Low BACK RE-INJURY PREVENTION

Document Sample
Low BACK RE-INJURY PREVENTION Powered By Docstoc
					             Low BACK RE-INJURY PREVENTION

   1. Drink Plenty of Water. After an adjustment your body may release
      old toxins into your system that need to be flushed.
   2. Keep moving. “Move it or lose it” they say. As tempting as it may
      be to lay in bed until you feel better, gentle movement is the best thing
      for your healing. It helps reduce inflammation, maintain mobility and
      prevent muscle weakening.
Before you begin to lift you should test the weight and determine how the
best way to lift it might be. You may need to get help from another person or
mechanical help (such as a cart or dolly) to assist you with the lift. During
lifting remember these things.

   3. Brace with Weight. Tighten your abdominal muscles in you are
      going to lift anything over 10 pounds, including a gallon of water. If
      you are unsure how to do this, be sure to ask me!
   4. Avoid twisting. Keep your shoulders over your hips and turn with
      your feet. It you need to reach for something, rotate your body as a
      unit.
   5. Use your leg muscles, not your back! Bend from the hips rather
      than from your low back. Especially if you are going to pick
      something from off the ground or tie your shoe, bend your knees not
      your low back. Use your “hip hinge.” Keep your back upright.
   6. Avoid forward flexion (bending over) the first hour after waking up:
      Even when you brush your teeth, bend over the sink with your hips,
      not your low back. Studies show that this can significantly decrease
      stress on your low back.
   7. Know where you are going to lift a load. Pre-plan your lift.
   8. Get a firm footing: Keep your feet apart (shoulder width) for a stable
      base and good balance; point toes out.
   9. Lift smoothly; don't jerk as you lift. Suddenly movement and
      weight shifts can injure your back.
   10. Keep load close: Don't hold the load away from your body. The
      closer it is to our spine, the less force it exerts on your back.




 Suzy Sarmasti, DC   212 4th Street Hood River, OR 97031   541-400-0266

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:18
posted:1/25/2009
language:English
pages:1