels that he or
she has been treated inappropriately or unfairly, they are encouraged to follow the student grievance
procedure outlined above on page 51.

                                    Student Retention and Dismissals

        The MSU faculty, administration, and staff are extremely interested and committed to your
successful completion of the program and want to assist you with this process when they can. However,
they must also maintain the integrity of the training program. Therefore, a student's acceptance into the
program does not guarantee her or his fitness to remain in the program. A detailed description of student
retention and dismissal criteria and procedures are provided in the Department of Counseling, Educational
Psychology, and Special Education Graduate Student Handbook. These processes and criteria are also
outlined during orientation. The basic criteria will be outlined below.

Academic Program Standards
      Students will be dismissed from the program if:

        1.    they make more than two grades of C or below or
        2.    they make an F or U or
        3.    they fail the masters comprehensive exam twice or


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        4.    they fail the written comprehensive exam twice or
        5.    they fail the oral comprehensive exam twice or
        6.    they fail the dissertation defense twice or
        7.    fail to pass AA certification exam requirements (see below).

Any or a combination of these will result in the termination of the student's program in the Department of
Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education.
         School psychologists must be certified by the State of Mississippi to serve in a school. In order to
be certified in psychometry, students should complete our M.S. program and must pass the Praxis tests.
Students who do not pass will not be allowed to go on practicum. At this point, students will work with
their advisor to develop a plan to assist them in passing the exam (including seeking assistance from The
Learning Center) or advise the student to consider dropping from the program or enrolling in another
program.

Non-Academic Program Standards
        Students may also be dismissed if they fail to develop the skills needed to effectively work with
people with diverse needs or fail to follow relevant ethical (APA and NASP) and legal codes. Students
are expected to:

        a.    be committed to professional development,
        b.    be concerned about the welfare of those with whom they work,
        c.    demonstrate professional skills that suggest they have the emotional and mental fitness to
              interact appropriately with others,
        d.    receive constructive feedback and alter their performance based on that feedback, and
        e.    apply theories, skills, and techniques that have been empirically supported or valid.

Again, the processes and procedures by which students will be dismissed from the program are outlined
in the COE/EPY Graduate Student Handbook located at this website
(www.educ.msstate.edu/CEdEPy/handbook/gr_handbook.html). Please read these carefully.

                                Financial Aid Information
         Many financial aid opportunities are available for graduate students in the Counselor Education
program at Mississippi State University. Students should apply for all assistance programs that interest
them. More than one award often is possible. Although most awards are made in the Spring for the next
Fall, vacancies occur throughout the year.

1.    Applications for low-interest loans and work-study jobs may be obtained from:

                Student Financial Aid and Scholarships
                106 Magruder Hall
                P.O. Box 9501
                Mississippi State, MS 39762
                (662) 325-2450 and (662) 325-7441

2.    Assistantships for students enrolled in 9 or more credits require 20-hours of work per week and pay
      a stipend each month. In-state and out-of-state tuition is waived for students on assistantships.
      Interested students should obtain applications from the following offices:
                 Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology
                 P.O. Box 9727
                 Mississippi State, MS 39762
                 (662) 325-3426


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Other divisions and potential departments include:

                Division of Student Affairs Assist
                115 Lee Hall
                P.O. Box 9504
                Mississippi State, MS 39762

                Office of Graduate Studies
                116 Allen Hall
                P.O. Box 9703
                Mississippi State, MS 39762
                (662) 325-3611

                Career Center
                316 Colvard Student Union
                P.O. Box 9533
                Mississippi State, MS 39762.
                (662) 325-3344

                Rehabilitation Research Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision
                150 IED
                P.O. Box 6189
                Mississippi State, MS 39762
                (662) 325-2001

                Social Science Research Center
                1 Research Park, Suite 103
                P.O. Box 5287
                Mississippi State, MS 39762
                (662) 325-7127

3.    The Department of Housing and Residence Life offers assistantships for Live-In Residence Hall
      Directors. In addition to a stipend, Directors receive a free furnished apartment, all utilities, and
      local telephone service as part of their compensation package. Both single and married students,
      including those with children, are eligible to apply. Applications are available from:

                Department of Housing and Residence Life
                Herbert Hall
                P.O. Box 9502
                Mississippi State, MS 39762
                (662) 325-3557

4.    Many positions are available throughout the university that may allow students to work and attend
      school. Job announcements are available from:

                Human Resources Management
                105 McArther Hall
                P.O. Box 9603
                Mississippi State, MS 39762



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                                 Department Graduate Assistantships

        Assistantships in the Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education
are awarded by the department head based on departmental need, the program the student is enrolled in
(these generally are awarded to doctoral students in the three areas). In order to receive a Graduate
Teaching/Research assistantship, students must complete the departmental application. An application can
be obtained from the departmental records secretary who will keep them on file. Students who teach
courses for the department must complete a university-wide Graduate Teaching Workshop held at the
beginning of each semester and have obtained a master’s degree.

                                               Outside Contracts

        As students matriculate through the program they will develop skills and obtain credentials that
may allow them to work outside the program. It is important to remember that all students in the school
psychology programs are school psychologists-in-training that require supervision for the provision of
school psychological services to students, families, and school personnel. As such, students must first
submit in writing to the school psychology faculty a formal request to engage in outside employment
where they will provide school psychological services. The faculty will then meet to review the request,
evaluate the impact on the student’s training, and provide an official decision regarding the request.

                                            Student Awards

         The SPP program grants two awards: The Thomas McKnight Award and the Jan Ruthvin Award.
These awards are given to outstanding school psychology students based on their research, academic
performance, service to the department and the community, professional maturity, and contributions to
the profession while a student. There are two Scottish Rite scholarships available. These awards have
been requested by the sponsor to be awarded to students who plan to work with children diagnosed with
dyslexia and who exhibit need. School psychology faculty will solicit Vitas’ from students and use a
democratic process in granting awards.
The University also gives a College of Education Graduate Student Research award and there is the Phi
Delta Kappa Outstanding Graduate Student award. School Psychology Ph.D. students have an impressive
history in the competition for these awards. Finally, various other organizations within the university as
well as at state, regional, and national levels grant awards to students to recognize their outstanding
performance. The school psychology faculty will work very hard with you to make you an extremely
strong school psychologist. You will find that in the process, you may become very competitive for these
awards.




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