ISEB Certificate in ITIL® based Application Management Essentials by qyt15644

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									                       ISEB Certificate in ITIL® based
                     Application Management Essentials


                                   Syllabus
Note: the percentages show the relative weightings for each area of the syllabus.
These weightings reflect the approximate percentage of examination questions which
will be devoted to this topic.

Note: the reference against each part of the syllabus denotes the section of the ITIL
Application Management manual that covers that part of the syllabus.

Note: all of the numbered points below should be considered to be preceded by:-“in
order to be successful in this qualification, candidates should be able to”:-

1.     Application Management – An Overview (10%) - (ref: 1, 2, 5.1, 8)
1.1.   Understand the issues in Application development , Service Management and
       Application management
1.2.   Describe key interfaces between Application Management ,ICT Infrastructure
       Management, ITIL Service Support and Delivery and other related areas
1.3.   Identify the key administrative and planning issues when implementing
       Application Management
1.4.   Describe the major system development lifecycle options
1.5.   Describe the implications of approaches such as “Commercial Off The Shelf
       (COTS)” packages and RAD/Agile for the system lifecycle


2.     Managing the business value (10%) – (ref: 3)
2.1.   Explain the ways in which business and IT can be aligned
2.2.   Describe the use of key business drivers
2.3.   Comprehend how an application portfolio can be managed

3.     Aligning the delivery strategy with key business drivers and
       organisational capabilities (10%) – (ref: 4)
3.1.   Understand the readiness assessment process
3.2.   Define the delivery strategy
3.3.   Recognise the environment into which an application is to be delivered and
       the importance of considering operability in the early stages of development

4.     Requirements Phase (10%) – (ref: 5.2)
4.1.   Describe how to determine requirements for the application.
4.2.   Distinguish between the concepts of functional requirements, non-functional
       requirements and usability requirements.
4.3.   Understand the concepts of and purpose behind modelling techniques
4.4.   Describe examples of non-functional requirements
4.5.   List the implications of changes to requirements
4.6.   Define, within a specific system development lifecycle, the major inputs to and
       outputs from this phase
4.7.   Describe basic validation and verification techniques in this phase and when
       they are best used.
4.8.   List key responsibilities of, and deliverables from, the AM team, IT Service
       Delivery and Support, ICTIM and other areas, in this phase.

5.     Design Phase (10%) – (ref: 5.3)
5.1.   Describe the importance of the Design phase
5.2.   State the importance of non-functional requirements in this phase
5.3.   Describe how a structured design process/manageability checklist will assist
       completion of this phase
5.4.   Define the concepts of risk driven scheduling and approaches to managing
       trade-offs
5.5.   Describe the concepts of Application-independent Design and Application
       Frameworks
5.6.   Define, within a specific system development lifecycle, the major inputs to and
       outputs from this phase
5.7.   Identify basic testing methodologies for functional and non-functional
       requirements in this phase and when they are best used.
5.8.   List key responsibilities of, and deliverables from, the AM team, IT Service
       Delivery and Support, ICTIM and other areas, in this phase

6.     Build Phase (10%) – (ref: 5.4)
6.1.   Describe the need for the Build phase
6.2.   Describe the benefits of using a consistent set of design and coding
       conventions
6.3.   Describe the need for and use of development tools
6.4.   Describe why and how embedded application instrumentation, event handling
       and diagnostic hooks can assist in the Deploy, Operate and Optimise phases
6.5.   Describe how a Build phase manageability checklist will assist development
       teams
6.6.   Define, within a specific system development lifecycle, the major inputs to and
       outputs from this phase
6.7.   Identify basic testing methodologies in this phase and when they are best
       used.
6.8.   List key responsibilities of, and deliverables from, the AM team, IT Service
       Delivery and Support, ICTIM and other areas, in this phase

7.     Deploy Phase (10%) - (ref: 5.5)
7.1.   Describe how an application moves from the Build phase to the Deploy phase
7.2.   Explain the use of and reasons for “Readiness” checklists.
7.3.   List typical contents of the deployment toolkit
7.4.   Describe a deployment route map
7.5.   Describe major Deployment / Distribution strategies, plans, methods,
       components and issues
7.6.   Describe the role of the ITIL ICTIM guidance in this phase
7.7.   Define, within a specific system development lifecycle, the major inputs to and
       outputs from this phase
7.8.    Identify basic testing methodologies in this phase and when they are best
        used.
7.9.    List key responsibilities of, and deliverables from, the AM team, IT Service
        Delivery and Support, ICTIM and other areas, in this phase

8.      Operate Phase (10%) – (ref: 5.6)
8.1.    List reasons for failure of IT applications to deliver business benefits
8.2.    Describe concepts of corrective maintenance and outline typical maintenance
        activities
8.3.    Describe the Service Level Agreement concept and its contribution to
        operational excellence
8.4.    Describe the concept of benefits assessment, reporting and realisation, as it
        applies to applications
8.5.    Describe key tasks in the Operate phase and list typical manageability checks
8.6.    List key responsibilities of, and deliverables from, the AM team, IT Service
        Delivery and Support, ICTIM and other areas in this phase

9.      Optimise Phase (5%) – (ref: 5.7)
9.1.    Describe the concept behind, and the process involved in application reviews
9.2.    List typical triggers and questions for the review process and the actions
        expected

10.     Organising roles and functions (5%) – (ref: 6)
10.1.   Describe typical goals and metrics for AM and how they can assist in
        improving processes and products
10.2.   Describe the concept of knowledge management and how it could be used
        within each phase of the Application Management Lifecycle.
10.3.   Describe the main roles and skill sets needed for an effective AM team

11.     Control Methods and Techniques (10%) _ (ref: 7, appendix D)
11.1.   Describe typical interrelationships between individual applications and
        provision of IT services
11.2.   Describe the concepts of Service Level Requirements and Operational Level
        Agreements and their role, along with SLAs, in achieving “quality” services
11.3.   Describe typical quality management approaches applicable to Application
        Management
11.4    Explain how quality definitions, indicators and measuring techniques will
        assist AM
                       ISEB Certificate in ITIL® based
                     Application Management Essentials


                 Glossary of additional terms
Note: This is a glossary of additional terms that are not included in the IT
Infrastructure Library manual - Best Practice for Application Management. Please
also refer to the whole of Appendix A of this manual for a comprehensive list of
acronyms and terms.

COTS
Commercially off the Shelf (COTS) software packages describe a set of products
which are bought by an organisation to meet a particular business need, which is
common throughout business as a whole or within a relevant industry sector. The
software is subject to no modifications or extensions by the user organisation and as
a result may not perfectly fit with current business processes and/or data structures.
Normally the business processes and data structures are modified by the user
organisation to fit with the package. Issues can arise where several COTS packages
are procured independently and then need to intercommunicate.

RAD/Agile
Rapid Application Development (RAD) is a development approach that enables
software to be developed through a series of iterative and incremental activities
generally involving the use of prototypes and active user involvement to ensure faster
development compared with traditional methodologies. Agile describes a set of
formalised approaches to RAD (such as DSDM).

SAOM
Strategic Alignment Objectives Model (SAOM) depicts the business functions directly
supported by one or more IT services, which are made up of one or more IT systems.

								
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